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Separate No More: The Long Road to Brown v. Board of Education (Scholastic Focus)

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Critically acclaimed author Lawrence Goldstone offers an affecting portrait of the road to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which significantly shaped the United States and effectively ended segregation. Since 1896, in the landmark outcome of Plessy v. Ferguson, the doctrine of "separate but equal" had been considered acceptable under the United States Consti Critically acclaimed author Lawrence Goldstone offers an affecting portrait of the road to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which significantly shaped the United States and effectively ended segregation. Since 1896, in the landmark outcome of Plessy v. Ferguson, the doctrine of "separate but equal" had been considered acceptable under the United States Constitution. African American and white populations were thus segregated, attending different schools, living in different neighborhoods, and even drinking from different water fountains. However, as African Americans found themselves lacking opportunity and living under the constant menace of mob violence, it was becoming increasingly apparent that segregation was not only unjust, but dangerous. Fighting to turn the tide against racial oppression, revolutionaries rose up all over America, from Booker T. Washington to W. E. B. Du Bois. They formed coalitions of some of the greatest legal minds and activists, who carefully strategized how to combat the racist judicial system. These efforts would be rewarded in the groundbreaking cases of 1952-1954 known collectively as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, in which the US Supreme Court would decide, once and for all, the legality of segregation -- and on which side of history the United States would stand. In this thrilling examination of the path to Brown v. Board of Education, Constitutional law scholar Lawrence Goldstone highlights the key trials and players in the fight for integration. Written with a deft hand, this story of social justice will remind readers, young and old, of the momentousness of the segregation hearings.


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Critically acclaimed author Lawrence Goldstone offers an affecting portrait of the road to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which significantly shaped the United States and effectively ended segregation. Since 1896, in the landmark outcome of Plessy v. Ferguson, the doctrine of "separate but equal" had been considered acceptable under the United States Consti Critically acclaimed author Lawrence Goldstone offers an affecting portrait of the road to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which significantly shaped the United States and effectively ended segregation. Since 1896, in the landmark outcome of Plessy v. Ferguson, the doctrine of "separate but equal" had been considered acceptable under the United States Constitution. African American and white populations were thus segregated, attending different schools, living in different neighborhoods, and even drinking from different water fountains. However, as African Americans found themselves lacking opportunity and living under the constant menace of mob violence, it was becoming increasingly apparent that segregation was not only unjust, but dangerous. Fighting to turn the tide against racial oppression, revolutionaries rose up all over America, from Booker T. Washington to W. E. B. Du Bois. They formed coalitions of some of the greatest legal minds and activists, who carefully strategized how to combat the racist judicial system. These efforts would be rewarded in the groundbreaking cases of 1952-1954 known collectively as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, in which the US Supreme Court would decide, once and for all, the legality of segregation -- and on which side of history the United States would stand. In this thrilling examination of the path to Brown v. Board of Education, Constitutional law scholar Lawrence Goldstone highlights the key trials and players in the fight for integration. Written with a deft hand, this story of social justice will remind readers, young and old, of the momentousness of the segregation hearings.

30 review for Separate No More: The Long Road to Brown v. Board of Education (Scholastic Focus)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: SEPARATE NO MORE: THE LONG ROAD TO BROWN v. BOARD OF EDUCATION by Lawrence Goldstone, Scholastic Focus, January 2021, 288p., ISBN: 978-1-338-59283-2 “Up in the mornin’ and out to school The teacher is teaching the Golden Rule American history and practical math You studyin’ hard and hopin’ to pass Workin’ your fingers right down to the bone The guy behind you won’t leave you alone” -- Chuck Berry, “School Days” (1957) Chuck Berry grew up attending segregated schools in St. Louis, MO. “Fo Richie’s Picks: SEPARATE NO MORE: THE LONG ROAD TO BROWN v. BOARD OF EDUCATION by Lawrence Goldstone, Scholastic Focus, January 2021, 288p., ISBN: 978-1-338-59283-2 “Up in the mornin’ and out to school The teacher is teaching the Golden Rule American history and practical math You studyin’ hard and hopin’ to pass Workin’ your fingers right down to the bone The guy behind you won’t leave you alone” -- Chuck Berry, “School Days” (1957) Chuck Berry grew up attending segregated schools in St. Louis, MO. “Following the Brown v, Board of Education decision in 1954, the authorization of federal desegregation enforcement in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Supreme Court’s ruling in Green v, County School Board of New Kent County that district-level integration plans must meaningfully decrease segregation levels, the United States experienced a sharp decline in black-white school segregation, especially in the South. As desegregation gradually continued through the late 1980s and into the early 1990s, the pace progressively began to decelerate before slowing to a halt. Despite initial successes, the primary enforcers of desegregation--federal district courts and the federal Departments of Justice and Education--began to face headwinds in the form of changes in residential living patterns, school enrollments, Supreme Court precedents, and increasingly successful local efforts to resist integration. The contemporary result of these trends is a highly segregated status quo.Yet scholars disagree over whether the broad trend in segregation has been stagnation or resegregation since the late 1980s.” -- Will McGrew, “U.S School Segregation in the 21st Century: Causes, Consequences and Solutions” (2019) “Brown v. Board of Education is perhaps the most widely recognized Supreme Court case in American history. But for all its renown, most Americans know little about the case itself or the great changes in American society that propelled the Supreme Court to rule as it did. When Brown was argued, Plessy v. Ferguson was more than half a century old, and the crushing Jim Crow laws that the decision had enabled and affirmed had doomed black people throughout the South to a social, political, and economic environment that was simply slavery in a new form. African Americans were denied even the most fundamental rights of citizenship; were regularly jailed, brutalized, and murdered; and could not effectively access a legal system that bragged hollowly about guaranteeing equal rights to all. To make certain that black Americans would remain apart and inferior to whites, their children were forced into a two-tiered and wholly unequal system of education.” -- from the Prologue Did you know that Jackie Robinson’s number 42 is the only number retired by every Major League Baseball team? If you want to learn the basic facts of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, you can check out the online Wikipedia article. But if you want to read a great story about the underpinnings of the modern Civil Rights Movement, a readily-accessible-yet-substantive examination of the people, organizations, events, laws, and court cases that culminated in the Brown rulings, you need to read Lawrence Goldstone’s SEPARATE NO MORE. It’s a book I highly recommend for middle and high school American history students, and for any teen or adult who is interested in the Civil Rights Movement. The author begins the story in the late-19th century, when the U.S. Supreme Court’s despicable Plessy v. Ferguson decision legalized racial discrimination and led to the Jim Crow era. Booker T. Washington’s philosophy is examined against that of W.E.B. du Bois. We see the birth of the Niagara Movement and the founding and growth of the NAACP. We are introduced to Charles Hamilton Houston, who was the first Black student to edit the Harvard Law Review and who rose to become the Dean of Howard University School of Law. From there, he would eventually become the NAACP’s lead attorney. The author surveys racist Supreme Court decisions, including Lum v. Rice (1927), which specifically focused on education. The Court’s decision in that case essentially permitted states to pass any laws they chose in order to “enforce a system that could not have been more obvious in its intent to discriminate.” The result? “By the 1930s, Alabama was spending $37 to educate a white child, but only $7 per student for African Americans. The figures in Georgia were $32 versus $7; in Mississippi, $31 and $6; and in South Carolina, $53 and $5.” What kind of schooling do you get for $5 per kid? To read the author’s descriptions of conditions in many schools for Black kids before the Brown decision, is to understand why so few Black kids--no matter their aspirations--were able to obtain the kind of education necessary to broaden their options beyond field hand or servant. Black kids were being deliberately provided an education that would keep them in their place. Into this mix came Howard University School of Law superstar-student Thurgood Marshall. Under the tutelage of Charles Houston, Marshall first became an attorney who helped Black clients with little resources. He eventually succeeded his mentor as the lead attorney of the NAACP. From this point, the last third of the book covers the better-known details of the Brown litigation. I’d previously read about many of the characters and events examined in SEPARATE NO MORE. But Lawrence Goldstone succeeds in presenting them in a manner that connects the dots and makes them far easier to understand. SEPARATE NO MORE explains much about American history and how it relates to today’s racial injustices. It’s an excellent work of narrative nonfiction. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ https://twitter.com/richiespicks [email protected]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Derek Kyan

    The book kept me interested in learning throughout its entirety because the information that the author picks to write about allows us to reflect on the past and connect to the present, while also providing a thorough yet engaging history of the "separate but equal" precedent. It begins with the Plessy v. Ferguson landmark case in the late eighteen hundreds and takes us up to Brown v. Board of Education in the 1950s. After decades of work by black activists, leaders, and lawyers, separate was de The book kept me interested in learning throughout its entirety because the information that the author picks to write about allows us to reflect on the past and connect to the present, while also providing a thorough yet engaging history of the "separate but equal" precedent. It begins with the Plessy v. Ferguson landmark case in the late eighteen hundreds and takes us up to Brown v. Board of Education in the 1950s. After decades of work by black activists, leaders, and lawyers, separate was declared to be not equal, and it never had been. The long road to equality was brutal and full of inconveniences that set back progress. Prejudiced and racist white lawmakers upheld Jim Crow laws that segregated black and white communities in every part of America, which allowed racism to thrive and grow. While African Americans protested against discrimination and hate, they were faced with white supremacists who expressed so much anger that they destroyed black communities and took away too many black lives, in a nation that guaranteed prosperity, in a nation that promised liberty. Although the book brings up these atrocities to our attention, it focuses on the achievement and tireless efforts made by African Americans amidst social injustices and inequalities. These individuals fought continuously for the integration of black and whites in schools and other public institutions that had unfairly marginalized black people. When the Supreme Court went in favor of Brown in Brown v. Board of Education, it was finally declared that "separate could not be equal." This book was insightful and vivid, taking us into the workings of these landmark cases led by black lawyers and individuals in the fight for justice.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    I appreciate all of the research that went into this, and it provides a lot of important historical context for Brown v. Board of Education. For me, the writing style wasn't particularly engaging and pieces of the overall narrative felt a bit rushed. And important book to have in libraries, though! I appreciate all of the research that went into this, and it provides a lot of important historical context for Brown v. Board of Education. For me, the writing style wasn't particularly engaging and pieces of the overall narrative felt a bit rushed. And important book to have in libraries, though!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    As he has done with his earlier books about social justice and voting rights, author Lawrence Goldstone effectively distills several of the important events culminating in the landmark Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. Beginning with Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 and ending in the Brown case, this book explores the meaning of the phrase "separate but equal," and how it was interpreted, often resulting in inferior living conditions as well as vastly inferior schools. Slowly As he has done with his earlier books about social justice and voting rights, author Lawrence Goldstone effectively distills several of the important events culminating in the landmark Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. Beginning with Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 and ending in the Brown case, this book explores the meaning of the phrase "separate but equal," and how it was interpreted, often resulting in inferior living conditions as well as vastly inferior schools. Slowly, it became clear that segregation was not fair from a legal point of view but also damaging psychologically. It also limited the future ambitions of many African Americans since their schools were poorly funded and understaffed. The book includes descriptions of some of the schools as well as archival photographs. Along the way, the author highlights some of the movers and shakers in this movement for social justice while providing historical context that sets the scene for change. Some readers may be surprised to note the impact of the color barrier being broken in baseball by Jackie Robinson and the reaction of many Black soldiers who served during WWII and were treated quite differently in Europe than back home. The book also profiles some of the important figures during those times, including Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Charles Houston, Thurgood Marshall, and some lesser known ones but nevertheless important ones such as Barbara Johns, who lead a school walkout in Virginia, Rev. J. A. De Laine who filed a suit to force a South Carolina school district to provide a bus for its Black students, and Harry Briggs, a Navy veteran who wanted fair pay for teachers. The author makes these moments and cases and the individuals behind them come alive in urgent fashion even while pointing out that change and the legal system take time and much patience is required. Since Brown has always been of interest to me, I read this book with great enthusiasm and would highly recommend it for adolescent readers. The only disappointment for me was the lack of inclusion of information on a couple of related school integration/segregation cases such as Mendez v. Westminster (California) in 1946 and Roberts v. City of Boston in 1847, the first case challenging the legal system in an attempt to eradicate segregated schools. Although it failed, it was a first step in the long road to change. The book stops after exploring briefly the aftermath of the Brown decision and the challenges faced in interpreting how fast these changes were expected to take. This isn't the first book by this author that I've read, and it won't be the last one since he includes essential details about historical periods but does so in accessible fashion, never getting so bogged down in minutia that readers become bored.

  5. 5 out of 5

    NCHS Library

    Publisher's Description: Critically acclaimed author Lawrence Goldstone offers an affecting portrait of the road to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which significantly shaped the United States and effectively ended segregation. Since 1896, in the landmark outcome of Plessy v. Ferguson, the doctrine of "separate but equal" had been considered acceptable under the United States Constitution. African American and white populations were thus segregated, attending different schools, liv Publisher's Description: Critically acclaimed author Lawrence Goldstone offers an affecting portrait of the road to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which significantly shaped the United States and effectively ended segregation. Since 1896, in the landmark outcome of Plessy v. Ferguson, the doctrine of "separate but equal" had been considered acceptable under the United States Constitution. African American and white populations were thus segregated, attending different schools, living in different neighborhoods, and even drinking from different water fountains. However, as African Americans found themselves lacking opportunity and living under the constant menace of mob violence, it was becoming increasingly apparent that segregation was not only unjust, but dangerous. Fighting to turn the tide against racial oppression, revolutionaries rose up all over America, from Booker T. Washington to W. E. B. Du Bois. They formed coalitions of some of the greatest legal minds and activists, who carefully strategized how to combat the racist judicial system. These efforts would be rewarded in the groundbreaking cases of 1952-1954 known collectively as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, in which the US Supreme Court would decide, once and for all, the legality of segregation -- and on which side of history the United States would stand. In this thrilling examination of the path to Brown v. Board of Education, Constitutional law scholar Lawrence Goldstone highlights the key trials and players in the fight for integration. Written with a deft hand, this story of social justice will remind readers, young and old, of the momentousness of the segregation hearings.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    Why read another book about American History and how our political system affected African Americans? Because it's important to learn about the topic, the issue from a variety of perspectives. The variety and quantity of photographs add to the narrative. "Separate No More" examines the history of law suits brought before the courts to eliminate the idea of 'separate but equal' as set out in Plessy v. Ferguson in 1898. The narrative ends with Brown v Board of Education of Topeka Kansas and its imm Why read another book about American History and how our political system affected African Americans? Because it's important to learn about the topic, the issue from a variety of perspectives. The variety and quantity of photographs add to the narrative. "Separate No More" examines the history of law suits brought before the courts to eliminate the idea of 'separate but equal' as set out in Plessy v. Ferguson in 1898. The narrative ends with Brown v Board of Education of Topeka Kansas and its immediate aftermath. It's written clearly and concisely with plenty of background information to flesh out the history, with never a dull moment. You'll learn more about the Fourteenth Amendment and about how court cases make their way from local to federal jurisdictions along with how lawyers and organizations might pick or put forth cases to be heard by the Supreme Court in Washington DC. Major players in this short book included the NAACP, Thurgood Marshall, and Chief Justice Earl Warren, to name a few. Along the way, I learned the history of not only the lawyers and individuals who sued in court, but also the justices and the court cases. This history book, written for teens, is a perfect refresher and wonderful background for understanding more of how racism and the class system developed in the United States. Thanks to the BookLoft of German Village (Columbus, OH) http://www.bookloft.com for an ARC to read and review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    @Kidlitexchange Thank you to @Scholasticinc for sharing an advance copy of Separate No More: The Long Road to Brown v. Board of Education by Lawrence Goldstone with the #kidlitexchange network. This YA nonfiction book is now available for purchase. All opinions are my own. Many YA readers have probably heard of Brown v. Board of Education, but I'm sure that Separate No More offers a story that few of them have heard. In this book, Goldstone outlines the long and arduous road that led to that histo @Kidlitexchange Thank you to @Scholasticinc for sharing an advance copy of Separate No More: The Long Road to Brown v. Board of Education by Lawrence Goldstone with the #kidlitexchange network. This YA nonfiction book is now available for purchase. All opinions are my own. Many YA readers have probably heard of Brown v. Board of Education, but I'm sure that Separate No More offers a story that few of them have heard. In this book, Goldstone outlines the long and arduous road that led to that historic Supreme Court case. Goldstone outlines cases that laid ground work for Brown v. Board of Education as well as the stories behind the men and women who fought for equality and the end of segregation. I found this book to be incredibly interesting. It offered a much deeper insight into a topic that I was only introduced to in school. It is very well researched, but is written in a way that is accessible to a YA audience. Goldstone explains the complexities of the situation and the various court cases and politics related to the topic in terms that any reader will be able to understand. This book allows the author to reflect on the progress made since the landmark case (even if it isn't as much progress as we'd hope to see) and think about how we can be part of a solution. It is bound to spark some great and important conversations.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The subtitle isn't kidding about a long road: Goldstone starts with Plessy v. Ferguson in 1892 and follows the decades of activism and other cases as people work to bring down segregation and discrimination. Readers will learn about cases and people that aren't often covered, like Gong Lum v. Rice (segregation won; might be why it's often skipped) and Lloyd Gaines, who mysteriously disappeared before his case could go to the Supreme Court. There are plenty of well-chosen photos. Goldstone has the The subtitle isn't kidding about a long road: Goldstone starts with Plessy v. Ferguson in 1892 and follows the decades of activism and other cases as people work to bring down segregation and discrimination. Readers will learn about cases and people that aren't often covered, like Gong Lum v. Rice (segregation won; might be why it's often skipped) and Lloyd Gaines, who mysteriously disappeared before his case could go to the Supreme Court. There are plenty of well-chosen photos. Goldstone has the habit of dropping in quotes with no context so the reader has to turn to the notes to learn that the excerpt is from a speech, or an encyclopedia article, or what have you. In his own words, he calls Howard University "the finest traditionally black college in the nation" (87) but a few pages later he quotes someone (this is not in the notes) calling Howard a "glorified high school" in 1926. (94) It left me wondering what that said about Tuskegee. A bit later he follows up a quote from an Army Air Corps film ("You don't judge a man by the shape of his nose or the color of his skin.") by telling us that the narrator was Ronald Reagan. (130) I really think that gives a false impression of Reagan's actual views given his later reliance on racist dog-whistles. Still, there are few books that look at Brown this comprehensively for young adults.

  9. 4 out of 5

    M.L. Little

    #kidlitexchange Partner: Separate No More by Lawrence Goldstone. Available now through @scholasticinc. This Young Adult nonfiction is packed with information on the rise and fall of segregated schools, from all the way back to the Plessy case and ending with Brown v. Board of Education. In between were countless other trials and cases literally across the country. With full-page photographs and legal details, Separate No More illustrates perfectly how separate was never equal. I learned so much #kidlitexchange Partner: Separate No More by Lawrence Goldstone. Available now through @scholasticinc. This Young Adult nonfiction is packed with information on the rise and fall of segregated schools, from all the way back to the Plessy case and ending with Brown v. Board of Education. In between were countless other trials and cases literally across the country. With full-page photographs and legal details, Separate No More illustrates perfectly how separate was never equal. I learned so much from this book. For example, I didn’t even know that Brown in Brown v. Board of Education was a little girl. It’s not that a little girl started the case; it’s just that her name came first in the school alphabetically, so her name headlined the case. I loved that I got to read this during Black History Month because it overlapped with a lot of what I’ve been covering with the kids I tutor. For example, psychologist Mamie Clark, whose doll experiments revealed the heartbreaking impact of segregation on kids. Mamie Clark was in this book and I’m also reading about her with the kids this week. Separate No More is available NOW in time for Black History Month! Thank you @kidlitexchange for the review copy—all opinions are my own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adelaide

    Noyce book club. The chapters leading up to Brown v Board of Education felt somewhat disjointed, there wasn't an overarching argument, just a lot of scene setting. When we did get to Brown, there was much less description of the actual arguments and legal maneuvering than I expected. (e.g. Why was the doll study so critical? Why is it not considered good science now?) The conclusion had a long list of things that have not gone well in integrating education since Brown, but then concluded without Noyce book club. The chapters leading up to Brown v Board of Education felt somewhat disjointed, there wasn't an overarching argument, just a lot of scene setting. When we did get to Brown, there was much less description of the actual arguments and legal maneuvering than I expected. (e.g. Why was the doll study so critical? Why is it not considered good science now?) The conclusion had a long list of things that have not gone well in integrating education since Brown, but then concluded without a lot of explanation that Brown changed American education for the better.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mccoy

    While I appreciate the historical summary of the many court cases leading to Brown v. Board. The quick evaluation of the effects of the court cases is incredibly rushed and sugarcoated with little acknowledgement of the present issues faced by the US educational system and the students and families it serves. I love the distilled work on the court cases, especially for the intended audience, but I am not a fan of some of the quick generalizations about them when the author’s voice intrudes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    A good overview of the way we got to Brown v. Board of Education. The only disappointment for me was that it didn't include Mendez v. Westminster, which didn't go to the Supreme Court, but was a case in California that the NAACP contributed a brief to and was about integrating elementary school education. A good overview of the way we got to Brown v. Board of Education. The only disappointment for me was that it didn't include Mendez v. Westminster, which didn't go to the Supreme Court, but was a case in California that the NAACP contributed a brief to and was about integrating elementary school education.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Toby Murphy

    Makes legalese very accessible for a YA audience. Goldstone does a solid job of showing the road to this case and connecting all the dots. My concern is the book’s title and description is a bit misleading. I thought there would be more on the case but there isn’t. It was a bit rushed on that.

  14. 5 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    SM

  15. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Plante

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  17. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lyssa

  19. 4 out of 5

    David Cleaver

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kendall Hill

  21. 4 out of 5

    Diana Dinh

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Watt

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Muller

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Shults

  27. 4 out of 5

    Caitlyn Sibole

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jaden Farris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Januse

  30. 5 out of 5

    Natha Anderson

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