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Legacy of Love: My Education in the Path of Nonviolence

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Called a messenger of peace, Arun Gandhi -- Mahatma Gandhis grandson -- has dedicated his life to spreading his grandfathers teachings around the globe. This compelling memoir begins in the heart of apartheid South Africa where the author lived under conditions of zealous racism until he was 12 years old. Following are the two pivotal years he spent with his grandfather in Called a messenger of peace, Arun Gandhi -- Mahatma Gandhis grandson -- has dedicated his life to spreading his grandfathers teachings around the globe. This compelling memoir begins in the heart of apartheid South Africa where the author lived under conditions of zealous racism until he was 12 years old. Following are the two pivotal years he spent with his grandfather in India, learning the lessons that would undo his anger and cultivate a profound activism. His account also describes living with his parents in religious and socially activist communities in South Africa and India. This book presents the practical wisdom the author learned from his grandfather revolving around family, men and women, simplicity, religious unity, humility, truth, and nonviolence.


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Called a messenger of peace, Arun Gandhi -- Mahatma Gandhis grandson -- has dedicated his life to spreading his grandfathers teachings around the globe. This compelling memoir begins in the heart of apartheid South Africa where the author lived under conditions of zealous racism until he was 12 years old. Following are the two pivotal years he spent with his grandfather in Called a messenger of peace, Arun Gandhi -- Mahatma Gandhis grandson -- has dedicated his life to spreading his grandfathers teachings around the globe. This compelling memoir begins in the heart of apartheid South Africa where the author lived under conditions of zealous racism until he was 12 years old. Following are the two pivotal years he spent with his grandfather in India, learning the lessons that would undo his anger and cultivate a profound activism. His account also describes living with his parents in religious and socially activist communities in South Africa and India. This book presents the practical wisdom the author learned from his grandfather revolving around family, men and women, simplicity, religious unity, humility, truth, and nonviolence.

30 review for Legacy of Love: My Education in the Path of Nonviolence

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Simply written, it is a decent book. But put into action, it is changing my life.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    "'Change is possible if we have the desire and the commitment to make it happen.'" "We are surrounded by many things that were once considered to be impossible, things that we now take for granted. These things have become part of our lives because someone refused to accept the common wisdom. If this is possible in the material and technological sense, it is equally possible in the moral sense... Beginning with ourselves, we must cause positive change to radiate out into the world. We need a chan "'Change is possible if we have the desire and the commitment to make it happen.'" "We are surrounded by many things that were once considered to be impossible, things that we now take for granted. These things have become part of our lives because someone refused to accept the common wisdom. If this is possible in the material and technological sense, it is equally possible in the moral sense... Beginning with ourselves, we must cause positive change to radiate out into the world. We need a change of heart, a change of perceptions, and a change of attitude, which we can then pass on to others through education, enlightenment and love."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I got this book from a used book store. It had obviously never been read. This gave me doubts, but I'm interested in Ghandi, so I purchased it. It is written by Gandhi's grandson Arun, who is continuing his grandfather's goal of pursuing non-violence as an answer to this messy world we find ourselves in. And, as taught by Mahatma Ghandi, non-violence encompasses much more than not being physically abusive. It is an attitude that must be practiced and practiced and practiced until it becomes part I got this book from a used book store. It had obviously never been read. This gave me doubts, but I'm interested in Ghandi, so I purchased it. It is written by Gandhi's grandson Arun, who is continuing his grandfather's goal of pursuing non-violence as an answer to this messy world we find ourselves in. And, as taught by Mahatma Ghandi, non-violence encompasses much more than not being physically abusive. It is an attitude that must be practiced and practiced and practiced until it becomes part of one's nature. This appeals to me because it is in keeping with Buddha's exhortation to practice compassion and the Eight-fold path. I am not, sorry to say, non-violent in that I get angry easily and act on that anger far too often. But I am becoming more aware of how harmful this is and desire to practice what will help with the cure. Reading uplifting books, such as this, is a huge help and inspiration.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Clark

    A great and easy read. It tells of ways we can better ourselves and to better the world with our insights to living a better life with others

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Arun Gandhi is a grandson of the late civil rights leader Mohandas Gandhi. He grew up in both South Africa and India, Legacy of Love recollects Arun's life with his grandfather and learning from both his teachings and simply living with him. They contain stories of how young Arun came to learn what nonviolence really means, and how to practice it, along with how to contain your anger and control it, turning it into nonviolent actions. One day when Arun is little he steals a box of chocolates his Arun Gandhi is a grandson of the late civil rights leader Mohandas Gandhi. He grew up in both South Africa and India, Legacy of Love recollects Arun's life with his grandfather and learning from both his teachings and simply living with him. They contain stories of how young Arun came to learn what nonviolence really means, and how to practice it, along with how to contain your anger and control it, turning it into nonviolent actions. One day when Arun is little he steals a box of chocolates his father brought home and eats them all. As a punishment for doing so, the whole family was not allowed to eat chocolate for three months. Even disciplining children was done nonviolently, showing them that when one person does something bad, everyone is affected. Many powerful moments about controlling anger are recollected by Arun as well. For example, one day his grandfather says to him, "Remember that being humble does not mean giving in and allowing yourself to be bullied. Humility means giving respect. You will have respect in return to the extent that you give it to others." I enjoyed reading this book because, like my grandfather's book: A White Preacher's Memoir, I had heard about most of the stories in the book (Arun being a family friend), and this book gave me a great insight into what his life was actually like, and it is amazing. I have a list of books that I believe are "books you should read before you die," and this just went on it. Mostly because it gives a great insight, as I had said before, and also because it taught me a lot, and it can teach everyone a lot.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    This book took forever to get going on...even though it is quite short. Arun Ghandi is Mahatma Ghanhi's grandson, and it talks about his teachings and how they affected the life of his family. I always understood the part about physical violence, but this talked alot about the role that passive violence plays in our lives. It was interesting. Still don't think i could have a remotely intelligent conversation on the subject, but it was a start in my understanding. This book took forever to get going on...even though it is quite short. Arun Ghandi is Mahatma Ghanhi's grandson, and it talks about his teachings and how they affected the life of his family. I always understood the part about physical violence, but this talked alot about the role that passive violence plays in our lives. It was interesting. Still don't think i could have a remotely intelligent conversation on the subject, but it was a start in my understanding.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dametra

    I loved this book, I must agree there was some values to take from this book. I like the end of the book the most, maybe because it provided more insight to me. Also it explains Ghandi and nonviolence in a narrative form and it gave more of a realistic view since the author is kin to Ghandi, it made it all the better. Short read, but took me a minute to read because I wanted to analyze and reflect on the important points featured in the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    D

    My grandma arranged for this Arun Gandhi (Gandhi's nephew) to give a speech, which is how I cam in contact with his book, which I otherwise probably wouldn't ahve ever heard of. i really liked it and found it a great companion to Gandhi's ideas and would recommend it to anyone interested in religion, non violence, or Martin Luther King My grandma arranged for this Arun Gandhi (Gandhi's nephew) to give a speech, which is how I cam in contact with his book, which I otherwise probably wouldn't ahve ever heard of. i really liked it and found it a great companion to Gandhi's ideas and would recommend it to anyone interested in religion, non violence, or Martin Luther King

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    I learned more about Ghandhi. I have even more respect, especially for him as a family man and a grandfather.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    don't whip yr kids. be nice instead. really though, the last chapter, "The Spinning Wheel" was probably the most insightful part of the book. don't whip yr kids. be nice instead. really though, the last chapter, "The Spinning Wheel" was probably the most insightful part of the book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    What Arun Gandhi learned from his grandfather, the Mahatma. Wonderful stories!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy Terhorst

    This was written by Gandhi's grandson. It was a beautiful telling of his life and lessons from one of the worlds greatest teachers of peace. This was written by Gandhi's grandson. It was a beautiful telling of his life and lessons from one of the worlds greatest teachers of peace.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julie Sebastian

    A narrative way to explain Gandhi's way of nonviolence. A narrative way to explain Gandhi's way of nonviolence.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liresansfrontiere

    A book which makes you think

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Wonderful short stories that provide us life lessons as told through the experiences of Gandhi's grandson. Wonderful short stories that provide us life lessons as told through the experiences of Gandhi's grandson.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hiro Oshita

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sunni

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Kroshewsky

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bj Livingstone

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samira

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ileana

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Yvette

  24. 5 out of 5

    Niklas

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shasta McBride

  27. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tabi

  29. 4 out of 5

    Milou

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan

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