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Grind: A No-Bullshit Approach to Take Your Business from Concept to Cash Flow

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This practical guide to starting a new business skips past the MBA and goes right to the nuts and bolts of building a successful, self-sustaining company. In Grind, Michael J. McFall, co-CEO of BIGGBY® COFFEE, helps readers identify the common-sense strategies needed to turn their start-up ideas into positive-cash flow businesses. Dispensing with the notion that potential This practical guide to starting a new business skips past the MBA and goes right to the nuts and bolts of building a successful, self-sustaining company. In Grind, Michael J. McFall, co-CEO of BIGGBY® COFFEE, helps readers identify the common-sense strategies needed to turn their start-up ideas into positive-cash flow businesses. Dispensing with the notion that potential business owners require a formal education, he outlines several fundamental areas of importance, keying in on hustle, self-evaluation, and commitment. Having risen from a minimum-wage barista to build a company with over 250 stores in 9 states, McFall writes with the authority of hard-fought achievement. In addition to his calls for “personal due diligence,” he goes into detail about crucial business drivers, speaking from his personal and professional experience and including examples of hits and misses along the way. ​Readers will be pleased to find that McFall avoids sophisticated descriptions of processes and theories, retaining a down-to-earth approachability throughout the book. Filled with anecdotes, ideas, and calls to action, Grind provides the insight and expertise aspiring business owners require to reach profitability.


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This practical guide to starting a new business skips past the MBA and goes right to the nuts and bolts of building a successful, self-sustaining company. In Grind, Michael J. McFall, co-CEO of BIGGBY® COFFEE, helps readers identify the common-sense strategies needed to turn their start-up ideas into positive-cash flow businesses. Dispensing with the notion that potential This practical guide to starting a new business skips past the MBA and goes right to the nuts and bolts of building a successful, self-sustaining company. In Grind, Michael J. McFall, co-CEO of BIGGBY® COFFEE, helps readers identify the common-sense strategies needed to turn their start-up ideas into positive-cash flow businesses. Dispensing with the notion that potential business owners require a formal education, he outlines several fundamental areas of importance, keying in on hustle, self-evaluation, and commitment. Having risen from a minimum-wage barista to build a company with over 250 stores in 9 states, McFall writes with the authority of hard-fought achievement. In addition to his calls for “personal due diligence,” he goes into detail about crucial business drivers, speaking from his personal and professional experience and including examples of hits and misses along the way. ​Readers will be pleased to find that McFall avoids sophisticated descriptions of processes and theories, retaining a down-to-earth approachability throughout the book. Filled with anecdotes, ideas, and calls to action, Grind provides the insight and expertise aspiring business owners require to reach profitability.

30 review for Grind: A No-Bullshit Approach to Take Your Business from Concept to Cash Flow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darya

    Are you dreaming about having your own business? Entrepreneurship is a tough game. If you don't have an entrepreneur experience, I recommend you to go through the one described in the book. Very cool comparison of who you need to be to engage with your own business - Cowboy Squirrel! Why? Check out the book. Are you dreaming about having your own business? Entrepreneurship is a tough game. If you don't have an entrepreneur experience, I recommend you to go through the one described in the book. Very cool comparison of who you need to be to engage with your own business - Cowboy Squirrel! Why? Check out the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Rhoa

    It has been my experience that business books come in one of two flavors: “the fond reflection”, “the academic dissertation”. In “the fond reflection” type, the author (in most cases a well-known, successful entrepreneur) takes the reader on a sanitized trip down memory lane in an effort to convey, “How I got to where I am today”. While potentially entertaining, such journeys are seldom helpful to the would-be-entrepreneur who is reading the book in an effort to “learn from the master”. All memo It has been my experience that business books come in one of two flavors: “the fond reflection”, “the academic dissertation”. In “the fond reflection” type, the author (in most cases a well-known, successful entrepreneur) takes the reader on a sanitized trip down memory lane in an effort to convey, “How I got to where I am today”. While potentially entertaining, such journeys are seldom helpful to the would-be-entrepreneur who is reading the book in an effort to “learn from the master”. All memories fade over time, even bad ones. While it may not be the intent of the author, the result is often a recitation of events that have been purified with the passing of time. Successes appear almost commonplace, and tales of failure seem to lack any sense of true human emotion. In “the academic dissertation” the author, (in most cases a business theorist or journalist who has watched business from the sidelines or from the ivory towers of academia) attempts to convey to the reader a checklist of things they must do to craft and launch their first business. No attention is ever given to the fact that author has never really done any of the stuff talked about in their book. Then, every once in a long while, along comes a book that knows how to speak to the entrepreneur as an entrepreneur. A book authored by someone who has not only crafted success for themselves, but someone who is STILL DOING IT EVERY DAY and can explain it to the reader with genuine emotion and relevant detail. That book is “Grind: A No-bullshit Approach to Take Your Business from Concept to Cash Flow” by Michael McFall. “Grind” is a quick read but packed with easy to understand, real-world applications for any person looking to make the leap from ideation to action. Mr. McFall pulls no punches about what it takes to craft the reader’s idea into a business, and perhaps most importantly, forces the reader to take a prolonged look at themselves before endeavoring into creating a business. Mr. McFall speaks from genuine, personal experience that took him from serving as a barista in a two-location coffee shop to co-CEO of one of the fasting growing franchises in the country. Mr. McFall accurately details the key strategies and subtle nuances essential in creating, maintaining, and growing a small business in our contemporary environment. Mr. McFall’s approach is often blunt (as the title might suggest) but nonetheless entertaining and equally informative. He is not shy about highlighting how and where he has failed along the way. Moreover, Mr. McFall is able to draw on nearly three decades of experience in working with countless would-be entrepreneurs as he works to expand the Biggby Coffee empire. It is with great enthusiasm that I recommend “Grind: A No-bullshit Approach to Take Your Business from Concept to Cash Flow” by Michael McFall to those thinking of starting their own business or those who seek to understand what it takes bring a business to life.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Noll

    BLUF: Read this book to better understand the mindset of a start-up business owner and to gain inspiration on methods of managing the business. The advice and perspective in this book are important for anyone thinking about starting or currently operating a small business. The author touches on major concepts and problems you will encounter. Many take-aways exist on these pages including: 1) owning the mindset of being your biggest advocate and 2) ideas on how to gain new customers. The biggest d BLUF: Read this book to better understand the mindset of a start-up business owner and to gain inspiration on methods of managing the business. The advice and perspective in this book are important for anyone thinking about starting or currently operating a small business. The author touches on major concepts and problems you will encounter. Many take-aways exist on these pages including: 1) owning the mindset of being your biggest advocate and 2) ideas on how to gain new customers. The biggest detraction was the author proffering advice as if there is no other path to success for a business owner. I applaud his determination in creating the company he did, but there is no single method that will work for every business in every situation. When reading this book keep in mind this method worked for the author; while replicating success might occur by adhering to his advice I recommend examining the methods and determine their applicability to your business model, ethos, vision, etc. That said, he nailed the hardships of small business ownership.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert P

    What I find interesting about Grind is it's simplicity and directness. So often we get startup books from an academic perspective or from some mega-entrepreneur that frankly lost track of reality a long time ago. This book has five principles in five chapters. Each one might seem terribly obvious, but as people (and business people) we tend to overcomplicate the startup phase. If you know someone that wants to start a business buy 3 books, and tell them keep one by their bedside, one in their ba What I find interesting about Grind is it's simplicity and directness. So often we get startup books from an academic perspective or from some mega-entrepreneur that frankly lost track of reality a long time ago. This book has five principles in five chapters. Each one might seem terribly obvious, but as people (and business people) we tend to overcomplicate the startup phase. If you know someone that wants to start a business buy 3 books, and tell them keep one by their bedside, one in their bathroom, and one in their briefcase … and read and re-read a chapter a day, and they will reach stability. Lack of focus on 'what is important at this moment' is the reason people fail at startup phase. This book will bring a simple reality and truthiness to anybody with an idea.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Belongia

    For anyone who is interested in being there own boss, this is the book for you. You should read this before you start your business and come back to it often. Its the kind of book of you will want to keep near you as you walk thru this life we call self employed. My favorite part of this book is the way its written from real world experience, and it shows. This is not theoretical. This is real blood, sweat and tears that you can feel coming thru the pages of real stories. Michael talks about whe For anyone who is interested in being there own boss, this is the book for you. You should read this before you start your business and come back to it often. Its the kind of book of you will want to keep near you as you walk thru this life we call self employed. My favorite part of this book is the way its written from real world experience, and it shows. This is not theoretical. This is real blood, sweat and tears that you can feel coming thru the pages of real stories. Michael talks about when the boogieman comes and punches you in the gut, and he will, you will wanna walk yourself back thru this book. So you can make sure you are grounded, centered, and ready to fight back.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Diane Parker

    I thought I was reading about my own experience with my start up, that is how accurate this book was for me! I recommend this as business 101 coursework for anyone opening a business. It is hard, it is constantly committing yourself to dig in, but this has been done before and there are people out there writing a book that is so on point that it will help you go from dream and hard work to reality.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    GRIND was a fantastic, quick, relevant read that I recommend for anyone who is engaged in, or considering, an entrepreneurial journey. The book stands out because it offers a raw and vulnerable look into the foundations of success in business ownership.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

    I won this as part of a Goodreads giveaway and this is my honest review. I wish there was a high school course developed based on this book. Easy to read, follow and implement in your own life for literally anything.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jason Woodrum

    Great read and tremendous insight. Fantastic book for anyone growing or managing a business of any size. Very insightful and wisdom that can be put to use immediately.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peggy Rector

    Excellent! Truthful, inspiring, on point. I can relate to so much of what he wrote and wish I had this book to read as I opened my first BIGGBY in early 2009.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eric Hultgren

    This might be one of the best business books I have read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Isabel Andrews

    I loved the book!! I am not interested in opening a store and yet I was able to find many things in it that fit in with my daily life. I highly recommend everyone to read it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    gifta alvina

    This book give us rich and real insight for starting a business, especially if you are in retail or business that face the end consumers directly. It only consist of 5 chapters, but the content is very complete and with applicable advice. The book does not sell dreams of starting your own business, but Grind show you what it takes to be an entrepreneur. Thank you netgalley for providing the arc.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle | Nine Tale Vixen

    I received a review copy from Greenleaf Book Group through a Goodreads giveaway; all opinions are my own and honest. 2.5 stars "Nobody has ever kind of tried and produced an amazing result." There's some really solid advice, and it's clear that the author is an expert. That said, I don't totally agree with the refrain that you have to give your fledgling business your literal all, whether you're sick or your family needs you: a clear recipe for burnout. (Even if it's totally necessary as the au I received a review copy from Greenleaf Book Group through a Goodreads giveaway; all opinions are my own and honest. 2.5 stars "Nobody has ever kind of tried and produced an amazing result." There's some really solid advice, and it's clear that the author is an expert. That said, I don't totally agree with the refrain that you have to give your fledgling business your literal all, whether you're sick or your family needs you: a clear recipe for burnout. (Even if it's totally necessary as the author asserts, it's definitely not something I personally could follow since I value my health and personal relationships, so sue me.) My main gripe is that the writing style kept me from taking the content as seriously as it deserved to be taken — some of the section headings were just A Lot, and the metaphors were abundant and extensive and very imaginative. They could've been totally omitted to make the book much more concise ... and no-bullshit.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I received this as a Goodreads giveaway. This is a solid, well-written business book. I only gave it 3 stars, because it's pretty discouraging. Mr. McFall lays the pitfalls of starting a new business all out on the table & then pretty much beats them dead into the ground. Since he works with new franchisees I understand why he wrote this book; basically to prevent people who are not truly committed from starting new businesses, but, boy, did his take on entrepreneurship depress the hell out of m I received this as a Goodreads giveaway. This is a solid, well-written business book. I only gave it 3 stars, because it's pretty discouraging. Mr. McFall lays the pitfalls of starting a new business all out on the table & then pretty much beats them dead into the ground. Since he works with new franchisees I understand why he wrote this book; basically to prevent people who are not truly committed from starting new businesses, but, boy, did his take on entrepreneurship depress the hell out of me. It was a decent book, but I wouldn't recommend it to any of my colleagues because it just wasn't encouraging.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kasey

    Thank you for the opportunity to review this book as a giveaway recipient. I am excited to read it and will update my thoughts on this book soon!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike He

    Grind is an excellent guide book for people who want to start their own business, and small business owners who are obsessed and struggling with winning more customers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    YOU MUST READ THIS! A total game changer!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan P. Hawkins

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Drago

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rob Wark

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marta

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nate

  26. 4 out of 5

    Din Scalper

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dino

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sara

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