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Slewfoot: A Tale of Bewitchery

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A spirited young Englishwoman, Abitha, arrives at a Puritan colony betrothed to a stranger – only to become quickly widowed when her husband dies under mysterious circumstances. All alone in this pious and patriarchal society, Abitha fights for what little freedom she can grasp onto, while trying to stay true to herself and her past. Enter Slewfoot, a powerful spirit of ant A spirited young Englishwoman, Abitha, arrives at a Puritan colony betrothed to a stranger – only to become quickly widowed when her husband dies under mysterious circumstances. All alone in this pious and patriarchal society, Abitha fights for what little freedom she can grasp onto, while trying to stay true to herself and her past. Enter Slewfoot, a powerful spirit of antiquity newly woken… and trying to find his own role in the world. Healer or destroyer? Protector or predator? But as the shadows walk and villagers start dying, a new rumor is whispered: Witch. Both Abitha and Slewfoot must swiftly decide who they are, and what they must do to survive in a world intent on hanging any who meddle in the dark arts.


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A spirited young Englishwoman, Abitha, arrives at a Puritan colony betrothed to a stranger – only to become quickly widowed when her husband dies under mysterious circumstances. All alone in this pious and patriarchal society, Abitha fights for what little freedom she can grasp onto, while trying to stay true to herself and her past. Enter Slewfoot, a powerful spirit of ant A spirited young Englishwoman, Abitha, arrives at a Puritan colony betrothed to a stranger – only to become quickly widowed when her husband dies under mysterious circumstances. All alone in this pious and patriarchal society, Abitha fights for what little freedom she can grasp onto, while trying to stay true to herself and her past. Enter Slewfoot, a powerful spirit of antiquity newly woken… and trying to find his own role in the world. Healer or destroyer? Protector or predator? But as the shadows walk and villagers start dying, a new rumor is whispered: Witch. Both Abitha and Slewfoot must swiftly decide who they are, and what they must do to survive in a world intent on hanging any who meddle in the dark arts.

30 review for Slewfoot: A Tale of Bewitchery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Char

    Having read LOST GODS a few years ago, I became a fan of Brom. When I saw the cover of this one I knew I had to have it. I was not disappointed! Abitha was sold off by her drunk father in London, to a husband, (Edward), in Puritanical Connecticut. She begins her life on her new husband's farm and grows to truly love him. Unfortunately, her husband's brother is part owner of the farm, and he's deep in debt. Before she knows it, her brother-in-law is attempting to steal their land and the nosy Puri Having read LOST GODS a few years ago, I became a fan of Brom. When I saw the cover of this one I knew I had to have it. I was not disappointed! Abitha was sold off by her drunk father in London, to a husband, (Edward), in Puritanical Connecticut. She begins her life on her new husband's farm and grows to truly love him. Unfortunately, her husband's brother is part owner of the farm, and he's deep in debt. Before she knows it, her brother-in-law is attempting to steal their land and the nosy Puritanical neighbors are all up in their business. It's almost too much for Abitha to take. One day, Edward wanders into the woods and Abitha's life changes forever. Widowed now, will she be able to hold on to her farm? Will her evil brother-in-law work with the uptight townsfolk to oust her? You'll have to read this to find out! I very much enjoyed the style of storytelling here, it was almost like a fairy tale. I'm trying to explain without spoiling anything, so bear with me. I felt like some of the characters could have used a bit more of a back story for me to be fully invested in them. Sky and Forest, to mention two. That said, Abitha has to be one of my favorite characters in all of literature. She was so well defined, I never found myself second guessing her decisions. She, being put into a terrible situation by her father, decides to make the best of it and then follows through on that, under the most ghastly conditions. She holds the memory of her mother dear, and Abitha never forgets what her mother told her as a young girl. But Abitha is also strong-willed and headstrong, and she's certainly a lot of woman for the prudish ladies in town to handle. That's what I loved most about her. Samson was a confusing character for me, which I guess isn't surprising, because he was confused himself. As the tale progressed though, things became more clear, and I began to like and pity Samson at the same time. I love characters that are conflicted because otherwise where's the story? Samson and Abitha both grew as characters and I felt differently about them both at the end of the tale than I did at the beginning. That's always a sign of great writing in my book, and that's what's in THIS book. Overall, I enjoyed this tale and Brom has impressed me once again. I read an e-ARC of this story, so I cannot yet speak to Brom's artwork. A paper copy is on the way though, and once I see it, I reserve the right to update this review accordingly. As of right now, based on the story alone, I highly recommend SLEWFOOOT: A TALE OF BEWITCHERY. Let Brom bewitch YOU! *Thanks to NetGalley/Tor/Nightfire for the e-ARC in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it!*

  2. 5 out of 5

    Books with Brittany

    3.25⭐️ maybe. So conflicted. The last 20% saved it. If only the first 80% was that good

  3. 5 out of 5

    Latasha

    This beautiful book -and narrator- gets all the stars in the sky!! It definitely deserves way more than the 5 I can rate it. Thank you a million times to Macmillan Audio for the book! Barrie Kreinik does the most beautiful and enchanting job reading this. Brom creates a realistic (and awful) world. The characters are real, richly detailed and wonderful. The story is absolutely horrific and captivating all at once. No way would I want to be alive during this time, and certainly not a Puritan. This beautiful book -and narrator- gets all the stars in the sky!! It definitely deserves way more than the 5 I can rate it. Thank you a million times to Macmillan Audio for the book! Barrie Kreinik does the most beautiful and enchanting job reading this. Brom creates a realistic (and awful) world. The characters are real, richly detailed and wonderful. The story is absolutely horrific and captivating all at once. No way would I want to be alive during this time, and certainly not a Puritan. Abitha is one of the best characters I've met in a very long time. I love her and was cheering her on during the whole book. Samson was very interesting as well. I enjoyed learning about him and his story.The villains were the worst, as they are meant to be. The magic in this book was so wonderful, I did not want it to end EVER! This is now one of my favorites and I'm sure i will listen to it over & over again. I'm already tempted to just start it over! I will be recommending Slewfoot for a very, very long time. Again, thank you so very much for the chance to listen to this one!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    I RECEIVED A DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA NETGALLEY. THANK YOU. My Review: Maybe it was the teen angst. Maybe it was my allergy to Villains Without Nuance. Maybe I'm just getting old. I don't like this book much. I should...spooky dos in Puritan times? folk horror? Revenge?! yes please...and I think I might have if I hadn't taken against Abitha so very strongly. Adolescents whose sense of themselves as Right and Hard Done By aren't enjoyable companions for an entire book. I felt Abitha's difficultie I RECEIVED A DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA NETGALLEY. THANK YOU. My Review: Maybe it was the teen angst. Maybe it was my allergy to Villains Without Nuance. Maybe I'm just getting old. I don't like this book much. I should...spooky dos in Puritan times? folk horror? Revenge?! yes please...and I think I might have if I hadn't taken against Abitha so very strongly. Adolescents whose sense of themselves as Right and Hard Done By aren't enjoyable companions for an entire book. I felt Abitha's difficulties with Authority were period appropriate...totally bought that she was justifiably angry with the entire male world...but she comes across as a modern woman. Then when Slewfoot-the-character wins her over with no effort? He's an innocent, albeit one with tremendous Powers, and with...um...horns? Literal goatly horns. But Abitha just...accepts. It strained me to buy into that. I'm not insensitive to the appeal of the Other to those trapped in rigid, conformity-enforcing social milieus. But Abitha's ready acceptance of this, um, extremely Other that resembles the goat we meet her losing...and she even calls him "Samson" after the goat...it didn't scan for me with a seventeenth-century woman. Not even one whose upbringing was as peculiar, her mother a root woman and her father a drunken sot, as hers was. My most favoritest thing is the animate Forest that Slewfoot (he has other names throughout the story, all of which carry their own shades of meaning and of humor) cohabits with, that has re-summoned Slewfoot from a liminal state to deal with Forest's concerns about its future. (I loved Jesus Thunderbird's name for Slewfoot...Hobomok...as it carried so many levels, from a beautiful butterfly to a scary demon via an early American novel about the Noble Savage slur. A quick trip to the internet will give you literal *hours* of perusing pleasure.) Perhaps the most unsettling of Brom's illustrations is the one he made for Creek: It's perfect, it's unsettlingly Other, and completely relatably familiar all at the same time. What's missing here is the essence of Creek's Wrongness, Otherness...scale...Creek is tiny and looks like that. Sweet dreams! These being hallmarks of Brom's works, and the source of my relatively high rating for a book I wasn't all the way in sympathy with, so I was rolling along fine until...the torture porn began. Abitha and her mother, women accused of witchcraft, were in for a bad time. I accepted that. But I was revolted by the deeply prurient recounting of the torments meted out to the women, guilty as charged by the lights of the community they lived in though ambiguously so in modern eyes. They transgressed...they paid dearly for it... "I want to burn them to the ground, All of them. All of it. Their church, their commandments, their covenants, their riles, edicts, and laws, their fields, their homes, and most of all their fucking bonnets and aprons. I want to hollow them out, make them know what it is to lose everything, everything, to lose their very soul!" Nothing in this life comes for free...the bigger the ask, the bigger the price. There is more truth than you can fully know in the ancient adage, "Be careful what you wish for lest the answer be Yes."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Lawson

    A tale of vengeance and horror just right for Halloween. A bit dark and gory but if you like that sort of thing you'll love it. A tale of vengeance and horror just right for Halloween. A bit dark and gory but if you like that sort of thing you'll love it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    WhiskeyintheJar

    2.7 stars I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Sutton, Connecticut, March 1666 At seventeen, Abitha's father sold her to the government to be shipped off to the colonies and become the bride of a Puritan man named Edward. For a girl who has a temper and has no problem spouting profanities, living in a Puritan society has been difficult. Even though he is ten years her senior, Abitha and her husb 2.7 stars I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Sutton, Connecticut, March 1666 At seventeen, Abitha's father sold her to the government to be shipped off to the colonies and become the bride of a Puritan man named Edward. For a girl who has a temper and has no problem spouting profanities, living in a Puritan society has been difficult. Even though he is ten years her senior, Abitha and her husband Edward get along and even are working at growing close to one another. Edward's brother Wallace, however, often tries to take advantage of Edward and this pits Abitha and Wallace against each other. When Wallace can't pay off a debt, he tries to take Edward's farm instead of losing his own and this sets off a tale of murder, spite, revenge, and fantasy and human devils trying to claim the land. “Angels must often do dark deeds in the name of the Lord.” Slewfoot was a story that combined fantasy horror with historical fiction. The colonial Puritan setting already provides it's own chills as their history in the 1600s is well known and with each charm Abitha makes for a fellow woman in the village, the tension creeps further in as you know how deadly this path could end up for her. I didn't expect the fantasy horror part to play such a large part, it sometimes felt like a separate story at times and wasn't until the last 20% that I thought those two components cohesively gelled. “Even the Devil does not wish to be the Devil. [...]” The fantasy horror part involves some inspiration from various pagan lore to create the “wildfolk” and their “father” who they wake up by luring a goat and then Edward into a pit and having father feed off their blood. As the goat was Abitha and Edward's, named Samson, this father goat beast becomes Samson. He's physically described to resemble a 1600s devil and this is what characters who see him call him but he's confused as to who , what, and why his purpose is. Samson dealing with his existential crisis provides a track for the author to explore nature vs human themes while Abitha's story fades to the background a little bit and she slowly gets put on a collision course to battle with Wallace. As at least cruelty was a thing that could be pointed out, confronted. But this belief, this absolute conviction that this evil they were doing was good, was God’s work— how, she wondered, how could such a dark conviction ever be overcome? With Abitha making charms for the other woman, we get some backstory that her mother was a “cunning woman”, a pagan healer, this works to bridge her to Samson as she works to convince herself that he isn't merely the devil but one of the gods, faefolk perhaps. At 40% the two sort of join forces as Samson helps her grow her crops to save her farm and she gives him a purpose other than murdering humans that are encroaching on the land. This upsets the wildfolk as they want to fully reclaim the land and the dichotomy of “good” nature vs “evil” humans gets played with as the wildfolk aren't altruistic and Abitha actually finds friends in a Reverend and his wife. The Devil has come for me! The middle, with Abitha and Samson, slowed down for me but at 60% we have the creeping witch hysteria finally come to fruition and the focus shifts to that horror as Samson exits the story for a while. The author does a great job of showing how spite and misogyny started the accusation against Abitha from Wallace and then how sweeping fear and cravenness fueled the townspeople. There's some torture scenes and then the last 20% brings together the witch hysteria historical fiction with the fantasy horror and I thought the two finally gelled together and created a murderous revenge celebration. “If it is a witch they want,” she hissed, “then a witch they shall have.” The beginning had a nice creeping tension feel to it, the middle slowed for me with the Samson fantasy thread not fully gelling with Abitha's historical fiction, but then the ending brought the two together to create some satisfying horror as the devil take their due. The epilogue will probably hit readers differently but I always enjoy a good happily ever after.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristina (heartsfullofreads)

    Actual rating: 4.5 stars This was exactly the kind of witchy horror tale that I love. It was atmospheric, creepy, and bloody. I'm sucker for a good vengeance story and the author truly delivered on this. Abitha was a fantastic character and I liked her right from the beginning. I was rooting for her through the whole story. I'm sure a horror book has ever elicited so many emotions from me. My only complaint is that the pacing slowed a little in the middle of the book. Otherwise, it was fantastic. Actual rating: 4.5 stars This was exactly the kind of witchy horror tale that I love. It was atmospheric, creepy, and bloody. I'm sucker for a good vengeance story and the author truly delivered on this. Abitha was a fantastic character and I liked her right from the beginning. I was rooting for her through the whole story. I'm sure a horror book has ever elicited so many emotions from me. My only complaint is that the pacing slowed a little in the middle of the book. Otherwise, it was fantastic. I think folk horror is definitely my vibe. I'll be picking up more of Brom's books in the future.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    Abitha is trying her best to fit in to this strange new world, America where she is wedded to a man she never knew until her father sold her off from England. Though not necessarily in love with her new husband there is an affection there, and she does what she can to be a good wife. Her husband's brother is a selfish and greedy man while her husband is often too meek to stand up to him. The villagers are Puritans, and are more realistically portrayed in this work of historical fiction than in t Abitha is trying her best to fit in to this strange new world, America where she is wedded to a man she never knew until her father sold her off from England. Though not necessarily in love with her new husband there is an affection there, and she does what she can to be a good wife. Her husband's brother is a selfish and greedy man while her husband is often too meek to stand up to him. The villagers are Puritans, and are more realistically portrayed in this work of historical fiction than in the actual history book I was made to study as a child. They are not people who believe in religious freedom, they are my way or the highway kind of people who would sooner shackle you and stone you than let you get away with being 2 minutes late for a sermon, and heaven help you if a lock of hair ever escaped from under your cap! When Abitha's husband is killed, his brother expects Abitha to become his servant. He tried to tell her she was weak, that she did not matter because she was only a woman, he tried to sabotage her efforts, however she was stronger and more powerful than he knew, and with some magical helpers she will have her revenge. This book is so many things in one. It's horror, fantasy, historical fiction, and a harrowing tale of revenge. It begins in 1666 and has a perfect ending in a 1970s epilogue. It is at times hauntingly beautiful and at others graphic and gory. I loved the way Abitha awakened to her true self. 4 out of 5 stars I received an advance copy. All of my reviews are posted at https://wellwortharead.blogspot.com/

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brinley

    I absolutely loved this book! I had been wary about starting it for some reason, but as soon as I picked it up, I couldn't put it down. It was historical fiction/fantasy at its finest, and I loved it. First off, Abitha was such a strong character. Her transformation over the course of the story was absolutely amazing, she held so much power. I'm not even going to pretend that I don't have entire paragraphs highlighted, they were that epic. I also loved how delightfully witchy this was. Abitha wa I absolutely loved this book! I had been wary about starting it for some reason, but as soon as I picked it up, I couldn't put it down. It was historical fiction/fantasy at its finest, and I loved it. First off, Abitha was such a strong character. Her transformation over the course of the story was absolutely amazing, she held so much power. I'm not even going to pretend that I don't have entire paragraphs highlighted, they were that epic. I also loved how delightfully witchy this was. Abitha was the type of witch I long for, she cast her spells, and she made her charms. The book was slow enough that she had time to develop and grow, without being too slow. I also really loved Samson. Sure, he was the devil, but I loved how he wasn't all bad. His portrayal was super unique, and it was a spin of religion and paganism I hadn't read before. Very rarely do I run across a book I want to rave about, but this is one of them. It was amazing, and I'll definitely be rereading it. Thanks to Netgalley for providing a free copy in exchange for an honest review

  10. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    If you liked the movie The Witch, you’ll probably enjoy this book! It’s got a similar vibe and story, but it’s also different in a lot of ways. It’s about a young Puritan woman, Abitha, who lives in a remote Colonial village in New England. She falls on hard times, and meets someone (something?) who may be able to help her. But who is he, and can she trust her instincts around him? I liked that this story plays with your expectations. And it’ll definitely make you feel! Hopeful, angry, unsettled - If you liked the movie The Witch, you’ll probably enjoy this book! It’s got a similar vibe and story, but it’s also different in a lot of ways. It’s about a young Puritan woman, Abitha, who lives in a remote Colonial village in New England. She falls on hard times, and meets someone (something?) who may be able to help her. But who is he, and can she trust her instincts around him? I liked that this story plays with your expectations. And it’ll definitely make you feel! Hopeful, angry, unsettled - sometimes all at once. The middle of the story felt slow, like I was waiting for something to happen, but fortunately it picked back up by the end. By then, I was tearing through pages to see what would happen! Overall, Slewfoot is a solid & eerie historical horror/dark fantasy novel that gives the reader a lot to think about. **Thanks to Tor Nightfire for the gifted book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    3.0 Stars This is very much a case of a book that is not for me. I rarely read historical fiction and the Puritan Era has never interested me. Despite that, I was actually impressed that I liked it at all. I liked that the main character was a strong independent woman. The writing was also quite strong with detailed descriptions of the monsters. So despite my personal underwhelming reading experience, I would still recommend this one to readers who enjoy fantastical horror and witch stories. Discl 3.0 Stars This is very much a case of a book that is not for me. I rarely read historical fiction and the Puritan Era has never interested me. Despite that, I was actually impressed that I liked it at all. I liked that the main character was a strong independent woman. The writing was also quite strong with detailed descriptions of the monsters. So despite my personal underwhelming reading experience, I would still recommend this one to readers who enjoy fantastical horror and witch stories. Disclaimer I received a copy of this book from the publisher.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle {Book Hangovers}

    Brom is the bomb.com! No doubt about it!!! I have never read a book by Brom that I didn’t enjoy. All of his books include pages of exquisite art, created by Brom himself and OH MY GAHHH…. they are PHENOMENAL!!. His talent blows my mind! If you love folk horror, fairytales and dark fantasy then this book is for you! It’ll ‘bewitch you mind, body and soul.’ ✨ This book is full of darkness and magic. With a killer female protagonist that you want to root for, villains you wish would burn (they are awf Brom is the bomb.com! No doubt about it!!! I have never read a book by Brom that I didn’t enjoy. All of his books include pages of exquisite art, created by Brom himself and OH MY GAHHH…. they are PHENOMENAL!!. His talent blows my mind! If you love folk horror, fairytales and dark fantasy then this book is for you! It’ll ‘bewitch you mind, body and soul.’ ✨ This book is full of darkness and magic. With a killer female protagonist that you want to root for, villains you wish would burn (they are awful), and a character that you’re unsure about….should I loathe them or feel sympathy for them?? Read Slewfoot and find out! I loved this book so darn much and it’s, by far, my absolute favorite by Brom! • Live deliciously and read Slewfoot!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (That's What She Read)

    This was so good!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christina Pilkington

    After hearing amazing things about the author Brom, when I had the opportunity to read an early copy of his latest book, Slewfoot: A Tale of Bewitchery, I jumped at the chance. Slewfoot is a horror book in the truest sense of the word. It’s bloody and visceral and chillingly violent. I had anticipated this being an unsettling book, but I was not prepared at how ruthlessly disturbing it was. The story is set in a Puritan colony where the term misogamy is tame to describe the way women are treated. After hearing amazing things about the author Brom, when I had the opportunity to read an early copy of his latest book, Slewfoot: A Tale of Bewitchery, I jumped at the chance. Slewfoot is a horror book in the truest sense of the word. It’s bloody and visceral and chillingly violent. I had anticipated this being an unsettling book, but I was not prepared at how ruthlessly disturbing it was. The story is set in a Puritan colony where the term misogamy is tame to describe the way women are treated. Abitha, a newly arrived young woman married off to a man she just met, isn’t the quiet, obedient wife she is supposed to be. At the same time, there is a dark power awakening in the forest. Throughout the novel, Abitha’s story intersects with that power and the two struggle to discover their true identities amidst a town bent on destroying them. With a plot that slowly builds to a grisly end, Slewfoot is perfect for horror fans who love anything supernatural, revenge-driven and stories that dive deep into the fine line between religious fervor and fanaticism. Thank you to NetGalley and Tor/Nightfire for an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for an honest opinion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emma Giles (byo.book)

    Puritans fear the devil. Wait until they meet the woman who's cat they've killed. Dark, gory and every thing I want in a witch story. I absolutely LOVE the idea of a woman who's been whipped again and again by Puritan society genuinely making friends with the "devil" and coming into her power. Every part of the woman inside me who's been beaten simply for being a woman was screaming for blood through this whole book. Puritans fear the devil. Wait until they meet the woman who's cat they've killed. Dark, gory and every thing I want in a witch story. I absolutely LOVE the idea of a woman who's been whipped again and again by Puritan society genuinely making friends with the "devil" and coming into her power. Every part of the woman inside me who's been beaten simply for being a woman was screaming for blood through this whole book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brittany (bees.horror.haunts)

    “𝗛𝗲 𝗯𝗲𝗴𝗮𝗻 𝘁𝗼 𝗵𝘂𝗺, 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗻 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝘁, 𝘁𝗮𝗹𝗸𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗵, 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝗿𝗻, 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝘀𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗱𝘀. 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝗳𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝗮 𝗿𝗵𝘆𝘁𝗵𝗺, 𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗰𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗶𝗿 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗯𝗲𝗮𝘁, 𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗼 𝗮 𝘀𝗼𝗻𝗴. 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝗵𝗼𝘀𝘁𝘀 𝗯𝗲𝗴𝗮𝗻 𝗰𝗶𝗿𝗰𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗺, 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗱𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗶𝗻𝗴…” Sutton Village, 1666. Abitha finds herself sold off by her father and sent to a new land. Her husband, Edward, is a kind soul and for that she is grateful. But the customs are foreign, and the society is harsh. Lurking around every corner the devil is waiting, watching. Villagers sea “𝗛𝗲 𝗯𝗲𝗴𝗮𝗻 𝘁𝗼 𝗵𝘂𝗺, 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗻 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝘁, 𝘁𝗮𝗹𝗸𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗵, 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝗿𝗻, 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝘀𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗱𝘀. 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝗳𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝗮 𝗿𝗵𝘆𝘁𝗵𝗺, 𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗰𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗶𝗿 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗯𝗲𝗮𝘁, 𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗼 𝗮 𝘀𝗼𝗻𝗴. 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝗵𝗼𝘀𝘁𝘀 𝗯𝗲𝗴𝗮𝗻 𝗰𝗶𝗿𝗰𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗺, 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗱𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗶𝗻𝗴…” Sutton Village, 1666. Abitha finds herself sold off by her father and sent to a new land. Her husband, Edward, is a kind soul and for that she is grateful. But the customs are foreign, and the society is harsh. Lurking around every corner the devil is waiting, watching. Villagers search for cloven hoof prints in the dirt. And pray that you don’t have the devils mark upon you, or a hanging be in your future. Abitha comes from a long line of cunning women who told of nature spirits, fairies, imps and forest gods. Who handed down customs and traditions for healing and protection. But she’s unsure of who God even is. And as fate would have it, Slewfoot does not remember who he is; destroyer or protector? Giver of life or does he bathe in blood? Enter Slewfoot’s existential crisis. This book is perfect for lovers of fantasy and historical fiction. For the ones who are called to nature, and answer when the pagan gods speak. I LOVED Slewfoot. I loved so much about this book that I can’t even begin to put it into words. I loved the friendship between Abitha and Samson. I loved the magical moments. Just EVERYTHING. And I cannot wait for my preorder to come in because I know the illustrations are going to be 😍😍 because Gerald Brom is amazing!! 5⭐️ Thank you to Nightfire and NetGalley for my copy!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    I’ve been reading a bit about the Puritan witch trials lately and I am both appalled yet fascinated by this ghastly part of history. While Slewfoot has a deep root in history, there is a strong element of fantasy/horror prominent throughout. It is wholly unique, devastatingly dark and a monstrously beautiful tale. To begin with, Abitha, the main character and narrator is a woman of great strength and resilience – she is, in short, a truly admirable character. Faced with the death of her husband I’ve been reading a bit about the Puritan witch trials lately and I am both appalled yet fascinated by this ghastly part of history. While Slewfoot has a deep root in history, there is a strong element of fantasy/horror prominent throughout. It is wholly unique, devastatingly dark and a monstrously beautiful tale. To begin with, Abitha, the main character and narrator is a woman of great strength and resilience – she is, in short, a truly admirable character. Faced with the death of her husband and fighting a misogynistic community, she fights to overcome the constraints put upon her using intelligence and bravery. Despite her strength of character, it is 1666 Colonial America and as we all know of this time, all it takes is one finger pointing and calling out ‘witch’ to bring a woman to the gallows. Abitha is no stranger to charms and potions, little things that are more to give confidence than to illicit any sort of magic. But these are dangerous times to be dabbling in charms and potions. “Her mother, though, she’d been a true cunning woman, and it was through her teachings – teachings cut short upon her untimely death [….] That Abitha had gained the handful of remedies, charms and divinations she now possessed.” Her meeting of and eventual relationship with the devil Slewfoot, who Abitha calls Samson, changes everything and watching their relationship evolve throughout the story is a thing of beauty. It took away from the God awfulness of humanity and balanced the dark nature of the story. The lore of the Wild Folk, Mother Earth and all things magical are the icing on the cake of this delicious piece of work. Narration: Barrie Kreinik narrates and she is a favorite of mine. She has a unique voice that is affecting and melodic; carrying a perfect rhythm that invited me into the story and kept me invested. This is an exceptional story that I highly recommend to fans of Hour of the Witch, The Witches-1692, The Manningtree Witches or any fan of the genre. My thanks to @Macmillan.Audio and @TorBooks for the gifted copies to review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    K Marcu

    Was looking for a Halloween novel based in colonial times & came across this new release. It was very good, surprisingly so.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shai

    RTC Running behind on reviewing a bit

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lena Lanz

    i only have 2 things to say: 1. GOOD FOR HER 2. this might be my favorite book

  21. 5 out of 5

    Janelle Janson

    Review to come

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebel Reads

    Thank you Nightfire and NetGalley, for my copy! Wow, what a fantastic book! It had ALL the feels, from beginning to end...hatred, anger, peace, happiness, revenge. I finished with the awesome feeling of not wanting it to end. This is, essentially, two stories expertly combined, so that you are in two different worlds. On one hand, we have the story of Abitha, a strong and mouthy woman living in a Puritan village, surrounded by godly and pious people. Her father sold her to be a wife to a man liv Thank you Nightfire and NetGalley, for my copy! Wow, what a fantastic book! It had ALL the feels, from beginning to end...hatred, anger, peace, happiness, revenge. I finished with the awesome feeling of not wanting it to end. This is, essentially, two stories expertly combined, so that you are in two different worlds. On one hand, we have the story of Abitha, a strong and mouthy woman living in a Puritan village, surrounded by godly and pious people. Her father sold her to be a wife to a man living in the village, but she has a hard time being the religious and devout woman the villagers expect. On the other, we have Samson, a beastly demon who is searching for his soul, wondering what his purpose is, sometimes in violent ways. These two beautifully developed characters come together in an amazing friendship, that tugs on the heartstrings, blows you away with the savagery and leaves you wanting more. Knowing about the Puritan way of life and their views on anything ungodly, we can only expect that Abitha's way of life will be questioned and challenged. And this is the cornerstone of the story, how we see the hypocritical views of the "godly" Puritans and their disgusting solutions to the sins they see. Brom just blew me away with the fierceness of this story, the extremes one will go through to see righteousness win, and the purity of strong relationships, both familial and not. I just loved this and can't wait for more Brom!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Leighanne

    This was my first experience with Brom, and I actually really enjoyed this book. I think that there is a distinct lack of witchy tales in horror, so I was glad to read this, and just in time for fall and Halloween. I loved that this was not just a witchy book set in puritan New England, but that there was a lot more description of the folklore surrounding the devil during that time period. I don't like to say too much about the plot when I review, so I will leave it at that. I will say that it to This was my first experience with Brom, and I actually really enjoyed this book. I think that there is a distinct lack of witchy tales in horror, so I was glad to read this, and just in time for fall and Halloween. I loved that this was not just a witchy book set in puritan New England, but that there was a lot more description of the folklore surrounding the devil during that time period. I don't like to say too much about the plot when I review, so I will leave it at that. I will say that it took it a moment to get going, but when it hit its stride it was good. The audiobook was well produced and the narrator really brought Abitha to life. She was a character that I could get behind and root for. If you are a fan of witchy tales and folk horror, this is definitely a book you will want to pick up.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Synopsis: Abitha is new to the Puritan lifestyle, an outsider. She attends church and plays her role like a good Christian. But Abitha is also from a bloodline of Cunning women, more known as a Witch. After her husband mysteriously perishes, she is left alone to fend for her land in a patriarchal, misogynistic society that is hellbent on keeping witches and devils away from their land. Enter Slewfoot (Samson). Samson is unsure who he is, he is told he is “The Devil” but that doesn’t feel right t Synopsis: Abitha is new to the Puritan lifestyle, an outsider. She attends church and plays her role like a good Christian. But Abitha is also from a bloodline of Cunning women, more known as a Witch. After her husband mysteriously perishes, she is left alone to fend for her land in a patriarchal, misogynistic society that is hellbent on keeping witches and devils away from their land. Enter Slewfoot (Samson). Samson is unsure who he is, he is told he is “The Devil” but that doesn’t feel right to him, he needs to know more. Together Abitha and Samson form a bond, using each other’s gifts in a world where Witchcraft means a death sentence, desperate to discover their true nature. “You think me worried about my soul? “ She laughed again, loud and fierce, locking blazing eyes on Samson. “I’ve no soul left,” she growled. “They’ve crucified my fucking soul!” Let’s talk Abitha our main character. I love her so much! Imagine that, characters written so well you become emotionally invested in them. She is a true badass. She speaks up despite the Puritan law, she takes no bs from any man, and she stands her ground at all times. Abitha is everything we want to see in a female lead. Strong, resourceful, brave, cunning, creative, intelligent and kind. Abitha’s growth shines throughout the story, becoming one powerful being. Characters in the book are fully developed with their own personalities and morals. Brom writes Samson so well, introducing a new image of “The Devil” in the readers mind. A God of Mother Nature with human thoughts and conundrums. Despite characters with strong, stubborn beliefs, some do show remorse and sadness for Abitha’s fate, showing that not everyone was okay with the silly happenings of the church. The story is beautifully written. The pacing starts slow, but stays interesting and engaging throughout. It’s hard to talk about certain parts without spoilers but the parts about nature are written so descriptive it’s like you’re there spinning in a field of flowers, drinking in the sun and witnessing mother nature’s growth and beauty. I specifically loved the wildfolk and the old gods. A certain bear that serves the beam may even make an appearance. 🐻 One of the main themes in Slewfoot is hysteria, and witchcraft in a Christian, Puritan society. Oh man once the first accusation was said, we tumbled into a whirlwind of hysteria. Fake accusations, lies, terror. His writing brought strong emotions out of me. I was angry at the townsfolk, and upset because for a work of fiction, it’s actually a reality we are all aware of. It was as if I were the one being persecuted. I don’t speak ill on any religion but Slewfoot highlights the problems within Christianity, especially during earlier times. Samson and Abitha’s relationship grows into something so strong and wonderful. It’s not your generic love story here. At first Abitha is hesitant to dance with the Devil, but eventually she sees him for his true self. For those who like a little gore in their horror, there is a satisfying amount throughout the ending but I can’t give it away. My favorite part of Slewfoot is the positivity it brings to the Pagan/Witch community. More so how the author paints witchcraft for what it truly is; a craft with potions, charms, incantations etc, that offers help and worship for the old ways, not just evil sorcery and devilry. Slewfoot is a perfect read for those who are interested in horror with some historical and religious elements, dripping with feminism and empowerment. It’s perfect for anyone of the craft, or anyone in general, and in my opinion a 5 star read. “A hard grimace set on Abitha’s face. “If it is a witch they want,” she hissed. “Then a witch they shall have.” 🧹🌼 Thank you NetGalley and TorNightfire for the advanced copy of Slewfoot: A Tale of Bewitchery

  25. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Strike

    The Puritans. Or as we in the historical profession refer to as ‘the worst thing to come out of Early Modern Europe’. These people were so toxic, even the relatively tolerant Netherlands didn’t want them. If you are interested in hate-reading about some Puritans, I have found you a book. In case you weren’t aware, Puritans were hardcore Christian zealots who were driven out of not one, but two polities before ending up in the “New World.” They were, as you may have guessed, totally ill-prepared The Puritans. Or as we in the historical profession refer to as ‘the worst thing to come out of Early Modern Europe’. These people were so toxic, even the relatively tolerant Netherlands didn’t want them. If you are interested in hate-reading about some Puritans, I have found you a book. In case you weren’t aware, Puritans were hardcore Christian zealots who were driven out of not one, but two polities before ending up in the “New World.” They were, as you may have guessed, totally ill-prepared for life in the colonies. Number one, these people were paranoid, and I mean paranoid in that special way that all uber zealots are paranoid. They saw threats everywhere. Number two, Puritans were super freaked out by the woods. They absolutely believed that the woods were where evil dwelled. So where did they choose to settle? You guessed it—they settled in areas surrounded by forest. The aphorism “know thyself” comes to mind... Well with the mini history lesson out of the way, let’s dive into the plot. Slewfoot follows a young woman, Abitha, who is the hero we need. She does not mess with the Puritan lifestyle. She and her husband are finally seeming to get ahead, when he dies, under mysterious circumstances. In the woods. **a Puritan shivers in his grave**. On a completely unrelated note, an entity called Father or Slewfoot just woke up from a long winter’s nap. Just kidding, these events are totally related. I won’t tell you much more but if you’ve ever wondered what the Puritans would do if they actually met the devil, read this! This book certainly filled up my Puritan novel bingo card. Religious zealots, the Devil, violence against women, hysterical girls, witchcraft.... BINGO! Slewfoot certainly had all the things that make for a solid piece of early American horror. Much of this novel didn’t surprise me. But then again, Slewfoot was totally unique in some aspects. Ultimately I would characterize this plot as one long misunderstanding. Let me explain. The entity Slewfoot, to my reading actually represents a pretty fascinating historical moment—when paganism and organized religion met. The misunderstandings and mischaracterizations sparked by this meeting were ultimately awful and violent, but make for compelling historical and sociological study. This novel explores these themes through the lens of fiction. In short, it’s absolutely worth a read, especially for my nerdy and witchy friends—my nerdy witches (witchy nerds?) Thank you to Netgalley, Brom, and Nightfire for giving me an opportunity to read this novel!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tyra Leann

    4.5 stars. That was unlike anything I’ve ever read, I stayed up an hour past my bedtime to finish it. Definitely going to be getting to more Brom soon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Flying Monkey

    5 Stars!! I love me some Brom!!!! Another excellent book by Brom. Slewfoot may not be as gruesome and dark as some of his other books, but Slewfoot still brings it. Well Done!!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Rothe

    4.5⭐️ the most perfect book to get into fall / halloween reading. this was so fun and so terrible and so brutal and I loved it. filled with demons who are more pure and good hearted than the devilish pious Puritans. a murky battle of good vs evil when both sides are neither. it’s been a while since I’ve read a book that stirs me up and makes me angry because of the unfairness and tragicness of the unfolding events but it makes the disturbing vengeance that comes after all the more pleasurable. n 4.5⭐️ the most perfect book to get into fall / halloween reading. this was so fun and so terrible and so brutal and I loved it. filled with demons who are more pure and good hearted than the devilish pious Puritans. a murky battle of good vs evil when both sides are neither. it’s been a while since I’ve read a book that stirs me up and makes me angry because of the unfairness and tragicness of the unfolding events but it makes the disturbing vengeance that comes after all the more pleasurable. not for everyone!! spent the first 75% of the book wondering how people could classify this as horror but the end answers that question. agh it was just great.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    As a HUGE fan of Brom, it doesn't surprise me that I loved this book. In typical Brom fashion, Slewfoot is dark, and the story is sometimes painful; nobody's feelings are spared (including the reader's). Brom has a way of showing you the harshness of humanity, but at the same time threading a deep connection between the reader and the characters, which is one reason I love his books so much. This particular tale was extremely timely for me, as I've been developing my witchy path over the past fe As a HUGE fan of Brom, it doesn't surprise me that I loved this book. In typical Brom fashion, Slewfoot is dark, and the story is sometimes painful; nobody's feelings are spared (including the reader's). Brom has a way of showing you the harshness of humanity, but at the same time threading a deep connection between the reader and the characters, which is one reason I love his books so much. This particular tale was extremely timely for me, as I've been developing my witchy path over the past few years, and I've recently been studying the Horned God(s). Watching Slewfoot's self discovery and his growing relationship with Abitha (as well as her own personal growth) was just beautiful to behold, and I appreciated that this reflected the shadow and the light within ALL of us (including gods). I enjoyed the mystery of some characters, and at the same time I enjoyed hating the villains (omg they were AWFUL, as expected). I'm a chandler by trade, and I will be creating a candle inspired by Slewfoot! I truly can't wait for my pre-ordered physical copy to arrive, so I can see all of the illustrations inside, and display it in my home library on the shelf with all of my other Brom books!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    just was so boring, The setting and characters had promise but after a few chapters it clear its starts going nowhere.

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