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On Violence and on Violence Against Women

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A blazingly insightful, provocative study of violence against women from the peerless feminist critic. Why has violence, and especially violence against women, become so much more prominent and visible across the world? To explore this question, Jacqueline Rose tracks the multiple forms of today's violence - historic and intimate, public and private - as they spread through A blazingly insightful, provocative study of violence against women from the peerless feminist critic. Why has violence, and especially violence against women, become so much more prominent and visible across the world? To explore this question, Jacqueline Rose tracks the multiple forms of today's violence - historic and intimate, public and private - as they spread throughout our social fabric, offering a new, provocative account of violence in our time. From trans rights and #MeToo to the sexual harassment of migrant women, from the trial of Oscar Pistorius to domestic violence in lockdown, from the writing of Roxanne Gay to Hisham Mitar and Han Kang, she casts her net wide. What obscene pleasure in violence do so many male leaders of the Western world unleash in their supporters? Is violence always gendered and if so, always in the same way? What is required of the human mind when it grants itself permission to do violence? On Violence and On Violence Against Women is a timely and urgent agitation against injustice, a challenge to radical feminism and a meaningful call to action.


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A blazingly insightful, provocative study of violence against women from the peerless feminist critic. Why has violence, and especially violence against women, become so much more prominent and visible across the world? To explore this question, Jacqueline Rose tracks the multiple forms of today's violence - historic and intimate, public and private - as they spread through A blazingly insightful, provocative study of violence against women from the peerless feminist critic. Why has violence, and especially violence against women, become so much more prominent and visible across the world? To explore this question, Jacqueline Rose tracks the multiple forms of today's violence - historic and intimate, public and private - as they spread throughout our social fabric, offering a new, provocative account of violence in our time. From trans rights and #MeToo to the sexual harassment of migrant women, from the trial of Oscar Pistorius to domestic violence in lockdown, from the writing of Roxanne Gay to Hisham Mitar and Han Kang, she casts her net wide. What obscene pleasure in violence do so many male leaders of the Western world unleash in their supporters? Is violence always gendered and if so, always in the same way? What is required of the human mind when it grants itself permission to do violence? On Violence and On Violence Against Women is a timely and urgent agitation against injustice, a challenge to radical feminism and a meaningful call to action.

30 review for On Violence and on Violence Against Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This is a wide-ranging and provocative analysis of the ways in which multiple forms of violence intersect on and around women’s bodies in ways that create cyclical, systemic power structures designed to pit women against each other—and ourselves. Rose begins her study by addressing the ways in which white male language and laws patrol all bodies, then expands on how such discourses create the perfect conditions for the reiteration of gender-based violence as an accepted, normative, and even cons This is a wide-ranging and provocative analysis of the ways in which multiple forms of violence intersect on and around women’s bodies in ways that create cyclical, systemic power structures designed to pit women against each other—and ourselves. Rose begins her study by addressing the ways in which white male language and laws patrol all bodies, then expands on how such discourses create the perfect conditions for the reiteration of gender-based violence as an accepted, normative, and even constitutive force. With chapters focused on specific topics related to sexual violence as it intersects with violence related to sexuality, gender identity, race, class, and ethnicity, Rose documents the clear ways in which violence against women is used by individuals with power to maintain their power. On Violence and On Violence Against Women is an urgent book that deserves to be read in classes on feminist theory and gender studies—but also one meant for readers outside of the classroom, from politicians and activists to individuals interested in learning more about the ways in which power is literally mapped onto our bodies.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sara Broad

    "On Violence and On Violence Against Women" by Jacqueline Rose is the study of and theories behind violence against women and the violence that is present across different fields and regions of the world. I'm an avid nonfiction reader, and I was really looking forward to a book devoted to this topic. The breadth of sources that Rose drew upon to compose this book was really outstanding. Until the last two or three chapters of this book though, I had a really hard time following along with many o "On Violence and On Violence Against Women" by Jacqueline Rose is the study of and theories behind violence against women and the violence that is present across different fields and regions of the world. I'm an avid nonfiction reader, and I was really looking forward to a book devoted to this topic. The breadth of sources that Rose drew upon to compose this book was really outstanding. Until the last two or three chapters of this book though, I had a really hard time following along with many of the tangents that Rose went on and how they were connected to the purpose of this book. There were a couple of times in "On Violence" that Rose stated that she needed to bring the reader back to the purpose of the chapter, and then the chapter would end shortly thereafter. For example, there were some deep dives into Freud and psychoanalytic theory, as well as pages long literary analysis of books the author read, and while this was interesting to a point, it wasn't really cohesive. There were some strong points in this book, and I hope more books are published on this subject.

  3. 4 out of 5

    r. fay

    4/5 Really engaging and informative. I've seen some critiques of this book for being too "scattered" and the author's thoughts not being perfectly linked, but to me that is both the book's personal draw to me, as well as its biggest success. It succeeds, to me, in communicating the "muteness" of violence; the experience of trauma that's so encompassing it's psychotic in expression. I also very much respect her (especially as an academic feminist in the Uk) for centering both trans women's experi 4/5 Really engaging and informative. I've seen some critiques of this book for being too "scattered" and the author's thoughts not being perfectly linked, but to me that is both the book's personal draw to me, as well as its biggest success. It succeeds, to me, in communicating the "muteness" of violence; the experience of trauma that's so encompassing it's psychotic in expression. I also very much respect her (especially as an academic feminist in the Uk) for centering both trans women's experiences and migrant women's experiences. I completely agree that these are the most prescient examples of violence against women currently, and I admire her not only not shying away from a discussion of these groups, but using them as the foundation for her thoughts. I appreciate that a lot, even if it wasn't a completely flawless and understandable philosophical take. I appreciate this book, I guess. I appreciate its existence and role. Yes this is, again, a white woman speaking about the experience of largely non-white women. But I still value her dedication, intellectually, to a subject that most cannot address directly. I am interested in Rose as a thinker, and often agree with her. I have been introduced to a lot of additional material through this book which I also think is a success. Well worth the read. Rose is a thoughtful, interesting, feeling sort of academic, and I respect her work.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anya Alekseevna

    A highly important read

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennie Chantal

    DNF Around 25% Might be more accurate to say CNF as in could not finish. In general the writing was not particularly engaging but when I got to The chapter Trans Voices it was just…a mess. Outdated language and references. Missed opportunities. Good intentions clearly! I mean, at least she tried! What I read wasn’t offensive just off.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hogmire

    TL;DR--I really thought I'd love this book, but boy was it not for me... Thanks to FSG for a free finished copy of this title, which was published on May 18, 2021. I'm writing this review voluntarily. Jacqueline Rose's "On Violence and on Violence Against Women" is a wide-ranging collection of essays on the subject matter of the title, mostly adapted and updated from previously published work and/or spoken lectures from around 2014 to the present. Rose tackles a lot of diverse subject matter: from TL;DR--I really thought I'd love this book, but boy was it not for me... Thanks to FSG for a free finished copy of this title, which was published on May 18, 2021. I'm writing this review voluntarily. Jacqueline Rose's "On Violence and on Violence Against Women" is a wide-ranging collection of essays on the subject matter of the title, mostly adapted and updated from previously published work and/or spoken lectures from around 2014 to the present. Rose tackles a lot of diverse subject matter: from literary accounts of violence written by women, to the rise of the #MeToo and #AmINext movements, to a specific focus on trans rights and racial injustice. As a feminist, I should be totally into this, right? So, why didn't I like it? I think I can split my critical beef with this book into two main categories. The first is that Jacqueline Rose constantly focuses on outdated ideas, despite the fact that this book came out in 2021. The second is that she tends to make contradictory statements that undercut her best points. All of these problems leave me with a lot of questions about the editing of this book! So to start with the first idea: Rose's sections on trans rights are a good initial example of the outdated issues that I'm talking about; the chapters are an odd mix of decent contemporary analysis (ex. the erasure of nonbinary people as members of the trans community by the mainstream) with a lot of incredibly outdated terminology and ideas that the trans community no longer uses (ex. use of "FtM" and "MtF"). Now, I'm not saying that we should shame members of the LGBTQIA+ community for adhering to old terms, particularly tons of elder members who still identify with these monikers. But Rose isn't trans. I'm really surprised that an editor didn't suggest changes, especially because the pieces were updated to reflect current events. Another example is Rose's constant discussion of Freud and psychoanalysis. Of course I think therapy is essential, and I agree with Rose that the world would be better off if we were more psychoanalytically-minded, but this perspective seems like it comes from decades ago. In our current aggressively online age, with the transition from a liberal humanist perspective to more of a post-humanist perspective, it's odd to see such a focus on individual psychology without an equal (or greater) focus on a more sociological viewpoint: systemic oppression, networks/links/connections of oppression, etc. Rose also doesn't really delve into the harmful aspects of this kind of individual focus (i.e. how rugged individualism goes too far and dips into the exact kind of toxic masculinity she's speaking against). Oddly enough, I'm currently reading the first volume of Foucault's "History of Sexuality," and it was strange to see Rose's reverence for psychoanalysis contrasted with Foucault's constant questioning of the confessional as a structural method of power. Lastly on the outdated front is Rose's obsession with literary modernism being the best artistic method of delving into stories of trauma and abuse. Look, I love literary modernism, and all the writers Rose mentions, but there's equally good work going on in post-modern and African/Afrofuturist writing, not to mention solid genre books--especially from women writing horror. Rose holds up Eimear McBride as the be-all-end-all of sexual abuse writers, but you could easily point to Emma Glass instead. Rose also loves the fragmentary nature of literary modernism, but some of the best work of that kind comes from more post-modern texts about violence (ex. Kate Zambreno's experimental and hybrid works, or the literary terrorism/piracy of Kathy Acker). Some of the best recent fiction on abuse, to my mind, has come from genre authors like Nalo Hopkinson, Nnedi Okorafor, Joanna Koch, etc, I could go on and on. Shew, OK: now shifting to my second problem. There are multiple points in this book where Rose makes over-correcting statements that go against her main points, particularly when it comes to trying to distance herself from radical feminist TERFS and attempting to criticize the state from a leftist perspective. For example, as I mentioned previously, she offers a great analysis of why wealthy and more gender-passing trans people are highlighted by the mainstream media, despite the fact that many trans people are poor and more genderfluid/nonbinary in presentation. This is an essential point, especially when it comes to trans people being able to define themselves and their identities outside of the binary. But then Rose makes an odd statement like, "Transition does not mean so much crossing from one side to the other as hovering in the space in between (in the United States, only about a quarter of transgender women have had genital surgery," which seems to uphold the opposite perspective--that being "fully" or "really" trans is defined by surgical intervention. Another one of these moments comes when Rose is discussing Hannah Arendt's ideas about the divide between power and violence. In order to, again, distance herself from radical feminists who believe that masculinity is inherently violent, Rose explains her differing perspective: violence actually occurs in moments when those in power are losing power, not in moments when they hold power strongly. Of course this makes sense on the surface, in terms of oppressive governments lashing out violently to quell outright rebellion, but it also undercuts Rose's smart focus on Rosa Luxemburg's ideas about more hidden violence in quiet moments. The state is always engaging in systemic violence, even during times of so-called peace, which is why it's such a toxic apparatus of oppression. Similarly, in abusive personal relationships, an abuser tends to react with violence long before their power starts to slip--instead, they wear their partner down, to prevent the power balance from tipping in the first place. At its worst, this kind of argument about the violence-power dichotomy can be used as a victim-blaming tactic: saying that a survivor provoked violence by acting or speaking out, or taking power from their abuser. It can also be used to justify the actions of the state, as Rose herself does when she falls into the liberal trap of praising women world leaders for handling the coronavirus pandemic better than male leaders. Just because this is true about the women leaders mentioned doesn't mean that they're ultimately not upholding the same violent and oppressive global capitalist system as their male counterparts. Like Luxemburg says, there's always violence occurring under the capitalist state, even in moments of supposed tranquility--even when a woman is leading.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    On Violence and On Violence Against Women is a powerful and powerfully depressing book. Its eight chapters detail what its clumsy title announces: the ways in which women are physically and psychologically abused, especially in the United States, England, and Africa (mostly South Africa). Jacqueline Rose sees the problem of violence in social and psychological terms. Implicit throughout, more explicitly in the brief afterword, is the idea that a remaking of sensibility that would release men and On Violence and On Violence Against Women is a powerful and powerfully depressing book. Its eight chapters detail what its clumsy title announces: the ways in which women are physically and psychologically abused, especially in the United States, England, and Africa (mostly South Africa). Jacqueline Rose sees the problem of violence in social and psychological terms. Implicit throughout, more explicitly in the brief afterword, is the idea that a remaking of sensibility that would release men and women from trying to be the kind of conventional, more or less strait-jacketed beings that they have been conditioned to be, a model false to human nature in its contradictions and complexity. Such a revamping, of course, would have to be on a broad and global scale. Along the way Rose offers a pantheon of cultural references, even more dazzling, plentiful, and fresh (to me, anyway) as the ones in The Haunting of Sylvia Plath, the only other book of hers that I have read. She is aware of this newness. In the chapters on South Africa, almost every name is tagged as “poet,” “essayist,” freedom fighter,” “activist,” etc. Rosa Luxemburg, Hannah Arendt, Virginia Woolf and the Perry Mason TV show may not need identification, but Thabo Mbeki, Hisham Matar, Mogobe Ramose, and Susan Shabangu were all new to me, a part of the world outside my limited experience. A reader will hear of many incidents, some dismaying and many horrific, and learn the names of new and often apparently praiseworthy and noble people. Unsurprisingly, Freud is central to her discussion of psychology. In me Rose has a sympathetic reader. In so far as she is preaching, I am one of the converted. Without making it my life’s work, I would like to be more whole-heartedly hopeful for her transcendent, humane vision. This book strengthens those feelings. Her pleas for wider and more accepting human relations are inarguable. Without being defeatist, I wish I could sense that it were closer to happening. Some discussion of that would for me have been to the point. As I read On Violence and On Violence Against Women, two passages from literary works (by men, it must be said) kept nudging me: Candide and The Scarlet Letter. In the spirit of Jacqueline Rose’s fondness for imaginative literature, I cite them: Croyez-vous, dit Candide, que les hommes se soient toujours mutuellement massacrés comme ils font aujourd'hui? qu'ils aient toujours été menteurs, fourbes, perfides, ingrats, brigands, faibles, volages, lâches, envieux, gourmands, ivrognes, avares, ambitieux, sanguinaires, calomniateurs, débauchés, fanatiques, hypocrites, et sots? Croyez-vous, dit Martin, que les éperviers aient toujours mangé des pigeons quand ils en ont trouvé? Oui, sans doute, dit Candide. Eh bien! dit Martin, si les éperviers ont toujours eu le même caractère, pourquoi voulez-vous que les hommes aient changé le leur? Oh! dit Candide, il y a bien de la différence, car le libre arbitre.... En raisonnant ainsi, ils arrivèrent à Bordeaux. (1759) • Everything was against her. The world was hostile. The child’s own nature had something wrong in it which continually betokened that she had been born amiss—the effluence of her mother’s lawless passion—and often impelled Hester to ask, in bitterness of heart, whether it were for ill or good that the poor little creature had been born at all. Indeed, the same dark question often rose into her mind with reference to the whole race of womanhood. Was existence worth accepting even to the happiest among them? As concerned her own individual existence, she had long ago decided in the negative, and dismissed the point as settled. A tendency to speculation, though it may keep women quiet, as it does man, yet makes her sad. She discerns, it may be, such a hopeless task before her. As a first step, the whole system of society is to be torn down and built up anew. Then the very nature of the opposite sex, or its long hereditary habit, which has become like nature, is to be essentially modified before woman can be allowed to assume what seems a fair and suitable position. Finally, all other difficulties being obviated, woman cannot take advantage of these preliminary reforms until she herself shall have undergone a still mightier change, in which, perhaps, the ethereal essence, wherein she has her truest life, will be found to have evaporated. A woman never overcomes these problems by any exercise of thought. They are not to be solved, or only in one way. If her heart chance to come uppermost, they vanish. Thus Hester Prynne, whose heart had lost its regular and healthy throb, wandered without a clue in the dark labyrinth of mind; now turned aside by an insurmountable precipice; now starting back from a deep chasm. There was wild and ghastly scenery all around her, and a home and comfort nowhere. At times a fearful doubt strove to possess her soul, whether it were not better to send Pearl at once to Heaven, and go herself to such futurity as Eternal Justice should provide. (1850) Perhaps I am too essentialist and defeatist. Prove me wrong! On Violence and On Violence Against Women overwhelmingly presents abiding outrages and inhumanity. Where, how, and when will the new day dawn?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I'm not sure, I always agree with Jacqueline Rose, and my main issue I guess is always that her books seem to rehash or present a condensed overview of theories that on their own, are far more complex, exhaustive, and satisfying in their understanding of violence, and especially violence against women. I'm also not sure, I agree with her assessment that sometimes oppressors cause harm without realizing it: I think violence is rarely an afterthought; it's the very purpose of oppressive systems, a I'm not sure, I always agree with Jacqueline Rose, and my main issue I guess is always that her books seem to rehash or present a condensed overview of theories that on their own, are far more complex, exhaustive, and satisfying in their understanding of violence, and especially violence against women. I'm also not sure, I agree with her assessment that sometimes oppressors cause harm without realizing it: I think violence is rarely an afterthought; it's the very purpose of oppressive systems, and they are not maintained by ignorance. I did appreciate the depth of some aspects of this book, especially the portion on Freud and psychoanalysis which have been foundational to misogyny and yet, for all the disclaimers, are still given a prominent spot in Western discourse around most anything. Overall, I'm a bit torn. Because on the one hand, I think that this would be good for someone who wants to have a general overview on the various theories that explain the roots and dynamics of violence against women, but then I think if perhaps its meandering nature might be that useful to someone who isn't at least somehow informed about this topic?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marlene Angelica

    [thank you to Faber Faber & NetGalley for the free copy for an honest review!] I’m not an avid non fiction reader (I read non-fiction, but not that often and I rarely review them because they feel very personal), but the title and content really drew me in, and I really wanted to read it. Jacqueline Rose shows through this book some theories behind violence against women, and on violence in general that goes on throughout the world. The amount of sources that went into this book was amazing, and [thank you to Faber Faber & NetGalley for the free copy for an honest review!] I’m not an avid non fiction reader (I read non-fiction, but not that often and I rarely review them because they feel very personal), but the title and content really drew me in, and I really wanted to read it. Jacqueline Rose shows through this book some theories behind violence against women, and on violence in general that goes on throughout the world. The amount of sources that went into this book was amazing, and it made it feel like a really well researched topic. I think what threw me off was that it was hard to follow along throughout the book on the topics. A lot of the times it felt like the book discussed one aspect, then another, and another, without having a clear red thread between them, and then there had to be some kind of explanation on why these things were important, and, yeah, it really threw me off. The book felt messy, and in the end I didn't really enjoy the reading experience because I felt like I had to try and decode it. A lot of the points made were interesting, but they just didn’t feel cohesive. I would have loved to see it more organised and simplified.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Montano

    Jacqueline Rose illustrates multiple dimensions of multiple current topics all which are upheld by violence towards women or minorities. She has a notable allegiance to psychoanalysis which is interesting but due to my ignorance in the matter some of her conclusions related to the field went over my head. However, there are still some really good truths produced by the psychoanalytic lens Jacqueline Rose uses on domestic and sexual violence. "If so many men, turn out to be so ghastly, where does Jacqueline Rose illustrates multiple dimensions of multiple current topics all which are upheld by violence towards women or minorities. She has a notable allegiance to psychoanalysis which is interesting but due to my ignorance in the matter some of her conclusions related to the field went over my head. However, there are still some really good truths produced by the psychoanalytic lens Jacqueline Rose uses on domestic and sexual violence. "If so many men, turn out to be so ghastly, where does it all begin?" is certainly a pretty important question that is brought up in one of the sections dedicated to this psychoanalytic process. What was exceptional about this book is the absolute wealth of sources Rose includes so effortlessly within her prose. Weaving in personal stories, historical facts, and a ton of literary works into each other make the book really compelling. There are a lot of steps a reader must take to really bring all these chapters together as the traces of a society which cause these issues can be drawn but aren't as concrete as I thought they would be. Rating: 3/5 , chapter on modernist language in literature is *chef kiss* great

  11. 4 out of 5

    mango_vodka

    Unfortunately I had some trouble getting through 'On Violence and On Violence Against Women' and stopped at about 40%. The topic is extremely important and relevant to today's time, but I think the book would be suited to someone more highly educated in the topic than myself. I have a lot of education in a different field (STEM), and lived experience as a woman, but felt a bit lost as the themes seemed to ping pong rapidly between Trump, Weinstein, fictional works and theory, and other global to Unfortunately I had some trouble getting through 'On Violence and On Violence Against Women' and stopped at about 40%. The topic is extremely important and relevant to today's time, but I think the book would be suited to someone more highly educated in the topic than myself. I have a lot of education in a different field (STEM), and lived experience as a woman, but felt a bit lost as the themes seemed to ping pong rapidly between Trump, Weinstein, fictional works and theory, and other global topics. "On Violence" is a solid review of many works and studies about violence against women, but it probably shouldn't be your first foray into the field. If you have an academic background in the humanities or are extremely well read in topics of women's rights, this could be a good next option to add to your list.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This is on a timely and important topic. As others have said the chapters are often a bit rambling with unnecessary tangents. It's more LRB than tight argumentation. The psychoanalytic perspective we might expect from Rose only occasionally registers. For me, these are the strengths of the the collection. It is when she registers psychological complexity to counteract simplified accounts of violence. For example, when she points out that Oscar Pestorious can be both guilty and expressing grief. This is on a timely and important topic. As others have said the chapters are often a bit rambling with unnecessary tangents. It's more LRB than tight argumentation. The psychoanalytic perspective we might expect from Rose only occasionally registers. For me, these are the strengths of the the collection. It is when she registers psychological complexity to counteract simplified accounts of violence. For example, when she points out that Oscar Pestorious can be both guilty and expressing grief. The collection covers some of the same terrain as Amia Srinivasan's The Right to Sex which is much more tightly argued

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jon Paul Roberts

    the latest in a recent string of essay collections* i've read that allow for a return to nuance and complexity. also, it might sound mad to say, but it's so refreshing to see a respected cisgender critic/writer engage seriously and empathetically with trans issues (and, in the process, tear apart TERF arguments) because it's honestly a rarity and it really fucking shouldn't be. *srinivasan's 'the right to sex', katherine angel's 'tomorrow sex will be good again', Laing's 'everybody' and nelson's the latest in a recent string of essay collections* i've read that allow for a return to nuance and complexity. also, it might sound mad to say, but it's so refreshing to see a respected cisgender critic/writer engage seriously and empathetically with trans issues (and, in the process, tear apart TERF arguments) because it's honestly a rarity and it really fucking shouldn't be. *srinivasan's 'the right to sex', katherine angel's 'tomorrow sex will be good again', Laing's 'everybody' and nelson's 'on freedom' being other good examples.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Wolf

    I mostly enjoyed this book. Rose is clearly a huge presence as a literary critic and she explores some really interesting avenues throughout this book - I particularly liked the two chapters that focused on trans people, and the chapter surrounding the murder of Reeva Steenkamp. There are some places where the narrative felt a little dry, or it felt like a lot of regurgitated theory was being employed instead of interviewing new sources - this might be the result of the book being a product of t I mostly enjoyed this book. Rose is clearly a huge presence as a literary critic and she explores some really interesting avenues throughout this book - I particularly liked the two chapters that focused on trans people, and the chapter surrounding the murder of Reeva Steenkamp. There are some places where the narrative felt a little dry, or it felt like a lot of regurgitated theory was being employed instead of interviewing new sources - this might be the result of the book being a product of the pandemic. Overall, informative but not mind blowing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kallie

    Rose is brilliant and complex and knowledgeable on theory and history. So 'On Violence . . .' is by no means easy reading but worth the effort and thought the reader brings to absorbing this very important work. She discusses other author's works on relevant subjects, so I now have a related reading list. In addition to spousal or other violence and sexual assault women everywhere experience, Rose discusses: the primal human tendency to violence when confronted with the unknown and how little we Rose is brilliant and complex and knowledgeable on theory and history. So 'On Violence . . .' is by no means easy reading but worth the effort and thought the reader brings to absorbing this very important work. She discusses other author's works on relevant subjects, so I now have a related reading list. In addition to spousal or other violence and sexual assault women everywhere experience, Rose discusses: the primal human tendency to violence when confronted with the unknown and how little we control over that; and the oppression too many suffer at the hands of the state, i.e. the inexcusably sadistic treatment of refugees in the U.K. and U.S.. She does not exaggerate the cruelty with this passage, written during the Trump administration: ". . . This is a cautionary tale of what has already been, and, in this worsening political scenario, of what is likely to come. Targeting women refugees and asylum seekers, turning them into criminals, lays bare the pleasure in sexual hatred, alongside the increasingly violent forms of inequality for which women have always been punished -- both of which continue to fuel gender violence across the globe. Todays migrants have become the ultimate scapegoats of a social order whose ever-expanding greed is on course to destroy the very air we breathe. . ."

  16. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Fascinating and so well reasoned.

  17. 5 out of 5

    ANA

    Excellent discourse, somewhat difficult to follow: academics may be wise to adapt the journalistic style

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

    Very hard to get out of your head

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joelle

    This book needs trigger warnings, concerning domestic violence, sexual assault, and racism. Other triggers include homophobia and transphobia. It's highly worth reading, but not at the expense of your mental health. This book needs trigger warnings, concerning domestic violence, sexual assault, and racism. Other triggers include homophobia and transphobia. It's highly worth reading, but not at the expense of your mental health.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mai-Anh

    Print giveaway from Goodreads

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katie Beswick

    I love being inside Jacqueline Rose’s mind and love the way her writing pushes at my assumptions and makes me question myself. I think the way she uses the concept of trans in this book is a really productive psychoanalytic intervention and usefully destabilises the fixed ideas around sex in a way that is ultimately feminist. Quite how any of this actually applies in a world where women are being shot in the face and murdered for being women and in which productive theoretical interventions have I love being inside Jacqueline Rose’s mind and love the way her writing pushes at my assumptions and makes me question myself. I think the way she uses the concept of trans in this book is a really productive psychoanalytic intervention and usefully destabilises the fixed ideas around sex in a way that is ultimately feminist. Quite how any of this actually applies in a world where women are being shot in the face and murdered for being women and in which productive theoretical interventions have little chance of practically addressing that violence and it effects remains to be seem.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Terence

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emilie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Justin Paszul

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steven Byne

  27. 4 out of 5

    Miah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

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