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40 review for Black Education: Myths and Tragedies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Doherty

    A Neglected Classic from Thomas Sowell This book shares Thomas Sowell's personal experiences as a professor at black colleges and universities in the 1960's and is immensely important not only as a fascinating piece of historical journalism documenting black education issues during a particular time and place from the perspective of a professor, but as an incisive and engaging critique of the prevailing attitudes, assumptions, ideological blinders, and other factors that caused and exacerbated th A Neglected Classic from Thomas Sowell This book shares Thomas Sowell's personal experiences as a professor at black colleges and universities in the 1960's and is immensely important not only as a fascinating piece of historical journalism documenting black education issues during a particular time and place from the perspective of a professor, but as an incisive and engaging critique of the prevailing attitudes, assumptions, ideological blinders, and other factors that caused and exacerbated the often-bemoaned problems in black education and in education generally. Sowell doesn't just engage in the usual moralizing, demonizing, hand-wringing, and virtue signaling. He asks real questions and gives some real answers about the problems and the possible paths for positive change.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Tyoember

    Truly Incredible book. Well worth the money.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    Sowell's writing is lucid, cogent & enlightening, but its access is limited to intellectually questioning minds and is likely unknown or lamentably inaccessible to Average Joe. Thus, a 3.5-4.0 rating. Much of this book receives its texture direct from the experiences of Sowell himself. Contrary to first impressions, he received a pretty shabby educational upbringing and didn't really display any distinct brilliance. For readers 'of color', the book will provide many a confirmation of observation Sowell's writing is lucid, cogent & enlightening, but its access is limited to intellectually questioning minds and is likely unknown or lamentably inaccessible to Average Joe. Thus, a 3.5-4.0 rating. Much of this book receives its texture direct from the experiences of Sowell himself. Contrary to first impressions, he received a pretty shabby educational upbringing and didn't really display any distinct brilliance. For readers 'of color', the book will provide many a confirmation of observations in the educational experience. Sowell meticulously and faithfully unearths the inconsistencies, gaps, inevitable consequences, shortcomings, illusions, and misinformed policies, aims & intentions, of black education. I prefer to describe it as Afro Education. Those familiar with his work will rediscover the attributes of an economist & scholar who does not bend to mediocrity and does not yield to conformity. It was entertaining and very easy to follow his anecdotes as he exposed the compromises that are made in an effort to enroll more black students. A salient point is that there is an acknowledgement of education, even an appreciation & respect for it, but that there are no concerns or aspirations toward intellectual excellence. He brought up the poor standing in rank of black colleges and how dismally they compare to prestigious universities. Another comparison was made between West Indian people and Afro American people, wherein a contrast exists in ethic, effort, principles & so forth. He exposes much of the fallacies & myths. Many a time he'll remark upon real occurrences & circumstances, such as the professors who basically change their grading criteria for black students, or the lack of effort or seriousness on the part of many students. And there is much discussion, in detail, on the livelihoods, family dynamics, generational patterns, and realities of the Afro demographic. The book's informative, revealing, and does offer some solutions toward the end. It's certainly a difficult & complex problem. I found the book easy to read & follow, it wasn't very economic or abstract or complex in its presentation but the subject itself is weighty. To get a glimpse of Sowell's upbringing, this might prove entertaining; there are hardly any graphs or tables but there is a moderate amount of statistics. I’d recommend it for scholars, or for students of sociology (i.e. black studies), education, or economics, and would advise any casually interested readers to think twice before choosing to follow Sowell’s indefatigable quest to uproot the myths of Afro education.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joe Zabek

  5. 4 out of 5

    Frank

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Murray

  7. 4 out of 5

    Creativemf

  8. 5 out of 5

    Frank

  9. 4 out of 5

    KM

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lord Mari

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laku

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steve Hager

  13. 5 out of 5

    Benar Fux Svaiter

  14. 5 out of 5

    Derek

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Angelique

  17. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lifelong

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

  22. 5 out of 5

    Graham Bates

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Kendrick

  24. 4 out of 5

    KnoxnGnome

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ebonique Boyd

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Haack

  28. 5 out of 5

    marciverse

  29. 5 out of 5

    Keri

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

  31. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Goins

  32. 4 out of 5

    David Ropars

  33. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  34. 5 out of 5

    TenekaHarrison

  35. 5 out of 5

    Mahreen Khan

  36. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Adams

  37. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Steele

  38. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  39. 4 out of 5

    Malachi

  40. 5 out of 5

    Tomasz Klosinski

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