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Chaat: Recipes from the Kitchens, Markets, and Railways of India: A Cookbook

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30 review for Chaat: Recipes from the Kitchens, Markets, and Railways of India: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    3.5 stars. This is a book I’ll have to come back to so I can try out some of the recipes. We enjoyed the very occasional meal from a street vendor when last in India (many years ago. We couldn’t tell my proper grandmother that we’d done so as she would have been offended we hadn’t had lunch with her those few times.) I liked the mix of memoir and recipe in this book, and looking at the photos made me very hungry!

  2. 5 out of 5

    FashionablyEvil

    Part travel memoir, part cookbook. And I am now very hungry.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    "Chaat are typically snacks or small meals that are tangy and sweet, fiery and crunchy, savory and sour all in one topsy-turvy bite." In this lovely book, CHAAT: RECIPES FROM THE KITCHENS, MARKETS, AND RAILWAYS OF INDIA, Maneet Chauhan explores the many regional chaat recipes she grew up with visiting friends and family along India's vast railway system. It is filled with fantastic photographs of railway stations, chaat vendors, and other scenes in India, and her recipes are accompanied with cap "Chaat are typically snacks or small meals that are tangy and sweet, fiery and crunchy, savory and sour all in one topsy-turvy bite." In this lovely book, CHAAT: RECIPES FROM THE KITCHENS, MARKETS, AND RAILWAYS OF INDIA, Maneet Chauhan explores the many regional chaat recipes she grew up with visiting friends and family along India's vast railway system. It is filled with fantastic photographs of railway stations, chaat vendors, and other scenes in India, and her recipes are accompanied with captivating little stories about her experiences eating and learning about them. It's wonderful. I used to travel to India (mainly Pune, in Maharashtra) often for work, and I loved talking to my colleagues, many of whom came from other states, about their favorite foods. I tried everything. We planned a weekend drive to Lonavla partly to see the Karla and Bhaja Caves and visit Tiger's Leap and Bhushi Dam, but also because I wanted to buy and eat allll the chikkis. Yum. Once I talked my driver into taking me to his favorite vada pav vendor in Pune, and if I remember correctly I had him buy me 3 (AMAZING) sandwiches for like 100 rupees (a little more than $1). I still salivate a little when I think about them. This book has a recipe, and I'll try to make it, but it's never the same. I've tried to make chicken biryani (from this book), dal makhni, paneer lababdar, and many of my other favorite Indian recipes at home, and even ordered them from a number of restaurants, but nothing quite catches the magic for me. But that's not to say it isn't worth it to try! Five stars, a beautiful book. I learned a lot about travel in India and the author's love for her country's food and its people are drawn out on each page. I look forward to trying more of the recipes. Format: Hardcover cookbook, owned Read for: 2021 Reading Women Challenge Prompt 4 - Cookbook by a Woman of Color

  4. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    An impulse purchase because chaat is my favorite part of the menu in any Indian restaurant, reading through this cookbook is making me miss cooking for friends. There are a handful of options here that would reasonably scale down for my current solo cooking but I’ll be planning a dinner party for six months or so from now.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Saw this at the library and decided to borrow it on a whim. I don't know much about the different foods or regions of India, beyond of what I've eaten here in the US and what my friends have shared with me. So it seemed like a fun read, even if I am too intimidated (and too unskilled, ha!) to really attempt any of these myself. The cookbook is pretty formulaic: you learn a bit about Indian food and various regions, with recipes of individual foods (plus in what context these foods are consumed an Saw this at the library and decided to borrow it on a whim. I don't know much about the different foods or regions of India, beyond of what I've eaten here in the US and what my friends have shared with me. So it seemed like a fun read, even if I am too intimidated (and too unskilled, ha!) to really attempt any of these myself. The cookbook is pretty formulaic: you learn a bit about Indian food and various regions, with recipes of individual foods (plus in what context these foods are consumed and where). The author often shares personal memories surrounding these foods and it makes for a nice mix of both cookbook and memoir. There's not much more to say about it. I think the author did a pretty good job in breaking down the unfamiliar, explaining what ingredients are, how to get them, etc. I couldn't say as to what level a person would need to be (obviously you should have some experience in the kitchen) but I would imagine this is reasonably accessible for many people. I suppose if I had any criticism I wish there had been more pictures, because the ones that were shared (just look at that cover!) definitely made me think these were also some genuinely beautiful recipes once they're made (and made by someone who knows what they're doing, haha). I enjoyed it! Not sure if I'd buy it for myself but for the right person this would make an excellent gift. Borrowed from the library and that was best.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This cookbook was almost more of a travelogue to India's railway system. Interesting narrative of how the railways work in India being the most popular mode of transportation to traverse that huge country. At every rail station, vendors are selling all kinds of different "Chaat", which is the sweet, salty, spicy, creamy, hot and cold snacks that all sound delicious. They have "milk bars"which are casual walk-up stands to drink flavored milks. All different kinds of Chutneys seem to go along with This cookbook was almost more of a travelogue to India's railway system. Interesting narrative of how the railways work in India being the most popular mode of transportation to traverse that huge country. At every rail station, vendors are selling all kinds of different "Chaat", which is the sweet, salty, spicy, creamy, hot and cold snacks that all sound delicious. They have "milk bars"which are casual walk-up stands to drink flavored milks. All different kinds of Chutneys seem to go along with everything they eat. Much more than just a cookbook with recipes, this book was a real eye-opener into a totally different way of life and cuisine. Nice page about the "dabbawalas". If you think you know something about Indian food...you really don't until you peruse this cookbook.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I enjoyed reading this cookbook a lot. I loved hearing about the railway system in India, and the different types of chaat you find throughout the country. The stories made me want to travel. The recipes (for me) were a bit intimidating due to unfamiliar ingredients. And I wish there had been pictures of each of the recipes. I had to look things up online to understand what she was talking about sometimes. Overall a fun book to read. I'll probably try a couple of the recipes. I enjoyed reading this cookbook a lot. I loved hearing about the railway system in India, and the different types of chaat you find throughout the country. The stories made me want to travel. The recipes (for me) were a bit intimidating due to unfamiliar ingredients. And I wish there had been pictures of each of the recipes. I had to look things up online to understand what she was talking about sometimes. Overall a fun book to read. I'll probably try a couple of the recipes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    (a)lyss(a)

    This is a thorough and intensive recipe book! It's part memoir, part recipe guide. Most of the recipes are intensive and require quite a bit of work. The recipes could be a bit more detailed for those unfamiliar with cooking this way. The book is broken down by geography and gives some information about the different foods. Overall an interesting find. This is a thorough and intensive recipe book! It's part memoir, part recipe guide. Most of the recipes are intensive and require quite a bit of work. The recipes could be a bit more detailed for those unfamiliar with cooking this way. The book is broken down by geography and gives some information about the different foods. Overall an interesting find.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    Bold, colorful, and filled with delicious recipes highlighting the diverseness of Indian cuisine. Gorgeous photography and heartwarming stories. Some of the recipes might be a little hard to make as some ingredients could be hard to source if you don't live near an Indian grocery store or an international food shop. Bold, colorful, and filled with delicious recipes highlighting the diverseness of Indian cuisine. Gorgeous photography and heartwarming stories. Some of the recipes might be a little hard to make as some ingredients could be hard to source if you don't live near an Indian grocery store or an international food shop.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Upuli Pahalawatta

    This is now one of my favourite cookbooks! The writing style is so engaging and the recipes are laid out so neatly that I want to go out and buy a copy for myself and presents. The authors write about each area of India, explaining their experience with each dishes, transporting you the reader to each locale, eating each delicious dish with them

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sara Brockunier

    While away I received a free copy from Clarkson Potter in exchange for a free and unbiased review. I have enjoyed reading this book ... especially the recipes ... so many different spices and foods from what I normally eat. The photographs are beautiful. Maneet Chauhan has become a favorite chef since watching her on Food Network.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Padmaja Patkar

    Wonderful book Loved the way Majestic describes the simplicity on the train rides & the adventures they bring! Growing bulb in India I do remember the fun. She also talks about each place & it's culinary culture passionately! This is more than just a cookbook! Wonderful book Loved the way Majestic describes the simplicity on the train rides & the adventures they bring! Growing bulb in India I do remember the fun. She also talks about each place & it's culinary culture passionately! This is more than just a cookbook!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sheela Lal

    After listening to a podcast interview, I assumed the book would feature less popular chaat stories and recipes. I was wrong. The recipes were definitely for a Western audience, which surprisingly rubbed me the wrong way.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jane H

    Gorgeous cookbook! I especially loved the memoir sections. I'm still a bit hesitant to try a recipe that has so many unfamiliar ingredients. I wondered if I needed more handholding or if I need to just get over it and jump in. It's mouthwatering just to page through! Gorgeous cookbook! I especially loved the memoir sections. I'm still a bit hesitant to try a recipe that has so many unfamiliar ingredients. I wondered if I needed more handholding or if I need to just get over it and jump in. It's mouthwatering just to page through!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sireesha Avvari

    Interesting recipes. Liked the photographs. Tried a few recipes and absolutely loved them. Didn’t read this cover to cover but browsed through the recipes that caught my fancy. The Goan Scotch Eggs had been a delight.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Gorgeous!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashani

    First reads from Maneater. Love and so many recipes to cook from🤩!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Haven’t made any of the recipes yet, most of them require specialty ingredients which makes sense. It was like a travel diary of the trains of India so I really enjoyed that aspect

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A beautiful cookbook that’s part memoir, part travelogue and part recipes. Everything in this book looks amazing. I can’t wait to try some of these snacks.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    These recipes seem so yummy, but too much work for me to prepare for myself.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cynde

    A wonderful introduction to street food from India. Beautiful photography and interesting text brings the magic and the flavors to mind. Makes me want to visit her restaurants!!!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    I loved reading the stories of Maneet’s childhood and visits to all parts of India!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Dowling

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rambling Reader

  25. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pardeep Sahota

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lg

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deena

  30. 4 out of 5

    kulvinder rajasansi

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