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Pocahontas: A Life from Beginning to End (Native American History Book 7)

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30 review for Pocahontas: A Life from Beginning to End (Native American History Book 7)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Terri Gostola

    The life of Pocahontas was not what I expected at all. It's funny that I grew up hearing her name and I'd heard stories that I assumed were partly true, and then of course I'd watched the Disney movie. It turns out that everything I'd ever heard about Pocahonatas was false. Her life was fascinating, dramatic, tragic, and sad. Her sharp wits and quick thinking made her a hero, and yet it was her association with the white man that ultimately made her a captive and then a bride. It was very ironic The life of Pocahontas was not what I expected at all. It's funny that I grew up hearing her name and I'd heard stories that I assumed were partly true, and then of course I'd watched the Disney movie. It turns out that everything I'd ever heard about Pocahonatas was false. Her life was fascinating, dramatic, tragic, and sad. Her sharp wits and quick thinking made her a hero, and yet it was her association with the white man that ultimately made her a captive and then a bride. It was very ironic that she should run into John Smith again in England years later. I am glad that she was able to speak her mind to him at that time. It is so sad that Pocohantas died at such a young age, leaving behind her young son. I wish someone would make a movie about her life that is accurate because that is the most fascinating story of all, not the fairy tale.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Jares

    This is the story of one of the most famous Indian women in the Americas. The name 'Pocahontas' seems to have been a nickname, meaning 'playful one' or 'wanton one.' Her real name was 'Matoaka.' Although Pocahontas' mother seems to have died at her birth, her father was a chief of the Powhatan tribe.  Of course, we know that there was no such thing as an 'Indian princess;' Indians did not have a royalty hierarchy in their social structure.   Pocahontas saved John Smith's life in late 1607 when sh This is the story of one of the most famous Indian women in the Americas. The name 'Pocahontas' seems to have been a nickname, meaning 'playful one' or 'wanton one.' Her real name was 'Matoaka.' Although Pocahontas' mother seems to have died at her birth, her father was a chief of the Powhatan tribe.  Of course, we know that there was no such thing as an 'Indian princess;' Indians did not have a royalty hierarchy in their social structure.   Pocahontas saved John Smith's life in late 1607 when she was between 10 and 13-years-of-age.  After John Smith returned to England, Pocahontas was told he was dead.  Over the years, she became an adult, married, and possibly had a child.  To get European hostages and guns from her father, Pocahontas was abducted by the Virginians.  At that time, it seems her Indian husband was killed in a skirmish to get her back. Strangely enough, she was with the English for so long that she had time to be instructed in Christianity and learn something of the Bible.  Some say she adopted European dress and caught the eye of John Rolfe, a widower who had also lost an infant son soon after coming to the New World. Pocahontas took the name ' Rebecca' when she converted to Christianity and it holds significance because, through Pocahontas, peace was arranged between two warring groups and she married Rolfe.  When they traveled to England, Pocahontas met King James I of England.  On her way back home to Virginia, Pocahontas became ill and died.  Because she was from a land without significant illnesses, she may have contracted one of the many contagious illnesses of Europe.  She died at about 21-years-of-age.  The ship could not take her body to Virginia, so she was buried in Gravesend, England on March 21, 1617. Although she lived such a short time and we know little of her childhood, Pocahontas has left an indelible mark on America's memory of this unique individual.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Roche

    Not much to work with I can't really say that this was a poorly done biography - there's just so little material to work with. It must have been frustrating for the researchers at Hourly History as well; it is mentioned a number of times in the book that there is very little actual historical information about Pocahontas that has survived to the modern era. I certainly don't fault the author for this, but it translates as a very bare bones read for the rest of us. Sad, I suppose- but it is what i Not much to work with I can't really say that this was a poorly done biography - there's just so little material to work with. It must have been frustrating for the researchers at Hourly History as well; it is mentioned a number of times in the book that there is very little actual historical information about Pocahontas that has survived to the modern era. I certainly don't fault the author for this, but it translates as a very bare bones read for the rest of us. Sad, I suppose- but it is what it is. I guess I may as well recommend the book to anyone who is interested in learning about Pocahontas, but don't expect a rich, in depth treatment of her life. The historical record is unfortunately slim.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Gleckler Clark

    Who was the real Pocahontas? Mist of what we know of this Native American Princess has been fictionalized by books, and movies. But what you will read herein is as close to the truth as it can possibly be. Most interesting is that she was just a child when she met John Smith, and still in her teens when she met and married John Rolfe. Her short life is an inspiration.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Victor Raul

    Muy complacido por haber conocido a traves de este libro la biografia de una muchacha excepcional. Sin lugar a dudas una joven mujer sin parangon en muchos aspectos. Invita ademas a leer el libro de Camilla Townsend sobre ella. Este libro me dejo un buen sabor.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rubin Carpenter

    Interesting life of the famous Native American This narrative of Pocahontas is captivating and full of mystery concerning her life and relationships that helped forge the begining of America

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Parker

    Pocahontas the meteorite She must have been a pleasure to meet: kind, loving and trusting. A shame that her path crossed with European colonialism.

  8. 4 out of 5

    George Polansky

    A very interesting read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Collins

    Clears up some preconceived ideas

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tilly Martin

    A concise overview, but felt quite biased.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erich

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter Pryce-Davies

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

  14. 4 out of 5

    L E Robertson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary Zingara Wilbanks

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sally Smith

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donald Stevenson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cliff

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cory Shumate

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Z Hirsch

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gordon G. Knott

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle

  25. 4 out of 5

    JUDIE G. HOUCHIN

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zee

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allana Murabito

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Catoe

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

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