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No Study Without Struggle: Confronting Settler Colonialism in Higher Education

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Examines how student protest against structural inequalities on campus pushes academic institutions to reckon with their legacy built on slavery and stolen Indigenous lands Using campus social justice movements as an entry point, Leigh Patel shows how the struggles in higher education often directly challenged the tension between narratives of education as a pathway to impr Examines how student protest against structural inequalities on campus pushes academic institutions to reckon with their legacy built on slavery and stolen Indigenous lands Using campus social justice movements as an entry point, Leigh Patel shows how the struggles in higher education often directly challenged the tension between narratives of education as a pathway to improvement and the structural reality of settler colonialism that creates and protects wealth for a select few. Through original research and interviews with activists and organizers from Black Lives Matter, The Black Panther party, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Combahee River Collective, and the Young Lords, Patel argues that the struggle on campuses reflect a starting point for higher education to confront settler strategies. She reveals how blurring the histories of slavery and Indigenous removal only traps us in history and perpetuates race, class, and gender inequalities. By acknowledging and challenging settler colonialism, Patel outlines the importance of understanding the relationship between the struggle and study and how this understanding is vital for societal improvement.


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Examines how student protest against structural inequalities on campus pushes academic institutions to reckon with their legacy built on slavery and stolen Indigenous lands Using campus social justice movements as an entry point, Leigh Patel shows how the struggles in higher education often directly challenged the tension between narratives of education as a pathway to impr Examines how student protest against structural inequalities on campus pushes academic institutions to reckon with their legacy built on slavery and stolen Indigenous lands Using campus social justice movements as an entry point, Leigh Patel shows how the struggles in higher education often directly challenged the tension between narratives of education as a pathway to improvement and the structural reality of settler colonialism that creates and protects wealth for a select few. Through original research and interviews with activists and organizers from Black Lives Matter, The Black Panther party, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Combahee River Collective, and the Young Lords, Patel argues that the struggle on campuses reflect a starting point for higher education to confront settler strategies. She reveals how blurring the histories of slavery and Indigenous removal only traps us in history and perpetuates race, class, and gender inequalities. By acknowledging and challenging settler colonialism, Patel outlines the importance of understanding the relationship between the struggle and study and how this understanding is vital for societal improvement.

30 review for No Study Without Struggle: Confronting Settler Colonialism in Higher Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    I RECEIVED THIS DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA EDELWEISS+. THANK YOU. My Review: Universities are under siege from as many angles as there are. Activists have campaigned, more or less successfully, for disinvestment from socially irresponsible industries. They've made the possession of a racially insensitive mascot a lightning rod for criticism. These news stories are commonplace enough to be readily Google-able, and to have a selection of attitudes and viewpoints from which to choose. I'd also recomm I RECEIVED THIS DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA EDELWEISS+. THANK YOU. My Review: Universities are under siege from as many angles as there are. Activists have campaigned, more or less successfully, for disinvestment from socially irresponsible industries. They've made the possession of a racially insensitive mascot a lightning rod for criticism. These news stories are commonplace enough to be readily Google-able, and to have a selection of attitudes and viewpoints from which to choose. I'd also recommend taking a few minutes to read Author Patel's Q&A on The Beacon Broadside's website for a trenchant, quotable précis of her thoughts on this difficult to dismiss subject. It is a clear statement of her purposes in writing this book. What makes this a worthwhile read is that it requires the reader to re-evaluate every university activity. There comes first identifying then admitting prospects "worthy" of the opportunity, with the "right kind" of work ethic both within their schools and outside them. Next the institution busies itself with identifying, designing, and inculcating the capitalist dogmas that will serve the needs of the ownership class. And finally, the cruelest step: indenturing students with mountains of debt to that ownership class for the privilege of enjoying the experience, which serves to prevent the offensive-to-them class and ethnic mixing. The fear being that, unburdened by economic chains, their students will inevitably rise above their starting points and cause their owners' control to be diluted. Reading Author Patel's work will, I'm sure, give the students and their parents the perspective to see through a definitively different lens. What makes that a good idea is that many will experience a sudden and usually pretty painful awakening. Those who are screaming about "critical race theory" are calling this propaganda spreading, brainwashing, or just plain indoctrination. As always, examine the accuser's accusations for cues as to the real source of their rage: the examination Author Patel demands we her readers undertake will cause some number of us to reject our present indoctrination as the unfair, exclusionary artifact of an exploitive ownership class's control paradigm. Since I've already had a pitcher of that Kool-Aid, this wasn't fresh stuff for me. What I needed to learn about was Author Patel's encouragement of the University's students to interrogate everything they are being offered through the awareness of settler colonialism's existence, reach, and signals of control. Her book is a call to arm yourself, youthful learners, with skepticism and information, not simply and passively accept the way things are without understanding how they got that way and who wants them to stay that way. What lowers my rating to four of five stars is my sense that the message, while complete and well-thought-through, isn't presented in such a way as to lead to action. In the world of young persons it's my experience that theory is best left to emerge from actions at the maxiumum possible number of times. I'd've been much more stirred and delighted had I seen some non-theoretical analysis..."when one sees this, then that is the likeliest cause; now, do this or that to draw attention to it with the aim of changing it." After all, Author Patel spoke to many whose lives of resistance and struggle included forging action agendas. Why not bring this facet, underpinning the work as it does, to the fore? But never mind all that Monday-morning quarterbacking. The book that is here, that is available from the estimable Beacon Press, will offer you much. If your child is leaving for college soon, I want to push you towards the read with some extra fervor. If your child is in college now, please send them one. There is no bad or wrong time to give someone not yet ossified into a brittle psychic shape the chisels and files and rasps to add refinement and enhancement to their awareness.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sanjay Varma

    A professor / former classmate of mine had tweeted about this book so I took a peek. Imagine a freshman walking to their classes that first day, and being taught to hate the University itself. What a bummer! I think that this author wants to create tormented, confused young people, who tie themselves into knots. After being taught to blame themselves, they are taught that the only way to find relief is to pass the blame on to others. Particularly damaging is the way that the process of blaming a A professor / former classmate of mine had tweeted about this book so I took a peek. Imagine a freshman walking to their classes that first day, and being taught to hate the University itself. What a bummer! I think that this author wants to create tormented, confused young people, who tie themselves into knots. After being taught to blame themselves, they are taught that the only way to find relief is to pass the blame on to others. Particularly damaging is the way that the process of blaming and blame shifting has been abstracted. The author writes it in a way that it appears she is blaming abstractions like higher education, America, or something called settlers. It is pretty obvious that these abstractions represent you, the student. (That is to say, anyone privileged enough to attend college, with an emphasis on white students.) By blaming abstractions the author makes her accusations into a less virulent strain of self-hatred. Her ideas won’t kill the host! However, impressionable young readers will suffer great psychic damage and find that the only way to relieve their pain will be by adding their voices to the chorus who attack our country’s institutions. (That is to say, through performative anti-racism) This book steals away a young person’s sense of community, confidence, faith, and their capacity for nurturing, knowledge-seeking, and trust. I want to ask seventeen and eighteen year olds, why are you going to college? Consider how many particle physicists have said that their biggest regret was to have wasted their entire academic career studying String Theory. Remember this famous song lyric: “Did they get you to trade / your heroes for ghosts?”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Leigh Patel's No Study Without Struggle is essential reading for anti-racists working in higher education. There was something on pretty much every page that I highlighted. My previous knowledge of colonization regarded colonial states, where colonizers would extract resources and then leave. Settler colonialism is, like in the U.S., where colonizers came and stayed, and still depend on white supremacy and structural racism. Settler colonialism requires acquisition of large amounts of private pr Leigh Patel's No Study Without Struggle is essential reading for anti-racists working in higher education. There was something on pretty much every page that I highlighted. My previous knowledge of colonization regarded colonial states, where colonizers would extract resources and then leave. Settler colonialism is, like in the U.S., where colonizers came and stayed, and still depend on white supremacy and structural racism. Settler colonialism requires acquisition of large amounts of private property and treating humans as property, not people. Some ways this plays out in higher ed, as Patel articulates, are the acquisition of native lands to house universities. These "land grant institutions," such as the one I work for, obfuscate and erase the presence and identity of native people on whose land their structures are built, as well as the labor of enslaved, racialized, or incarcerated people whose bodies build and work the campuses. Students and faculty are not free from encountering settler colonialism. Any minoritized scholars (both at student and faculty level) are "gifted" entrance and employment, scholarships and grants, and so on, which establishes an unequal relationship with the universities administration (usually white men) and the scholars of color. Patel also articulates the ways that the approach to issues of discrimination on campus is akin to couples counseling, which implies that all members willingly entered into the relationship, which does not address the imbalance of power or the university's unwillingness to actually change. I can't tell you how much I loved this book. After reading it, I felt like I needed to read it again at least twice to really get as much out of it as Patel put into it. Anyone who is in higher ed or has family in it should read this book, especially white people. I received an ARC of this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Heather Munao

    I definitely recommend this book to anyone who cares about issues of class, race, gender, and assorted American and educational sins. I also think it is basically required reading for everyone in academia / higher ed. The only reason I don’t give it 5 stars is because I think the author needed an extremely clear definition of settler colonialism up front. The 3 main traits did not get laid out until rather late in the book, so I felt I had to connect a lot of dots for a good part of the book— es I definitely recommend this book to anyone who cares about issues of class, race, gender, and assorted American and educational sins. I also think it is basically required reading for everyone in academia / higher ed. The only reason I don’t give it 5 stars is because I think the author needed an extremely clear definition of settler colonialism up front. The 3 main traits did not get laid out until rather late in the book, so I felt I had to connect a lot of dots for a good part of the book— especially in terms of how settler colonialism specifically differs from systemic racism. But I enjoyed and was challenged by this book. My full review is in Booklist.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a well-written work that extends the social justice conversation into deeper and richer territory. It was repetitive at times, but still a worthwhile read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    "Whenever education, specifically higher education, has been made to reckon with its settler colonial structure, it has been largely through thr struggles of those cast underneath the heel of oppression, fueled by their own formations to study." "...the very defenders who claim that this nation is meritocratic are often the beneficiaries of a centuries-long holocaust in which their ancestors seized Indian land and stole Black labor. The struggle to interrupt these narratives have been present thr "Whenever education, specifically higher education, has been made to reckon with its settler colonial structure, it has been largely through thr struggles of those cast underneath the heel of oppression, fueled by their own formations to study." "...the very defenders who claim that this nation is meritocratic are often the beneficiaries of a centuries-long holocaust in which their ancestors seized Indian land and stole Black labor. The struggle to interrupt these narratives have been present throughout this history and in current contexts." "The nation still upholds itself as the land of opportunity, where liberty, justice, and pursuit of hapiness are on offer all. Yet, during 2020 alone, the nation watched as thousands protested the robbing of Black life at the hands of militarized law enforcement and white men who had deputized themselves. Althought the nation's words assert its excellence and talent, its deeds, devaluing most peoples' lives and favoring individualism over collective wellness, were on full display, with Donald Trump, a lifelong explicit racist and misogynist, for years tweeting lies from the highest office in the land and refusing to concede electoral defeat despite clear evidence that he lost. These are not aberrations; they are but a few of thousands of data points from a nation that has a beautiful declaration of independence, written and signed largely by white men who enslaved people." "Public entities, such as parks and schools, may seem open to the public, but often are owned and surveilled by private entities or run through corporatist justifications of lifting up achievement and casting aside those who are not in the #1, A-plus club. Corporate-like charter schools are a poignant example of schools being available, purportedly, for the public good but not belonging and being answerable to the commons." "Dr. Mariame Kaba consistently reminds her many social media followrs and those who work with her for prison abolition, hope is a discipline. It is to be practiced, renewed, and maintained." "Struggle," in Kelley's essay and in this book, does not mean suffering and pain but people's rigorous engagement with each other and differing ideas of freedom." "The system of white supremacy has resulted in higher ed being historically and persistently white. The ongoing erasure of Indigenous peoples through Eurocentric curricula and the lack of accurate education about Indigenous lands upon which universities sit upon results in a miseducation and mixed messages from campuses that celebrate diversity in their brochures and websites, but in reality function as sites of whiteness." "Enslaved peoples literally built the nation's most elite institutions. In contemporary contexts, the majority of funding for public K-12 school districts comes from local property taxes. This means that the zip code into which children are born and their racially segregated neighborhoods determine their educational opportunities." "Barriers to higher education take many forms, and although different populations experience different forms of discrimination, they are connected through the larger structure of settler colonialism." "The belief that this a nation built by immigrants does several things at once: It erases origin stories and relationships to land that are fundamental to Indigenous knowledge systems. It lionizes immigrants while erasing the shifting forms of xenophobia directed at migrants throughout the history of the United States." "The narratives of education as the great equalizer and America as a melting pot gloss over the reality that the nation came to be a world power by building its wealth through stolen labor on stolen land. The project of settler colonialism, an ongoing power structure, manifests itself, in part, through racist capitalism, but it has many structural components that are not limited to racism." "Higher education has long been both a construct of colonialism and a hierarchy. The hierarchy, in which only those who have ascended through the long-standing cultural norms can weigh on who is admitted, hired, and tenured, reproduces the hierarchy." "The "nervous" mother who called the police during the CSU college tour, out of a misplaced perception of threat, was doing so beacuse this nation continues to materially protect and perpetuate the well-being of white people to the exclusion of all other groups. She had been socialized to believe the lie that youth of color, particularly when transgressing a rule regarding timelines, were to be held in suspicion, subject to arrest, for her literal and imagined safety." "...People in power sanction those who appear familiar. As a result, the highest rank of full professor is still overwhelmingly white and male. Black women make up less that 3 percent of all full professors, meaning that the tenured professoriate is largely unable to grasp the intertwined patriarchy and anti-racism that Black female professors face." "...the nation has used logics regarding who is more and less human to justify labor exploitation and the seizure of land. When those truths are not spoken, we are in essence preserving the credentials and means of ascendance for the dominant population. And we are co-signing education systems that tell BIPOC that their stories are either inferior or simply do not exist." "Part of her exasperation is owed to the expanse that she has to bridge between the sweeping dreams she carries as the daughter of migrants and the detailed energies and worries of belonging and identity she negotiates with her college-going peers." "The university is the creditor, and students of color are made to feel indebted. Also of note in this situation is who literally profits from the presence of students of color on college campuses and in society." "Societies and its institutions, including higher education, refelect each other. Every single social and political space of the United States has been deeply shaped by the history and structure of empire and colonialism and, in turn, feeds back into those structures." "The terms of inclusion are often understood through race, gender, and class, and sometimes sexual identity, but rarely in terms of how these categories create relationships to knowledge." "The uprising of the Dakota took place in response to a large-scale, armed settler encroachment. President Abraham Lincoln, the Great Emancipator, made the decision to hold the largest mass hanging to date the quell the uprising and, implicity, calm settler anxieties and secure settler property entitlement. He reduced the number of Dakota men to be executed from 303 to 38." "Historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz describes the United States as a culture of conquest that faciliates property quests at all costs. Within the structure of settler colonialism, there can never be enough land to satisfy the thirst of a few." "While it is inarguable that a plural society requires diverse curricula, marking of some texts as "diverse" or "multicultural" runs the risk of labeling these texts as other, in which case Eurocentric texts, or whiteness more broadly, continue to represent the center." "Normal schools," as schoolsof education were oreviously known, were created for the circumscribed education of white women and to trian them as teachers. At least until they married. This history of gender in education is both a mirror of an window into contemporary teacher education: it reflects and provides insight into the issues related to schoolteachers being predominantly white women. The teaching population is overwhelmingly white, female, and middle to middle-upper class. As gender studies scholars have brilliantly articulated, schools of education are animated by plantation politics that are feminized yet rarely feminist." "Race was created to deliver racism, and the category of race is too often seen as simple biological fact. Because categories, including race, gender, sexuality, and class, are ubiquitous, it can be easy to overlook that these categories are constructs with crushingly real material consequences." "Within my own experience, the particular power dynamics held by white women who, through patriarchy, rarely access the highest realms of power, often violently reinforce racist and settle power relations as a way to enact power over others." "And like the military and the Catholic church, higher education is a strictly hierarchal system." "Just as K-12 teachers perpetuate racism, heteropatriarchy, and ableism through their practices, higher education faculty do so in relation with their teaching and research. They also refresh the concept of whiteness as property." "College and K-12 students face significant structural challenges if they do not come with the safety nets that white families with generational wealth provide." "The racial trade-off between maintaining one group's safety at the expense of another is a common one, in which Black people die at higher rates because of enironmental racism, working conditions, and lack of access to healthcare, even in a city whose tallest buildings are lit up with the names of medical centers." "In a now-classic article that reframes the school-to-prison pipeline as the school-prison nexus, Meiners opens with a description of a conversation she had with an incarcerated man who asked why she was in the facility so frequently. Meiners explained her project of studying to interrupt carcerality. This incarcerated man replied, "Oh, so you study what I live?" "Poverty and debt do not simply exist naturally. They are created and perpetuated on purpose. Wealth and property accumulation are tied to debt and enclosure. One cannot exist without the other." "Myraid professional development sessions for educators consist of workshops with the aim of articulating and reducing implicit bias. These trainings confirm that growing up in a racialized society will lead to implicit biases." "The optics of diversity is the goal, and if they move beyond representation to vocalizing dissent or collectively articulating the need for structural change rather than reform, many universities are quick to reprimand them, call them uninformed about how much the university is doing to address racism-or more commonly, co-opt the issue abd host a forum about it, ,after which little further action is taken." "Although rarely acknowledged, the nation owes a great debt to the many cultures it has exploited for the purposes of accumulating property as whiteness. This is blatantly obious in the ways that stolen labor built universities on stolen land. However, there are other forms of debt that are rarely framed as such. The nation owes debts not only to those who have suffered under its project of settler colonialism, but also to those populations who have manifested, under challenging obstacles, success and stability." "As a child, I listened to my mother belittle herself, not because she lacked a sense of worth, but because the world had consistently told her that a migrant women who spoke English with an accent could not possibly be intelligent, let alone brilliant. It didn't matter that she taught herself English, a language with a completly different alphabetic code than her home language of Gujarati, slowly and over years. Neither did it matter that she taught herself to sew, slowly grew a home business that began with hemming pants on a lone Singer sewing machine that she still has and uses, then expanded to owning multiple industrial-grade sewing machines to handle sizable jobs involving drapes, valances, and bedspreads." "The stories that we tell about ourselves, our people, our nation, other people, and success or failure all have material force in the shape and functions that institutions perform in society. Because higher education is a key place where settler colonialism is conveyed, it would be a profound mistake to overlook the learning that happens beyond and within education that departs from settler principles of individualism and property ownership." "Linearity is a narrative, but the continuity of struggle is a reality." "Racial progress is intertwined with the resurgence of racism and the ongoing erasure of Indigeneity." "Then, as now, the nation's institutions of formal education emaciate Black, Native, and children of color, often from low-income families, through underfunding and teachers who do not see them as fully human." "...the advice that Horace Tate said he held closely throughout his life: be watchful of what is happening to what you have built, and be willing to destroy it if it no longer is serving the purpose of creating knowlledge and educating oppressed peoples." "Although the nation boasts that it was built by immigrants, it also simultaneously conducts xenophobic raids and holds migrant children in cages at the border." "Learning is a potent, transformational praxis. Why else would a nation work so hard to delegitimize so many languages and even outlaw literacy for enslaved peoples? Literacy opens doors to learning and knowing. Those are fundamentally political practices because power is always present in who gets to know what." "If you name the problem, you become the problem." "Bell, in examining why the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education came to be, asked this question: If the nation had been built on stolen labor and on stolen land, why would it suddenly have seen the light, so to speak, and changed course? He came yo a different conclusion through examining a confluence of social phenomena after World War II, including the return of Black soldiers to a nation that still regarded them as inferior and the successful rebellion of many colonized nations in Africa and Asia. Nell posed that Brown v. Board of Education, which was meant to encourage racial desegregation of schools, was a gesture. A conciliatory act that would sacrifice a bit of power to maintain white supremacy as the cultural and economic stronghold of the country." "The centering of diversity is, in and of itself, a move on the part of whiteness, as it names the absence of "the other" as the problem, not whiteness." "Systemic oppression, designed and maintained for settler colonial wealth, cannot be even approached through one-on-one conversations. Rather, these types of meetings perpetuate individualism and self-care sessions that are focused on the experiences of being heard. These moves are important but incomplete. They should not be conflated with structural change." "Diversity itself has taken on a life of its own in higher education and in the corporate world, but what's remained consistent has been its use to evade confronting racism." "Whiteness does not need to be named, a it is both assumed to be the norm and when referenced it is more specific: ethnic whites, such as Polish, Irish, and German American people. This pattern of sweeping pan-ethnic terms of the "Black community" or the LGBTQ community" creates categories for the purposes of delivering differing but consistent messages of these groups' relationships to power and oppression. It also creates a challenge for people to work across the created categories for collective resistance and struggle. Consequently, settler colonialism trundles along." "The reason that a few Black men have been profiled more frequently than the three Black women who started the Black Lives Matter movement and its dozens of charters nationwide is due to the demand for a charismatic male leader. This echoes the largely unkown fact that Coretta Scott King was pivotal in politicizing her husband's views." "Academic freedom has been collapsed into a facile notion of "free speech" and an articulation of "both sides of the story," when higher education itself has always been harmful physically, psychically, and spiritually to those cast on the underside of humanity." "When they are overloaded with requests to be on committees and provide unpaid labor, I remind graduate female students of color, particularly Black women, that they are already succeeding in a society that uses both patriarchy and white supremacy to dismiss their deep knowledge." "I doubt many researchers are aware that when they tell the story of an overachieving migrant youth, they are collapsing structural obstacles of racism and global capitalism, and strengthening nationalist narratives of meritocracy." "As a people who have been dreaming and pursuing freedom for centuries, Black Americans, like migrants, learn quickly that ownership of a home, of property, or a business is the imprint of the American Dream. They also, however, learn quickly that that dream is less available to them because of the still elusive generational wealth that whites continue to hold in the United States. The desire for stability through money is understandable, but as any factually based history of whiteness as property teaches, the laws and practices of anti-Blackness will do their best to unseat the economic gains of racially minoritized groups to preserve wealth for a few." "...settler colonialism has benefited from people conceiving of it as a historical event, not an ongoing structure and reality. That has allowed this overarching structure of society to stay under the radar of better-known perspectives such as critical race theory." "Society cannot change without struggle, and that struggle is susceptible to the kindling of appeasement that might burn but provides no heat or light." "People of color is not an identity but a relationship defined by racism, dispossession and imperalism. I'm not saying we're just "people" making some claim to universalism, but rather we need to recognize that as long as "difference" is structured in dominance, we are not free and we are not "made." Making revolution requires making new identities."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lance Eaton

    It's a compelling critique about higher education as a place that extends the settler-colonial mentality and practices of ownership, particularly the concept of creditors and debtors. It feels timely and relevant given a range of cultural clashes within higher education over the last decade, not to mention how schools have approached the entire pandemic and student, staff, and faculty safety--often interested in protecting the "investment" of the "live experience" over meaningful support of peop It's a compelling critique about higher education as a place that extends the settler-colonial mentality and practices of ownership, particularly the concept of creditors and debtors. It feels timely and relevant given a range of cultural clashes within higher education over the last decade, not to mention how schools have approached the entire pandemic and student, staff, and faculty safety--often interested in protecting the "investment" of the "live experience" over meaningful support of people in crisis at numerous levels. In essence, Patel asks how the legacy of the European invasion of the Americas, Africa, and Asia has been reinforced through concepts of property, many of which are baked into higher education. For instance, she draws out the ways in which older institutions (particularly Ivy Leagues) thrive through the use of enslaved people and financially benefitting from the slave trade (side mention for more on this: Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities). She goes beyond that to consider things like "land grant institutions" and how most of these colleges were granted "land" or resources from the land that placed Native Americans had been removed from. She pulls this lineage to the present to explore how this has happened in cities like Pittsburgh where land acquisition by higher education institutes was done in ways to reinforce gentrification and alienation of people and families, who once again, must go elsewhere because owners of capital have decided they do not matter. But she goes even further to consider how we think about knowledge, the classroom, and students, where the wealth institute extends cultural "credit" (in the form of course credits) to students, many of whom inevitably become debtors, thus subject to whatever may be possible, all in the name of reinforcing the European concept of ownership. Knowledge and mastery are grounded in Western ways of knowing, often devaluing or dismissing other types of knowledge from the cultures that have been pushed off the lands of their ancestors. And of course, credit and debt in teaching and learning make for a useful connection to Friere's concept of the banking model of education, to which higher education is still very much interesting as Patel points out. Investing too in all of its literal (endowments) and metaphorical (students, staff, faculty) becomes another axis for Patel to illustrate how the settler mindset still permeates higher education in ways that can still do harm to people that higher education and the U.S. culture has routinely seen as less important and (pun intended) valuable to the bottom line.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Incredible - recommended reading for every single person who has a desire to be anti-racist and critically dissect the legacy of American society, and should be required reading for every single higher education professional. I've never read a book that so clearly pierced into sentiments that I didn't know how to put into words. Incredible - recommended reading for every single person who has a desire to be anti-racist and critically dissect the legacy of American society, and should be required reading for every single higher education professional. I've never read a book that so clearly pierced into sentiments that I didn't know how to put into words.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Book Club of One

    * I received a free copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.* In No Study Without Struggle: Confronting Settler Colonialism in Higher Education Dr. Patel uses campus social justice movements as a gateway to contrast the meritocratic narrative against the structural reality of settler colonialism. As it frames much of the book it is worth noting that settler colonialism is defined as an ongoing system of power that perpetuates containment, repression and genocide of indigenous peoples and * I received a free copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.* In No Study Without Struggle: Confronting Settler Colonialism in Higher Education Dr. Patel uses campus social justice movements as a gateway to contrast the meritocratic narrative against the structural reality of settler colonialism. As it frames much of the book it is worth noting that settler colonialism is defined as an ongoing system of power that perpetuates containment, repression and genocide of indigenous peoples and cultures.* This very timely short work, details the formations of many institutions of higher education and the role of slavery or stolen indigenous land in that process. Drawing from personal experiences, interviews with activists and organizers from Black Lives Matter, The Black Panther Party as well as researching the archival materials of organizations such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; Patel present the case that much of higher education is built and maintained for white people and that naming the problem of racism is not enough, and offers many different possibilities for improvement and change. As articulated by Patel, we as a culture need to understand that history is not confined to the past but has continually repercussion on our present. As one discussed example, an American textbook presents the narrative of Manifest Destiny as the White Christian god given right to the control and ownership of the Western United States, but this erases the Native American cultures that were displaced, contained and destroyed. (pages 44-47). A very thought provoking book, and one that should be read by anyone currently working, or planning to work, in higher education. Dr. Leigh Patel is currently a professor of Educational Foundations, Organizations, and Policy at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr Patel is "is a transdisciplinary (sic) scholar who studies the narratives that create material realities in society. Her research focuses on both the ways schooling delivers inequities and how education can be a tool for liberation."** * Alicia Cox. "Settler Colonialism." Oxford Bibliographies Accessed 7-18-2021. ** "Leigh Patel." Univeristy of Pittsburgh, Accessed 7-18-2021.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Important reading for educators

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chantelle

    read it for class but loved the calling out of (settler) institutional oppression

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was an incredibly informative, quick read. Important for any that have worked in any facet of academia. Jam packed full of info, this book is a must-read for those in higher education.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Corynne

  15. 5 out of 5

    Debmeinke

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sbmedlin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia Tan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alejandra

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mwa

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cass

  22. 5 out of 5

    DJ Meunier

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eman

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris Linder

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mikaela C.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Tehee

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

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