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Wisdom and Eloquence: A Christian Paradigm for Classical Learning

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To succeed in the world today, students need an education that equips them to recognize current trends, to be creative and flexible to respond to changing circumstances, to demonstrate sound judgment to work for society's good, and to gain the ability to communicate persuasively. To succeed in the world today, students need an education that equips them to recognize current trends, to be creative and flexible to respond to changing circumstances, to demonstrate sound judgment to work for society's good, and to gain the ability to communicate persuasively.


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To succeed in the world today, students need an education that equips them to recognize current trends, to be creative and flexible to respond to changing circumstances, to demonstrate sound judgment to work for society's good, and to gain the ability to communicate persuasively. To succeed in the world today, students need an education that equips them to recognize current trends, to be creative and flexible to respond to changing circumstances, to demonstrate sound judgment to work for society's good, and to gain the ability to communicate persuasively.

30 review for Wisdom and Eloquence: A Christian Paradigm for Classical Learning

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Once heard some folks say that this is the place to go for a critique of Sayers's poll-pert-poet approach. Mentioned here about 18 minutes in. See here; Wilson's review is available here. Once heard some folks say that this is the place to go for a critique of Sayers's poll-pert-poet approach. Mentioned here about 18 minutes in. See here; Wilson's review is available here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adam Balshan

    2 stars [Education] A mediocre book (decent chapters 2, 5, and 6, and smaller parts), but weighed down with other negatives. Littlejohn and Evans claim at the outset that a new book on Christian classical education is needed because times change. I was left with the opposite perception; Wilson's 1991 book Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning did a far better job. Furthermore, whereas Wilson is mostly in agreement with Dorothy Sayers--author of the famous essay, The Lost Tools of Learning--Littlej 2 stars [Education] A mediocre book (decent chapters 2, 5, and 6, and smaller parts), but weighed down with other negatives. Littlejohn and Evans claim at the outset that a new book on Christian classical education is needed because times change. I was left with the opposite perception; Wilson's 1991 book Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning did a far better job. Furthermore, whereas Wilson is mostly in agreement with Dorothy Sayers--author of the famous essay, The Lost Tools of Learning--Littlejohn and Evans criticize her view of history and curriculum education throughout their book. I feel that they misunderstood her argument, though, and attacked something at least partially made of straw. They ascribe totality to her ideas, whereas I think she was clearly making partitive suggestions. She did not say "Grammar" was only for younger ages, etc., but that it was to be the focus. Likewise, she allowed for an "advanced track" into Quadrivium learning before university; L&E deny that at all possible in her paradigm. Finally, they disagree with her metaphorizing the Trivium, of having a "grammar of history" or "grammar of mathematics." I hold her interpretation--historical or no, I cannot say--superior to theirs. L&Es' explanations of curricula were cursory and out of place. A book otherwise devoted to general education theory does not have room in 174 pages to inform the novice as to rhetoric curriculum, for instance. I grasped almost none of it. Their explanation of honor systems was superficial. And does no one know of VMI or the Citadel as the highest examples of honor systems in America?! I do not recommend this book. Read Wilson and/or Sayers instead.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Cain

    An excellent introduction to the ideas behind classical Christian education, Wisdom and Eloquence goes a step further, reexamining the presuppositions with which that contemporary classical educators practice. Littlejohn particularly hones in on what Douglas Wilson and ACCS call the "Sayers Insight," the belief that classical education matches (and should match) child development. One of the best chapters is the fourth, where Littlejohn discusses a community of faith and learning, suggesting tha An excellent introduction to the ideas behind classical Christian education, Wisdom and Eloquence goes a step further, reexamining the presuppositions with which that contemporary classical educators practice. Littlejohn particularly hones in on what Douglas Wilson and ACCS call the "Sayers Insight," the belief that classical education matches (and should match) child development. One of the best chapters is the fourth, where Littlejohn discusses a community of faith and learning, suggesting that schools should be a hub of learning for families without supplanting the family's place in God's economy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Clint Lum

    I really want to rate this book a 3.5. This is certainly a helpful work, but I am not sure that the authors accomplish what they set out to do: articulate a Christian paradigm for classical learning. Perhaps this is simply too big a task to attempt in 200 pages, but after most chapters I was left thinking, "Why did they not go in such and such direction, or How come they did not engage with so an so...?" I do think the authors contribute something to the conversation around Christianity, the lib I really want to rate this book a 3.5. This is certainly a helpful work, but I am not sure that the authors accomplish what they set out to do: articulate a Christian paradigm for classical learning. Perhaps this is simply too big a task to attempt in 200 pages, but after most chapters I was left thinking, "Why did they not go in such and such direction, or How come they did not engage with so an so...?" I do think the authors contribute something to the conversation around Christianity, the liberal arts, and classical education, however, namely that the trivium is not primarily a pedagogical method. Some folks take issue with this thread throughout the book and see it as being unnecessarily divisive to the Christian Classical movement, but I disagree with the reading. If you are looking for a "Philosophy of _____" type of book, this is not it. If you are looking for a work that dabbles in the philosophy behind Christian classical education, administration, and references secular/state education along the way, this is the book for you. For those who are like me and want to know the reasons/philosophies behind things, Kevin Clark and Ravi Jain's book "The Liberal Arts Tradition" will serve you better. One last note. The appendices to the book are great resources and almost worth the price of the book itself.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    One of the best books on classical teaching that I've read--mostly because this book is extremely practical. It's not just about the theory of classical education or why we need to teach this way--instead it jumps right into what it looks like to implement a classical education effectively as a teacher. And between the mutual experiences of the authors, they have a lot of material to draw on. I particularly enjoyed their critique of Dorothy Sayer's presentation on classical education, since the m One of the best books on classical teaching that I've read--mostly because this book is extremely practical. It's not just about the theory of classical education or why we need to teach this way--instead it jumps right into what it looks like to implement a classical education effectively as a teacher. And between the mutual experiences of the authors, they have a lot of material to draw on. I particularly enjoyed their critique of Dorothy Sayer's presentation on classical education, since the more I've grown as a classical teacher, the more flawed I've realized her famous presentation is. I didn't agree with the authors' claim that the Trivium are meant to be subjects not cross-subject paradigms, as it goes against what Aristotle argues in his Art of Rhetoric about the nature of Rhetoric and Dialectic. However, I agreed with their critique of Sayer's strict developmental-model of the classical education and with their critique of her use (or lack thereof) of the Quadrivium. Taken as a whole, this was quite good and very practical. I really liked their focus on designing curriculum from 12-K, not K-12. Recommended to any classical educator out there. Rating: 4.5 Stars (Excellent).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I think they were unclear about their audience when they wrote this. Some apology for classical ed, but then remarks that seem to be directed to heads of schools...who should be sold on the philosophy already, right? I didn't find anything particularly compelling here. I think they were unclear about their audience when they wrote this. Some apology for classical ed, but then remarks that seem to be directed to heads of schools...who should be sold on the philosophy already, right? I didn't find anything particularly compelling here.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nathan G.

    The worldview parts in front and back are boiler-plate and can be skipped, but sandwiched in between is some excellent practical wisdom about how to plan and run a classical school (as well as a compelling, though not definitive, perspective on the place of rhetoric and dialectic).

  8. 5 out of 5

    mpsiple

    Helpful book for understanding a "classical" curriculum. Better suited for someone trying to start or run a school than for your average parent. Helpful book for understanding a "classical" curriculum. Better suited for someone trying to start or run a school than for your average parent.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Wagner

    A good introduction to a classical and Christian approach to education. I agreed with a lot of what the authors said. This is a very practical book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Patchin

    Full of good questions and some answers. Struggling cCe schools should use this as a blueprint for revising their practices, structures, and perspectives.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Scott Guillory

    Really great.

  12. 5 out of 5

    April

    Great read for those who want to open a Classical, Christian school.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Dense and hard for me to read quickly but chock full of good info. Definitely recommend to any parent or educator in a classical school.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rod Zinkel

    Wisdom and Eloquence, by Robert Littlejohn and Charles T. Evans, describes a classical Christian education, which is to say a liberal arts education by a pre-twentieth century definition. The authors write of the importance of the trivium – grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric, with their emphasis on rhetoric, and the quadrivium – arithmetic, geometry, astronomy and music. The authors expand the quadrivium a little more widely than the classical definition, as they include geography and visual arts. Wisdom and Eloquence, by Robert Littlejohn and Charles T. Evans, describes a classical Christian education, which is to say a liberal arts education by a pre-twentieth century definition. The authors write of the importance of the trivium – grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric, with their emphasis on rhetoric, and the quadrivium – arithmetic, geometry, astronomy and music. The authors expand the quadrivium a little more widely than the classical definition, as they include geography and visual arts. They do not ignore math and science, and write of the Christian student’s need for these subjects. Science is not opposed to Christianity: “The overarching paradigm for a Christian education in the sciences is the understanding that our worldview embraces the reality that our study of the natural sciences is our window into God’s revelation of himself to his image-bearers through his creation” (124-25). The culmination of science is theology and philosophy, “toward which all our studies in the liberal arts has been building” (127).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    I read this because it was on a list of recommended reading for parents of children receiving a classical education. However, it is clearly addressed to educators, and therefore it was not useful for my purposes; I may have rated it more highly were I an educator. The book was generally boring and made a classical education appear elitist to me, and so I am glad it was not the first (or only) book I have read on the subject. Although I did glean some good from it, I felt that, overall, the book I read this because it was on a list of recommended reading for parents of children receiving a classical education. However, it is clearly addressed to educators, and therefore it was not useful for my purposes; I may have rated it more highly were I an educator. The book was generally boring and made a classical education appear elitist to me, and so I am glad it was not the first (or only) book I have read on the subject. Although I did glean some good from it, I felt that, overall, the book was not very well written; that is to say, it is not engaging, and it seems to begin almost in media res, without introduction or context. In fact, it was many pages before I knew who this “we” was of which the narrators spoke. It turned out they were referring to themselves, as two authors, but nowhere did they introduce themselves, their backgrounds, their experience, or their reasons for speaking authoritatively, and so I kept wondering who this “we” was. The authors talk about their schools without much introducing them either. I felt as if I were missing some kind of essential front matter. One thing I did particularly like about this book was that it engaged Dorothy Sayers article “The Lost Tools of Learning” and addressed some of the practical objections I had to her arguments. It addressed them by saying, basically, yes, that’s impractical, and that’s why we don’t do it. So it eased my concerns in some areas. I’ve compiled a list of other titles I recommend to parents who are considering a classical education in my article Learning How to Think: A Reading List for Parents Considering Classical Education.”. As for this book, some random thoughts appear below. Begin random thoughts--- I appreciate the book’s perspective on the practical application of classical education: “Liberally educated people, whose intellectual skills are transferable to the learning of any subject or craft, are increasingly important in an economy in which the average adult changes careers multiple times over the course of his life.” I appreciated the insistence that the “mission of the [Christian classical:] school, in short, is not to evangelize, not to parent, not to generate revenue, but to educate.” The authors say that “students should be taught and rewarded for valuing the difference between ‘tattling,’ a power play that calls attention to another’s behavior from a motivation of personal gain or retribution, and ‘bringing wrongdoing to light,’ which (ideally) is motivated by a desire to preserve peace and to help others learn to get along.” If my daughter could learn only one thing next year, I would love for her to learn this distinction. I wish her teachers luck. I have not been able to teach it. “Studies show that students who dress conscientiously for school tend to take their studies more seriously and to perform better. The goals of any dress code ought to be to reduce the stress that kids (and their parents!) face with clothing choices.” I sure hope so, because meeting that dress code sure is going to be a lot more expensive than buying her clothes from Target, and, personally, I’m already stressing out trying to figure out what she can and cannot wear in order to conform with the dress code. I do like the idea of desks facing the teacher and have to agree with this: “I have long said I could tell who does the teaching as soon as I walk into a class. If desks are arranged in pods of four with students facing each other, requiring them to look right, left, or behind them to find the teacher or the board, then students are learning from each other and on their own. If desks are arranged facing the front, then students are learning from the teacher.” I’m old school enough that, in elementary school, I want my daughter to learn from an adult teacher and not her peers. “Of course as students mature, we want them to be taught Socratically.” --End random thoughts.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leah Douglas

    Lots of good stuff in here, but I can't give it 5 stars because it is clearly attacking Doug Wilson/the ACCS on some things that I don't think need attacking. I would be very curious to know if Mr. Littlejohn or Mr. Evans had ever in fact visited an established ACCS school. I suspect they would be mildly surprised to find that a good school works out exactly the way Mr. L and Mr. E say they should. I've never met anyone who thought the quadrivium wasn't remarkably important or that it shouldn't Lots of good stuff in here, but I can't give it 5 stars because it is clearly attacking Doug Wilson/the ACCS on some things that I don't think need attacking. I would be very curious to know if Mr. Littlejohn or Mr. Evans had ever in fact visited an established ACCS school. I suspect they would be mildly surprised to find that a good school works out exactly the way Mr. L and Mr. E say they should. I've never met anyone who thought the quadrivium wasn't remarkably important or that it shouldn't be taught in age-appropriate ways to children of all ages/levels. Strawman? I appreciate his meticulous analysis and sort-of redefinition of the Trivium. And sure, some folks teaching this stuff might not define things the same exact way, but it all is working itself out the same way. I would have appreciated more Scripture back up at least on occasion in relation to all this as well. I found it blurry when discussing the relationship between the school and the parents of the children. The school is absolutely serving the parents as THEY educate their children. "Since schools are not families, they should not perform the functions of families" (p. 52). Well, sort of, but...no. The school is not it's own thing like the state or the church or the family, as is implied on p. 51. It is subordinate to the family. It is a servant. (Not that any particular family can force a school to do what it wants, but that the family can choose to simply not use that school. It's not an equal "partnership", it's employment. I guess I'm jumping up and down on this because I hate seeing parents drop their kids off at school and not paying any attention to what is happening afterwards, even if what happens just happens to be good for them. And I don't like schools who are happy when this happens [Bringing Up Bebe for instance].) I doubt the authors would argue too much with me on this one. But I do wish they had done a better job at working this bit out. I had hoped this book would be a little more helpful for homeschoolers too, but alas. NEVERTHELESS, this is a good book with lots of helpful things for educators. I am glad I bought it and am certainly keeping it, no doubt to be read at least once or twice more in my lifetime. "All grammatical and dialectical study, then, can be understood as both preliminary to and concurrent with the student's preparation as an orator who knows the good when he sees it, who is willing to do it, and who is capable of drawing others after him in pursuit of it." p. 137 "If a collection of good men and women speaking well is the most valuable commodity a culture can possess, then our schools must establish eloquence as the goal for ever student." p. 147 "In short, he requires wisdom and eloquence and not just a facade of wisdom or eloquence. Our activist must understand himself to be the inheritor of a dependable tradition of wisdom (rooted in a transcendent, authoritative source) that he has the responsibility to steward and to articulate to his contemporary world." p. 18

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brad Belschner

    Interestingly, this book critiques Dorothy Sayers' model of the Trivium. Grammar, Logic and Rhetoric are *not* stages of development; rather, they are subjects to be studied. Historically the trivium was never an overarching pedagogy that all other subjects fit into; the trivium was simply a part of the curriculum they studied. At its most basic level, grammar literally means grammar--nouns and verbs and such. Logic means logic, etc. Children do undergo developmental stages, but not necessarily Interestingly, this book critiques Dorothy Sayers' model of the Trivium. Grammar, Logic and Rhetoric are *not* stages of development; rather, they are subjects to be studied. Historically the trivium was never an overarching pedagogy that all other subjects fit into; the trivium was simply a part of the curriculum they studied. At its most basic level, grammar literally means grammar--nouns and verbs and such. Logic means logic, etc. Children do undergo developmental stages, but not necessarily in a clean-cut manner and not necessarily at precise ages. Rhetoric training ought to begin at a young age, with children reciting poetry and re-telling stories for example. Even if one does accept the 'parrot-pert-poet' model wholesale, that's all fine and well, but it's not what the trivium refers to. But that's only a small part of the book, the controversial part that stood out to me the most. Overall, the point of this book is Wisdom and Eloquence (yes, the tome is aptly named). The goal is to raise up children to be wise and eloquent, and everything is centred around that goal. I found the book to be more practical than most, with helpful suggestions and advice scattered throughout. Definitely worth reading if you want to start a school. :-) To fit all their curriculum into a classical model---the trivium and quadrivium---the authors seem to use each of the 7 Liberal Arts as a thematic umbrella, fitting any material under the "art" it seems to fit best. For example... "Grammar" is indicative of: -Reading, writing, spelling, and vocabulary -English grammar (obviously) -Handwriting, keyboarding -Foreign and classical languages "Astronomy" is expanded to include all the natural sciences: -Geology -Physics -Chemistry -Biology Etc. Overall, a helpful book. I liked it. That means 3 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Donald Linnemeyer

    I'm torn. On the one hand, this book provides some great practical insights. Since both authors have many years of teaching and administrative experience, they're able to offer plenty of great advice on curriculum development, teacher training, disciplinary issues, etc. If you're looking to be involved with a classical school, or really any private school, this seems like a great resource. On the other hand, the book doesn't really address the potential pitfalls of classical education. First, you I'm torn. On the one hand, this book provides some great practical insights. Since both authors have many years of teaching and administrative experience, they're able to offer plenty of great advice on curriculum development, teacher training, disciplinary issues, etc. If you're looking to be involved with a classical school, or really any private school, this seems like a great resource. On the other hand, the book doesn't really address the potential pitfalls of classical education. First, you've got elitism and intellectualism. Fundamentally, the philosophy of education here was remarkably "bookish" and intellectual. Sure, there was room for athletics, and they took a very hands-on approach to science, but that was all under the liberal arts. No room, apparently, for the mechanical arts. Second, you've got the potential for over-emphasizing the west, specifically in a way that shakes hands with Roman and Greek paganism. In this case, the authors said it explicitly in an appendix: "We derive heroism from the Greeks, humility from the Hebrews." And not only heroism, in context; freedom, too. Another way this can manifest itself is in politics. In Wisdom and Eloquence, Rhetoric seems to be the capstone, specifically a political rhetoric. Centering on the public sphere makes sense in a Roman setting, but I'm not seeing how it jives with Christianity, at least without some pretty significant changes. Overall, I the book is solid, and I found myself agreeing with most of what I read. There are some bigger, educational philosophy issues, though, that made me a little nervous.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Micah Neely

    There's a real wealth of information regarding pedagogy here. I think the occasional history of education and philosophy that they allude to is flawed or at least not well thought out. Particularly, I was offended by the brief mention of C. S. Peirce lumping him in with his later pragmatist follower, John Dewey, who remains the shadowy boogie-man archetype who few Christian education reformers really know anything about. Peirce was in fact among the very greatest of American philosophers embodyi There's a real wealth of information regarding pedagogy here. I think the occasional history of education and philosophy that they allude to is flawed or at least not well thought out. Particularly, I was offended by the brief mention of C. S. Peirce lumping him in with his later pragmatist follower, John Dewey, who remains the shadowy boogie-man archetype who few Christian education reformers really know anything about. Peirce was in fact among the very greatest of American philosophers embodying an almost maniacal trinitarianism (not completely orthodox, I'll concede) and just the kind of interaction with ancient and medieval sources that we believe is missing from a modern liberal arts education. Worth reading for sure. I had to put it down for a week or two to cool my jets in certain places, but I'll most definitely go back to the chapters on literature and rhetoric as I teach.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brent Pinkall

    Anyone who reads Doug Wilson's "Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning" would do well to read this book. The authors agree with Wilson on the most fundamental issues, but they also offer some helpful critiques. Whether or not you agree with those critiques, this book will help you think more deeply about Wilson's (and Sayers') claims and suggestions. That said, I did enjoy Wilson's book more. Wisdom and Eloquence focuses little on the philosophy of education and more on the practical outworkings Anyone who reads Doug Wilson's "Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning" would do well to read this book. The authors agree with Wilson on the most fundamental issues, but they also offer some helpful critiques. Whether or not you agree with those critiques, this book will help you think more deeply about Wilson's (and Sayers') claims and suggestions. That said, I did enjoy Wilson's book more. Wisdom and Eloquence focuses little on the philosophy of education and more on the practical outworkings of it (What does it look like in the classroom?). While practical suggestions are helpful, they are not much use unless the reader knows why they're doing what they're doing. I think the authors could have spent more time convincing the skeptical reader of the benefits and virtues of classical education in a postmodern world.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Comis

    Really good stuff in here on classical education. These guys take a bit of a different tact on the trivium than that of Dorothy Sayers. It was pretty refreshing to get their perspective on the trivium, and on classical pedagogy as a whole. They argued for more of an integrational approach to the trivium than what most classical schools I'm familiar with use. The appendix on the history of classical education was also very enlightening. These are the first authors I've read who actually tried to g Really good stuff in here on classical education. These guys take a bit of a different tact on the trivium than that of Dorothy Sayers. It was pretty refreshing to get their perspective on the trivium, and on classical pedagogy as a whole. They argued for more of an integrational approach to the trivium than what most classical schools I'm familiar with use. The appendix on the history of classical education was also very enlightening. These are the first authors I've read who actually tried to ground the classical approach to education in the Hebraic tradition, rather than simply begin with the Greeks. There's also plenty of good practical advice on starting and maintaining a school.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    A helpful book in many ways. The last several chapters (8-10 & appendices) were the best parts. In that section it made many practical applications about teachers, curriculum, and the school that would be a benefit to all connected with a school: students, teachers, admin, and parents. In many ways, the book is an introduction to classical, Christian education which means that it is probably best suited for those who are new to the idea. This also means that those familiar with these things may A helpful book in many ways. The last several chapters (8-10 & appendices) were the best parts. In that section it made many practical applications about teachers, curriculum, and the school that would be a benefit to all connected with a school: students, teachers, admin, and parents. In many ways, the book is an introduction to classical, Christian education which means that it is probably best suited for those who are new to the idea. This also means that those familiar with these things may not find the book as helpful.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Lister

    Very helpful guide to Classical Christian Education. Littlejohn and Evans couple practical Christian wisdom with a historical case for classical liberal arts education. Although, for those familiar with Dorothy Sayers' essay, "The Lost Tools of Learning", prepare yourself for some confusion. The authors are very critical of Sayers and her use of the trivium as a broad pedagogical framework . However, they also seem to agree with her on many other fronts. It is possible that their criticisms are Very helpful guide to Classical Christian Education. Littlejohn and Evans couple practical Christian wisdom with a historical case for classical liberal arts education. Although, for those familiar with Dorothy Sayers' essay, "The Lost Tools of Learning", prepare yourself for some confusion. The authors are very critical of Sayers and her use of the trivium as a broad pedagogical framework . However, they also seem to agree with her on many other fronts. It is possible that their criticisms are merely semantic but the lack of clarity is a blemish on an otherwise great book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    This book provided a very good introduction to classical education and I agreed with their conclusions about how eduction should be and the goals of education. I thought they skimmed some areas of great importance, like worldview and its effect on our teaching, but since it is written to the popular audience, I can't complain too loudly. I'm not the specific intended audience. This book provided a very good introduction to classical education and I agreed with their conclusions about how eduction should be and the goals of education. I thought they skimmed some areas of great importance, like worldview and its effect on our teaching, but since it is written to the popular audience, I can't complain too loudly. I'm not the specific intended audience.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    Worth the read. Effectively brings up the great emphases of a classical education and explores a variety of issues within the classical curriculum. Not an engaging read and doesn't effectively give a mental image of the particulars of what a classical education ought to look like in our modern culture. Worth the read. Effectively brings up the great emphases of a classical education and explores a variety of issues within the classical curriculum. Not an engaging read and doesn't effectively give a mental image of the particulars of what a classical education ought to look like in our modern culture.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J. Alfred

    If you are interested in Christian education, you ought to read this book. You may not agree with everything the authors have to say, but you will appreciate the passion, the research, and the care that went into their writing. If you read this whole book without being struck, at least once, with an idea that made you say, "wow! that's the way it ought to be," well, I'll be impressed. If you are interested in Christian education, you ought to read this book. You may not agree with everything the authors have to say, but you will appreciate the passion, the research, and the care that went into their writing. If you read this whole book without being struck, at least once, with an idea that made you say, "wow! that's the way it ought to be," well, I'll be impressed.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mystie Winckler

    Own. Read with Elly. The authors promote a "trivium refers to subjects only" perspective, but not a classicist's classical education. Their emphasis was on raising activists who can speak well in order to persuade. Own. Read with Elly. The authors promote a "trivium refers to subjects only" perspective, but not a classicist's classical education. Their emphasis was on raising activists who can speak well in order to persuade.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    Essential reading for educators in the classical Christian tradition. The chief merits of this book lie in its detailed prescriptions for a number of things, and its advancement of the discussion about the history and nature of classical Christian education.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Weitz

    Very helpful. Best idea/reminder: when planning curriculum, start with what you want your student to know by senior year in high school and work backwards, instead of starting with kindergarten and working forward.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Smith

    The Next Book I will read.

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