Hot Best Seller

Auschwitz, última parada: Cómo sobreviví al horror 1943-1945

Availability: Ready to download

Eddy de Wind llega a Auschwitz en 1943 junto a su esposa Friedel. Él es médico y ella enfermera. Allí son separados. Ella queda entre los presos destinados a los crueles experimentos médicos del Dr. Mengele; él al cuidado de los prisioneros políticos polacos. Cuando la guerra está perdida y los nazis huyen del campo con los presos que sobreviven (entre ellos su mujer), Edd Eddy de Wind llega a Auschwitz en 1943 junto a su esposa Friedel. Él es médico y ella enfermera. Allí son separados. Ella queda entre los presos destinados a los crueles experimentos médicos del Dr. Mengele; él al cuidado de los prisioneros políticos polacos. Cuando la guerra está perdida y los nazis huyen del campo con los presos que sobreviven (entre ellos su mujer), Eddy decide esconderse y esperar la llegada de los rusos. Permanece por un tiempo con ellos en el campo y allí empieza a escribir Auschwitz, última parada, donde describe la rutina diaria, las atrocidades de las que ha sido testigo y víctima y la liberación por los rusos. Pero en su texto muestra también su amor y deseo hacia Friedel.


Compare

Eddy de Wind llega a Auschwitz en 1943 junto a su esposa Friedel. Él es médico y ella enfermera. Allí son separados. Ella queda entre los presos destinados a los crueles experimentos médicos del Dr. Mengele; él al cuidado de los prisioneros políticos polacos. Cuando la guerra está perdida y los nazis huyen del campo con los presos que sobreviven (entre ellos su mujer), Edd Eddy de Wind llega a Auschwitz en 1943 junto a su esposa Friedel. Él es médico y ella enfermera. Allí son separados. Ella queda entre los presos destinados a los crueles experimentos médicos del Dr. Mengele; él al cuidado de los prisioneros políticos polacos. Cuando la guerra está perdida y los nazis huyen del campo con los presos que sobreviven (entre ellos su mujer), Eddy decide esconderse y esperar la llegada de los rusos. Permanece por un tiempo con ellos en el campo y allí empieza a escribir Auschwitz, última parada, donde describe la rutina diaria, las atrocidades de las que ha sido testigo y víctima y la liberación por los rusos. Pero en su texto muestra también su amor y deseo hacia Friedel.

30 review for Auschwitz, última parada: Cómo sobreviví al horror 1943-1945

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    Thank you to the publisher for the gifted copy. Written while Eddy de Wind was a prisoner in Auschwitz, this survival story is one that can’t be missed. Like all Holocaust stories, the atrocities are laid bare, and like with most survival stories, there is always hope, hope and humanity. More thoughts to come. Many of my reviews can also be found on instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader Thank you to the publisher for the gifted copy. Written while Eddy de Wind was a prisoner in Auschwitz, this survival story is one that can’t be missed. Like all Holocaust stories, the atrocities are laid bare, and like with most survival stories, there is always hope, hope and humanity. More thoughts to come. Many of my reviews can also be found on instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    There have been many books written of late about world war II experiences; there are those detailing the lead up to the brutal war, those that discuss the war itself and those that talk about the aftermath but never have I read one which was actually written with a pencil and paper whilst both Eddy de Wind and his wife, Friedel, were imprisoned and put to work at Auschwitz. During His 16 month stay, he recorded the occurrences and his feelings about such incidents and I felt incredibly moved to There have been many books written of late about world war II experiences; there are those detailing the lead up to the brutal war, those that discuss the war itself and those that talk about the aftermath but never have I read one which was actually written with a pencil and paper whilst both Eddy de Wind and his wife, Friedel, were imprisoned and put to work at Auschwitz. During His 16 month stay, he recorded the occurrences and his feelings about such incidents and I felt incredibly moved to be reading his personal account. The fact that he had to create a character, Hans, in order to express his thoughts illustrates just how affected and tormented he felt. This is a deeply moving and disturbing account of Nazi atrocities and one mans struggle to survive. The torturous conditions described made it difficult to read at times but I feel it is a very important book. My heart broke for the separation Eddy and his wife had to endure and I was touched by the small snippets of time they stole together whenever possible. Although this is a terrifying depiction of the great loss of life and what it was like to live under the Nazi regime it does have a powerful and ultimately uplifting message about how with courage and strength you can survive anything. As de Wind recognises the horrors that took place at the camp not only showed the most evil of humanity but the most compassionate and selfless too. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Doubleday for an ARC.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    This book is very hard to read. I love reading historical fiction book about WWII, so I really want to read this book to see how it really was. I found this book had great information in it. It is not a book you can pick up and read quickly. I found reading a little bit everyday help to really take in all the information in it. I won a hardcover of this book from a goodreads giveaway, but this review is 100% my own opinion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    The only known memoir written by an Auschwitz survivor, whilst still within the camp. This is a true story which the author sadly did not live to see published and appreciated by the world. However, his legacy continues as his book is becoming ever more popular as the 75th anniversary of the Auschwitz liberation has passed. This memoir reads almost in a fiction like dialogue, but it is still an intriguing glimpse at the many complexities of camp life. The book also features an afterword discussin The only known memoir written by an Auschwitz survivor, whilst still within the camp. This is a true story which the author sadly did not live to see published and appreciated by the world. However, his legacy continues as his book is becoming ever more popular as the 75th anniversary of the Auschwitz liberation has passed. This memoir reads almost in a fiction like dialogue, but it is still an intriguing glimpse at the many complexities of camp life. The book also features an afterword discussing the authors life. Although the book has been translated into English, there are still phrases from other languages without a direct translation. Otherwise, this was an engrossing and thoroughly thought provoking read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Although this story is about one of the most horrific periods in humanity's history, I found it droll and I found it difficult to connect with the author. Its a shame, but after reading many true accounts of WWII I find myself struggling to read books that aren't well written. Although this story is about one of the most horrific periods in humanity's history, I found it droll and I found it difficult to connect with the author. Its a shame, but after reading many true accounts of WWII I find myself struggling to read books that aren't well written.

  6. 4 out of 5

    julianne

    This book was written while the author was in Auschwitz, and shows the horrors of the camp. It is in a rash of books about the Holocaust that have been published recently and while informative it is lacking a certain something.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This was definitely something I usually don't read. It's a description of Eddy de Winds life at Auschwitz and how he survived it. It describes the camp and what it was like to be there and what you had to do to survive. It's different to read someone's story than read about it from school books. This is eye-opening story and worst part for me was the after camp was gone. How people told their stories, what they had seen and done in order to survive, it is awful. Also, I appreciate de Winds reason fo This was definitely something I usually don't read. It's a description of Eddy de Winds life at Auschwitz and how he survived it. It describes the camp and what it was like to be there and what you had to do to survive. It's different to read someone's story than read about it from school books. This is eye-opening story and worst part for me was the after camp was gone. How people told their stories, what they had seen and done in order to survive, it is awful. Also, I appreciate de Winds reason for republishing this book: He was worried of intolerance and political violence waking again in western countries (this was 1980). He wanted to stay alive to tell everyone what really happened, to make sure people knew it was true. Very good book in historical and in educational aspects.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tam

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Notes before I start - 1) I feel ridiculous checking the spoilers box, because the Holocaust is a well documented historical fact. At the same time, Eddy's life is not known as well, and so I will leave it to the reader whether they wish to read this review before or not. 2) The book itself is well worth reading. It is not an easy read, it is very emotionally charged, and it is an incredible treasure. 3) I apologize for the length of the review. I chose to use quotes from the book because I feel Notes before I start - 1) I feel ridiculous checking the spoilers box, because the Holocaust is a well documented historical fact. At the same time, Eddy's life is not known as well, and so I will leave it to the reader whether they wish to read this review before or not. 2) The book itself is well worth reading. It is not an easy read, it is very emotionally charged, and it is an incredible treasure. 3) I apologize for the length of the review. I chose to use quotes from the book because I feel that Eddy's words have power that can never be replicated in summation. When I started reading this recollection of life in Auschwitz, I did not realize that it was written in the third person - Eddy de Wind found that he simply could not relate these agonizingly painful and fresh experiences in a first person narrative. In many ways this made the book easier to read because an artificial emotional distance was created between the reader and the narrative voice. There are certain moments in the book, however, where this distance vanishes with the power of a thousand exploding suns, when the reader is reminded that the author was describing a hell that he personally experienced: "Anyway, that evening a few more of us were sick." De Wind had a deep understanding of the horror of concentration camps that served as both extermination centers and forced labor camps that wrung every last drop of effort out of the people they sought to destroy: "No, Auschwitz was more than torment writ large. With its factories and mines it was an important part of the Upper Silesian industrial area and its workers were cheaper than anywhere else in the world. They didn't need any pay and they ate almost nothing. And then, when they were exhausted and fell victim to the gas chamber, there were still enough Jews and political opponents in Europe to make up the numbers yet again." The psychological horror inflicted on the prisoners followed them all the way through complete physical infirmity because "[i]t's a law of nutrition that, even when wasting away, the heart, brain, and organs maintain their normal weight the longest. As a result, most of them were all too aware of what was happening to them." Having studied the Holocaust and concentration camps from that and other eras, I am well familiar with the concept of gallows humor that often developed among the prisoners. It is, nevertheless, always jarring to hear it related by a survivor. One notable example here is an offhand comment that: "Arbeit macht frei... Krematorium drei!" (Work will set you free... [in] crematorium three!) Likewise, it seems inconceivable to hear a stint of hard labor that nearly led to de Wind's demise referred to as an "adventure." Without resorting to gallows humor and light-hearted references to their inhumane circumstances, people imprisoned in these camps of horrors would likely have given in to their despair and perished from this world. At the same time, "after years in concentration camps even the best of people develop their own 'sense of justice.'" After all, "[r]esistance, even a show of pity, would have been pointless suicide." It is in such recurrent narratives about the dual reality of being tortured and having to accept that choices must be made that can lead to torture and/or death for others, that de Wind started what would become his life's work - learning to process and help others process the trauma resulting from concentration camp imprisonment. However, de Wind drew a sharp distinction between the prisoners would had to learn to survive by giving up a measure of their humanity, and the Nazis who suppressed their own humanity in the name of the ideals they adopted. When speaking about Nazis who sometimes made kind decisions, he told Friedel that: "I don't think that's a point in their favor. On the contrary. The youngsters have been raised in the spirit of blood and soil. They don't know any better. But those older ones, like the Lagerarzt, show through those minor acts that they still harbor a remnant of their upbringing. They didn't learn this inhumanity from an early age and had no need to embrace it. That's why they're guiltier than the young Nazi sheep, who have never known better." This condemnation becomes all the more powerful because it is directed at Josef Mengele, who showed through acts of interceding on the behalf of Eddy and Friedel on 2 separate occasions, that he fully understood and was capable of humane behavior. This narrative of one man's experiences is an incredible historical account of a dark stain on human history. It should become required reading for students, alongside Maus. Together, the two works form a powerful picture of life under the bootheel of the German Reich.

  9. 4 out of 5

    donna craig

    i was so disappointed in this book .i had been looking forward to reading but it took me ages to read it was so slow and quite boring .i have read similar books and enjoyed them but not this one

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Cresswell

    Like all Holocaust memoirs this was very harrowing, it also makes it difficult to rate as the Dutch translation is a bit choppy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    3.5 Using the character of Hans, Eddy de Wind shares his experience from his time within the camp, written on the premise of the Auschwitz complex. First off, i just want to say that it wasnt written the best. Some sentences seemed off, but for the most part it was ok. This may have have been due to things getting lost in translation, or something equivalent. Also the fact that he isnt an actual writer, but a Häftling, as the book would say. Which brings me to my next point. Some common words wi 3.5 Using the character of Hans, Eddy de Wind shares his experience from his time within the camp, written on the premise of the Auschwitz complex. First off, i just want to say that it wasnt written the best. Some sentences seemed off, but for the most part it was ok. This may have have been due to things getting lost in translation, or something equivalent. Also the fact that he isnt an actual writer, but a Häftling, as the book would say. Which brings me to my next point. Some common words within the book were kept as German. For example, Häftling (prisoner) is used all throughout, as with Pfleger (nurse) and lager (camp), along with a lot of others - although the others only only make a few appearances. I never once closed my google translate tab for this reason, but there is actually a glossary at the back with all the German mentioned (i didnt know this until 50 pages towards the end though). So if u read this THERE IS A GLOSSARY. Dont make the same mistake i did. It was a slow read for me, but i enjoyed it nevertheless. I learnt new words in German, as well as learned more about what happened in the camps, since i have never been taught from school so i have to teach myself. I recommend this to people who enjoys these things, but also has the patience as it isnt the quickest read ever.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Hay

    This book is yet another reminder of the atrocities experienced during the Holocaust. Believed to be the only book written in Auschwitz itself, Eddy describes the day to day occurrences within the concentration camp; an insight I haven't come across before. Translated from Dutch, I did struggle to easily comprehend this book but would recommend to anyone to read! This book is yet another reminder of the atrocities experienced during the Holocaust. Believed to be the only book written in Auschwitz itself, Eddy describes the day to day occurrences within the concentration camp; an insight I haven't come across before. Translated from Dutch, I did struggle to easily comprehend this book but would recommend to anyone to read!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    “It is, to me, the ultimate Holocaust testimony” author Heather Morris. It is the ONLY complete testimony to date written inside Auschwitz. Last Sop Auschwitz is an incredible account of life in one history’s darkest times. Rightly or wrongly, I continue to devour books set during this time, the second world war, so it was no surprise that I bought this as soon as it hit the shelves. The writer of this account is Dutch doctor and psychiatrist, Eddy de Wind. In 1943, De Wind volunteered to work in “It is, to me, the ultimate Holocaust testimony” author Heather Morris. It is the ONLY complete testimony to date written inside Auschwitz. Last Sop Auschwitz is an incredible account of life in one history’s darkest times. Rightly or wrongly, I continue to devour books set during this time, the second world war, so it was no surprise that I bought this as soon as it hit the shelves. The writer of this account is Dutch doctor and psychiatrist, Eddy de Wind. In 1943, De Wind volunteered to work in a labour camp, known as Westerbork, in the Netherlands. It was here in this transit camp to Auschwitz and Bergen- Belsen, De Wind met a nurse, his soon to be wife, Friedel. That same year, husband wife, found themselves being separated in Auschwitz. Finding ways to see one another and be together, albeit briefly, it is two more years before Auschwitz is liberated. This is no fairy tale ending though. Through unfortunate circumstances, Eddy was left behind when Friedel was forced with to leave Auschwitz. Joining the Russian liberators, De Wind stayed for another three months to treat the survivors and Russian soldiers. During the night, he wrote his account of life as a prisoner, changing his name to Hans. No review can do this justice as it needs to be read to be fully appreciated. There were many moments, both horrific and hopeful, I have taken away from this memoir that will stay with me for a long time. It is also a reminder of the greatest and harshest moments in time that the human race is capable of. Personally, this is one of the few books that I can see myself reading again to remind myself of all that I should be grateful for in this new decade in the 21st century.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sharen

    The authenticity, experiences and horrors of Eddy de Wind's accounts are crucial to the history of Auschwitz and that unfathomable time. This book is not a re-telling of his time spent there done months or many years later. It is taken directly from his notebook that he wrote in while at camp weeks following the Red Army's liberation. I also appreciated the notes at the end of the book on the author, the text and insight from the translator. It really brought things together even more. ..."they h The authenticity, experiences and horrors of Eddy de Wind's accounts are crucial to the history of Auschwitz and that unfathomable time. This book is not a re-telling of his time spent there done months or many years later. It is taken directly from his notebook that he wrote in while at camp weeks following the Red Army's liberation. I also appreciated the notes at the end of the book on the author, the text and insight from the translator. It really brought things together even more. ..."they had a task, a purpose in life that bound them. They had to shout out what they experienced. They felt that they were the apostles of a vengeance so thorough that barbarism would be exterminated on Earth forever, a vengeance that would purify the world and open it up to a new humanism." This is a remarkable and important memoir that exposes countless acts of evil and goodness. The will to survive and the ability to love and care for others even when under such distress is eye-opening and touching.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Another Auschwitz book read and again another can't put down book! Another Auschwitz book read and again another can't put down book!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Last Stop Auschwitz by Eddy de Wind was first published January 1st 1946. I am so glad I had a chance to read and review. I found it a hard book to read but so glad I read it. So you will need Tissues and a Lots of them! It will be a book that will be with me a very long time. I would highly recommend it to people who want to know and and read more about this terrible time in the Second World War. This book is a true story about a prisoner Eddy De Wind: the author is a real-time record of his lif Last Stop Auschwitz by Eddy de Wind was first published January 1st 1946. I am so glad I had a chance to read and review. I found it a hard book to read but so glad I read it. So you will need Tissues and a Lots of them! It will be a book that will be with me a very long time. I would highly recommend it to people who want to know and and read more about this terrible time in the Second World War. This book is a true story about a prisoner Eddy De Wind: the author is a real-time record of his life of the daily struggle to survive. Eddy was a Dutch doctor and a psychiatrist who was shipped to Auschwitz with his wife Friedel. They met and married at Westerbork labour camp in Netherlands. They never spent much time together but found odd moments where they stole time for a brief embrace before they were caught by the guards. They were moved to Auschwitz, this was their last stop as prisoner's, they made it through the brutal selection process and they were both put to work. This work was brutal but they had to work hard to survive. Eddy found a notebook and a pencil, he began to write his life whilst they were a prisoner of war. He had to hide to write his experiences and hoped this notebook would never be found by the guards. I do agree there has been a lot of books out or have been rewritten about about world war II experiences; Auschwitz etc and I am glad the Publishers and Authors have done this. We should never forget what happened all those years ago......and it should be remembered in our life time and especially taught in schools and colleges etc. Big Thank you to Doubleday, netgalley and the author for an ARC for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chetna

    Eddy De Wind shares his incredible journey of suffering and survival in Auschwitz. Tricked into thinking he could help his mother, Eddy comes out of hiding and joins the transportation camp. There, he meets Friedel. Soon after they are married they are both sent to Auschwitz. As a trained doctor Eddy worked in the camp tending to patients. He was also made to do some of the most pain staking jobs a human being is barely capable of. Yet his sheer determination of seeing his wife again sees him th Eddy De Wind shares his incredible journey of suffering and survival in Auschwitz. Tricked into thinking he could help his mother, Eddy comes out of hiding and joins the transportation camp. There, he meets Friedel. Soon after they are married they are both sent to Auschwitz. As a trained doctor Eddy worked in the camp tending to patients. He was also made to do some of the most pain staking jobs a human being is barely capable of. Yet his sheer determination of seeing his wife again sees him through the torture. Eddy heard and witnessed some of the most horrific torture methods and brutal attacks in human history. As the death marches began and the Nazi’s fled as the war ended, it is remarkable to hear where Eddy’s bravery and survival took him...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aby Rose

    The afterword of this memoir is by John Boyne (the author of The Boy in Stripped Pyjamas) and the following two quotes summarise this memoir by Eddy de Wind... "A unique insight into a tragedy that, more than any other event, defines the twentieth century." "I've found myself astonished by how deeply the daily events of camp life emblazoned themselves on the minds of the survivors, scorched into their collective memories with as much indiscriminate savagery as the tattoos carved into their arms" I The afterword of this memoir is by John Boyne (the author of The Boy in Stripped Pyjamas) and the following two quotes summarise this memoir by Eddy de Wind... "A unique insight into a tragedy that, more than any other event, defines the twentieth century." "I've found myself astonished by how deeply the daily events of camp life emblazoned themselves on the minds of the survivors, scorched into their collective memories with as much indiscriminate savagery as the tattoos carved into their arms" I highly recommend this memoir to anyone who wants to read into the subject of the Holocaust.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Thank you to the publisher for a gifted copy of this impactful book. It feels trite to give a star rating to someone's life story, especially one of this magnitude. I think books like this one, Night by Elie Wiesel, and Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl should be required reading for all people. As we move farther away from this time in history and our lives become more and more privileged, this book and other stories like it can help to ground us. It makes one realize how easy our lives Thank you to the publisher for a gifted copy of this impactful book. It feels trite to give a star rating to someone's life story, especially one of this magnitude. I think books like this one, Night by Elie Wiesel, and Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl should be required reading for all people. As we move farther away from this time in history and our lives become more and more privileged, this book and other stories like it can help to ground us. It makes one realize how easy our lives truly are, how insignificant our problems tend to be in the grand scheme of things. There are parts of this book that will forever be burned in my brain. The suffering of the prisoners in Auschwitz is truly so unfathomable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Haynes

    This is such an enlightening read. To see the perspective of the camp and the systematic cruel treatment of the Jew's from inside the perspective of someone who was in the camp, written while the events were fresh is an eye opening experience. We all know of the atrocities but rarely get a glimpse inside the minds of those in the camps. I recommend this book as a read for anyone. It is a great learning tool into humanity and how actions of a few can effect many. Given the state of the world at t This is such an enlightening read. To see the perspective of the camp and the systematic cruel treatment of the Jew's from inside the perspective of someone who was in the camp, written while the events were fresh is an eye opening experience. We all know of the atrocities but rarely get a glimpse inside the minds of those in the camps. I recommend this book as a read for anyone. It is a great learning tool into humanity and how actions of a few can effect many. Given the state of the world at the moment, I don't get as much time to read as I am trying to keep my bills paid but I did find this book to be a very inspirational book on being a better person to others and their situations.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Janette Schofield

    I couldn't put this book down, Eddy's account of life in Auschwitz, whilst in the camp, was really hard to read at times. There was a few moments where I had to pause from reading as I couldn't comprehend what life must have been like. I did find the hope and love between himself and Friedel a really interesting aspect. Those brief moments of happiness that they had together during this awful time really did show that there can be light in the darkest of times. This book will stick with me for a I couldn't put this book down, Eddy's account of life in Auschwitz, whilst in the camp, was really hard to read at times. There was a few moments where I had to pause from reading as I couldn't comprehend what life must have been like. I did find the hope and love between himself and Friedel a really interesting aspect. Those brief moments of happiness that they had together during this awful time really did show that there can be light in the darkest of times. This book will stick with me for a long time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan Taylor

    Reminded me of The Last Tattoo Artist... It tells of the horrors that this Dr. & wife went through during the war and how many were killed. The torture and desegregation of thousands of human beings. The last 2 chapters are the authors notes; explaining some things I don't want to spoil. Reminded me of The Last Tattoo Artist... It tells of the horrors that this Dr. & wife went through during the war and how many were killed. The torture and desegregation of thousands of human beings. The last 2 chapters are the authors notes; explaining some things I don't want to spoil.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Cooper

    What an amazing read. The horrors that these people went through and still found the courage to keep going. The odd German word within the text but translations are in the back of the book, it doesn’t spoil the read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Urquhart

    I absolutely loved reading about how Eddy and Friedel defied the odds and survived the most awful brutality/conditions. The ending had me wanting to cry with relief. A must read

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angelique Simonsen

    This is an intelligently written memoir and because it was written so close to the end of the war the recollections are fresh and there is no real mulling over of things, just straight talking.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Erik Surewaard

    NOTE: after having written my review, I have been approached by a family member of the author. This with the following statement (dutch): “ Ik verdenk je dan ook van onheuse motieven. Vertel eens, ben je een zogenaamde holocaust denier?” English translation: “I suspect you of unjust motives. Tell me, are you a so-called holocaust denier?” Unacceptable in my opinion. This because my review apparently wasn’t what he liked to read... So be aware that this may happen in case you write a review that isn NOTE: after having written my review, I have been approached by a family member of the author. This with the following statement (dutch): “ Ik verdenk je dan ook van onheuse motieven. Vertel eens, ben je een zogenaamde holocaust denier?” English translation: “I suspect you of unjust motives. Tell me, are you a so-called holocaust denier?” Unacceptable in my opinion. This because my review apparently wasn’t what he liked to read... So be aware that this may happen in case you write a review that isn’t positive... And to be clear, I have neither unjust motives nor am I a holocaust-denier. ##### My original review #### Writing this review in 2020, I observe a trend the last few years where more and more books are published about life in Auschwitz (or another German camp). I have read numerous books on camp life. If you consider reading this book, I suggest you to do otherwise. This book namely doesnt really show the real hardship of life in Auschwitz. Other books about camp life describe the constant suffering, hunger, beating, murder and exploitation. This book however is a lot different. Clearly the author seems to be in a very privileged position. I was stunned by the freedom of movement the author seems to have in the camp, the access to food and even the audacity to bluntly ask the SS what he needs. I myself am aware of the principle of “survivorship bias”, but even a small part of the behavior as described in this book would have gotten a normal prisoner killed in Auschwitz. And I dont even take into account the fact that the author is a jew, which in the camp is regarded as the lowest of the low. Some parts if the book were even questionable... He supposedly met a greek literature professor that was part of the Sonderkommando of “Krematorium 3”. The professor was in such a high standing that he survived several purges of the Sonderkommando. And he would have also survived the revolt of Krematorium 3... I personally have doubts that this story is true. Maybe the author was inspired by the book written by doctor Miklos Nyiszli whom was doing autopsies in Krematorium 2. In the afterword, the family of the author tries to claim that the author is some kind of hero. As if this book is an extremely special work. The below three points are some of the examples raised by the authors family... * First they try to argue that the author was involved in the February Strikes. In the annual remembrance event of these strikes only two survivor are mentioned. The family of the author is however of the opinion that the author is also survivor that should be mentioned. * Second, the family of the author wants to make you believe that this book is a very special diary because it is the only one that is written in a camp. I got the impression as if they wanted to position it as something as important as the “Anne Frank war diary”. * Last, the family states that the author even got personal requests fulfilled by the famous camp doctor Mengele (aka the “angel of death”). They even claim that the author asked Mengele to save his wife’s life, which Mengele organized for him. I personally get the impression that part of this book is fiction. Written with a commercial objective in mind, this book is clearly written with a target of 200 pages. The remainder of the pages up to 250 is a lot of filler.. In my opinion there are other books that are way better in explaining what life in Auschwitz was. As such, I was not able to give more than 2 stars for this book (2.4 stars rounded down to 2 stars).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    I cannot give a book written by a Holocaust survivor any less than five stars just on principle of what they have come through and survived. Sharing their stories is very painful I am sure and this one is no different than the others I have read .... so hard to absorb and then to believe that people could be so capable of such cruelty. A terrible time in history. Taking a break from Holocaust reading for a bit… Glad it’s a sunshiny day

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tony Nielsen

    In 2019 there seems to have been a rush to publish books about the horrors of the Nazi Concentration camp Auschwitz. I have got myself caught up in wanting to understand the depths of cruelty and desperation which was wrought on literally hundreds of thousands of Europeans shipped to Auschwitz and almost certain death. Last Stop Auschwitz is somewhat unusual amongst the number of books which have recently been published, as its a first hand account by doctor and psychiatrist Eddy de Wind, and his In 2019 there seems to have been a rush to publish books about the horrors of the Nazi Concentration camp Auschwitz. I have got myself caught up in wanting to understand the depths of cruelty and desperation which was wrought on literally hundreds of thousands of Europeans shipped to Auschwitz and almost certain death. Last Stop Auschwitz is somewhat unusual amongst the number of books which have recently been published, as its a first hand account by doctor and psychiatrist Eddy de Wind, and his wife Friedel. The Dutch couple arrived at the Concentration Camp together and mostly through good fortune Eddy's medical qualifications kept him away from the brutal work which men were tasked with until they were worn out and bound for the Crematoria. Surviving was an every day challenge with Eddy daily negotiating with the Nazis and their nominated henchmen and women to maintain his medical duties and therefore avoid the slave labour. Friedel's challenge was to not be chosen for medical experiments. Amazingly their locations in this massive site were close to each other. Over time they became able to communicate with each other and occasionally to see one another. Last Stop Auschwitz gives the reader a shocking rollercoaster ride across the emotions attached to such a horror story which in the end sees the couple reunited.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Caren

    I find it difficult to rate a Holocaust testimony. I unreservedly honour the courage and the commitment of the survivor, in this case Dr. Eddy de Wind, who published in 1946 what is thought to be the "only complete book written in Auschwitz itself". However, he chose to have his story narrated by "Hans" because "the horror of his experience was still so raw he couldn't find the words to describe it in the first person." (publisher's foreword) I was confused by this convention and, as a result, f I find it difficult to rate a Holocaust testimony. I unreservedly honour the courage and the commitment of the survivor, in this case Dr. Eddy de Wind, who published in 1946 what is thought to be the "only complete book written in Auschwitz itself". However, he chose to have his story narrated by "Hans" because "the horror of his experience was still so raw he couldn't find the words to describe it in the first person." (publisher's foreword) I was confused by this convention and, as a result, felt I was reading a fictional testimony rather than a memoir. Thus, the power of the record is diminished when I consider memoirs such as Wiesel's "Night" and Muller's "Eyewitness Auschwitz." Incidentally, I read the book in spite of the endorsement by Heather Morris on its cover, professing it to be "the ultimate Holocaust testimony." {Morris's work has been discredited by The Auschwitz Memorial Research Centre and Holocaust scholars because of its inaccuracies} Overall, the day-to-day experiences of this survivor highlight the degradation of the prisoners and their incomprehensible physical and mental suffering. As well, de Wind's story is one of resilience, particularly with regard to the strength of his love for his imprisoned wife and the hope that they would both survive this horror.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aislinn Kelly

    Last Stop Auschwitz is the heartbreaking true story of Dutch Jew Eddy de Wind and his experiences in Auschwitz. This story was very difficult to read at periods as Eddy's time in Auschwitz was so horrifying and cruel.. Even though the book was upsetting at times, I did find this story uplifting as it shows the power and courageness of people in spite of such injustice. Eddy's story will stay with me for a long time to come. Thanks to NetGalley and the publishers for this ARC Last Stop Auschwitz is the heartbreaking true story of Dutch Jew Eddy de Wind and his experiences in Auschwitz. This story was very difficult to read at periods as Eddy's time in Auschwitz was so horrifying and cruel.. Even though the book was upsetting at times, I did find this story uplifting as it shows the power and courageness of people in spite of such injustice. Eddy's story will stay with me for a long time to come. Thanks to NetGalley and the publishers for this ARC

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...