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Caste: A Brief History of Racism, Sexism, Classism, Ageism, Homophobia, Xenophobia, Religious Intolerance, and Reasons for Hope

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30 review for Caste: A Brief History of Racism, Sexism, Classism, Ageism, Homophobia, Xenophobia, Religious Intolerance, and Reasons for Hope

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    How could anyone not know this? You would have to live in a cabin in the mountains to not realize these things. Kinda mad at the friends who said this is essential reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Too short. Too few examples. Too little discussion of'what to do about it'. Too short. Too few examples. Too little discussion of'what to do about it'.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eric Hein

    Read like a mediocre high school student paper I got absolutely nothing of value or interest out of reading this. Don't waste your time or money on it. Read like a mediocre high school student paper I got absolutely nothing of value or interest out of reading this. Don't waste your time or money on it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Zucker-Conde

    I think the author did a great job in presenting often fraught information in a clear, easy-to-understand, contextualized way that could be very helpful for teachers of middle-college age students. I appreciated her brief historical overview for each common -ism, since people who blame others for their own prejudice tend to erase or minimise history. I think it's important for all people to understand that bias is part of life, that we all have biases, prejudices, and perspectives based on our l I think the author did a great job in presenting often fraught information in a clear, easy-to-understand, contextualized way that could be very helpful for teachers of middle-college age students. I appreciated her brief historical overview for each common -ism, since people who blame others for their own prejudice tend to erase or minimise history. I think it's important for all people to understand that bias is part of life, that we all have biases, prejudices, and perspectives based on our lived history and where we were born. When you recognise your own biases and those of your culture and upbringing, you can begin to treat others better and yourself with more compassion. You can also, hopefully, institute fairer social and economic policies, but that's a lot harder to do than simply reading a book that analyses our -isms. Nonetheless, denial changes nothing. I believe the intended audience for this book is students, and as such, the author ends each chapter with "reasons for hope", a common, necessary trope when dealing with younger people, since despair has never been known to be a positive change-maker. Thinking through presentation reminded me of other hatreds, such as the European prejudice against the Roma or gypsies, or modern day disdain of fat people. I wonder what it would be like or even if I could encounter others free of bias?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cecily Winter

    This short treatise paints with a broad brush lightly applied the various forms of prejudice existing worldwide from ancient times to the current decade (including racism, classism, ageism, homophobia, religious intolerance, xenophobia, and sexism). These are ongoing problems in our culture(s) that I hope will be excised as soon as possible, but most of us with a decent sense of history are familiar with every major point that the author/algorithm makes in this essay. The perfect reader is someon This short treatise paints with a broad brush lightly applied the various forms of prejudice existing worldwide from ancient times to the current decade (including racism, classism, ageism, homophobia, religious intolerance, xenophobia, and sexism). These are ongoing problems in our culture(s) that I hope will be excised as soon as possible, but most of us with a decent sense of history are familiar with every major point that the author/algorithm makes in this essay. The perfect reader is someone, say a high school or college student, unfamiliar with the range of social castes operating in the world and in need of a quick, clear overview. This is not a scholarly essay: there are grammatical errors and plodding sentences. In addition, there are no sources cited, few details, and no footnotes or endnotes. This is an essay of generalities that attempts to convey way too much history with too few specifics and too little material. Its best function is that of an introductory text to social inequality.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    The kindle edition is only 7 chapters which doesn’t to justice to the book. I checked it out from my local library. This is book that challenges your ideas of caste in the United States as compared to India. While the Indian caste system is more visible than the US ours still is there. The author shares personal stories as well as documented history with over 50 sources. African American are at the bottom of our system or the untouchables. I grew up in Western and Central Kansas. Never saw a black The kindle edition is only 7 chapters which doesn’t to justice to the book. I checked it out from my local library. This is book that challenges your ideas of caste in the United States as compared to India. While the Indian caste system is more visible than the US ours still is there. The author shares personal stories as well as documented history with over 50 sources. African American are at the bottom of our system or the untouchables. I grew up in Western and Central Kansas. Never saw a black person until we spent a summer in Lawrence Kansas while my parents attended KU. Some of this book gave me new insight into the 40sand 50s. This a book recommended for adult and teenagers wanting to be a change maker as well as a good person. High school libraries will find the history in this book not found in others.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Charles Anaman

    A good start for the 21st century I write this after the judgment is passed on George Floyd 's killer, I am sceptical of anyone who says justice is served. Until justice can function in the absence of public accountability to serve all members of the community without prejudice freedoms can't be protected in the world. I stated this some month ago as part of a self education much to add more understanding other progression that rights have been fought for and I'm not disappointed. There's t more hist A good start for the 21st century I write this after the judgment is passed on George Floyd 's killer, I am sceptical of anyone who says justice is served. Until justice can function in the absence of public accountability to serve all members of the community without prejudice freedoms can't be protected in the world. I stated this some month ago as part of a self education much to add more understanding other progression that rights have been fought for and I'm not disappointed. There's t more historical aspects to consider and I'll keep reading much more like this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    An important problem which deserved better scholarship. Sweeping statements made without foundation and the conclusions drawn (which are likely to be true), are made far too flippantly. Unfortunately this pamphlet (hardly what I’d term a “book”), is not saved by the writing; more like a sophomore term paper, which in my day would not merit more than a “C”. There has to be better treatment of this very devastating issue.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Phillip B. Duncan

    A good start This was a good quick read on important biases. Given the brevity, only so much could be covered. I appreciate the use of examples for each type of bias. I also appreciate that the presentation was not overly judgemental. Hopefully a book like this will encourage the reader to flesh out biases with intent. It is a good beginning to examination and discussion of our biases.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Sue

    There seems nothing wrong with this summary man's injustices, despite some clumsy writing. Did a computer write it? What I want to know is, who is University Press? Who writes a series of nonfiction pamphlets without identifying the writer, the sources, the publisher's location? Does anyone know? I'm not saying I found anything wrong or offensive. I just want to know who it is. I, among others, bought it thinking it was somehow related to the Wilkerson book. Beware! It's not. There seems nothing wrong with this summary man's injustices, despite some clumsy writing. Did a computer write it? What I want to know is, who is University Press? Who writes a series of nonfiction pamphlets without identifying the writer, the sources, the publisher's location? Does anyone know? I'm not saying I found anything wrong or offensive. I just want to know who it is. I, among others, bought it thinking it was somehow related to the Wilkerson book. Beware! It's not.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sharon L. Seaver

    "Caste" is an excellent summary and short history of the various forms of bias that infect us, world wide. Each one of these chapters could easily be a whole book, but it is constructive for us to be aware of all of these "isms" and phobias, and the relationships between them. A longer discussion would include possible solutions. Maybe that will come next. "Caste" is an excellent summary and short history of the various forms of bias that infect us, world wide. Each one of these chapters could easily be a whole book, but it is constructive for us to be aware of all of these "isms" and phobias, and the relationships between them. A longer discussion would include possible solutions. Maybe that will come next.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis P. Sherline

    Caste , a big subject in a little book I’ve heard nothing but rave reviews of this book. One person considers it the most important book of the year. It defines all the ways we hate each other but falls short in what we can do about it. I would have liked more descriptions, more examples and yes, reasons for hope but it’s definitely worth reading

  13. 5 out of 5

    JERI B GROVES

    Quick read on a Devastating and Pervasive Problem I always thought of myself as free of racism, sexism, ageism, etc. but the examples in this brief history laid bare my own biases. Highly recommended!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cheri Poulos

    Simple direct and informative This brief history of racism, sexism, classism etc. is coming into publication at the right time. And yes there is Hope even though our history shows a slow movement towards a more accepting world

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tom Boyer

    Nothing too new in this book. If you are totally uninformed about race, gender, LGBTQ, age, or social status, then you could benefit. It's kind of a handy book to keep to try and educate those who's biases make them over react to daily issues. Nothing too new in this book. If you are totally uninformed about race, gender, LGBTQ, age, or social status, then you could benefit. It's kind of a handy book to keep to try and educate those who's biases make them over react to daily issues.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eric Frost

    Caste review Well written book. Good description of the many ways mankind has created to gain advantages over other humans. I read this book to better understand and overcome my various biases.

  17. 4 out of 5

    geraldine delu

    Excellent overview of worldwide systemic racism! Important read for all! Excellent introduction for school age children 10 and older a must for Adults ! Great for family discussions!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Broder

    Review of the book Caste Excellent nonfiction about the historic beginnings ofRacism, sexism, caste systems and our own tendencies to place others into those categories. The book read very much like a fiction would read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    An informative book! Just finished reading Caste. There were some facts I did not know. Being aware is incredibly helpful and understand our own biases is key to advancement. I will share this book w others!!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Neill & Linda Brownstein

    Succinct but glib I expected a lot more depth hearing reviews of CASTE from.friends and family. Each type of bias speaks very briefly to the nature of that particular bias while avoiding a deep dive either into the psychosis nor sufficient case studies.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Arta Curtis

    A MUST READ This should be required reading in our public schools. Acknowledging our biases is a step to reducing them or eliminating them altogether. There is hope as things are changing worldwide. There is still much work left to do.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robert Faron

    Fine summary or difference Concise descriptions of caste and prejudice among human categories and the treatment through power and domination of one set of humans over other humans without empathy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Smith

    Very helpful! The definitions and examples in this short book were very helpful to me, to better understand what is and has been going on, in some cases for millennia. I’m thankful to a friend who recommended this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Meh....hardly qualifies as a book at 36 pages, an expanded essay maybe. Almost feels like a very general draft as a proposal for a longer book. Very little substantiation for general statements.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Clisbee

    I did not look closely enough. This is a short, SHORT version of the book. Moving on to the full text. Very intriguing however.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Claremarie Bonafede

    A Brief Summary A very brief summary of the history of race, sexism, and class. Causes you to look within st your own biases.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Grossi

    So brief that transgender discrimination isn't even mentioned?? So brief that transgender discrimination isn't even mentioned??

  28. 4 out of 5

    Judy A Humphrey

    Excellent book. It will open your eyes, without straining your brain.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Short and interesting, but not to be confused with the book by Isabel Wilkerson with the same main title. Because it is so short, it barely expands on any of the topics included.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert B. Hammond

    Not a polemic I was pleasantly surprised. It is brief and to the point on each major type of destructive bias that we humans hold and act upon. Descriptive. Balanced.

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