Hot Best Seller

Trans-Galactic Bike Ride: Feminist Bicycle Science Fiction Stories of Transgender and Nonbinary Adventurers

Availability: Ready to download

What would the future look like if we weren't so hung up on putting people into boxes and instead empowered each other to reach for the stars? Take a ride with us as we explore a future where trans and nonbinary people are the heroes. In worlds where bicycle rides bring luck, a minotaur needs a bicycle, and werewolves stalk the post-apocalyptic landscape, nobody has time t What would the future look like if we weren't so hung up on putting people into boxes and instead empowered each other to reach for the stars? Take a ride with us as we explore a future where trans and nonbinary people are the heroes. In worlds where bicycle rides bring luck, a minotaur needs a bicycle, and werewolves stalk the post-apocalyptic landscape, nobody has time to question gender. Whatever your identity you'll enjoy these stories that are both thought-provoking and fun adventures. Featuring brand-new stories from Hugo, Nebula, and Lambda Literary Award-winning author Charlie Jane Anders, Ava Kelly, Juliet Kemp, Rafi Kleiman, Tucker Lieberman, Nathan Alling Long, Ether Nepenthes, and Nebula-nominated M. Darusha Wehm. Also featuring debut stories from Diana Lane and Marcus Woodman.


Compare

What would the future look like if we weren't so hung up on putting people into boxes and instead empowered each other to reach for the stars? Take a ride with us as we explore a future where trans and nonbinary people are the heroes. In worlds where bicycle rides bring luck, a minotaur needs a bicycle, and werewolves stalk the post-apocalyptic landscape, nobody has time t What would the future look like if we weren't so hung up on putting people into boxes and instead empowered each other to reach for the stars? Take a ride with us as we explore a future where trans and nonbinary people are the heroes. In worlds where bicycle rides bring luck, a minotaur needs a bicycle, and werewolves stalk the post-apocalyptic landscape, nobody has time to question gender. Whatever your identity you'll enjoy these stories that are both thought-provoking and fun adventures. Featuring brand-new stories from Hugo, Nebula, and Lambda Literary Award-winning author Charlie Jane Anders, Ava Kelly, Juliet Kemp, Rafi Kleiman, Tucker Lieberman, Nathan Alling Long, Ether Nepenthes, and Nebula-nominated M. Darusha Wehm. Also featuring debut stories from Diana Lane and Marcus Woodman.

30 review for Trans-Galactic Bike Ride: Feminist Bicycle Science Fiction Stories of Transgender and Nonbinary Adventurers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tucker

    I mean, I'm biased because I've got a story in here, but really I am entertained, encouraged, and inspired by the thoroughgoing genderqueerness of all the bicyclists. I am distributing 10 copies around Bogotá, Colombia. Please let us make this international as well as trans-galactic. If you'd like to share the goods on Twitter: my Twitter thread I mean, I'm biased because I've got a story in here, but really I am entertained, encouraged, and inspired by the thoroughgoing genderqueerness of all the bicyclists. I am distributing 10 copies around Bogotá, Colombia. Please let us make this international as well as trans-galactic. If you'd like to share the goods on Twitter: my Twitter thread

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    The premise and the stories are delightful. The tone is generally light and fun. From the title, I thought it would be all science fiction in space, but some stories are fantasy and some take place solely on Earth. Which is all fine. Some of the stories are amateurish in the world-building and how-things-might-work areas, but the enthusiasm of the writers makes up for it. And it's great to see so many trans writers and characters! The premise and the stories are delightful. The tone is generally light and fun. From the title, I thought it would be all science fiction in space, but some stories are fantasy and some take place solely on Earth. Which is all fine. Some of the stories are amateurish in the world-building and how-things-might-work areas, but the enthusiasm of the writers makes up for it. And it's great to see so many trans writers and characters!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kyra Bea

    I've been growing to like short story collections, and this one was fun too. A couple stories pop more than others but I'm still glad to have read them. I've been growing to like short story collections, and this one was fun too. A couple stories pop more than others but I'm still glad to have read them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Lalor

    Short stories were too short, I wanted more! I couldn’t get invested into some of them before it was over! That’s probably just me not liking short stories that much. That being said, It was great to read trans, queer, and non binary stories though! We need more of that, and I hope I can read more stories like these in 2022. If anyone has any recommendations, let me know!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    What a romp! So much fun seeing what each author did with this niche and specific prompt!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kevin James

    3 star, a neat little collection of fun stories

  7. 4 out of 5

    D.N. Bryn

    Trans-Galactic Bike Ride is a lovely collection of stories, each with fun world building, characters you can root for, and diverse themes of transness that come from the soul.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marlee

    This book is utterly delightful. The stories were all fun, but my favorite parts were the introduction and the author bios. Why? Because they sum up exactly why anthologies like these are so vitally important. There is such a huge diversity of authors here, both in identity and writing background. I'm finding it difficult not to quote Lydia Rogue's entire introduction, but I'll settle for these lines: "I pushed that this book was going to be by us, about us, and *for* us. The book should provide This book is utterly delightful. The stories were all fun, but my favorite parts were the introduction and the author bios. Why? Because they sum up exactly why anthologies like these are so vitally important. There is such a huge diversity of authors here, both in identity and writing background. I'm finding it difficult not to quote Lydia Rogue's entire introduction, but I'll settle for these lines: "I pushed that this book was going to be by us, about us, and *for* us. The book should provide proof that there is a future beyond the now for us and that it will be beautiful." This is by no means the first anthology to do this, nor will it be the last, but the fact that it exists at all is a source of validation. It imagines queerness, specifically transness, as a simple, undisputed state of being. Sometimes characters find joy in it, sometimes they face external roadblocks to transition, but there is no transphobia, no self-loathing, no pain so often associated with trans identity. It's not even a celebration as much as just a way of existing, a way of seeing yourself in stories without your Gender Journey being the center focus. That kind of representation is so rare, and so desperately needed. I don't have a ton to add about each individual story, but I don't want to forget them later so: 1. Per Rotas ad Astra by Ether Nepenthes - This story is only a few pages long, but it sets the tone right away with fun bike-based space travel and the love and concern between a nonbinary couple. 2.Riding for Luck by Juliet Kemp - The idea of biking specific routes bringing the rider luck powers, typically used for transition-based needs, is so much fun. On top of that, the characters are delightful and work well together. 3. The Edge of the Abyss by M. Darusha Wehm - One of the longer stories in the anthology. It's got major Star Wars/space opera vibes, with grand, sweeping space politics and dubiously employed main characters. It was a little distracting that the MC's name was April May, which is the same name as the protagonist of Hank Green's Carls series, but other than that, I liked it just fine. 4. Unexpectedly Trans-Parent by Lydia Rogue - This story is so damn sweet. Trans parents adopt an abandoned trans child through some complicated circumstances. Familial happiness in trans centered stories is something I'll never get enough of. 5. Rovers by Marcus Woodman - Trans mlm werewolves. Werewolf transition as a means for masc gender transition in a post-apocalyptic world. It simply does not get better than this. 6. The Visitmothers by Charlie Jane Anders - I've said it in almost every one of these anthology reviews, but CJA is a national treasure and I love her work so much. In this one, a trans woman wishes to be validated and not so alone. So her childhood bicycle gains sentience and becomes her platonic companion. The scenery feels so real and alive, and I just want to crawl into this world and comfort the MC. 7. A Sudden Displacement of Matter by Ava Kelly - Another one of the long stories. The idea of interplanetary support sometimes being appropriative is fascinating, and I absolutely loved the idea of a separatist colony for nonbinary people. 8. Briar Patch by Lane Fox - Godddd this story is so sweet!!!! The fall atmosphere practically drips off the page. The character has a traumatic history, but that makes their present joy all the more beautiful. The backstory of them and their partner is adorable, and there's casual background poly rep too. I love the depiction of trans parenthood. I love the descriptions of fresh farmers' market food. I love everything about this. 9. Clashing/Complementary by Rafi Kleiman - Street art is so rarely shown in a positive light, so this was a welcome change. Also flying bikes are just objectively cool. 10. Lucy Doesn't Get Angry by Tucker Lieberman - I'm always, ALWAYS here for a queer retelling of the minotaur myth. Especially when its a transmasc self-discovery retelling. 11. Beyond by Nathan Alling Long - What a way to end the anthology. Its just a few pages long, but this story basically sums up everything I love about trans specfic as a genre.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

    I don’t generally like short stories, but apparently rly I just needed to be reading short stories about spake bikes with trans narratives. The authors were each so creative, and I am now absolutely in love with the idea of biking across space!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jade

    Delightful! A lot of fun and thought-provoking short stories. I wish I had access to this kind of representation as a teen. I'm already looking up a few of the authors to see what else they have done. Delightful! A lot of fun and thought-provoking short stories. I wish I had access to this kind of representation as a teen. I'm already looking up a few of the authors to see what else they have done.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Howard

    What a delight! None of these stories are new favorites but I enjoyed all of them to some extent. It is so refreshing to feel well represented, to know that in some way I would recognize myself in a character from each story. Lots of trans joy in this one.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bee Ostrowsky

    Does what it says on the tin!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julianne Vantland

    What a delightfully weird, thought provoking collection. I loved the diversity of these stories - in theme, characters, identities, and world building. A great read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    This book was everything I hoped it would be! Short stories gender, bicycles, belonging, and freedom.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Fictionista Du Jour

    I had wondered how diverse a set of short stories about bicycles and transness could be. And then I got through these short stories, each vastly different than the last, and was reminder that both narrative and gender are fluid and infinite.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    An interesting collection with a fun, super-niche theme. It's cool to see where different authors have taken this idea, and its great to read work from voices in different demographics and/or marginalised communities. That said, a lot of these short stories are not really that innovative or interesting. Mini-reviews of each short story are below. Per Rotas Ad Astra by Ether Nepenthes 2/5 Really only does what is says on the tin- there are trans people, there is space travel, and there are bicycles. An interesting collection with a fun, super-niche theme. It's cool to see where different authors have taken this idea, and its great to read work from voices in different demographics and/or marginalised communities. That said, a lot of these short stories are not really that innovative or interesting. Mini-reviews of each short story are below. Per Rotas Ad Astra by Ether Nepenthes 2/5 Really only does what is says on the tin- there are trans people, there is space travel, and there are bicycles. Nothing interesting to write home about. Riding for Luck by Juliet Kemp 4/5 Really cool- captures that vibe of something slightly numinous; tapping in to powers greater than yourself and more unknowable. Manages to also give a great community feel without being overly saccharine- showing that safe spaces sometimes have to be carved out of harder worlds and that this can be a painful process, but that they are ultimately worth fighting for. Cool urban fantasy vibe. The Edge of the Abyss by M. Darusha Wehm 3/5 A fine little short story. Highlights how easy it is to blinker ourselves ideologically; shutting ourselves off from other points of view, even ones which differ only slightly from our own, and even when on the face of it we’re open and welcoming. Even when we know people on the other sides of these arbitrary divides. In such a short space, I think it maybe shoots itself in the foot by having the protagonist also be so blinkered and closed-minded; this idea can absolutely work but I think it would need a little more space to do so well. Unexpectedly Trans-Parent by Lydia Rogue 2/5 Another story that doesn’t do much beyond the title. Once again we have a bicycle, we have interplanetary travel, and we have trans people. In this one, a child is found and subsequently adopted. I got absolutely no sense of character or worldbuilding. Did Kai (the protagonist) want to be a parent? How did they feel about children? We don’t get access to any of this that might make the story interesting or give it an arc. Rovers by Marcus Woodman 3/5 Not bad- the metaphor of werewolves might be a little on the nose but sure, it’s fun to see. I think the same idea could have been tackled with a lot more nuance though. This one at least gives us a bit of worldbuilding; not masses but enough to be interesting. Nicely developed themes of defining your own place in the world. The Visitmothers by Charlie Jane Anders 3/5 A pretty classic “be careful what you wish for” type cautionary tale. The idea of being able to wish away your problems is obviously tempting, but possibly also demeans the struggles that people go through to overcome their problems- which is why the ending was good to see. A different solution that doesn’t solve the original problem but provides an option that wasn’t obvious or even considered by the protagonist. That said, taking the ending of the story literally is a little weird and unsatisfying (and borderline horrific); taking it metaphorically leaves it a little saccharine. Fine story. A Sudden Displacement of Matter by Ava Kelly 3/5 Robin Hood-type story set in an interesting future society. This feels like a lived-in world, where equality and rights have been fought for hard, and those who live there are not complacent about this fact. The plot and individual character work could use some improvement, but I enjoyed the setting of this one a lot more. Briar Patch by Lane Fox 4/5 Really like this one. Sweet and lovingly written, with somewhat more accomplished prose than others in the collection. Interesting hints of a wider world, but defining the community that actually affects the characters clearly and allows for the short and pleasant tale to be told. Good short story. Clashing/Complementary by Rafi Kleiman 3/5 Not bad, a fun little light urban fantasy with magic graffiti and magic-inscribed flying bicycles. Some nice little commentary on the nature and purpose of art. Nothing special characterwise. Lucy Doesn’t Get Angry by Tucker Lieberman 2/5 A little confused, but it feels like the heart is in the right place. A different twist on the Minotaur myth where the real minotaur was inside us all along. Ends with a nice little message about righteous anger, but ultimately is too disjointed and full of somewhat twisted metaphors to really connect. Beyond by Nathan Alling Long 2/5 Too whimsical for my tastes. Repeat after me: correlation does not imply causation. Correlation does not imply causation. I can tell that it’s trying to have fun by presenting some very speculative and very silly ideas as fact, but this rubs me the wrong way entirely.

  17. 5 out of 5

    E

    I give this book four stars with a bit of hesitation. It was wonderful to see queer and trans lives shared from the inside—that is, without the omnipresent cishet gaze that is in most other depictions of queer and trans folks. In the introduction of this book, Lydia Rogue addresses exactly this (and does so perfectly), when they say: “Do I talk to the reader this book is meant for—a small fraction of a percentage of humanity that is often overlooked or outright ignored—or do I talk to the reader I give this book four stars with a bit of hesitation. It was wonderful to see queer and trans lives shared from the inside—that is, without the omnipresent cishet gaze that is in most other depictions of queer and trans folks. In the introduction of this book, Lydia Rogue addresses exactly this (and does so perfectly), when they say: “Do I talk to the reader this book is meant for—a small fraction of a percentage of humanity that is often overlooked or outright ignored—or do I talk to the reader who is more likely to be picking up this book—the privileged part of humanity that has been the focus of the speculative fiction genre for years?” The reason I’m giving four stars hesitantly is for two main reasons…(1) the quality of some of the stories on an individual basis and (2) small grammatical errors. (1) regarding world-building and story quality in general: being an anthology, it is near impossible to not compare the strengths and weaknesses of each story compared to the others in the collection. There were some stories that were quite gripping and felt urgent, and yet others felt like they were still in the early stages of figuring themselves out, like maybe they were still in the stage of being rough drafts. The latter category caused me to lose the ability to suspend my belief in the world the author had created because it either seemed like too much of a stretch or I didn’t feel as though I, as a reader, earned all the secrets the story seemed so quick to share. (2) there were maybe two handfuls(or so?) of errors in this book. I was able to look past them, but it did take me out of the moment of the story I feel like this could’ve been easily and quickly remedied in the editing process, prior to the anthology going to print. I’ll say that sci-fi, as a genre, is far from my comfort zone when it comes to reading. Often, I am wary of—and therefore less likely to—buy into plots that aren’t grounded in realism. In some ways, though, I think that provided a sort of litmus test because it shows that the stories which I did believe and feel invested in did that much more to earn my belief and respect as a reader.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Vincent

    Read over half of the short stories. As compilations go, some I really liked, some were just meh. All of it was brain-turningly funky sci-fi, which was a ton of fun. One story was of two intergalactic bikers stuck between two political factions on the brink of war, those of a libertarian federation and another of a progressive empire. The world building was a bit on the nose when it came to one-to-one comparisons to modern stuff, but the characters they built with it were awesome. Another story Read over half of the short stories. As compilations go, some I really liked, some were just meh. All of it was brain-turningly funky sci-fi, which was a ton of fun. One story was of two intergalactic bikers stuck between two political factions on the brink of war, those of a libertarian federation and another of a progressive empire. The world building was a bit on the nose when it came to one-to-one comparisons to modern stuff, but the characters they built with it were awesome. Another story was of a bikers group who discovered that if they biked without breaking it brought them good luck, and this good luck could be built up, used, and transferred between people. The bulk of the story was them building up this luck to attempt to save a local trans and non-binary organization that was going to close down. If you like fun, experimental sci-fi that is overall positive and happy, these stories are for you.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    This is a fun little volume. It sits at an intersection of multiple niches. And I don't quite know what to think. But I enjoyed most of the stories, so I count it as a good read. Personally, I found it easier to connect with some of the gender journeys than some of the scientific ones: my brain seems to stubbornly resist the idea of bicycles riding through space between planets. I'm not sure why that particular bit of authorial license tripped me up so much, but I think I coped by mostly thinkin This is a fun little volume. It sits at an intersection of multiple niches. And I don't quite know what to think. But I enjoyed most of the stories, so I count it as a good read. Personally, I found it easier to connect with some of the gender journeys than some of the scientific ones: my brain seems to stubbornly resist the idea of bicycles riding through space between planets. I'm not sure why that particular bit of authorial license tripped me up so much, but I think I coped by mostly thinking of it as "a solo spaceship" and not worrying too much about what form that ship took. Despite all that, the stories were imaginative and fun to read, and I'm very glad I got the chance to read this book

  20. 5 out of 5

    Squirrel

    This book is adorable. From the first time I saw the cover, I knew I had to read it. It's still a novel thing to be so exactly catered to; this is comfort reading par excellence. It sounds incredibly specific: trans and enby speculative fiction involving bicycles, but I think it really brings together a lot of very disparate kinds of stories, from the political to the familial. The story quality is really high, and the stories themselves are fairly short, so it was like getting a small box full This book is adorable. From the first time I saw the cover, I knew I had to read it. It's still a novel thing to be so exactly catered to; this is comfort reading par excellence. It sounds incredibly specific: trans and enby speculative fiction involving bicycles, but I think it really brings together a lot of very disparate kinds of stories, from the political to the familial. The story quality is really high, and the stories themselves are fairly short, so it was like getting a small box full of fancy bonbons. Just a tantalizing taste.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lizzy

    This is such a niche! It's honestly pretty clear from the title what you're getting into and I appreciated that the collection was not apologetic about not being for everyone. It was so... Relaxing? Nice? To read a story and assume some (or all) of the characters weren't cis and I was really surprised at how many nonbinary characters there were! Some of the stories I wish were much longer but I appreciate the joy and bottled nature of short stories. Some of the imagery and characters will stick w This is such a niche! It's honestly pretty clear from the title what you're getting into and I appreciated that the collection was not apologetic about not being for everyone. It was so... Relaxing? Nice? To read a story and assume some (or all) of the characters weren't cis and I was really surprised at how many nonbinary characters there were! Some of the stories I wish were much longer but I appreciate the joy and bottled nature of short stories. Some of the imagery and characters will stick with me like I dreamt about them instead of read about them which is really nice.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma Whaley

    This anthology isn't breaking any new ground in sci fy writing, and the bicycle themes seem brutishly inserted in most of the stories. However, it's one of few books I've read to include neopronouns, agender characters, or speculations on futuristic transitions. That last plus side, however, is very mixed through the stories in the anthology. Some stick to T and top surgery while others use cybernetics and existential space radiation to accomplish transition. I would have appreciated more of the This anthology isn't breaking any new ground in sci fy writing, and the bicycle themes seem brutishly inserted in most of the stories. However, it's one of few books I've read to include neopronouns, agender characters, or speculations on futuristic transitions. That last plus side, however, is very mixed through the stories in the anthology. Some stick to T and top surgery while others use cybernetics and existential space radiation to accomplish transition. I would have appreciated more of the latter; it would have made the sci fy themes much more interesting.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Medical Patents Are Murder

    Ah yes, my favorite genre: feminist bicycle sci-fi. (It turns out feminist bicycling and attendant fiction is A Thing. Like this isn't even the first bicycle sci-fi book they've published. I can't deny there's something queerly sexual about them. Like riding a metal horse, but you get sweaty. Are bicycles the low-carbon hot rods of the future?) Reminds me of a post I saw the other day where someone said their favorite genre was "fishing horror". Ah yes, my favorite genre: feminist bicycle sci-fi. (It turns out feminist bicycling and attendant fiction is A Thing. Like this isn't even the first bicycle sci-fi book they've published. I can't deny there's something queerly sexual about them. Like riding a metal horse, but you get sweaty. Are bicycles the low-carbon hot rods of the future?) Reminds me of a post I saw the other day where someone said their favorite genre was "fishing horror".

  24. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    We Bike Book Club April 2021 I really enjoyed this collection of short stories. In other feminist sci-fi short story compilations by Microcosm Publishing, you get a few inexperienced writers and the writing suffers from that, but this collection is full of professional writers, which made it really enjoyable to read. Definitely recommend for the bicycle science fiction readers out there.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kat Mayerovitch

    What a fun collection of stories! They varied a fair bit in quality, and I subtracted a star for the fact that some seemed quite clunky for what they were trying to accomplish. But I loved how many wildly creative variations on a fairly narrow theme all the contributors were able to bring to the table.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Peter Salva

    The stories in this collection were hit or miss to me. My favorites were “Rovers,” and “A Sudden Displacement of Matter.” The thing that this collection does extremely well is trans/non-binary representation. I can see this being a much loved volume for a young sci-fi fan who misses seeing themself on the page in more mainstream works.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aster

    There were one or two stories that I didn't care about but the rest were very good and original ! I think "Rovers" was my favourite but I love seeing so many different sff universes with trans and non binary characters all connected by bikes. There were one or two stories that I didn't care about but the rest were very good and original ! I think "Rovers" was my favourite but I love seeing so many different sff universes with trans and non binary characters all connected by bikes.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fred Langridge

    A lovely book of feminist, trans, bicycle SFF short stories.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vas

    I loved this book SO MUCH. It brought me so much joy and hope. I love how weird and imaginative it is. The last story "Beyond" was breathtaking. I loved this book SO MUCH. It brought me so much joy and hope. I love how weird and imaginative it is. The last story "Beyond" was breathtaking.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    It’s not often I fear a short story collection with no bad entries. Probably helps that this combines several of my interests.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...