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The Spirit of Music: The Lesson Continues

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"We may not realize it as we listen to the soundtrack of our lives through tiny earbuds, but music and all that it encompasses is disappearing all around us. In this fable-like story three musicians from around the world are mysteriously summoned to Nashville, the Music City, to join together with Victor to do battle against the "Phasers," whose blinking "music-cancelling" "We may not realize it as we listen to the soundtrack of our lives through tiny earbuds, but music and all that it encompasses is disappearing all around us. In this fable-like story three musicians from around the world are mysteriously summoned to Nashville, the Music City, to join together with Victor to do battle against the "Phasers," whose blinking "music-cancelling" headphones silence and destroy all musical sound. Only by coming together, connecting, and making the joyful sounds of immediate, "live" music can the world be restored to the power and spirit of music"--


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"We may not realize it as we listen to the soundtrack of our lives through tiny earbuds, but music and all that it encompasses is disappearing all around us. In this fable-like story three musicians from around the world are mysteriously summoned to Nashville, the Music City, to join together with Victor to do battle against the "Phasers," whose blinking "music-cancelling" "We may not realize it as we listen to the soundtrack of our lives through tiny earbuds, but music and all that it encompasses is disappearing all around us. In this fable-like story three musicians from around the world are mysteriously summoned to Nashville, the Music City, to join together with Victor to do battle against the "Phasers," whose blinking "music-cancelling" headphones silence and destroy all musical sound. Only by coming together, connecting, and making the joyful sounds of immediate, "live" music can the world be restored to the power and spirit of music"--

30 review for The Spirit of Music: The Lesson Continues

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    The Spirit of Music is a beautiful story that reads like a love letter to music and its role in the author's life. In this fable-like story, three musicians go to Nashville to join Victor to battle against the "Phasers," whose "music-canceling" headphones destroy music. Only "live" music can restore the spirit of music. I loved one section where the author was feeling bedraggled and unfulfilled by his crazy touring schedule. He talked to his dad and said, "I'm not making time for music." Dad sai The Spirit of Music is a beautiful story that reads like a love letter to music and its role in the author's life. In this fable-like story, three musicians go to Nashville to join Victor to battle against the "Phasers," whose "music-canceling" headphones destroy music. Only "live" music can restore the spirit of music. I loved one section where the author was feeling bedraggled and unfulfilled by his crazy touring schedule. He talked to his dad and said, "I'm not making time for music." Dad said something to the effect of, "Then you're not making time for you." In this book, music becomes a parable for the world. We can say the same thing about the environment or mother nature. Music is for the greater good. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/vic...

  2. 4 out of 5

    greggo o’neill

    i loved the first book, the music lesson, and i kept wanting to love this one but it’s less of a lesson and more an incoherent pile of coincidences, tensionless conflict, and vague complaints about the ‘digital era’ that is so preoccupied with the power of magical thinking to prevail over any foe that it forgoes supplying any actual foe to prevail over. i’m glad he’s having fun writing fantasy but i wish he hadn’t piggybacked on the fantasy structure of the music lesson. i kept waiting for more i loved the first book, the music lesson, and i kept wanting to love this one but it’s less of a lesson and more an incoherent pile of coincidences, tensionless conflict, and vague complaints about the ‘digital era’ that is so preoccupied with the power of magical thinking to prevail over any foe that it forgoes supplying any actual foe to prevail over. i’m glad he’s having fun writing fantasy but i wish he hadn’t piggybacked on the fantasy structure of the music lesson. i kept waiting for more of the good sense insights about music and then the book was over. i literally just talked myself out of another star.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Arnie

    Victor Wooten and his cast of characters from The Music Lesson return to help him save music from disappearing. The very real Wooten Family wisdom and magic is lovingly tucked between these pages. ( I know it's real because I've seen and heard it for myself in person!) Fantasy? Fiction? Maybe, or maybe not! Either way... Magic. This book will make you think about music in a whole new light... and that's the whole point. Victor Wooten and his cast of characters from The Music Lesson return to help him save music from disappearing. The very real Wooten Family wisdom and magic is lovingly tucked between these pages. ( I know it's real because I've seen and heard it for myself in person!) Fantasy? Fiction? Maybe, or maybe not! Either way... Magic. This book will make you think about music in a whole new light... and that's the whole point.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    The Spirit of Music, by Victor Wooten, is about the importance of music in our lives, told in the form of a parable, with Music (note the capital M) personified in female form and speaking through anyone who cares to make the connection. Victor himself is an important character in the story, though by no means the main one. The author makes a number of memorable comments about the nature of music and about teaching it. For instance: All instruments sound the same. They are silent. The music comes The Spirit of Music, by Victor Wooten, is about the importance of music in our lives, told in the form of a parable, with Music (note the capital M) personified in female form and speaking through anyone who cares to make the connection. Victor himself is an important character in the story, though by no means the main one. The author makes a number of memorable comments about the nature of music and about teaching it. For instance: All instruments sound the same. They are silent. The music comes from the one playing it. Another central theme is that forces in this world (called Phasers in the book) are trying to attack, kill, and destroy Music. There are valid reasons for believing that much of what he says about this is true, though much good music also continues to be made, and new music makers are arriving on the scene every day. I rated this as I did only because it's kind of lightweight, not because I disagree or found anything objectionable about it. In fact, the whole book is positive and about feel-good emotions. Music has been an essential part of my own life literally since the day I was born since my father was a skilled professional classical musician, and his work dominated our home. In my own journey, I discovered Bela Fleck and the Flecktones soon after they formed and have been a huge fan of the band always. In fact, two of my brothers formed personal relationships with members of the band, so I feel a special connection to them. (And I have met Howard Levy myself.) Music will live and grow. What forms it will ultimately take remains to be seen.

  5. 5 out of 5

    KennyO

    Always a fan of Victor L. Wooten’s playing, I read The Music Lesson, loved it, and I’ve since reread it more than once. After reading it I’d passed it along as gifts it to several friends. Most of them “got it” but one called it too fuzzy-wuzzy and too flower child for him. Now, having read The Spirit of Music, I get about this book what my friend got about the earlier book. I won’t be giving this one as gifts and I’m not sure I’ll reread it or even keep it on my shelf. Spirit isn’t badly writte Always a fan of Victor L. Wooten’s playing, I read The Music Lesson, loved it, and I’ve since reread it more than once. After reading it I’d passed it along as gifts it to several friends. Most of them “got it” but one called it too fuzzy-wuzzy and too flower child for him. Now, having read The Spirit of Music, I get about this book what my friend got about the earlier book. I won’t be giving this one as gifts and I’m not sure I’ll reread it or even keep it on my shelf. Spirit isn’t badly written but I think it’ll struggle to find an appreciative audience. I was an engineer so those expressions that English majors use to analyze and describe books were long ago swatted out of my vocabulary. That’s a wordy way to say that I’m at a loss to describe Spirit. If you’re even slightly interested, by all means, give it a read! I am not interested in discouraging anyone from reading a book they may like more than I do.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    This book, unlike the first installment, has no direction. In the Music Lesson we were given 10 elements of music which were weaved into a sort of fantastical story with a fair share of new age "woo woo". Whereas this book is ALL "woo woo" and zero substance. I would say it's a mix between The DaVinci Code and The Secret with a random element of anti digital media propaganda. Even taking that for what it is, the story itself was poorly written. No real stakes, drawn out interactions, cringe wort This book, unlike the first installment, has no direction. In the Music Lesson we were given 10 elements of music which were weaved into a sort of fantastical story with a fair share of new age "woo woo". Whereas this book is ALL "woo woo" and zero substance. I would say it's a mix between The DaVinci Code and The Secret with a random element of anti digital media propaganda. Even taking that for what it is, the story itself was poorly written. No real stakes, drawn out interactions, cringe worthy dialogue, and flat characters. If Victor wants to continue writing in more of a fantasy genre, he needs a ghost writer. Regarding books from musicians, this is tied for me with the Charles Mingus biography as worst of the worst. Lastly, whomever was in charge of hiring the voice actors for the audio book needs fired. Love you Victor, but what in the hell was that?

  7. 5 out of 5

    John Chapman

    I don't write many reviews, but it's good to be warned off a book. This book seems to have a message that one should put one's heart into one's music. There's no real explanation of what is the crisis with "Music" as it is anthropomorphized, and it seems that the lesson is to "just do it", maybe something about overcoming one's fears. The dialog of some of the side characters is stereotyped in ways that are embarrassing. The bad guys are never explained, and it's not clear what they're doing thr I don't write many reviews, but it's good to be warned off a book. This book seems to have a message that one should put one's heart into one's music. There's no real explanation of what is the crisis with "Music" as it is anthropomorphized, and it seems that the lesson is to "just do it", maybe something about overcoming one's fears. The dialog of some of the side characters is stereotyped in ways that are embarrassing. The bad guys are never explained, and it's not clear what they're doing throughout the trumped up struggle. The only reason I finished the book was to get credit toward my annual goal for Goodreads.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bass Cadet

    Worth the Wait Since reading his first book, I have been waiting for this follow-up book for years. I had it on my wishlist and when it became available for preorder, placed my order. It's a good story and has quite a few examples of interesting connections between music and life. I intend to have my children read it but not sure if I should have them read the first book before this book. This can almost stand on its own, but there may be some unclear references or messages if starting from this Worth the Wait Since reading his first book, I have been waiting for this follow-up book for years. I had it on my wishlist and when it became available for preorder, placed my order. It's a good story and has quite a few examples of interesting connections between music and life. I intend to have my children read it but not sure if I should have them read the first book before this book. This can almost stand on its own, but there may be some unclear references or messages if starting from this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jay Clement

    28-2021. Wooten’s first book was wonderful, and I’ve recommended it to all my musical friends. This one was a little too fanciful and mystical, without the wonder of the first book. I see where he was going with it, but it left me flat.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ConRoy Smith

    I love the first book and this one fell right inline with it. Victor is by far one of my favorite bass players and to hear him so intricately talk about music as more than a note or a song really opened my heart, mind, and soul to a new perspective on music.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    A fun and interesting read. I think I would’ve gotten more out of it had I read his first book beforehand, but as a musician I found this to be a bit like a musical Alice in Wonderland — fun and absurd and insightful!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    " A woman's strength is different than a man's. The sacred gift she carries within can lift the human spirit higher than any man can lift with muscle alone" " A woman's strength is different than a man's. The sacred gift she carries within can lift the human spirit higher than any man can lift with muscle alone"

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ewan Anderson

    Excellent journey, difficult to put down.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    A refreshingly unique story. Definitely enjoyed reading this one!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Not my typical genre. Very thoughtful ideas on teaching, that that could be applied to teaching, coaching, parenting etc. The story line reminded me a bit of Hearts in Atlantis by Stephen King

  16. 4 out of 5

    Barry

    Victor takes us on another journey with Michael and friends into the spirit and life of Music. Is it a parable? Is it a warning? Is it a call to action? Yep!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Didn’t care for the authors voice or his alarmism about the state of music. Only made it through about 2 chapters and then gave up.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mark Rimelspach

    A deep dive into the importance of music in the world by telling a story of it being attacked and saved.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  20. 5 out of 5

    Winston

  21. 4 out of 5

    Fleur

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andraleia Buch

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joanie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Drew Cohen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Doug Sawyer

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave Blickstein

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hélder Galego

  29. 4 out of 5

    B Corbin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

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