Hot Best Seller

This Is What I Know About Art

Availability: Ready to download

Pocket Change Collective was born out of a need for space. Space to think. Space to connect. Space to be yourself. And this is your invitation to join us. In this powerful and hopeful account, arts writer, curator, and activist Kimberly Drew reminds us that the art world has space not just for the elite, but for everyone. Pocket Change Collective is a series of small books Pocket Change Collective was born out of a need for space. Space to think. Space to connect. Space to be yourself. And this is your invitation to join us. In this powerful and hopeful account, arts writer, curator, and activist Kimberly Drew reminds us that the art world has space not just for the elite, but for everyone. Pocket Change Collective is a series of small books with big ideas from today's leading activists and artists. In this installment, arts writer and co-editor of Black Futures Kimberly Drew shows us that art and protest are inextricably linked. Drawing on her personal experience through art toward activism, Drew challenges us to create space for the change that we want to see in the world. Because there really is so much more space than we think.


Compare

Pocket Change Collective was born out of a need for space. Space to think. Space to connect. Space to be yourself. And this is your invitation to join us. In this powerful and hopeful account, arts writer, curator, and activist Kimberly Drew reminds us that the art world has space not just for the elite, but for everyone. Pocket Change Collective is a series of small books Pocket Change Collective was born out of a need for space. Space to think. Space to connect. Space to be yourself. And this is your invitation to join us. In this powerful and hopeful account, arts writer, curator, and activist Kimberly Drew reminds us that the art world has space not just for the elite, but for everyone. Pocket Change Collective is a series of small books with big ideas from today's leading activists and artists. In this installment, arts writer and co-editor of Black Futures Kimberly Drew shows us that art and protest are inextricably linked. Drawing on her personal experience through art toward activism, Drew challenges us to create space for the change that we want to see in the world. Because there really is so much more space than we think.

30 review for This Is What I Know About Art

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    The fine art world is whitewashed, artists of color left out and unrecognized. Kimberly shares her experiences as a Black woman working in the art world, and her gradual realizations about the strong connection between art and protest, and what is needed to make the art world more accessible both for audience and creators. Appreciated the suggestions of Black artists to check out, wish there were images included. Wanted a little more analysis, a little less resume recounting.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I genuinely believe that everyone I know should read this book. I also think they will each get something different out of it, and that makes me excited to talk to everyone I know about this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Georgia

    a slim, lovely, and personal ode to the importance of art in kimberly drew's life. the main emphasis is the direct tie between art and activism, and how intertwined the two are for her. as someone who struggles to relate to visual arts, i perhaps was expecting something different from this-- maybe a contemporary and condensed 'ways of seeing' a la john berger? but i think that's just me. a slim, lovely, and personal ode to the importance of art in kimberly drew's life. the main emphasis is the direct tie between art and activism, and how intertwined the two are for her. as someone who struggles to relate to visual arts, i perhaps was expecting something different from this-- maybe a contemporary and condensed 'ways of seeing' a la john berger? but i think that's just me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    BookishStitcher

    "This is my story about loving art so much that you want to see it change for the better." This pocket sized book is a part of a series by Pocket Change Collective that is built on the premise "small books with big ideas from today's leading activists." This book chronicles Kimberly Drew's life changing "summer internship at the Studio Museum in Harlem, a museum dedicated to showing art by people of the African diaspora". This experienced ignited a love and desire to learn more about black artists "This is my story about loving art so much that you want to see it change for the better." This pocket sized book is a part of a series by Pocket Change Collective that is built on the premise "small books with big ideas from today's leading activists." This book chronicles Kimberly Drew's life changing "summer internship at the Studio Museum in Harlem, a museum dedicated to showing art by people of the African diaspora". This experienced ignited a love and desire to learn more about black artists and made Kimberly Drew change her major from mathematics to art. The book showcases her incredible drive and passion to cultivate a diversity not only in artists represented, but also in the population of people who love art. From starting a blog featuring different black artists to working at the M.E.T., Kimberly hopefully expresses the changes she wants to see in the art world and gives a voice to the anger she feels when confronting the huge disparity she sees in the art world. I'm excited to read more of these.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Tournas

    This tiny book is a part of a new series of short books by young adult activists in different disciplines explaining how they merged their study with social change. Drew is an arts writer and activist who is trying to make Black artists part of the mainstream art world. She explains how her college art training included very few Black artists, and relates how in her work life she endeavored to make Black art accessible to all, especially to the Black public, in her jobs after college. The essay This tiny book is a part of a new series of short books by young adult activists in different disciplines explaining how they merged their study with social change. Drew is an arts writer and activist who is trying to make Black artists part of the mainstream art world. She explains how her college art training included very few Black artists, and relates how in her work life she endeavored to make Black art accessible to all, especially to the Black public, in her jobs after college. The essay is smart, articulate, and very inspiring. I imagine high school art students feeling empowered by her singular pursuit of exactly what she found important. Janelle Monáe’s endorsement of Drew on the back cover will pique the interest of young people interested in the arts.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erikka

    I received ARCs of these little Pocket Collective books and they are simply exceptional. They're basically TED talks in a book. This one is about a Black activist who draws attention to the lack of Black art history in schools and museums. She gives her own experiences in various colleges and museums, all culminating in her time at the Met and how she is slowly but surely making an impact on underserved groups. I appreciated her humility in acknowledging that she can't do it herself, but that sh I received ARCs of these little Pocket Collective books and they are simply exceptional. They're basically TED talks in a book. This one is about a Black activist who draws attention to the lack of Black art history in schools and museums. She gives her own experiences in various colleges and museums, all culminating in her time at the Met and how she is slowly but surely making an impact on underserved groups. I appreciated her humility in acknowledging that she can't do it herself, but that she can certainly contribute, as we all can. Learn about a Black artist today. May I suggest Kara Walker, whose black and white work is absolutely breathtaking? Or Nina Chanel Abney, whose "who what when where why" series draws your eye and your mind towards the Black Lives Matter movement and the relationship between African Americans and police? This is something you can do to help Kimberly Drew's mission--learn about Black artists and share their work as you would a Picasso or Monet.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    Drew recounts how art influenced her life. Her narrative is peppered with anecdotes about elitism in the art world, how she discovered black and Latinx artists, and what she has been able to do to make art more accessible to a wider audience. My only complaint is that this book was too short (I read it in less than 20 minutes). I understand this is the series format, but I would have appreciated learning about other contemporary artists whose works I may just appreciate in jpegs, much like the au Drew recounts how art influenced her life. Her narrative is peppered with anecdotes about elitism in the art world, how she discovered black and Latinx artists, and what she has been able to do to make art more accessible to a wider audience. My only complaint is that this book was too short (I read it in less than 20 minutes). I understand this is the series format, but I would have appreciated learning about other contemporary artists whose works I may just appreciate in jpegs, much like the author did, until I have the opportunity to seek them out.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Duck

    Rep: queer Black author, Black artists discussed --- I don't have a lot of thoughts about this book, as it's so short; mostly, I enjoyed what I learned from it and I'm glad I read it. The style didn't blow me away or anything, but I didn't really care; it felt like the author was just talking to me about something they were passionate about, which I think is the whole point. I also hope I can find this on ebook later on so I can catch some of the artists' names I missed on audiobook because I'm a Rep: queer Black author, Black artists discussed --- I don't have a lot of thoughts about this book, as it's so short; mostly, I enjoyed what I learned from it and I'm glad I read it. The style didn't blow me away or anything, but I didn't really care; it felt like the author was just talking to me about something they were passionate about, which I think is the whole point. I also hope I can find this on ebook later on so I can catch some of the artists' names I missed on audiobook because I'm a lot more interested in the history of Black art now.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marisha Murphy

    This is a cute little pocket book. Perfect for a quick flight read. . . Kimberly Drew love for art is for the most part unmatched. She has been into art activism since she was in kindergarten. Art is a core part of her upbringing as well as who she is as a person. This is the story about how that love was so strong that it empowered her to strive to change art and the process for the better. It is a pretty light read. It can be best described as a short walk down memory lane.

  10. 5 out of 5

    LaShana (she|her) Avery

    There are definitely some great gems about making museums more accessible for POCs. And this is a great read for any POC entering White spaces on how to be yourself and make change at your organization.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Asia Edwards

    Drew’s passion for getting Black people properly, and proudly represented in the Art world is admirable. Her commitment to the culture and representation is everything.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Palos Heights Public Library

    This Is What I Know About Art is from the Pocket Change Collective series, small books with big ideas from today's leading activists. This book focuses on Kimberly Drew and how she found a career in the art world. Drew visited museums as a young girl and fell in love with art. She eventually realized that is where she belonged, so she started taking courses in art history only to find that she was a bit behind compared to her peers. This didn't stop her, she studied hard and created an art blog This Is What I Know About Art is from the Pocket Change Collective series, small books with big ideas from today's leading activists. This book focuses on Kimberly Drew and how she found a career in the art world. Drew visited museums as a young girl and fell in love with art. She eventually realized that is where she belonged, so she started taking courses in art history only to find that she was a bit behind compared to her peers. This didn't stop her, she studied hard and created an art blog focusing on black artists. She graduated, worked a few different jobs, posting on social media, working at a high end gallery, and eventually worked at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Drew made a name for herself and never changed her appearance or ideas for others. I would recommend this for readers who enjoy art and for grades 9 and up. --Reviewed by Lorena R.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Thank you Penguin Teen and NetGalley for the free advanced digital copy. All thoughts are my own. This is What I Know About Art by Kimberly Drew is a part of the Pocket Change Collective Series. This tiny book is packed with anecdotes and lessons on how to take a passion, like art, and turn it into activism. Drew reminds her readers that "art and protest will forever be bound together. And the beautiful thing about art, like activism, is that it allows us space to be curious and learn." She is hu Thank you Penguin Teen and NetGalley for the free advanced digital copy. All thoughts are my own. This is What I Know About Art by Kimberly Drew is a part of the Pocket Change Collective Series. This tiny book is packed with anecdotes and lessons on how to take a passion, like art, and turn it into activism. Drew reminds her readers that "art and protest will forever be bound together. And the beautiful thing about art, like activism, is that it allows us space to be curious and learn." She is humble in her explanation, reiterating that one person can contribute, but it takes a collective to truly start change. Through her journey throughout school and navigating the art world, Drew learns that her voice is a powerful one. She learns that small actions foster change, especially when done in conjunction with others. Art is one of the ways that Drew knows best to amplify voices for change. So, through her short book she explains how young readers can go through the process of "discovery, confusion, and progress" just as she did. Drew challenges readers (just as she did for herself) to learn about Black artists and celebrate them. In this she shows that a job worth doing is met with resistance.It takes time, and it takes effort. Above all, it is worth it. This is a great, giftable book for a young graduate or teens needing the encouragement to make a change.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomasin Propson

    Short (63 pages) and powerful and angry and hopeful and determined. In Kimberly Drew's own words: This is my story about loving art so much that you want to see it change for the better. Describing the essential voice and balm of art in response to continuing violence committed by police upon Black and justice-seeking communities: My faith in the importance of art had never been more concrete. It was images, sculptures, and writing that helped me wade through the anger I was feeling. There was a Short (63 pages) and powerful and angry and hopeful and determined. In Kimberly Drew's own words: This is my story about loving art so much that you want to see it change for the better. Describing the essential voice and balm of art in response to continuing violence committed by police upon Black and justice-seeking communities: My faith in the importance of art had never been more concrete. It was images, sculptures, and writing that helped me wade through the anger I was feeling. There was a moment of respite whenever I encountered a work that mirrored feelings that felt too complicated to define on my own. A worthwhile text that, while quick to read, sticks with you afterward.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Rose

    I love the Pocket Change Collective series, and this was no exception. I really enjoyed hearing about Drew’s experiences and awakening of art/political consciousness. The only aspect I thought was lacking was that I think it could have been more informative about some references rather than encouraging the reader to look them up (better than nothing). As a librarian, I would recommend this for young people interested in art, but I don’t think it would be enjoyable to those without that interest, I love the Pocket Change Collective series, and this was no exception. I really enjoyed hearing about Drew’s experiences and awakening of art/political consciousness. The only aspect I thought was lacking was that I think it could have been more informative about some references rather than encouraging the reader to look them up (better than nothing). As a librarian, I would recommend this for young people interested in art, but I don’t think it would be enjoyable to those without that interest, and I think it could have been expanded a few more pages to include more information about the artists mentioned in order to appeal to a wider audience. Overall, though, I think the book is great.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Renata

    This is a really quick, short read and I guess it follows through on the title. It's pretty much Kimberly Drew (@MuseumMammy) explaining how she got into her career as an art curator (despite the worst efforts of her college's almost-all-white art history program). I think it's a good read to show Black teens that there is a path for them in the art world even if it's a struggle and not something that would necessarily be offered to them by a guidance counselor. I like the look of these Quick Ch This is a really quick, short read and I guess it follows through on the title. It's pretty much Kimberly Drew (@MuseumMammy) explaining how she got into her career as an art curator (despite the worst efforts of her college's almost-all-white art history program). I think it's a good read to show Black teens that there is a path for them in the art world even if it's a struggle and not something that would necessarily be offered to them by a guidance counselor. I like the look of these Quick Change Collective books--they're very short and small and un-intimidating for teen readers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    A Reader in Time

    This is a really good book that I really enjoyed. It follows the authors story of using art as a form of activism and continuing to diversify art in today’s world. I am not going to rate this book because it is a work of nonfiction and I don’t feel comfortable giving someone’s life story a star rating. But I would definitely recommend this book if you want to learn more about black artists and why it’s so important to have a diverse museum collection.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Chapman

    Part-memoir, part inspirational/activist self-help, I loved this short book on art & activism. The author uses her own experience as an art history major, blogger, and activist to share about bringing the arts to everyone, especially people of color. I think this will really resonate with young people & new adults who are interested in the arts, protest, activism, politics, and following through on your big ideas. *Listened on audiobook*

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jas

    I read Black Futures, which Kimberly Drew co-edited, earlier this year and I was obsessed. Still am. It’s an amazing book. Reading this book in the pocket change collective series was such a treat in getting to know more about Drew. She shares her personal story with art beautifully, no surprise at all. But it was just really lovely to get some insight into the experience of someone who I think is an incredible genius. I can’t wait to see more of her work.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chris Shores

    You could literally carry this book in your pocket, find a park bench and read it in one sitting. But I would suggest reading it over multiple days, looking up the Black artists Kimberly Drew writes about, and thinking hard about the many questions she raises. Is a museum, even a free one, truly accessible if it isn't actively finding ways to connect with people and feature diverse artists and perspectives? How can we be anti-racist in ensuing that everyone can experience and learn from art? Wha You could literally carry this book in your pocket, find a park bench and read it in one sitting. But I would suggest reading it over multiple days, looking up the Black artists Kimberly Drew writes about, and thinking hard about the many questions she raises. Is a museum, even a free one, truly accessible if it isn't actively finding ways to connect with people and feature diverse artists and perspectives? How can we be anti-racist in ensuing that everyone can experience and learn from art? What can the industry better do to protest injustice? I look forward to continue following Drew's journey and finding ways to help.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Loved the mentions of artists that I'd never heard of before, I was writing down names and looking up images and articles to read while going through this lil' book! Excited to read Drew's Black Futures next year! Loved the mentions of artists that I'd never heard of before, I was writing down names and looking up images and articles to read while going through this lil' book! Excited to read Drew's Black Futures next year!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alec Rigdon

    An incredibly quick read with a lot of great food for thought concerning the art world and who is included.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jensen Werley

    A small but mighty book that will get you thinking about the relationship between activism and art.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I love reading real...art lovers’ accounts of encountering art and literature so this was really up my alley. I would read a way longer book by Kimberly Drew.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sailor

    This is more of a memoir than a book about the art world. I did enjoy it, but I really think it would have been better had it been longer, and going into more details.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary Donofrio

    If you work in a creative field, love art, or are invested in diversity and access, this is a lovely, short, and sharp read. I read this through the library but I’m most likely going to purchase my own copy to have on hand.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mashed Potato

    4.5 stars i want what she has

  28. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Listened to the audiobook. Need to go back in the print version and look up all the artists! I love these little books! I'm excited to read them all! Listened to the audiobook. Need to go back in the print version and look up all the artists! I love these little books! I'm excited to read them all!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Kahn

    Informative and readable given the constraints of the short and small form. There were times during the narrative that I wished for more. Interesting young person doing important work.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I really like the way Kimberly Drew writes, I found it very engaging and enjoyable. I liked how she curated her experiences and also her references to various artists works.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...