Hot Best Seller

The Lost Art of Connecting: The Gather, Ask, Do Method for Building Meaningful Business Relationships

Availability: Ready to download

Reclaim the power of genuine human connection Networking is often considered a necessary evil for all working professionals. With social media platforms like Linkedin, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook at our disposal, reaching potential investors or employers is much easier. Yet, these connections often feel transactional, agenda-driven, and dehumanizing, leaving profession Reclaim the power of genuine human connection Networking is often considered a necessary evil for all working professionals. With social media platforms like Linkedin, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook at our disposal, reaching potential investors or employers is much easier. Yet, these connections often feel transactional, agenda-driven, and dehumanizing, leaving professionals feeling burnt out and stressed out. Instead, we should connect on a human level and build authentic relationships beyond securing a new job or a new investor for your next big idea. To build real and meaningful networking contacts, we need to go back to basics, remembering that technology is a tool and more than just a means to an end. We need to tap into our humanity and learn to be more intentional and authentic. As a "serial connector" and communications expert, Susan McPherson has a lifetime of experience building genuine connections in and out of work. Her methodology is broken down into three simple steps: Gather: Instead of waiting for the perfect networking opportunity to come to you, think outside the box and create your own opportunity. Host your own dinner party, join a local meet-up group, or volunteer at your neighborhood food pantry. Ask: Instead of leading with our own rehearsed elevator pitches asking for help, ask to help, opening the door to share resources, experience, contacts, and perspectives that add diversity to your own vision. Do: Turn new connections into meaningful relationships by taking these newly formed relationships deeper. Follow through on the promises you made and keep in touch. Woven together with helpful tips and useful advice on making the most out of every step, this book draws on McPherson's own experience as a renowned "serial connector," as well as the real life success stories of friends and clients. Filled with humor, humility, and wisdom, The Lost Art of Connecting is the handbook we all need to foster personal and professional relationships that blur the lines between work and play--and enrich our lives in every way.


Compare

Reclaim the power of genuine human connection Networking is often considered a necessary evil for all working professionals. With social media platforms like Linkedin, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook at our disposal, reaching potential investors or employers is much easier. Yet, these connections often feel transactional, agenda-driven, and dehumanizing, leaving profession Reclaim the power of genuine human connection Networking is often considered a necessary evil for all working professionals. With social media platforms like Linkedin, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook at our disposal, reaching potential investors or employers is much easier. Yet, these connections often feel transactional, agenda-driven, and dehumanizing, leaving professionals feeling burnt out and stressed out. Instead, we should connect on a human level and build authentic relationships beyond securing a new job or a new investor for your next big idea. To build real and meaningful networking contacts, we need to go back to basics, remembering that technology is a tool and more than just a means to an end. We need to tap into our humanity and learn to be more intentional and authentic. As a "serial connector" and communications expert, Susan McPherson has a lifetime of experience building genuine connections in and out of work. Her methodology is broken down into three simple steps: Gather: Instead of waiting for the perfect networking opportunity to come to you, think outside the box and create your own opportunity. Host your own dinner party, join a local meet-up group, or volunteer at your neighborhood food pantry. Ask: Instead of leading with our own rehearsed elevator pitches asking for help, ask to help, opening the door to share resources, experience, contacts, and perspectives that add diversity to your own vision. Do: Turn new connections into meaningful relationships by taking these newly formed relationships deeper. Follow through on the promises you made and keep in touch. Woven together with helpful tips and useful advice on making the most out of every step, this book draws on McPherson's own experience as a renowned "serial connector," as well as the real life success stories of friends and clients. Filled with humor, humility, and wisdom, The Lost Art of Connecting is the handbook we all need to foster personal and professional relationships that blur the lines between work and play--and enrich our lives in every way.

30 review for The Lost Art of Connecting: The Gather, Ask, Do Method for Building Meaningful Business Relationships

  1. 5 out of 5

    lisa

    This is the perfect book for anyone looking for inspiration on how to get out there, meet new people and be of service in the world. Authentic, passionate and deeply experienced Susan McPherson is a serial connector known far and wide for her connections and for the impact she has on those around her. This fun read is packed with personal stories and actionable items that show anyone, from the introvert to the social butterfly, how to make meaningful connections that bring about social impact an This is the perfect book for anyone looking for inspiration on how to get out there, meet new people and be of service in the world. Authentic, passionate and deeply experienced Susan McPherson is a serial connector known far and wide for her connections and for the impact she has on those around her. This fun read is packed with personal stories and actionable items that show anyone, from the introvert to the social butterfly, how to make meaningful connections that bring about social impact and career success. This optimistic, energetic and profoundly helpful book is exactly what we need as we wade our way into the post pandemic world.

  2. 4 out of 5

    KKEC Reads

    Published: March 30, 2021 McGraw Hill I received a copy of this book for free, and I leave my review voluntarily. Meet Susan. She's one of the best connected people in the social good world. Whether she's speaking at industry events, writing for business publications or hosting a McPherson Memo Live Social Impact Chat, Susan brings warmth, knowledge and savvy to everything she does. Susan is also the author of The Lost Art of Connecting. “Every single person is an introduction to something else: an Published: March 30, 2021 McGraw Hill I received a copy of this book for free, and I leave my review voluntarily. Meet Susan. She's one of the best connected people in the social good world. Whether she's speaking at industry events, writing for business publications or hosting a McPherson Memo Live Social Impact Chat, Susan brings warmth, knowledge and savvy to everything she does. Susan is also the author of The Lost Art of Connecting. “Every single person is an introduction to something else: another person, a unique skill, a new project, or something you inevitably will learn about yourself.” I received a copy of this book from Susan’s publicist, Nina, after I reached out to Susan on Twitter. And I’m still blown away that these incredible women sent me a copy to review. This book has been sitting on my “to be read” pile, and I have been anxious to get here. Everything about this book is fantastic. Susan McPherson shares so much valuable insight, and she delivers it as though she is your dearest friend and loudest cheerleader. The advice is broken down into easy-to-read and understand sections. And it’s things that everyone can do. Whether you’re a high-powered CEO, or a dreamer trying to get their brain baby to take flight, The Lost Art of Connecting holds something that will resonate inside you. This is a mind, body, and soul journey. The way Susan writes is so genuine and so authentic. She is not afraid to be vulnerable. She practices what she preaches. You will gain so much knowledge on how to take your constellation to the next level. The beautiful thing is that it was written from a place of passion and genuine excitement. This is not just another “self-help” book that will look cool sitting on your office bookshelf. This is a brilliantly researched, thoroughly detailed, easy-to-understand, life-changing book filled with so much hope and so much real experience that you won’t believe how quickly you finish. I devoured this book. And as I was reading, I kept getting an image of one of my dear test friends in my mind. My friend is seriously the natural embodiment of everything Susan is saying. I immediately messaged my friend and told her she needed to read this book. Boom. I was making a connection. It is insane how easy Susan’s roadmap to building our constellations is. We are doing many leg work already but might need a little direction or some polish. Susan teaches a “How can I help?” method, and it is foolproof. I am so excited to take these tools into my next networking event. You will want to attend a conference with 300+ people you don’t know, simply so you can put these words into action. This is something every person can benefit from. These tips are so genuinely written, and the advice and shared experience are so selflessly given. Get ready to add a Susan McPherson star to your constellation, my friends, because after reading this book, you will feel like you can take on any challenge before you. Motivation, action, and tangible things you can change or implement right now are only a few of the beautiful benefits of this book. Thank you so much to Susan McPherson and Nina for allowing me to read and review this book. I can promise you ladies and my constellation will all be fans of these words.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    I fully enjoyed this book! It will do wonders for you if you are nervous about networking, but even if you're pretty good at it (I am, but after all, I'm lucky enough to have Susan as my IRL mentor!), you'll be reminded *why* building relationships is an art and inspired to be ever better at it. While reading "The Lost Art of Connecting," I texted friends and even arranged a meet-up. It's that effective at driving you to gather, act, do. I loved how Susan weaved her advice in with her personal st I fully enjoyed this book! It will do wonders for you if you are nervous about networking, but even if you're pretty good at it (I am, but after all, I'm lucky enough to have Susan as my IRL mentor!), you'll be reminded *why* building relationships is an art and inspired to be ever better at it. While reading "The Lost Art of Connecting," I texted friends and even arranged a meet-up. It's that effective at driving you to gather, act, do. I loved how Susan weaved her advice in with her personal story and her parents' legacy, along with fantastic interviews and research. Buy this book or check it out from the library -- and when you're done, pass it along. This is a book meant to be shared!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Libby

    Incredible book about the power of connection, networking and building community to help you achieve your dreams. Easy and clear with simple to follow tips and tricks!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    QUOTES Page vii Connecting comes down to one simple question "How can I help?" --asking this question in any meeting, any introduction--any moment--immediately narrows my focus on how I can be of service and support others. Page 5 ...it's okay to have interactions that feel awkward. We can learn from each of those interactions and do better next time. Instead of thinking, "Oh, maybe that rubbed that person the wrong way or I'm not sure if I fit in with this group," it's more helpful to think "What QUOTES Page vii Connecting comes down to one simple question "How can I help?" --asking this question in any meeting, any introduction--any moment--immediately narrows my focus on how I can be of service and support others. Page 5 ...it's okay to have interactions that feel awkward. We can learn from each of those interactions and do better next time. Instead of thinking, "Oh, maybe that rubbed that person the wrong way or I'm not sure if I fit in with this group," it's more helpful to think "What did that interaction teach me about myself? What can I create from that?" Page 7 ....when people throw out the excuse that they don't want to "bother" someone else, it's usually an excuse to avoid vulnerability--the very thing that can allow a meaningful connection to transpire. ...pause to consider where the obstacle might be fear. Fear of rejection, fear of closeness, fear of failure, or even just fear of feeling awkward. Page 14 When you're feeling overwhelmed at work, maybe what you need isn't less-or different work, but better relationships. Page 73 Instead of "get a job in public relations," think "use communications and media to eliminate gender bias" or whatever issue is important to you. When you move from the tactical to the inspirational, you will start to build a constellation that fuels both personal as well as professional growth. Page 81 So remember to establish that first: if you are willing to be completely yourself, to be brave, and to get uncomfortable, the constellation you seek to create will more easily fall into shape. Page 113 ...if you feel nervous about making an ask, you can remove yourself from the situation and place the attention back on your mission. Page 123 As the business and interruptions of the workday put pressure on you to send out your emails and texts quickly, it's important to keep a relationalist framework in mind: How can you communicate with this person in a way that deepens your commitment to each other, as well as your shared goals and values? How can you pave the way for dep conversation, mutual comfort, or impactful work in a way that builds beauty and depth?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joachim Viktil

    Lots of great takeaways in this book. I like the optimism and the approach to building business relationships. Parts of it is a bit too connected to American culture for me and elements like snail mail seems dated. However the key lessons are valid and useful. I for my part will work to open doors. I especially enjoyed the part about leaders who are connectors having the most positive impact on the people they lead.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Juan Consuegra

    It is actually a good reading, one that put some methodology into the art of connecting. What really caught my attention was the simple “how can I help” question, that opens limitless opportunities if one makes it disciplined and on a constant basis. As always, discipline favors the brave 😀

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gloria Feldt

    The world turns on human connections and Susan McPherson reveals exactly how to make genuine connections in this book; they will serve you well in your career and life. The book is engagingly written. You'll enjoy it. The world turns on human connections and Susan McPherson reveals exactly how to make genuine connections in this book; they will serve you well in your career and life. The book is engagingly written. You'll enjoy it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelly LeBlanc

    In The Lost Art of Connecting, Susan McPherson argues that our business self and our non-business self are one in the same, and she encourages readers to develop genuine friendships with professional contacts in order to make career growth both more fruitful and more personally fulfilling. Much of the advice was reminiscent of Dale Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People" (another excellent relationship-focused business tome). Although McPherson seems to be writing for a business aud In The Lost Art of Connecting, Susan McPherson argues that our business self and our non-business self are one in the same, and she encourages readers to develop genuine friendships with professional contacts in order to make career growth both more fruitful and more personally fulfilling. Much of the advice was reminiscent of Dale Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People" (another excellent relationship-focused business tome). Although McPherson seems to be writing for a business audience, the nuggets of wisdom she dispenses can be applied to any manner of relationships, in order to help readers build more meaningful connections.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    Such an important read at this time and since she wrote it during the pandemic, it has a lot of up to date information. Well done!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christian Pretelt

  12. 5 out of 5

    Giovanna Basso

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann

  14. 5 out of 5

    Deepak Mehta

  15. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cdizzle

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evelina Rimkute

  20. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  21. 5 out of 5

    Crystal King

  22. 4 out of 5

    Truc-Vien Nguyen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cory

  24. 4 out of 5

    Donald DSouza

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alice

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  27. 4 out of 5

    Thad

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura Lisowski

  29. 4 out of 5

    DanaM116

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Daniel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...