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Children Of Albion: Poetry Of The 'Underground' In Britain (Penguin Poets, 116)

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30 review for Children Of Albion: Poetry Of The 'Underground' In Britain (Penguin Poets, 116)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    read this in the 70s and loved it, hippy poetry, probably really dated now, I daren't go back and re-read and spoil my fond memories. read this in the 70s and loved it, hippy poetry, probably really dated now, I daren't go back and re-read and spoil my fond memories.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tiff Gibbo

    This is a re-read. I picked up this collection of poems at 14 from a second hand store, mainly out of curiosity regarding the use of the word 'Albion' (not to blow up my spot, but I may have been a Libertines stan in my teens). The poetry holds up. It's engaging and at times explosive, making you stop and really think about a line over and over again. I see the text as indicative of its time; of course, there are far more male poets than female poets featured. There's also that sort of '60s Baby This is a re-read. I picked up this collection of poems at 14 from a second hand store, mainly out of curiosity regarding the use of the word 'Albion' (not to blow up my spot, but I may have been a Libertines stan in my teens). The poetry holds up. It's engaging and at times explosive, making you stop and really think about a line over and over again. I see the text as indicative of its time; of course, there are far more male poets than female poets featured. There's also that sort of '60s Baby-Boomer-esque hangover of "I'm writing PISS and WHORE and BOOZE and OTHER BAD WORDS and it's being PRINTED, whaddayamake of that mum and dad?!" People were still really freaked out about Howl, I guess! The Rolling Stones were scandalizing the English aristocracy just by prancing around in tight pants and wearing their hair long. Marianne Faithfull even gets mentioned in one poem called The News by Herbert Lomas. Rebellion had a template set in diametric opposition to tradition. It seems kind of lame now, but again, it's a beautiful artefact of its time. A standout poet for me was Gael Turnbull, and I will be seeking out more of his works because of what was featured of his here. Rated four stars because some of these modernist poets just took it too far with the spacing of their words (this is a pet peeve of mine, so it's personal preference). Also didn't love how edgy some of these poets thought they were being simply by mentioning, for instance, sex workers or homosexuals as window-dressing for their poetry - they were never the subject of the poems, just these sort of props. I get why I thought these sort of poems were so cool when I was 14, but hey, I also loved Bukowski back then.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve Bowbrick

    Brilliant collection. All the hairy anarchists, bass guitarists, bus drivers, drop-outs, pacifist squaddies, tramps and street corner crazies from about 75 years of British poetry (no Auden, no Larkin, nothing respectable). Funny, challenging, radical and often lyrical. And the absolutely best bit is the long section at the back - the eccentric and inspiring notes on the poems and the period from editor/participant Horovitz, including fascinating contemporaneous notes from the 1965 'Internationa Brilliant collection. All the hairy anarchists, bass guitarists, bus drivers, drop-outs, pacifist squaddies, tramps and street corner crazies from about 75 years of British poetry (no Auden, no Larkin, nothing respectable). Funny, challenging, radical and often lyrical. And the absolutely best bit is the long section at the back - the eccentric and inspiring notes on the poems and the period from editor/participant Horovitz, including fascinating contemporaneous notes from the 1965 'International Poetry Incarnation' at the Royal Albert Hall - with Ginsberg et al. You can get this one for a few quid second-hand - and you must. I've marked this one as 'read' but I reckon I'll still be going back to it when I die.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ade Bailey

    Read it largely for Horowitz's extensive notes as I'm contextualising 1960s 'bohemian' Liverpool poetry and music. The great poetry read-ins are all discussed here, and there is some useful stuff, especially on establishment reception of the 'underground'. It all seems dated now. Most of the poetry is crap. Read it largely for Horowitz's extensive notes as I'm contextualising 1960s 'bohemian' Liverpool poetry and music. The great poetry read-ins are all discussed here, and there is some useful stuff, especially on establishment reception of the 'underground'. It all seems dated now. Most of the poetry is crap.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lysergius

    Bought this from the Penguin catalogue in 1969. Some fabulous stuff. Read again in 2015 - some dated and lost in time. Some now the products of famous poets...

  6. 4 out of 5

    glen r

  7. 5 out of 5

    Iliad Ercanli

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leo Dunsker

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alice

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peter King

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jude Brigley

  13. 4 out of 5

    Agnes Marton

  14. 4 out of 5

    Magdelanye

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nic Dafis

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd Whittle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Acquaye

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Morley

  19. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Jacobi

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vee

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jai Emmett

  22. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  23. 5 out of 5

    Denni

  24. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dean

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nate Marcel

  27. 4 out of 5

    Liberty

  28. 4 out of 5

    Louise Robinson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Don Wilton

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fitzhugh

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