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How to Hold a Cockroach: A book for those who are free and don't know it

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When a heartbroken and miserable boy is confronted by a loathsome visitor at his dinner table, he is forced to consider some of Life's most slippery questions: How do we tell the difference between the sacred and the abhorrent? How can we be at peace in the face of a shattered heart, a bruised childhood, a numbing medical diagnosis, and other challenging circumstances? Wha When a heartbroken and miserable boy is confronted by a loathsome visitor at his dinner table, he is forced to consider some of Life's most slippery questions: How do we tell the difference between the sacred and the abhorrent? How can we be at peace in the face of a shattered heart, a bruised childhood, a numbing medical diagnosis, and other challenging circumstances? What decides how we experience our life? Here, Matthew Maxwell offers us the possibility of ultimate freedom - that our entire human experience is determined not by the "facts" of the stories we tell ourselves, but by the meaning we choose to make of those stories. It's a truth both astounding and powerful in its simplicity, and Maxwell skillfully builds a window through which readers of all ages can observe its emergence as they watch his protagonist's seemingly pitiful day unfold. How to Hold a Cockroach is Maxwell's delightful and moving love letter to humankind. A quick, compelling read, it is indeed a book for those who are free and don't know it. . . yet.


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When a heartbroken and miserable boy is confronted by a loathsome visitor at his dinner table, he is forced to consider some of Life's most slippery questions: How do we tell the difference between the sacred and the abhorrent? How can we be at peace in the face of a shattered heart, a bruised childhood, a numbing medical diagnosis, and other challenging circumstances? Wha When a heartbroken and miserable boy is confronted by a loathsome visitor at his dinner table, he is forced to consider some of Life's most slippery questions: How do we tell the difference between the sacred and the abhorrent? How can we be at peace in the face of a shattered heart, a bruised childhood, a numbing medical diagnosis, and other challenging circumstances? What decides how we experience our life? Here, Matthew Maxwell offers us the possibility of ultimate freedom - that our entire human experience is determined not by the "facts" of the stories we tell ourselves, but by the meaning we choose to make of those stories. It's a truth both astounding and powerful in its simplicity, and Maxwell skillfully builds a window through which readers of all ages can observe its emergence as they watch his protagonist's seemingly pitiful day unfold. How to Hold a Cockroach is Maxwell's delightful and moving love letter to humankind. A quick, compelling read, it is indeed a book for those who are free and don't know it. . . yet.

30 review for How to Hold a Cockroach: A book for those who are free and don't know it

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheena P

    I still won't hold a cockroach myself but this is a very good reminder about what things we need to give a sh*t about. It's easy to understand but will take a lot of practice to execute. It's a very short read but I chose to read a few pages a day to savor the lessons. I still won't hold a cockroach myself but this is a very good reminder about what things we need to give a sh*t about. It's easy to understand but will take a lot of practice to execute. It's a very short read but I chose to read a few pages a day to savor the lessons.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eli B

    A feel good book that takes a realistic look at life It was the cockroach that attracted me to the book and then discovering the repulsion they are usually greeted with is how the book evolves. The cockroach is what everything is held up to. Not as cuddly of a book as The Boy, the Mole, the Fox, and the Horse but it holds its own. Gives one another way to view life and it’s possible outcomes. Lovely illustrations. For anyone contemplating life and its meaning as it pertains to them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Mata

    A book that will help you appreciate life and truly live it. Even with all of its heartbreaks and issues.

  4. 4 out of 5

    William

    This is a heartfelt story about a boy bound to the past and resenting the future. It reads like a children’s book for adults. It is an experience reading the book illustrated by Allie Daigle. I would encourage others to get the largest copy with full color illustrations. I bought the paperback. It was still neat to see all of Daigle’s illustrations in black and white, nonetheless. The author, Matthew Maxwell, artfully crafts a narrative about a boy who suffers, while some how challenging defeatis This is a heartfelt story about a boy bound to the past and resenting the future. It reads like a children’s book for adults. It is an experience reading the book illustrated by Allie Daigle. I would encourage others to get the largest copy with full color illustrations. I bought the paperback. It was still neat to see all of Daigle’s illustrations in black and white, nonetheless. The author, Matthew Maxwell, artfully crafts a narrative about a boy who suffers, while some how challenging defeatist thinking and shattering our desire to know a la Buddhist ideas and Eastern Philosophy. The author does not get preachy with this. It’s a bit more subtle. There are lots of examples of how curiosity yields greater positivity. However, this is not so much a book about positive thinking. I found my own resistance arising in witnessing the main character go through his struggles. Some of his story is hard to take, much like life, but the messages along the way have helped me challenge my own illogical thinking and beliefs some. This is a great book for those in the dark night of the soul or anyone who is growth-oriented and would like to reflect on their own inner demons some.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeff B.

    A few things before I start: 1. I actually give this 3.5 stars, but rounded up to 4 stars - because that's how I roll. 2. I read this on my Kindle Oasis, and I imagine a full color hard cover version would be a beautiful addition to a library or make a wonderful coffee table book. As I read this book, I wondered mostly who this book is for. It's written like a children's book with illustrations and everything. So I was thinking maybe it's for 3rd graders. On the other hand, it had a protagonist t A few things before I start: 1. I actually give this 3.5 stars, but rounded up to 4 stars - because that's how I roll. 2. I read this on my Kindle Oasis, and I imagine a full color hard cover version would be a beautiful addition to a library or make a wonderful coffee table book. As I read this book, I wondered mostly who this book is for. It's written like a children's book with illustrations and everything. So I was thinking maybe it's for 3rd graders. On the other hand, it had a protagonist that drives a car and gets a (presumable) cancer diagnosis, which made me think maybe it's for adults. Also, some of the words were a little bigger than I think would be in a 3rd grader's vocabulary - though I might be wrong. The book is relatively short and I read it in a few hours. I really liked the story and the message it gave. By the end of the book, it touched my heart to go on this spiritual journey with the protagonist and reach my destination of love with what is. I also loved the illustrations throughout the book. There weren't a ton, but they were beautiful and added to the story. Again, I was reading on my Kindle Oasis, but I imagine the pictures would of added even more if it was full size and in color. It was perfectly fine on my Kindle Oasis, but I am seriously considering re-buying the physical version of this book just to have. I read a lot of books in the "non-duality" school of thought, so I was familiar with many of the ideas put forth, but I can imagine it blowing your mind if you're new to non-duality thinking. I think I can safely recommend this book if this sounds like your cup of tea, though I think I would encourage the physical version.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gerald Seavey

    A simple powerful truth I can imagine anyone would benefit from this story. It’s wisdom is simple but profound. Tead it slowly, then read it again.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marisol Hernandez

    Great book! Love this book! I really needed this! Thank you! A book to reread from time to time when life gets scary.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark Gaskins

    Quick read that was filled with great lessons for both adults and kids!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Sommer

    Beautiful!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Made me consider where our beliefs come from and why we hold on to the stories we create.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jose

    He smiles in joy. He wonders at the experience of being, and being aware of being. And being aware of the awareness! -Matthew Miller A simple story with plenty of meaning!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wil

    Simple, but deep, precepts for living a good life.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Greg Russell

    Quick, fun and meaningful. Why to we perceive things the way we do? Have fun exploring this concept from a unique perspective. Perfect summer read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  15. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

  17. 5 out of 5

    karena

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steven Rodriguez

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Schlager

  20. 5 out of 5

    KT

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kaushilla Gunase

  22. 4 out of 5

    Will Cotton

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wendolyn

  24. 5 out of 5

    kathryn schuler

  25. 4 out of 5

    christie meehan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Caauwe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mindy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

  29. 5 out of 5

    Smiling Villanueva

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brie

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