Hot Best Seller

Composing Music: A New Approach

Availability: Ready to download

Aimed at those who have some knowledge of music but not formal training in composition, this concise introduction to composing starts right in with a brief composition exercise, then proceeds step by step through a series of increasingly complex and challenging problems, gradually expanding the student's musical grammar. "This is a wonderful book for anyone who is developin Aimed at those who have some knowledge of music but not formal training in composition, this concise introduction to composing starts right in with a brief composition exercise, then proceeds step by step through a series of increasingly complex and challenging problems, gradually expanding the student's musical grammar. "This is a wonderful book for anyone who is developing improvising skills or who would like a fun way to explore music."—Jim Stockford, Co-Evolution Quarterly


Compare

Aimed at those who have some knowledge of music but not formal training in composition, this concise introduction to composing starts right in with a brief composition exercise, then proceeds step by step through a series of increasingly complex and challenging problems, gradually expanding the student's musical grammar. "This is a wonderful book for anyone who is developin Aimed at those who have some knowledge of music but not formal training in composition, this concise introduction to composing starts right in with a brief composition exercise, then proceeds step by step through a series of increasingly complex and challenging problems, gradually expanding the student's musical grammar. "This is a wonderful book for anyone who is developing improvising skills or who would like a fun way to explore music."—Jim Stockford, Co-Evolution Quarterly

30 review for Composing Music: A New Approach

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Hatch

    I’ve been writing music for over 30 years at this point and was a music major and teach music professionally, so I was not expecting to learn anything new. And I did not. I read this book with an eye to getting ideas for exercises and approaches I could use in teaching composition to my own students, and I even did a few of the exercises when it seemed like I would learn something interesting from working them. The book is aimed at students who have very minimal knowledge of music and compositio I’ve been writing music for over 30 years at this point and was a music major and teach music professionally, so I was not expecting to learn anything new. And I did not. I read this book with an eye to getting ideas for exercises and approaches I could use in teaching composition to my own students, and I even did a few of the exercises when it seemed like I would learn something interesting from working them. The book is aimed at students who have very minimal knowledge of music and composition — think college freshmen who are maybe also taking Theory 101 and studied some instrument in high school. It would be totally fine for self study. If you do that, know that it came out in 1980 so it’s subtly dated, mostly in its emphasis on ideas found in minimalism. Which at the time was absolutely cutting edge. For my own work it was most helpful in reminding me of techniques and procedures that I often don’t think to try, so I copied them into a list in my notebook as I went, to refer to when I’m writing my next pieces.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Max

    I keep wanting to rate this book higher, because it really is filled with fascinating ideas, a lot of which are going to be very interesting to a new composer-to-be. The problem with this book, however, lies in its "new approach." Learning concepts while constantly writing things is ultra refreshing compared to the standard, and the fact that it's so easy to hold and carry around for self study is another great feature, but unfortunately it is a very odd book with very advanced ambitions, which i I keep wanting to rate this book higher, because it really is filled with fascinating ideas, a lot of which are going to be very interesting to a new composer-to-be. The problem with this book, however, lies in its "new approach." Learning concepts while constantly writing things is ultra refreshing compared to the standard, and the fact that it's so easy to hold and carry around for self study is another great feature, but unfortunately it is a very odd book with very advanced ambitions, which is an odd thing to throw at beginning students of music. For instance, the insistence on non-diatonic chords, or the incredibly long look at organum or the 12 tone row. I struggled for hours on the 12 tone row, trying to write good and listenable music, before looking online and finding that even the professional music recorded in this way is intentionally jarring and difficult to understand.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Nothing I didn't already know, which surprised me Nothing I didn't already know, which surprised me

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chadd B Knowlton

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nupur Tustin

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Nelson

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nate Trier

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Clark

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tom Getty

  12. 5 out of 5

    William Jay

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Holman

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Josh Levesque

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Agrell

  17. 4 out of 5

    Althea

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hausmann

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Langford

  20. 4 out of 5

    Prince Daryl

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Meusch

    If not one of the best books on composition. Get it fill up the pages with notes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Solacium

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  24. 5 out of 5

    Martin Zimandl

  25. 5 out of 5

    Coty Taylor

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leong Wai San

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karl

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chaz Hunt

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joe Bean

  30. 4 out of 5

    exaltron

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...