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A Scholastic Miscellany: Anselm to Ockham (Library of Christian Classics)

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This volume includes readable translations of a number of important texts that speak to both concrete and practical issues of church life as well as questions of its very nature and constitution. Long recognized for the quality of its translations, introductions, explanatory notes, and indexes, the Library of Christian Classics provides scholars and students with modern Eng This volume includes readable translations of a number of important texts that speak to both concrete and practical issues of church life as well as questions of its very nature and constitution. Long recognized for the quality of its translations, introductions, explanatory notes, and indexes, the Library of Christian Classics provides scholars and students with modern English translations of some of the most significant Christian theological texts in history. Through these works--each written prior to the end of the sixteenth century--contemporary readers are able to engage the ideas that have shaped Christian theology and the church through the centuries.


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This volume includes readable translations of a number of important texts that speak to both concrete and practical issues of church life as well as questions of its very nature and constitution. Long recognized for the quality of its translations, introductions, explanatory notes, and indexes, the Library of Christian Classics provides scholars and students with modern Eng This volume includes readable translations of a number of important texts that speak to both concrete and practical issues of church life as well as questions of its very nature and constitution. Long recognized for the quality of its translations, introductions, explanatory notes, and indexes, the Library of Christian Classics provides scholars and students with modern English translations of some of the most significant Christian theological texts in history. Through these works--each written prior to the end of the sixteenth century--contemporary readers are able to engage the ideas that have shaped Christian theology and the church through the centuries.

30 review for A Scholastic Miscellany: Anselm to Ockham (Library of Christian Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erick

    This serves as a good introduction to Scholasticism. The selections are quite brief, but they do provide a sampling of the themes and subjects that were being discussed and debated during this period. You have selections from notable Scholastic writers like Anselm, Ockham, Duns Scotus and Bonaventure, but nothing from Aquinas. This series had a volume dedicated to Aquinas so that is somewhat understandable that they didn’t include him. As I said this really only serves as an introduction. A full This serves as a good introduction to Scholasticism. The selections are quite brief, but they do provide a sampling of the themes and subjects that were being discussed and debated during this period. You have selections from notable Scholastic writers like Anselm, Ockham, Duns Scotus and Bonaventure, but nothing from Aquinas. This series had a volume dedicated to Aquinas so that is somewhat understandable that they didn’t include him. As I said this really only serves as an introduction. A full appreciation can only come from reading complete works from the notable Scholastic writers that are here only given brief extracts. One positive element of this presentation is for means of overview and comparison. If one can approach it from that perspective it serves its purpose.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Nemo

    None of this scholastic philosophy is easy reading--we were assigned 9 books of Aristotle before being allowed to touch the stuff--but it illuminates an era of tremendous advances in systematic and synthetic thought in the west. And in terms of perseveration, these guys are the world champions. I got a headache and wept the first time I understood the scholastic/aristotelian version of the Trinity. Not because of any particular christianity, but because of the heights of contemplative abstractio None of this scholastic philosophy is easy reading--we were assigned 9 books of Aristotle before being allowed to touch the stuff--but it illuminates an era of tremendous advances in systematic and synthetic thought in the west. And in terms of perseveration, these guys are the world champions. I got a headache and wept the first time I understood the scholastic/aristotelian version of the Trinity. Not because of any particular christianity, but because of the heights of contemplative abstraction I reached after protracted effort. They've played well, the medieval philosophers, and passed the ball--now it's up to you to take it up, make your own play, pass it on to those who come after you. A long game, and one requiring much patience, but utterly rewarding.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This book was assigned for my class on Medieval and Reformation Theology. It's actually a fine book--well done with good introductions for each Medieval author, and then important selections from their work. I feel bad giving it just two stars, but since the Goodreads stars are based on how much you "like" the book, I have to say "It was ok." Some of it was interesting, but mostly I came away A) realizing that I really don't agree with the assumptions, logic, and conclusions of the Medieval Scho This book was assigned for my class on Medieval and Reformation Theology. It's actually a fine book--well done with good introductions for each Medieval author, and then important selections from their work. I feel bad giving it just two stars, but since the Goodreads stars are based on how much you "like" the book, I have to say "It was ok." Some of it was interesting, but mostly I came away A) realizing that I really don't agree with the assumptions, logic, and conclusions of the Medieval Scholastics (big surprise, I know) and B) thinking once again about how many of our own assumptions and conclusions people a few hundred years from now will look at in head-scratching confusion.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    The introductions are what make this series so important. By far the best overview of church history, taking into account issues and influences of the day. This particular volume's highlight is Anselm of Canterbury's 'Why God Became Man.' Even if you have trouble with the high scholasticism toward the end of the book, Anselm is worth the effort. The introductions are what make this series so important. By far the best overview of church history, taking into account issues and influences of the day. This particular volume's highlight is Anselm of Canterbury's 'Why God Became Man.' Even if you have trouble with the high scholasticism toward the end of the book, Anselm is worth the effort.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Fr. Thomas Reeves

    Especially influential were the writings of Anselm of Canterbury. Certainly, the importance of the incarnation and it's importance for our redemption; less on the aspect of feudal propitiation and more on a general substitutionary atonement centered on the cross, but engaging the entirety of Christ's life, death and resurrection. Especially influential were the writings of Anselm of Canterbury. Certainly, the importance of the incarnation and it's importance for our redemption; less on the aspect of feudal propitiation and more on a general substitutionary atonement centered on the cross, but engaging the entirety of Christ's life, death and resurrection.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    This book was used as a text for the Philosophic Method course at Union Theological Seminary in New York. Although I was familiar with Ockham from high school and college, Abelard was new to me and I liked him quite a lot. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Abelard speaks in a familiar, modern voice.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maranatha

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  9. 5 out of 5

    Allie Farrell

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tim Booher

  11. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Rollo

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kris

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt Hale

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jay D

  16. 4 out of 5

    Iracema Brochado

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  18. 4 out of 5

    Todd

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robert D. Cornwall

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Forman

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  23. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  25. 4 out of 5

    Greg Coates

  26. 4 out of 5

    James Barclay

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa J

  29. 5 out of 5

    Howard

  30. 4 out of 5

    Scott Simmons

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