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I Left My Homework in the Hamptons: What I Learned Teaching the Children of the One Percent

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A captivating memoir about tutoring for Manhattan’s elite, revealing how a life of extreme wealth both helps and harms the children of the one percent. Ben orders daily room service while living in a five-star hotel. Olivia collects luxury brand sneakers worn by celebrities. Dakota jets off to Rome when she needs to avoid drama at school. Welcome to the inner circle of New Y A captivating memoir about tutoring for Manhattan’s elite, revealing how a life of extreme wealth both helps and harms the children of the one percent. Ben orders daily room service while living in a five-star hotel. Olivia collects luxury brand sneakers worn by celebrities. Dakota jets off to Rome when she needs to avoid drama at school. Welcome to the inner circle of New York’s richest families, where academia is an obsession, wealth does nothing to soothe status anxiety and parents will try just about anything to gain a competitive edge in the college admissions rat race. When Blythe Grossberg first started as a tutor and learning specialist, she had no idea what awaited her inside the high-end apartments of Fifth Avenue. Children are expected to be as efficient and driven as CEOs, starting their days with 5:00 a.m. squash practice and ending them with late-night tutoring sessions. Meanwhile, their powerful parents will do anything to secure one of the precious few spots at the Ivy Leagues, whatever the cost to them or their kids. Through stories of the children she tutors that are both funny and shocking, Grossberg shows us the privileged world of America’s wealthiest families and the systems in place that help them stay on top.


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A captivating memoir about tutoring for Manhattan’s elite, revealing how a life of extreme wealth both helps and harms the children of the one percent. Ben orders daily room service while living in a five-star hotel. Olivia collects luxury brand sneakers worn by celebrities. Dakota jets off to Rome when she needs to avoid drama at school. Welcome to the inner circle of New Y A captivating memoir about tutoring for Manhattan’s elite, revealing how a life of extreme wealth both helps and harms the children of the one percent. Ben orders daily room service while living in a five-star hotel. Olivia collects luxury brand sneakers worn by celebrities. Dakota jets off to Rome when she needs to avoid drama at school. Welcome to the inner circle of New York’s richest families, where academia is an obsession, wealth does nothing to soothe status anxiety and parents will try just about anything to gain a competitive edge in the college admissions rat race. When Blythe Grossberg first started as a tutor and learning specialist, she had no idea what awaited her inside the high-end apartments of Fifth Avenue. Children are expected to be as efficient and driven as CEOs, starting their days with 5:00 a.m. squash practice and ending them with late-night tutoring sessions. Meanwhile, their powerful parents will do anything to secure one of the precious few spots at the Ivy Leagues, whatever the cost to them or their kids. Through stories of the children she tutors that are both funny and shocking, Grossberg shows us the privileged world of America’s wealthiest families and the systems in place that help them stay on top.

30 review for I Left My Homework in the Hamptons: What I Learned Teaching the Children of the One Percent

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

    3.5 stars This is a fascinating memoir about a woman who has been a tutor for the wealthiest of the wealthy students. She combines anecdotes about the students she tutored (composites from years of tutoring, this isn't a "tell all" book, it's an analysis) with studies and observations about learning, education, and college admissions. I personally would have liked it to be organized in a more straightforward manner. There are times where the objective/statistical information is so heavy and goes o 3.5 stars This is a fascinating memoir about a woman who has been a tutor for the wealthiest of the wealthy students. She combines anecdotes about the students she tutored (composites from years of tutoring, this isn't a "tell all" book, it's an analysis) with studies and observations about learning, education, and college admissions. I personally would have liked it to be organized in a more straightforward manner. There are times where the objective/statistical information is so heavy and goes on for longer than it needs to, and I found myself wishing for more stories and anecdotes about the students and their parents. I could definitely relate to this book because I have children who are currently in college. I am intimately familiar with standardized testing, grades, and how college admissions works. Seeing this through the eyes of the incredibly wealthy is both eye-opening and a bit disheartening for those of us not in that bracket. Overall though, I appreciated her observations about the mindset of these affluent families. It is so far from the way the rest of us think of things that it almost seems like fiction. It is no wonder that many of these young adults crash and burn when they get to college as they have had their entire lives micromanaged to the nth degree and they don't know how to handle the freedom of choice. That's such a minor part of it though, Grossberg does it so much more justice with her analysis in the book. If you're interested in the subject matter, this is a fascinating memoir. It's definitely not for everyone as the statistics and studies will probably not be relatable for many readers. If you're looking for a "tell all" memoir about the elite then you will be slightly disappointed because it's more thoughtful than that. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christy Stickney

    This book was not at all what I thought it would be. Feels like the author has a chip on her shoulder.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janilyn Kocher

    Grossberg writes a very revealing book about affluent students she tutored over a 20 year period in Manahttan. I felt so much empathy for the students she discusses. They were over scheduled, led a much too structured life, and felt nothing but endless pressure to get the best grade and get into an Ivy League school. As I read, I just kept shaking my head at what I was reading. The parents who blame everyone else for a B grade, students who have no common sense and who don't read but expect to p Grossberg writes a very revealing book about affluent students she tutored over a 20 year period in Manahttan. I felt so much empathy for the students she discusses. They were over scheduled, led a much too structured life, and felt nothing but endless pressure to get the best grade and get into an Ivy League school. As I read, I just kept shaking my head at what I was reading. The parents who blame everyone else for a B grade, students who have no common sense and who don't read but expect to pass comprehensive exams with flying colors. It really is a depressing reality. Hats off the the author for being a tutor to these high strung students. This world is so different from my life and how I was reared, and for that I remain grateful. It's an enlightening read. Thanks to Hanover Square Press and NetGalley for the advance copy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tia

    Eye-opening and relevant So much to talk about. This book shows that problems aren't wiped away because you have the means to purchase material things. Having the best of everything and at your finger tips doesn't exclude you from pressure from peers and parents. The book showed that anxiety and the pressure to measure up has no financial status attached to it. Poor or rich we all can be struggling mentally and emotionally. Coping with the pressure to be your best at such a high level was very d Eye-opening and relevant So much to talk about. This book shows that problems aren't wiped away because you have the means to purchase material things. Having the best of everything and at your finger tips doesn't exclude you from pressure from peers and parents. The book showed that anxiety and the pressure to measure up has no financial status attached to it. Poor or rich we all can be struggling mentally and emotionally. Coping with the pressure to be your best at such a high level was very difficult for parents and children alike. I recommend. I apologize for scrambled thoughts. I received an advanced reader copy from Harlequin/Hanover Square Press via Netgalley

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma-Kate Schaake

    Interesting, but very repetitive. Summary: rich kids are stressed under the weight of expectations and don’t have the space to just be kids. Actually, a few times when I was listening to the audio I thought I skipped back a chapter accidentally because it sounded so similar.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eaycrigg

    This book was a fun and interesting read. As a former nanny in Manhattan/Dumbo and a public school teacher at a Title 1 school, it addressed many of the issues around children, education, and social class that I’ve been ruminating on for years. Sometimes I wished the author betrayed more frustration with the parents of these children, who possess such whacked-out values, but I was ultimately grateful and challenged by her insights into how difficult school can be for children with learning chall This book was a fun and interesting read. As a former nanny in Manhattan/Dumbo and a public school teacher at a Title 1 school, it addressed many of the issues around children, education, and social class that I’ve been ruminating on for years. Sometimes I wished the author betrayed more frustration with the parents of these children, who possess such whacked-out values, but I was ultimately grateful and challenged by her insights into how difficult school can be for children with learning challenges and what is owed them by their teachers.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    Brilliant and disturbing in equal measure. Reading this (1) reinforces why I'm a teacher, and (2) reinforces why I'm very VERY glad I'm not a teacher in any American system of education. This is a beautifully written revelation. Brilliant and disturbing in equal measure. Reading this (1) reinforces why I'm a teacher, and (2) reinforces why I'm very VERY glad I'm not a teacher in any American system of education. This is a beautifully written revelation.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Arizpe Strobel

    When I was just starting school, I took a placement test and my parents were granted the opportunity of having me skip a grade and attend private school on a scholarship. I can't imagine what a strange life I would've had if they had accepted that offer. As a working-class adult, I still revisit this notion from time to time and think about whether or not I would even enjoy that alternate path in life. Blythe Grossberg's intimate look into the world of the incredibly wealthy was a good-enough su When I was just starting school, I took a placement test and my parents were granted the opportunity of having me skip a grade and attend private school on a scholarship. I can't imagine what a strange life I would've had if they had accepted that offer. As a working-class adult, I still revisit this notion from time to time and think about whether or not I would even enjoy that alternate path in life. Blythe Grossberg's intimate look into the world of the incredibly wealthy was a good-enough substitute to satisfy my wonder. While I most benefited from the narrative aspect of the memoir, there are many important statistics that will encourage readers to examine their biases about both the moneyed class and the have-nots. Through a good deal of research, she effectively dispels stereotypes that are of ambiguous origin but still harmful; we learn that wealthy families are the most likely to have more children, and that substance use, disordered eating habits, and struggles with insecurity have never discriminated and affect children across all class statuses. Grossberg's anecdotes also give us an unfortunately grim look into the relationships that these parents have with their children, which often feel cold, distant, and transactional. Much of the actual one-on-one time that the kids get with their parents is spent micromanaging them vs. nurturing them; reviewing academic plans, which start as early as the kids are born and of which the sense of urgency never relents, from K-12 and beyond. Preoccupied with getting their kids to the Ivy Leagues, the parents often overlook their own children's agency and maintain a take-no-prisoners approach to getting what they want. Grossberg often reflects upon her own role as a mother throughout the book, observing how dramatically different the parents and her students are from her and her son. Largely due to her history in teaching as well as her role as a parent of a neurodivergent child, Grossberg has a valuable and broad skillset for understanding and creating gameplans for students of every ability. She writes with such careful, empathetic regard for the children she teaches, a gift that isn't often granted to them by even their own parents. At the end of the book, there is also a thorough and and sincere look into the kids' futures, citing where they are now and always wishing only the best for them. The result of this combo of anecdotes and statistics is this healthy balance of memoir and scientific journal, which I generally enjoyed reading. note: While I have mostly praise for this title, I did notice a great deal of repetition, particularly when Grossberg revisits the topic of peak experiences and how they prevent kids from looking forward to anything in life. One does not simply forget reading the words 'axiomatic' and 'insouciant', which were mentioned three and five times throughout the book, respectively. There was also a great deal of referring back and forth to The Great Gatsby and As I Lay Dying, although a reader's unfamiliarity with the titles shouldn't prevent them from understanding the text. Since I was granted a galley copy, it is also likely that the repetitive parts were reviewed and excluded from the final publication.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    2.5 Rich kids aren’t so much different than ‘normal’, but sometimes Grossberg describes their antics as if they are a different species. Teacher-blaming, dogs eating homework, inattentive parents, underage partying, & lying are not limited to the Hamptons set. Lots of bellyaching about universal parental issues that any tutor would face, having nothing to do with being rich or not. Probably most accurate -and germane to the book’s examination of affluent students - would be the tactics some empl 2.5 Rich kids aren’t so much different than ‘normal’, but sometimes Grossberg describes their antics as if they are a different species. Teacher-blaming, dogs eating homework, inattentive parents, underage partying, & lying are not limited to the Hamptons set. Lots of bellyaching about universal parental issues that any tutor would face, having nothing to do with being rich or not. Probably most accurate -and germane to the book’s examination of affluent students - would be the tactics some employ to influence admissions. Aunt Becky, I’m looking at you.

  10. 5 out of 5

    TraceyL

    A fascinating look into the lives of the children of the ultra-rich. I've been kind of obsessed with the college admission scandal, and this book pulls back the curtain and shows you what life is like for these kids whose parents will do anything to get them into a prestigious school. I found it had a good balance of facts and personal stories. I loved this. A fascinating look into the lives of the children of the ultra-rich. I've been kind of obsessed with the college admission scandal, and this book pulls back the curtain and shows you what life is like for these kids whose parents will do anything to get them into a prestigious school. I found it had a good balance of facts and personal stories. I loved this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Murtagh Ramsay

    It’s just ok. Heavy handed at times, there’s something of a disconnect in what the author reports was her experience and any impact it may have had. And for heaven’s sake, put down The Great Gatsby.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mila Chorosz

    Excellent

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Rating: 3.5 Blythe Grossberg, with a Harvard degree and a doctorate in psychology, has served as a teacher, learning specialist and tutor to students in some of New York City's toniest private schools. Her pupils are often the children of the "1 percent." They have high pressure academic and extra-curricular schedules, frequently suffer from learning difficulties, anxiety, and high stress, and expect to get into Ivy League schools. Their parents are consumed by their jobs, social lives,financial Rating: 3.5 Blythe Grossberg, with a Harvard degree and a doctorate in psychology, has served as a teacher, learning specialist and tutor to students in some of New York City's toniest private schools. Her pupils are often the children of the "1 percent." They have high pressure academic and extra-curricular schedules, frequently suffer from learning difficulties, anxiety, and high stress, and expect to get into Ivy League schools. Their parents are consumed by their jobs, social lives,financial statements, and (particularly in the case of non-employed mothers, it seems) their children's success. They seem to feel entitled to anything they can afford to pay for, and they are obsessed with getting their children into Ivy League schools. The result is a lot of unhappy students, and parents who feel they have failed if their children do not live up to their measure of success. Gross berg, at the end of the book, also suggests some remedies. She presents this memoir of her experiences through a series of anecdotes, identifying the wide variety of problems with which she has had to deal. The book is really interesting,though I found it to be a bit rambling and unstructured -- it was hard to differentiate one chapter from another. Still, interesting. I'm glad my children are past this stage, and my grandchildren aren't there yet. I sympathize with all concerned, because NYC is not the only place this happens.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: January 18, 2021 Publication date: August 17, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of Date reviewed/posted: January 18, 2021 Publication date: August 17, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. A captivating memoir about tutoring for Manhattan’s elite, revealing how a life of extreme wealth both helps and harms the children of the one percent. Ben orders daily room service while living in a five-star hotel. Olivia collects luxury brand sneakers worn by celebrities. Dakota jets off to Rome when she needs to avoid drama at school. Welcome to the inner circle of New York’s richest families, where academia is an obsession, wealth does nothing to soothe status anxiety and parents will try just about anything to gain a competitive edge in the college admissions rat race. When Blythe Grossberg first started as a tutor and learning specialist, she had no idea what awaited her inside the high-end apartments of Fifth Avenue. Children are expected to be as efficient and driven as CEOs, starting their days with 5:00 a.m. squash practice and ending them with late-night tutoring sessions. Meanwhile, their powerful parents will do anything to secure one of the precious few spots at the Ivy Leagues, whatever the cost to them or their kids. Through stories of the children she tutors that are both funny and shocking, Grossberg shows us the privileged world of America’s wealthiest families and the systems in place that helps them stay on top. NOTHING in this book shocked me - aside from the thought that THESE KIDS ARE TOO YOUNG TO BE MILLENIALS! This was a guilty pleasure kind of read - you will start to wonder who is crazier...the parents or the kids...??? This was a wonderfully interesting book that I will recommend to people in look of a different kind of a read - this is decidedly not literature but it was delightful to read, shake my head and laugh over. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🍉🍉🍉🍉🍉 just because it was so juicy!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Megan Nigh

    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the advanced review copy. I wasn't expecting this to be as compelling as it was. I figured it would just be a bunch of gossip about rich people--(I watch RHONY, I know who vacations in the Hamptons.) And yes, it has a bit of a gossip-y tone, but that enhances what is at it's heart a story about the students that Grossberg tutors and the lengths parents will go to ensure their children's success (measured in academic standing, prestigious school attendance Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the advanced review copy. I wasn't expecting this to be as compelling as it was. I figured it would just be a bunch of gossip about rich people--(I watch RHONY, I know who vacations in the Hamptons.) And yes, it has a bit of a gossip-y tone, but that enhances what is at it's heart a story about the students that Grossberg tutors and the lengths parents will go to ensure their children's success (measured in academic standing, prestigious school attendance, followed by the Ivy League and, presumably, a high-powered career and wealth). But we also see the students for who they really are--kids. Kids who are smart, but unmotivated. Students with anxiety. Students with learning differences. Students who have their parents advocate for their needs. Parents who rely on expensive tutors and donations to keep their students enrolled. This was a fascinating read--one which would appeal to educators or viewers of shows like Real Housewives of New York.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Liralen

    Another boy whose situation causes me to lose sleep lived in his apartment by himself. His parents were divorced, and his father worked in another city during the week. His family had bought the son’s former babysitter a studio apartment in the same building so she would be nearby if he needed an adult, but he was still, at age sixteen, alone most nights of the week. (100) What a strange word the ultra-rich live in. Grossberg didn't inhabit that world herself, but for years she supplemented her i Another boy whose situation causes me to lose sleep lived in his apartment by himself. His parents were divorced, and his father worked in another city during the week. His family had bought the son’s former babysitter a studio apartment in the same building so she would be nearby if he needed an adult, but he was still, at age sixteen, alone most nights of the week. (100) What a strange word the ultra-rich live in. Grossberg didn't inhabit that world herself, but for years she supplemented her income by tutoring the teenagers of those Park Avenue parents: children who collected shoes worn by celebrities, whose conception of New York City extended only as far as Manhattan (and then only to the northern end of Central Park), whose parents couldn't compute the idea that Grossberg wouldn't be spending the summer in the Hamptons. Children whose parents could buy an apartment (and I imagine that even a studio, in those Park Avenue buildings, goes for well over a million dollars) for a former babysitter. Lots of anecdotes throughout, though I would have liked a stronger through-line for some of the students Grossberg worked with. I had a hard time remember who was who, and it wasn't always clear to me which events Grossberg witnessed and which she heard about after the fact. I also found it a bit surprising that Grossberg could find so much compassion for these kids and their parents but talked so dismissively about, for example, other tutors—she says of one tutor (78) that she'd never refer students to him because he didn't have experience working with kids with learning disabilities, which is fair to a point, but...not all kids who get tutoring (or benefit from tutoring; not the same thing) have learning disabilities. She dismisses SAT tutors as 'lovely people' (158) but not therapists, which is...you know...accurate. They aren't therapists, and neither is Grossberg, and I suppose I'm left wondering how much of her work with these ultra-rich kids she thought actually helped the kids and how much of it was just contributing to the strange cyclical money-status-power focus of the Manhattan elite. Also, almost a throwaway moment, but there's this: His therapist, with his parents’ permission, tells me that he continues to struggle with depression and with wanting a romantic relationship that he can’t seem to manage. (183) I beg your pardon. With his parents' permission? What about his permission?

  17. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe

    Having recently read Jackpot, which is generally about the lives of the super-rich, this book, which focuses on the children of the super-rich and their unique challenges, was less impactful on me, however no less fascinating. Grossberg, who earned a living tutoring Fifth Avenue offspring over a number of years, offers a sort of collective analysis of her experiences. I immediately thought of poor Marion Crawford whose own memoir ruined her, but Grossberg does not appear to be motivated by any d Having recently read Jackpot, which is generally about the lives of the super-rich, this book, which focuses on the children of the super-rich and their unique challenges, was less impactful on me, however no less fascinating. Grossberg, who earned a living tutoring Fifth Avenue offspring over a number of years, offers a sort of collective analysis of her experiences. I immediately thought of poor Marion Crawford whose own memoir ruined her, but Grossberg does not appear to be motivated by any desire to tell secrets. Her observations are laid out in a not-particularly organized style, and at times she swings between present-tense and past-tense in a slightly confusing way. She appears to genuinely care about her students although the first chapter is so full of comparisons to her own relative poverty that we quickly get a bit tired of what sounds like whining. (She herself comments on her warped perspective.) She tosses around phrases like "repp ties" (? had to look it up) and high-end names like Imari in a sort of offhand name-dropping way. But overall this is a well written book that shines a bright light on a broken system and the fallout of horrendously over-scheduled, pressure-cooker, lonely lives of super-wealthy teens. A quick and absorbing read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nelda Brangwin

    Let’s just say, I am glad I didn’t grow up in a New York City Park Avenue family and this memoir gives me more evidence. Blythe Grossberg, a learning specialist, tutors the children of the 1%. Attending private schools, these children must excel not only in academics but often in some sport as well, ensuring from lower school on up that they will be admitted to a top-tier school. Private schools have no tolerance for learning differences. Working with ADHD and dyslexic children, she must tutor t Let’s just say, I am glad I didn’t grow up in a New York City Park Avenue family and this memoir gives me more evidence. Blythe Grossberg, a learning specialist, tutors the children of the 1%. Attending private schools, these children must excel not only in academics but often in some sport as well, ensuring from lower school on up that they will be admitted to a top-tier school. Private schools have no tolerance for learning differences. Working with ADHD and dyslexic children, she must tutor them to meet the rigorous academic standards of their schools. In this job, she must compete against heavy sports schedules as well. Kids are exhausted. There were times when parents told her because of the child’s schedule, academic tutoring may not take place until 11pm. Along the way she continually shows the different lifestyle of these kids. One boy, lives in a hotel room by himself, while his parent travel extensively. Another tries to buy a $2.00 bagel with his Gold Amex card. Throughout this, images from The Great Gatsby are interspersed and how the ultra-wealthy relate differently to it than most Americans.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Brenner Graham

    I usually find books through bookstagram, NetGalley, podcasts, etc. But I found this one the old fashioned way: I LEFT MY HOMEWORK IN THE HAMPTONS caught my eye in a local independent bookstore. I read a few pages of the hardcover — which coincidentally was published on my birthday when I defended my dissertation — and decided to buy it. I couldn’t put it down- everything about I LEFT MY HOMEWORK IN THE HAMPTONS worked for me. I have so much respect for the author Blythe Grossberg: captivating w I usually find books through bookstagram, NetGalley, podcasts, etc. But I found this one the old fashioned way: I LEFT MY HOMEWORK IN THE HAMPTONS caught my eye in a local independent bookstore. I read a few pages of the hardcover — which coincidentally was published on my birthday when I defended my dissertation — and decided to buy it. I couldn’t put it down- everything about I LEFT MY HOMEWORK IN THE HAMPTONS worked for me. I have so much respect for the author Blythe Grossberg: captivating writing, real stories to tell, and above all sharp insights about them. I LEFT MY HOMEWORK IN THE HAMPTONS is narrative nonfiction about high school students from the wealthiest families. I learned in this book about professionalized children’s sports, expensive processes behind learning diagnoses, and the realities of rich people. Grossberg’s analysis is complex and nuanced, while engaging. proud to report that at Work this morning I talked this book up so much that a colleague bought it. finally, I loved the Gatsby analogy sprinkled through the narrative. I may not be a high school student or wealthy, but I wish Blythe Grossberg could teach me how to write!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Heather Hakanen

    Tales behind the scenes of a private high school academic (Harvard educated) who both teaches and tutors the children of the 1% wealthiest of New York's population. The struggles they put their children through... in order to achieve the best schools in the nation with the ultimate goal being the top 3 (Harvard, Yale, Princeton) Universities. These kids are never left to develop internal coping skills, have absolutely no "hang out and play" time. Instead their schedules are managed every minute Tales behind the scenes of a private high school academic (Harvard educated) who both teaches and tutors the children of the 1% wealthiest of New York's population. The struggles they put their children through... in order to achieve the best schools in the nation with the ultimate goal being the top 3 (Harvard, Yale, Princeton) Universities. These kids are never left to develop internal coping skills, have absolutely no "hang out and play" time. Instead their schedules are managed every minute of their lives and anxiety must be everyone's middle name. It's eye opening, jaw dropping and often sad for extremely weathly people to basically use every tool available to these goals often at the expense of the child's own happiness and emotional health. Anything taken to an extreme (and most of these tales are extreme) can be a detriment. All the kids then turn out similar to their parents and go right back into NYC to live similar lives to their parents.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    This book reminded me so much of some of the alumni interviews I did at a local elite boarding school, (as sharply contrasted with alumni interviews I did with local public school students). When asked about outside interests or activities, students regaled me with stories of “how they spent their summer vacation,” in actuality, their significantly shorter “spring break.” One student, in particular, recounted digging latrines in some third world country. I’m pretty sure I had a hard time keeping This book reminded me so much of some of the alumni interviews I did at a local elite boarding school, (as sharply contrasted with alumni interviews I did with local public school students). When asked about outside interests or activities, students regaled me with stories of “how they spent their summer vacation,” in actuality, their significantly shorter “spring break.” One student, in particular, recounted digging latrines in some third world country. I’m pretty sure I had a hard time keeping a straight face having recently interviewed an earnest public school kid who was working 20 hours a week to earn money for college. Can you guess which student I recommended for admission? I can’t recall whether or not I ever found out which students were offered admission, but all these years later I’d guess it was the latrine digging rich kid. Cynical? You bet. The author presented a pretty authentic story of this alternative universe.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    This book was interesting as I expected one thing but got another... the cover leads you to believe that you're about to experience the excuses of youth who are being tutored and are perhaps not compliant with their role as students since they are already rich. Instead, this book left me feeling a bit sorry for these teens who don't seen to have great family relationships and their parents are focused mainly on over programming and preparing their children for brag-worthy Ivy league schools. It This book was interesting as I expected one thing but got another... the cover leads you to believe that you're about to experience the excuses of youth who are being tutored and are perhaps not compliant with their role as students since they are already rich. Instead, this book left me feeling a bit sorry for these teens who don't seen to have great family relationships and their parents are focused mainly on over programming and preparing their children for brag-worthy Ivy league schools. It was sometimes a boring account of different family stories as the youth lack a sense of urgency in relation to their own goals and lives and many are depressed or over scheduled. This inside look was kind of sad...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wilma Ann

    The title suggests that the author learned something, but I'm not sure what. This rambling, wordy book describes the lifestyles of the 1% and cites a lot of studies, but it seems that what she learned is what everyone already knows, that these are entitled people who will do anything to get their kids accepted in the proper colleges. We've seen this on the news, so there's nothing new there. Maybe the last few pages sum up what she learned--it's time to move out of NYC. Also, you'd better have r The title suggests that the author learned something, but I'm not sure what. This rambling, wordy book describes the lifestyles of the 1% and cites a lot of studies, but it seems that what she learned is what everyone already knows, that these are entitled people who will do anything to get their kids accepted in the proper colleges. We've seen this on the news, so there's nothing new there. Maybe the last few pages sum up what she learned--it's time to move out of NYC. Also, you'd better have read The Great Gatsby before this book. At first it was interesting how she related events in that book to hers, but then it became forced. If this topic interests you, read the first 2 chapters. You'll get the idea. The rest is repetitive.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sherrie Howey

    In this memoir, the author discusses her experience tutoring wealthy children in New York City. She illustrates how the students are overly scheduled, some with sport practices beginning at 5 am. They are pressured by their parents to excel, both academically and in extracurricular activities. I give the author so much credit for her patience, in particular with some of the parents. While this book showcases the pressure and stress that students face in New York City, unfortunately this occurs ac In this memoir, the author discusses her experience tutoring wealthy children in New York City. She illustrates how the students are overly scheduled, some with sport practices beginning at 5 am. They are pressured by their parents to excel, both academically and in extracurricular activities. I give the author so much credit for her patience, in particular with some of the parents. While this book showcases the pressure and stress that students face in New York City, unfortunately this occurs across the nation. I did find the book a bit repetitive at times and there were too many Gatsby references in my opinion.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily Linacre

    this peek into the lives of some of new york's wealthiest students and their families was super interesting, and not entirely what i expected. i felt like an absolute lump after hearing what their rigorous schedules and private school expectations are O.O the disparities highlighted between the well-off families she worked for and the students she tutored pro bono were disheartening, but not surprising. 3.5 stars, rounded down for sooo much great gatsby talk and the use of the word "insouciance" this peek into the lives of some of new york's wealthiest students and their families was super interesting, and not entirely what i expected. i felt like an absolute lump after hearing what their rigorous schedules and private school expectations are O.O the disparities highlighted between the well-off families she worked for and the students she tutored pro bono were disheartening, but not surprising. 3.5 stars, rounded down for sooo much great gatsby talk and the use of the word "insouciance" like FIVE TIMES and at least 3 of those were within a few pages of each other. it's a good word, but also, jeez.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Schultz

    Read if you: Enjoy books like Bobos in Paradise and other studies of the 1%. However, this is not a gossipy look at Manhattan's elite and their children. Grossberg sincerely cares/worries about her tutoring charges and their futures. Although at times I did have (very!) limited patience for these families, I did empathize with the fact that many of these children are overscheduled, overindulged, and under-prepared for reality after high school. Many thanks to Harlequin and NetGalley for a digita Read if you: Enjoy books like Bobos in Paradise and other studies of the 1%. However, this is not a gossipy look at Manhattan's elite and their children. Grossberg sincerely cares/worries about her tutoring charges and their futures. Although at times I did have (very!) limited patience for these families, I did empathize with the fact that many of these children are overscheduled, overindulged, and under-prepared for reality after high school. Many thanks to Harlequin and NetGalley for a digital review copy in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Arthur

    A sympathetic look at the offspring of the uberrich, whose well-intentioned impulses harm their kids in the short term, but maybe not so much in the long term. Offers some insight into unbelievable pressures and behaviors; it certainly inadvertently explores the disconnect between the rich and everyone else now in American politics. Before feeling too much sympathy for these kids, I'd like to see Dr. Grossberg's insight on the poor and the middle class. Seems the solution for these New York City A sympathetic look at the offspring of the uberrich, whose well-intentioned impulses harm their kids in the short term, but maybe not so much in the long term. Offers some insight into unbelievable pressures and behaviors; it certainly inadvertently explores the disconnect between the rich and everyone else now in American politics. Before feeling too much sympathy for these kids, I'd like to see Dr. Grossberg's insight on the poor and the middle class. Seems the solution for these New York City kids is to leave their bubbles.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lilla

    It’s fitting that the extended metaphor of this book is Fitzgerald’s Gatsby, and there certainly are many parallels Dr Grossberg makes to the children she tutors and their parents’ dreams of reaching that “green light at the end of Daisy’s dock.” This book highlights the race to nowhere, snow plow parenting, and the fate of the seriously over scheduled child. It’s a fascinating look into a very specific type of child and parent. If there is another side to this story, I definitely want to read i It’s fitting that the extended metaphor of this book is Fitzgerald’s Gatsby, and there certainly are many parallels Dr Grossberg makes to the children she tutors and their parents’ dreams of reaching that “green light at the end of Daisy’s dock.” This book highlights the race to nowhere, snow plow parenting, and the fate of the seriously over scheduled child. It’s a fascinating look into a very specific type of child and parent. If there is another side to this story, I definitely want to read it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Received this book as a gift from a bookshop that received an early copy. Overall a great read that didn’t have any groundbreaking information for someone who has worked with elite students before, but it packages it all in a heartfelt way. All the student names can sometimes become confusing (which one was Alex again? How was he different from Trevor) and at some points the paragraphs state some ideas without fully fleshing them out, but I’m aware that could be cleaned up in the final copy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia

    3.5. At the beginning of this book I wasn’t sure I was going to finish it. The author seemed embittered by the wealth of these families and kept comparing her situation to theirs. Then she became more objective and I found the stories of the individual kids and families she tutored fascinating. I liked her analysis of what she experienced as well as her citing studies and experts that she’d light on the situation of being a child of the .01%.

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