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Justice League: Galaxy of Terrors

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The next chapter for DC Comics' premier team of superheroes is here! As writer Simon Spurrier jumps on board for the start of the tale "The Rule of War," it's close encounters...of a Justice League kind! After answering a distress signal from distant space, Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, and Green Lantern discover an abandoned cargo ship full of young aliens The next chapter for DC Comics' premier team of superheroes is here! As writer Simon Spurrier jumps on board for the start of the tale "The Rule of War," it's close encounters...of a Justice League kind! After answering a distress signal from distant space, Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, and Green Lantern discover an abandoned cargo ship full of young aliens! When the League attempts to return the children to their home planet, they are met with awe, terror, and war! Thus begins a new story line that will take the League to an unknown and war-torn planet, overrun with new species, a perilous mystery, and an otherworldly adversary. As the team faces off with different uncertainties and battles rogue factions, can the League save a population that hates and fears them? Or will it threaten any hope the Justice League has of returning home? Justice League: Galaxy of Terrors collects Justice League #48-52.


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The next chapter for DC Comics' premier team of superheroes is here! As writer Simon Spurrier jumps on board for the start of the tale "The Rule of War," it's close encounters...of a Justice League kind! After answering a distress signal from distant space, Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, and Green Lantern discover an abandoned cargo ship full of young aliens The next chapter for DC Comics' premier team of superheroes is here! As writer Simon Spurrier jumps on board for the start of the tale "The Rule of War," it's close encounters...of a Justice League kind! After answering a distress signal from distant space, Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, and Green Lantern discover an abandoned cargo ship full of young aliens! When the League attempts to return the children to their home planet, they are met with awe, terror, and war! Thus begins a new story line that will take the League to an unknown and war-torn planet, overrun with new species, a perilous mystery, and an otherworldly adversary. As the team faces off with different uncertainties and battles rogue factions, can the League save a population that hates and fears them? Or will it threaten any hope the Justice League has of returning home? Justice League: Galaxy of Terrors collects Justice League #48-52.

30 review for Justice League: Galaxy of Terrors

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    An alien society divided into two warring factions - can the Justice League unite them? Also, alien space parasite devouring the Justice League’s bodies while psychically giving them their hearts’ desires. This is Star Trek with superheroes aka Justice League: Galaxy of Terrors! Justice League books are always the suck and this one is no exception. The only reason I picked it up though is because Jeff Loveness wrote the second story and I’m a big fan of that guy’s work. The first chunky three-pa An alien society divided into two warring factions - can the Justice League unite them? Also, alien space parasite devouring the Justice League’s bodies while psychically giving them their hearts’ desires. This is Star Trek with superheroes aka Justice League: Galaxy of Terrors! Justice League books are always the suck and this one is no exception. The only reason I picked it up though is because Jeff Loveness wrote the second story and I’m a big fan of that guy’s work. The first chunky three-parter, called The Rule by Simon Spurrier, is awful, like all of Spurrier’s comics are. When the League aren’t doing repetitive action, they’re repeatedly learning they don’t know anything about the aliens’ customs and jibber-jabbering about whether or not it’s moral or something to rule them. Tedious, boring - hated it. Loveness’ two parter, The Garden of Mercy, is miles better but isn’t among his best comics. It’s essentially a Batman story that looks at the character’s motivations, as well as underlining the importance of change and pondering weighty topics like the nature of existence, who we are vs who we want to be, where we are vs where we want to be. It’s a little pointless because these characters are too popular to ever fundamentally change but it was nice to see Loveness addressing the subject of change and the characters acknowledging it. It felt like a breath of fresh air in a series that’s been stale for so long. And Robson Rocha’s art is excellent too. Justice League, Volume 7: Galaxy of Terrors is only worth checking out if you’re a Jeff Loveness fan, but even then I wouldn’t expect much from this one. Still, if his story is an indication of where he might take this title, hopefully future Justice League books - featuring only his writing and not sharing the space with bog-standard writers - might actually be good!

  2. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Man, can I just get a GOOD Avengers or Justice League comic? Like come the fuck on. I mean this isn't horrible. Spurrier is capable of way more than this but what he gives is a okay story about superheroes overstepping their boundaries. Except it is nothing new and doesn't try to be anything special. The second story is only a two parter but least gets the characters far more right and way more interesting. It is too bad the art kind of sucks overall though. Justice League needs a REAL boost by Man, can I just get a GOOD Avengers or Justice League comic? Like come the fuck on. I mean this isn't horrible. Spurrier is capable of way more than this but what he gives is a okay story about superheroes overstepping their boundaries. Except it is nothing new and doesn't try to be anything special. The second story is only a two parter but least gets the characters far more right and way more interesting. It is too bad the art kind of sucks overall though. Justice League needs a REAL boost by a great writer.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Here, we seem to have hit a throw-everything at the wall era of Justice League, where there's no regular creative team, which is pretty much never good for serialized entertainment, and it gets worse ... The Rule (#48-50). When a great writer like Simon Spurrier comes into a potentially great titles like JLA, there are high expectations. They are not met. In fact, Spurrier really seems to want to write a science-fiction novel here. He spends excruciating detail on two different alien races, one of Here, we seem to have hit a throw-everything at the wall era of Justice League, where there's no regular creative team, which is pretty much never good for serialized entertainment, and it gets worse ... The Rule (#48-50). When a great writer like Simon Spurrier comes into a potentially great titles like JLA, there are high expectations. They are not met. In fact, Spurrier really seems to want to write a science-fiction novel here. He spends excruciating detail on two different alien races, one of which has bifurcated into two warring ideologies, another of which hates anything but the eternal now. The problem is that he doesn't actually spend enough time on these conceits to really get them to pay out. Well, that's the first problem. Beyond that it's not actually a good JLA story, as it requires massive suspension of disbelief all up and down. And then when you get to the characterization of the JLA, it's horrible. Ever-calm Clark gets angry; ruling class Diana thinks they shouldn't be rulers; super-competent Batman gets beat up. It goes on ... There's one heel turn that excuses some of the bad characterization, but not all of it, and even that's not enough to save a story that's a dull head-scratcher [2/5]. The Garden of Mercy (#51-52). And now Jeff Loveness is suddenly the new writer. His story about Batman's greatest desire is good, but given it's in Justice League, not his own comic, no one is ever going to remember it, and so nothing will develop from it, which is a shame [3+/5]. But this whole volume is kind of a shame. Super skippable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Collecting a three issue arc by Si Spurrier and a two issue arc by Jeff Loveness, this interstitial collection of Justice League bridges the gap between Robert Venditti's run and the Justice League's role in Death Metal. Si Spurrier is one of my favourite writers, but even I can admit that his arc here isn't great. It poses some interesting thought experiments about the Justice League governing an alien planet, as well as a strange class system, but it does a lot of setting up without following t Collecting a three issue arc by Si Spurrier and a two issue arc by Jeff Loveness, this interstitial collection of Justice League bridges the gap between Robert Venditti's run and the Justice League's role in Death Metal. Si Spurrier is one of my favourite writers, but even I can admit that his arc here isn't great. It poses some interesting thought experiments about the Justice League governing an alien planet, as well as a strange class system, but it does a lot of setting up without following through to the ultimate conclusion. It's all a bit wishywashy, and it gets very wordy (and not in the good way that Spurrier is known for). The art here is Aaron Lopresti, who does a fine job, especially on the extra-sized issue 50, but he doesn't get a lot to play with other than aliens, aliens, and more aliens. The next two issues are much better however - Jeff Loveness does a For The Justice League That Has Everything by introducing the Black Mercy to the team. It's not a particularly inspired set-up, but it works really well - Loveness does some great character work, and it's propped up nicely by Robson Rocha's gorgeously detailed artwork. A tale of two halves, this volume of Justice League works well enough as a fill-in between two bigger storylines, but it's definitely a bit lopsided in terms of quality.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    I'm not exactly sure why, but this Volume of Justice League felt very childish to me. Almost like the characters didn't have a lot of depth and were just going through the motions. It's odd for this feeling to come up because there is actually a fair amount of moral choices in this Volume, so in a way it feels more mature, but somehow isn't. Kind of hard to explain... (My mind is saying "Good actors, bad script"... though not sure why.) Brief Highlights: - "The Rule" - The JL is out in space and t I'm not exactly sure why, but this Volume of Justice League felt very childish to me. Almost like the characters didn't have a lot of depth and were just going through the motions. It's odd for this feeling to come up because there is actually a fair amount of moral choices in this Volume, so in a way it feels more mature, but somehow isn't. Kind of hard to explain... (My mind is saying "Good actors, bad script"... though not sure why.) Brief Highlights: - "The Rule" - The JL is out in space and they intercept a distress call. On board the ship are younglings from the Trotha species. When the League takes them home, they stumble upon a war torn society. In their typical "save the day" attitude, they end up being setup as the new rulers of the society. Wonder Woman refuses to join: "Heroes lead by example, not by command." In the end, peace is achieved, but only have unravelling the machinations of the former ruler and overcoming a society's faction divides. - "The Garden of Mercy" - On their way home, the JL Ship encounters a space parasite ("The Black Mercy") who infects each of the members a different way. We primarily get to Batman's encounter, where the alien is trying to show Bruce a world where his parents survived, in order to get him to let his guard down. He fights his way through, as do they all, but it does give him a lot to think about from a tower in Gotham. Justice League next goes onto the "Future State" event, and I am curious as to how that will unfurl, before we ultimately probable go back to another restart and another Volume 1.... ugh... Still recommend, but with some slight issues in mind.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ian Raffaele

    My only complaint is how short it was. Consisting of only five issues, this collection covers two stories. The first is well written. The second is fine, though very brief. Overall I was pleased with the stories and the artwork. I'm hoping the next instalment will have a little more meat on its bones. My only complaint is how short it was. Consisting of only five issues, this collection covers two stories. The first is well written. The second is fine, though very brief. Overall I was pleased with the stories and the artwork. I'm hoping the next instalment will have a little more meat on its bones.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jason Deuman

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  9. 5 out of 5

    Troy-David Phillips

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Spaulding

  11. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Coakley

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nick Zambrano

  13. 4 out of 5

    James Huston

  14. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  15. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steve Beversdorf

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Sheingold

  18. 4 out of 5

    StuFighter 2020

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  20. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  21. 5 out of 5

    Roger

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sudheer

  23. 5 out of 5

    Trey

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Gan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Roman

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vapaem

  27. 4 out of 5

    Raphael

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jonathon

  29. 4 out of 5

    David

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Shannon Jr

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