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Art and Faith: A Theology of Making

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From a world-renowned painter, an exploration of creativity’s quintessential—and often overlooked—role in the spiritual life “Makoto Fujimura’s art and writings have been a true inspiration to me. In this luminous book, he addresses the question of art and faith and their reconciliation with a quiet and moving eloquence.”—Martin Scorsese   “[An] elegant treatise . . . Fujimu From a world-renowned painter, an exploration of creativity’s quintessential—and often overlooked—role in the spiritual life “Makoto Fujimura’s art and writings have been a true inspiration to me. In this luminous book, he addresses the question of art and faith and their reconciliation with a quiet and moving eloquence.”—Martin Scorsese   “[An] elegant treatise . . . Fujimura’s sensitive, evocative theology will appeal to believers interested in the role religion can play in the creation of art.”—Publishers Weekly Conceived over thirty years of painting and creating in his studio, this book is Makoto Fujimura’s broad and deep exploration of creativity and the spiritual aspects of “making.” What he does in the studio is theological work as much as it is aesthetic work. In between pouring precious, pulverized minerals onto handmade paper to create the prismatic, refractive surfaces of his art, he comes into the quiet space in the studio, in a discipline of awareness, waiting, prayer, and praise.   Ranging from the Bible to T. S. Eliot, and from Mark Rothko to Japanese Kintsugi technique, he shows how unless we are making something, we cannot know the depth of God’s being and God’s grace permeating our lives. This poignant and beautiful book offers the perspective of, in Christian Wiman’s words, “an accidental theologian,” one who comes to spiritual questions always through the prism of art.


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From a world-renowned painter, an exploration of creativity’s quintessential—and often overlooked—role in the spiritual life “Makoto Fujimura’s art and writings have been a true inspiration to me. In this luminous book, he addresses the question of art and faith and their reconciliation with a quiet and moving eloquence.”—Martin Scorsese   “[An] elegant treatise . . . Fujimu From a world-renowned painter, an exploration of creativity’s quintessential—and often overlooked—role in the spiritual life “Makoto Fujimura’s art and writings have been a true inspiration to me. In this luminous book, he addresses the question of art and faith and their reconciliation with a quiet and moving eloquence.”—Martin Scorsese   “[An] elegant treatise . . . Fujimura’s sensitive, evocative theology will appeal to believers interested in the role religion can play in the creation of art.”—Publishers Weekly Conceived over thirty years of painting and creating in his studio, this book is Makoto Fujimura’s broad and deep exploration of creativity and the spiritual aspects of “making.” What he does in the studio is theological work as much as it is aesthetic work. In between pouring precious, pulverized minerals onto handmade paper to create the prismatic, refractive surfaces of his art, he comes into the quiet space in the studio, in a discipline of awareness, waiting, prayer, and praise.   Ranging from the Bible to T. S. Eliot, and from Mark Rothko to Japanese Kintsugi technique, he shows how unless we are making something, we cannot know the depth of God’s being and God’s grace permeating our lives. This poignant and beautiful book offers the perspective of, in Christian Wiman’s words, “an accidental theologian,” one who comes to spiritual questions always through the prism of art.

30 review for Art and Faith: A Theology of Making

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maxwell

    [3.5 stars] I enjoyed this book, especially reading it with some friends. It made for a good discussion and I liked hearing how they interpreted things and what they took away from the reading. That being said, I think it started stronger than it ended. And some of the info didn't feel particularly new to me—though if I'd read this book 4-5 years ago, and had not already read Surprised by Hope, then I might have found this more revelatory. All in all, a nice change of pace from what I normally rea [3.5 stars] I enjoyed this book, especially reading it with some friends. It made for a good discussion and I liked hearing how they interpreted things and what they took away from the reading. That being said, I think it started stronger than it ended. And some of the info didn't feel particularly new to me—though if I'd read this book 4-5 years ago, and had not already read Surprised by Hope, then I might have found this more revelatory. All in all, a nice change of pace from what I normally read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    This was a really thought-provoking book on the meaning of art from a Christian perspective. I loved all of the illustrations and examples Fujimura took from Japanese culture to explain what true art looks like. Fujimura's reflections on the restoration of brokenness in art, the value of making sacrifices for art, the deep connections between art and love, and the ability that art has to have a softer approach to cultural transformation were all really valuable and I really appreciated hearing h This was a really thought-provoking book on the meaning of art from a Christian perspective. I loved all of the illustrations and examples Fujimura took from Japanese culture to explain what true art looks like. Fujimura's reflections on the restoration of brokenness in art, the value of making sacrifices for art, the deep connections between art and love, and the ability that art has to have a softer approach to cultural transformation were all really valuable and I really appreciated hearing his perspective. The one aspect of the book I'm still mulling over is Fujimura's suggestion that we're ultimately created to make art. His point that the Christian life is about more than fixing our sin problem--that we're actually called to do something as well--was well-put. To the extent that he seemed to be arguing that our purpose is primarily to do art, I was more unsure. This seemed to be elevating art on a pedestal that's too high--especially when there are many other worthy vocations out there. While Fujimura did clarify that everyone can do art (whether or not one is an artist), I wrestle with whether it has a position as high as Fujimura says it is. I'm not convinced yet; I'm also not convinced that he's completely wrong. So I'm still thinking on it. As a whole, I really enjoyed this book and it's one I hope to return to at some point in the future. Rating: 4 Stars (Very Good).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Justin Wiggins

    Art & Faith A Theology of Making by the brilliant Japanese visual artist and writer Makoto Fujimura, is an amazing book about the importance of art to our human tribe, the discipline it takes to be an artist, the healing power of art, a critique of naturalism, rapture theology, and how The Great Artist, Christ, brings healing through our sufferings and struggles, brings us joy, and sustains us with His agape love. I liked Fujimura's conversational writing style, his references to Emily Dickinson, Art & Faith A Theology of Making by the brilliant Japanese visual artist and writer Makoto Fujimura, is an amazing book about the importance of art to our human tribe, the discipline it takes to be an artist, the healing power of art, a critique of naturalism, rapture theology, and how The Great Artist, Christ, brings healing through our sufferings and struggles, brings us joy, and sustains us with His agape love. I liked Fujimura's conversational writing style, his references to Emily Dickinson, T.S.Eliot, N.T.Wright, C.S.Lewis, his moving story of becoming an artist and embracing faith, and there are some valuable truths and moving quotes that I have been reflecting on and incorporating into my life. I finished the book today for the Hugin and Munin read and drink mead book club a friend and I started a few years ago. A recent conversation we had about the book was quite enriching and spiritually nourishing. I highly recommend it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mariah Dawn

    This book was a feast. It will inspire you to create, however that looks for you, and dive into Scripture anew with an artist’s eye. A good half of the book is addressing sorrow and what that does for the artist in us, should we press through it. He shares his own journey of walking through the aftermath of 9/11 and what Elliott’s Four Quartets did for him through that season. He takes a good look at Mary and Martha, Lazarus, and the tears of Christ. There is no area of our lives where the tenta This book was a feast. It will inspire you to create, however that looks for you, and dive into Scripture anew with an artist’s eye. A good half of the book is addressing sorrow and what that does for the artist in us, should we press through it. He shares his own journey of walking through the aftermath of 9/11 and what Elliott’s Four Quartets did for him through that season. He takes a good look at Mary and Martha, Lazarus, and the tears of Christ. There is no area of our lives where the tentacles of imagination and creativity do not touch. There is no separation, especially for the Christian. He points to where we go wrong, how we are focused on an apocalyptic end instead of having eyes to see and focus on the new creation. Some quotes: The Spirit does not read labels. In other words, the word Christian, used as a mere label, does not mean anything to the Holy Spirit who hovers near people who authentically, earnestly wrestle with truth, beauty, and goodness. In order to be a sower of the kingdom each of us must become a farmer poet. Just like the art of kintsugi, what once was broken is repaired, not to highlight its flaws, but to celebrate them as a part of what is to become beautiful. God, for some mysterious reason, waits upon human making, and chose to use our ability to make bread and wine to reveal Jesus’ resurrected presence known at the table of the Eucharist. Imagine that. The resurrected Christ waits until we create... Christian imagination today obsesses over the end rather than scanning for the new creation in our midst. Let us reclaim creativity and imagination as essential, central, and necessary parts of our faith journey. Let us remember that we are sons and daughters of God, the only true Artist of the Kingdom of abundance. We are God’s heirs, princes and princesses of this infinite land beyond the sea where heaven will kiss the earth. May we steward well with what the creative King has given us, and accept God’s invitation to sanctify our imagination and creativity. Even as we labor hard on this side of eternity may our art, what we make, be multiplied in the new creation. May our poems, music, and dance be acceptable offerings for the cosmic wedding to come. May our sand castles, created in faith, be turned into permanent grand mansions in which we will celebrate the banquet of the table. Let us come and eat and drink at the supper of the lamb now, so that we might be empowered by this meal to go into the world to create and to make and to return to share what we have learned on this journey towards the new.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    As always, Mako's writing is beautiful. He writes deeply, gently, free of academic distractions yet firmly established on excellent scholarship and insight. In this book, he looks at what he calls a "theology of making," using making as a way of avoiding the potentially specialized term "art." He wants all readers, not just those who consider themselves artists, to consider engaging the world in a "maker" way, bringing "use-less" beauty to a society obsessed with pragmatic utility. Along this jo As always, Mako's writing is beautiful. He writes deeply, gently, free of academic distractions yet firmly established on excellent scholarship and insight. In this book, he looks at what he calls a "theology of making," using making as a way of avoiding the potentially specialized term "art." He wants all readers, not just those who consider themselves artists, to consider engaging the world in a "maker" way, bringing "use-less" beauty to a society obsessed with pragmatic utility. Along this journey, he looks at N. T. Wright, Wendell Berry, George Eliot, Mark Rothko, T. S. Eliot, and many others. It's the kind of book that makes me want to read (or re-read) all the other books mentioned in this one. Too much goodness to fit into a pithy review. I look forward to teaching through this book next semester in a new class, and I know it will be rewarding in class discussions.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jackson Ford

    A breath of fresh air for Christian artists and thinkers. Mako, once again, brings us into the narrative of scripture to illumine our calling to live faithfully in the world as ‘makers’. With plenty of great personal anecdotes, Mako lands the plane for his readers, demonstrating that the reality of the Kingdom isn’t beyond the horizon, but here with us. It is such an encouragement to be reminded that our artistry is meant to be used for Christ’s ministry of reconciliation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    scott meadows

    "Let us reclaim creativity and imagination as essential, central, and necessary parts of our faith journey." I truly think this is one of the best books an evangelical artist can read while processing their calling to the creative world. Meditative and beautifully written, Makoto's words took some time for me to digest which is why this took almost two months to read. Leaning into new creation, eternity, knowing God, and preparing for the wedding feast of the lamb between Christ and His church so "Let us reclaim creativity and imagination as essential, central, and necessary parts of our faith journey." I truly think this is one of the best books an evangelical artist can read while processing their calling to the creative world. Meditative and beautifully written, Makoto's words took some time for me to digest which is why this took almost two months to read. Leaning into new creation, eternity, knowing God, and preparing for the wedding feast of the lamb between Christ and His church so does Makoto commission the artist of faith to steward the good gifts God has given them for holiness. A personal favorite chapter and theme was on the artistic style of Kintsugi; my absolute favorite analogy for the gospel used many times my past testimonial/evangelistic interactions. This might be making it into my top 10 list of the year. "Let us remember that we are sons and daughters of God, the only true Artist of the Kingdom of abundance. We are GOd's heirs, princesses and princes of this infinite land beyond the sea, where heaven will kiss the earth. May we steward well what the Creator King has given us, and accept God's invitation to sanctify our imagination and creativity, even as we labor hard on this side of eternity. May our art, what we make, be multiplied into the New Creation. May our poems, music, and dance be acceptable offerings for the cosmic wedding to come. May our sandcastles, created in faith, be turned into permanent grand mansions in which we will celebrate the great banquet of the table. Let us come and eat and drink at the supper of the Lamb now so that we might be empowered by this meal to go into the world to create and to make, and return to share what we have learned on this journey toward the New."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Grace T

    JSTOR access through one's university to PDFs of books you can't find at your regular library is a delightful thing *grins* I don't think I'd agree with particulars of Fujimura's emphases or theology (for instance, at one point I was getting the distinct impression that he's amill or postmill), but the general points he makes here about the importance of beauty and making to the Christian's life, and how we are little-a artists co-creating after our Creator (a la Tolkien), and how our faith allow JSTOR access through one's university to PDFs of books you can't find at your regular library is a delightful thing *grins* I don't think I'd agree with particulars of Fujimura's emphases or theology (for instance, at one point I was getting the distinct impression that he's amill or postmill), but the general points he makes here about the importance of beauty and making to the Christian's life, and how we are little-a artists co-creating after our Creator (a la Tolkien), and how our faith allows us to make beauty out of the pain of this fallen world, were well made and something that Christians need to be reminded of, whether in an artistic field or not. I think there's a deal of value in here, despite some theological differences.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mitali

    Took this book on a solo retreat recently to recharge my vision for being a creative in a suffering world, and it both inspired and strengthened me. I especially enjoyed learning about kintsugi (repairing broken pottery with gold) and wabi-sabi--wabi (things worn) and sabi (things rusted)--as they related to a wider theology of art and suffering. Highly recommend this for anyone asking, as I do, "Is it good and right to cloister oneself and create art in a world of suffering and need?" Took this book on a solo retreat recently to recharge my vision for being a creative in a suffering world, and it both inspired and strengthened me. I especially enjoyed learning about kintsugi (repairing broken pottery with gold) and wabi-sabi--wabi (things worn) and sabi (things rusted)--as they related to a wider theology of art and suffering. Highly recommend this for anyone asking, as I do, "Is it good and right to cloister oneself and create art in a world of suffering and need?"

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maria Copeland

    Makoto Fujimura is perhaps my favorite of the authors I discovered last year, and this is a new and necessary text to be shelved alongside spiritual formation classics. Grateful for his insight as an artist and admirable sub-creator into the nature and theology of creativity. Also, I love that every one of his books are so visually stunning: blues and greens for Culture Care, gold-edged pages for Refractions, a swirling "walking on water" painting by Mako for Art + Faith. If I ever write a book, Makoto Fujimura is perhaps my favorite of the authors I discovered last year, and this is a new and necessary text to be shelved alongside spiritual formation classics. Grateful for his insight as an artist and admirable sub-creator into the nature and theology of creativity. Also, I love that every one of his books are so visually stunning: blues and greens for Culture Care, gold-edged pages for Refractions, a swirling "walking on water" painting by Mako for Art + Faith. If I ever write a book, I'll have to figure out who arranges his cover designs.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Davis

    Makoto Fujimura has crafted a masterwork, as theologically sharp and spiritually wise as it is beautifully written. I have read many wonderful volumes on the art and faith relationship over the years, but this may be the best. Perhaps what we needed all this time were the words not just of artistically-informed theologians, but of a theologically-informed artist. Mako's unique language of "plumbing theology," as well as his engagement of pain and redemption pictured through the kintsugi process Makoto Fujimura has crafted a masterwork, as theologically sharp and spiritually wise as it is beautifully written. I have read many wonderful volumes on the art and faith relationship over the years, but this may be the best. Perhaps what we needed all this time were the words not just of artistically-informed theologians, but of a theologically-informed artist. Mako's unique language of "plumbing theology," as well as his engagement of pain and redemption pictured through the kintsugi process of mending pottery with gold, are but two of the real gems that make this book an inspiring, thought-provoking, and even therapeutic journey. It is a must-read, and not just for artists or theologians.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Izzy Markle

    A contemplative work on the role of art, imagination, and creation in the Person and work of God and in our identity, redemption, and purpose as his Creations made in his image. This book speaks to the the necessity of art and beauty in our relationship with and worship of God, and the danger of slipping into an intellectual utilitarian faith.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Beth Anne

    A fantastic and unique book by a visual artist about the concepts of art (not limited to “artists”, visual or otherwise) and making, and how these relate to theology and New Creation. I really appreciated how inclusive the idea of making was presented, and I related in many ways as a writer to what was being said. Grounded in scripture and encouraging, highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Learned

    The last third of the book: 5 stars. The first 2/3 3 stars.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky Marsh

    I’m still a bit undecided about this book. I had high hopes for it, and it didn’t entirely live up to that for me, but I’m glad I read it and there were definitely some really great parts. Initially I disliked his writing style; it felt like hard work to extract relatively simple points from what seemed like unnecessarily wordy phrasing. But as I read on I grew to appreciate it more and realised that taking time to digest his writing seemed fitting when he was presenting such a patient and medit I’m still a bit undecided about this book. I had high hopes for it, and it didn’t entirely live up to that for me, but I’m glad I read it and there were definitely some really great parts. Initially I disliked his writing style; it felt like hard work to extract relatively simple points from what seemed like unnecessarily wordy phrasing. But as I read on I grew to appreciate it more and realised that taking time to digest his writing seemed fitting when he was presenting such a patient and meditative approach to life and creating. He focuses a lot on how we’re called to more than just fixing work; that before the fall there was a work of creating and making that was separate to the restoration work that was necessary after; and as such there is a necessity to be creating and making into the new creation now. It was interesting to see just how much value he placed on art and creating, to the extent that he views our creations as something that will last into the new heavens and new earth. I’ve not really encountered this view before. A large part also focusses on sorrow and lamenting over the brokeness of the world, and how that’s a fundamental part of bringing forth the new creation. I was glad of this. It felt like a truer and more meaningful way of approaching the hard paradox of living in the now of suffering whilst knowing we have the hope of all God promises. Too often I think we can either whitewash over sorrow with a shallow hope, or wallow in sorrow ignoring hope. He seemed to present a good balance; focusing on Jesus’ tears over Lazarus’ death as a crucial example for us. And it was interesting to see him link this to the process of creating. Overall I couldn’t say I definitely agreed with everything I read; there were some thoughts of his that I’m not entirely sure could be backed up biblically, but I don’t think they could be argued against either. As such, I felt like I need time to ponder them more - and I guess this is a good thing to come away with from a book. I don’t wish for everything I read to simply validate the viewpoints I already hold, and I felt this book did challenge the way I perceived some things. However, the call to walk closely with Jesus, meditate on him, love deeply and ‘wastefully’ and generously, be present in sorrow and patient in the process of bringing in the new, and to value the beauty of creating and making for more than just utilitarian purposes, can’t be dismissed and were encouraging reminders.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Atwood

    Excellent. Thoughtful. Humble. Inspiring. Complex. Beautiful. Just like Fujimura’s art.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This is an excellent book and one that I will definitely recommend to others, whether they see themselves as artists or not. The theology of making presented in this book will cause you to give glory to the ultimate Creator and see your role in his creation with fresh eyes. Amazing!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A little disjointed at times, but overall one of the most underline-able, most HOPEFUL books I’ve read in a long time. Excellent food for thought. Highly recommend.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zach Busick

    I came to the book w/ high expectations. I was thinking, this is the book for me. This is what I’ve been looking for. I really did like it. There were some interesting insights and quotable moments. But it didn’t end up being what I was wanting it to be. I guess I wanted it to be a sort of manifesto for real Christian artists or something. It turned out to be mostly a sort of confused word-salad that was hard to follow with any concise train of thought. There was one chapter and a few strong mom I came to the book w/ high expectations. I was thinking, this is the book for me. This is what I’ve been looking for. I really did like it. There were some interesting insights and quotable moments. But it didn’t end up being what I was wanting it to be. I guess I wanted it to be a sort of manifesto for real Christian artists or something. It turned out to be mostly a sort of confused word-salad that was hard to follow with any concise train of thought. There was one chapter and a few strong moments throughout the book that really landed with me. What I did love, I loved a lot, but it either got lost in the word-salad or overdone so much that it felt like beating a dead horse.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason Kanz

    Once again, I was deeply moved by Fujimura's writing. The integration of a New Creation vision with a theology of making was welcome and important. Once again, I was deeply moved by Fujimura's writing. The integration of a New Creation vision with a theology of making was welcome and important.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kyle McManamy

    What a beautiful reading - while it focuses on art and creativity, it expands to the whole enterprise of making. I recently just finished and am about to reread! Highly recommend.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A series of reflections connecting art and faith in the act of making. Makoto Fujimura is a world-class painter and committed Christian. Many would not make this association in contemporary art but in this work, Fujimura offers a series of reflections on the seamless connection of these in his life, beginning with the act of making. Fujimura declares, “I have come to believe that unless we are making something, we cannot know the depth of God’s being and God’s grace permeating our lives Summary: A series of reflections connecting art and faith in the act of making. Makoto Fujimura is a world-class painter and committed Christian. Many would not make this association in contemporary art but in this work, Fujimura offers a series of reflections on the seamless connection of these in his life, beginning with the act of making. Fujimura declares, “I have come to believe that unless we are making something, we cannot know the depth of God’s being and God’s grace permeating our lives and God’s creation. The creator we come to understand through making is one who creates out of love and not necessity. God doesn’t need us but in love invites us to collaborate in God’s creation. We enter into this when we make. We labor in a fallen world, but our work is not to “fix” broken plumbing but to be restored and participate in creation’s renewal empowered by the spirit restored through the sacrifice of Christ, and refreshed by God’s new wine. Fujimura illustrates this in his own creative process of Nihonga. It is not so much a technique but a kind of imitatio Christi of attending to the materials one works with, as part of a community of those who make the brushes, the paper, and powders with which he lays down wash after wash in creating, slowing down to work at the painstaking pace required of the materials. It is a process that takes him into sacrifice and an understanding of brokenness, evoking another Japanese art practice, that of kintsugi. This practice works with broken cups and pottery, using lacquer covered with gold to mend the broken pieces, creating new beauty out of brokenness. This art points toward the New Creation of Resurrection that doesn’t obliterate brokenness but shines light and beauty through it. Art helps renew our understanding of work. Fujimura observes that work wasn’t cursed but rather the ground and the serpent. Art points us toward work as gift, and toward the greatest Gift of the gospel. In the Eucharist, we make the very elements that reveal God’s gift of resurrection through sacrifice. We make not for it all to be burned up but toward New Creation. Fujimura proposes that imagination and faith are closely linked. We often think of Christian theology and leadership in rational, propositional terms. Fujimura notes how much of scripture is in metaphor, in symbol, and description requiring imagination for understanding. As he has argued elsewhere, this imagination invites us into culture care, contra the culture war, battle of ideas that has framed much of our cultural engagement. In another reflection, he likens the words “Jesus wept” to the “pinhole lens” that captures the whole story of God from loving creation to weeping over the broken creation to be restored through Christ’s suffering and resurrection. He offers a beautiful reflection on John 11 and 12, and the art form of wabi-sabi, the use of well-worn but well-loved objects like a well-worn wallet. He goes deeper into the tears of Christ in the art of Mark Rothko, the poetry of T. S. Eliot, and his own traumatic experience of 9/11, which displaced him from a studio in the shadow of the Twin Towers. He weds tears and fire in a discussion of artistic renewal out of the devastation. He concludes with a chapter on “Lazarus culture” reflecting on what it means to practice resurrection. To make in a fallen, broken world is to enter into Christ’s suffering and be enabled by the resurrection to point toward the New Creation. The power of this book is in the contention that as we enter into the making of art as people of faith, we open ourselves to a way of knowing the story in which we live. His most trenchant words are those where he asserts the vital importance of imagination and making in the life of faith. His reflections remind me of what a vital role artists play in the life of the church, and perhaps the value of all of us finding ways to be makers and not just consumers, of culture.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    8/10 "The only way to pass through the fire of Hell is to be filled with the fire of God. " "When we make, we invite the abundance of Gods world into the scarcity of ours. " God is looked at primarily as maker and creator here, and Fujimura does an excellent job of delving into that portion of God that I typically overlook. From a personal point of view in my brief stint of dabbling in art, I resonated with much of this book. "All artists seek the new, great ones redefine new for the next generatio 8/10 "The only way to pass through the fire of Hell is to be filled with the fire of God. " "When we make, we invite the abundance of Gods world into the scarcity of ours. " God is looked at primarily as maker and creator here, and Fujimura does an excellent job of delving into that portion of God that I typically overlook. From a personal point of view in my brief stint of dabbling in art, I resonated with much of this book. "All artists seek the new, great ones redefine new for the next generation." "Unless we become makers in the image of the Maker, we labor in vain. Whether we are plumbers, garbage collectors, taxi drivers, or CEOs, we are called by the Great Artist to co-create. The Artist calls us little-'a' artists to co-create, to share in the "heavenly breaking in" to the broken earth."

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robert McDonald

    I love Makoto Fujimura. This is the third of his books I've read (after Culture Care and Silence and Beauty), which lends itself to understanding more of his unique turns of phrase and unusual narrative flow. There are so many gems in his writing and this work in particular that are refreshing, inspirational, hopeful, and realistic. What a gift for artists and the Church at large. I love Makoto Fujimura. This is the third of his books I've read (after Culture Care and Silence and Beauty), which lends itself to understanding more of his unique turns of phrase and unusual narrative flow. There are so many gems in his writing and this work in particular that are refreshing, inspirational, hopeful, and realistic. What a gift for artists and the Church at large.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    It is a gift that Mako has taken the pains not only to share his art with us, but also to use his voice to articulate what he is learning about the one true Artist - how He makes things new, overflows with love, weeps with those who weep, sets people free, and invites us to partner with him in his miraculous mission in the world.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Johnson

    There aren't enough stars in the heavens to rate this book...how powerful it is...how much the breath of God speaks through it. Makoto's magnum opus....so far. This book is how I survived the past year of global insanity and struggles as a creator. I will carry these words everywhere I go in this next season of life. There aren't enough stars in the heavens to rate this book...how powerful it is...how much the breath of God speaks through it. Makoto's magnum opus....so far. This book is how I survived the past year of global insanity and struggles as a creator. I will carry these words everywhere I go in this next season of life.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aya Hayashi

    I purposefully read this book very slowly. Tiny section by tiny section. It is exquisitely written with some of the most beautiful, poignant sentences found in the middle of paragraphs. Even as I took 3+ months to read it, I was sad when I reached the end. This is a heart stealer for sure.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hope Helms

    A thought provoking book per usual for Makoto Fujimura. I came away with a soul more nourished, faith strengthened, and heart open. Editing wise the flow of the book could have been better and was a bit disjointed at places compared to his other works. This made it more difficult to connect the overall flow of thought, but this book was still worth reading through.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    I rarely read books slowly. Most books don't deserve (or require) that level of attention. This one does; hence it taking nearly a week to travel 150 pages. That image of the New Creation breaking through cracks of our current reality (Kintsugi on the grandest scale possible) will stick with me. I rarely read books slowly. Most books don't deserve (or require) that level of attention. This one does; hence it taking nearly a week to travel 150 pages. That image of the New Creation breaking through cracks of our current reality (Kintsugi on the grandest scale possible) will stick with me.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jared Abbott

    This is an amazing little book! I particularly loved the last few chapters that discuss the account of the raising of Lazarus through the pinhole lens of John 11:35, "Jesus wept." This is an amazing little book! I particularly loved the last few chapters that discuss the account of the raising of Lazarus through the pinhole lens of John 11:35, "Jesus wept."

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