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How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch: In Search of the Recipe for Our Universe

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Experimental physicist and acclaimed science presenter Harry Cliff takes you on an exhilarating search for the most basic building blocks of our universe, and the dramatically unfolding quest to unlock their cosmic origins Carl Sagan once quipped, "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe." But finding the ultimate recipe for apple Experimental physicist and acclaimed science presenter Harry Cliff takes you on an exhilarating search for the most basic building blocks of our universe, and the dramatically unfolding quest to unlock their cosmic origins Carl Sagan once quipped, "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe." But finding the ultimate recipe for apple pie means answering some big questions: What is matter really made of? How did it escape annihilation in the fearsome heat of the Big Bang? And will we ever be able to understand the very first moments of our universe? In How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch, Harry Cliff--a University of Cambridge particle physicist and researcher on the Large Hadron Collider--sets out in pursuit of answers. He ventures to the largest underground research facility in the world, deep beneath Italy's Gran Sasso mountains, where scientists gaze into the heart of the Sun using the most elusive of particles, the ghostly neutrino. He visits CERN in Switzerland to explore the Antimatter Factory, where the stuff of science fiction is manufactured daily (and we're close to knowing whether it falls up). And he reveals what the latest data from the Large Hadron Collider may be telling us about the fundamental nature of matter. Along the way, Cliff illuminates the history of physics, chemistry, and astronomy that brought us to our present understanding--and misunderstandings--of the world, while offering readers a front-row seat to one of the most dramatic intellectual journeys human beings have ever embarked on. A transfixing deep dive into origins of our world, How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch examines not just the makeup of our universe, but the awe-inspiring, improbable fact that it exists at all.


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Experimental physicist and acclaimed science presenter Harry Cliff takes you on an exhilarating search for the most basic building blocks of our universe, and the dramatically unfolding quest to unlock their cosmic origins Carl Sagan once quipped, "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe." But finding the ultimate recipe for apple Experimental physicist and acclaimed science presenter Harry Cliff takes you on an exhilarating search for the most basic building blocks of our universe, and the dramatically unfolding quest to unlock their cosmic origins Carl Sagan once quipped, "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe." But finding the ultimate recipe for apple pie means answering some big questions: What is matter really made of? How did it escape annihilation in the fearsome heat of the Big Bang? And will we ever be able to understand the very first moments of our universe? In How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch, Harry Cliff--a University of Cambridge particle physicist and researcher on the Large Hadron Collider--sets out in pursuit of answers. He ventures to the largest underground research facility in the world, deep beneath Italy's Gran Sasso mountains, where scientists gaze into the heart of the Sun using the most elusive of particles, the ghostly neutrino. He visits CERN in Switzerland to explore the Antimatter Factory, where the stuff of science fiction is manufactured daily (and we're close to knowing whether it falls up). And he reveals what the latest data from the Large Hadron Collider may be telling us about the fundamental nature of matter. Along the way, Cliff illuminates the history of physics, chemistry, and astronomy that brought us to our present understanding--and misunderstandings--of the world, while offering readers a front-row seat to one of the most dramatic intellectual journeys human beings have ever embarked on. A transfixing deep dive into origins of our world, How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch examines not just the makeup of our universe, but the awe-inspiring, improbable fact that it exists at all.

30 review for How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch: In Search of the Recipe for Our Universe

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    All educated people know chemistry is the foundation of modern science. But what if, like me, your grasp of high school and college chemistry was weak and maybe has even faded with time? Or maybe never really took root in the first place? Cliff takes the reader through modern chemistry from its earliest beginnings in the dreams of the alchemists to the modern intersections of chemistry and physics and our newest insights into how the world holds together. Without condescending, he weaves a narra All educated people know chemistry is the foundation of modern science. But what if, like me, your grasp of high school and college chemistry was weak and maybe has even faded with time? Or maybe never really took root in the first place? Cliff takes the reader through modern chemistry from its earliest beginnings in the dreams of the alchemists to the modern intersections of chemistry and physics and our newest insights into how the world holds together. Without condescending, he weaves a narrative history that never skims the important scientific detail while including enough of the personal stories behind the science to help even the less scientifically minded engage with the material and remember it. A gem of a book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paperclippe

    Lately I've found myself skimming, barely finishing, or indeed, not finishing most of the popular science books I read, especially those predominantly devoted to breaking the universe down in a predictable pattern, starting with Newton or sometimes Galileo or sometimes Democritus and building - or should I say, deconstructing - the universe up - down - into its most constituent parts. Even with those books released in the last year or two, I just keep swipe-swipe-swiping, internally shouting, "Y Lately I've found myself skimming, barely finishing, or indeed, not finishing most of the popular science books I read, especially those predominantly devoted to breaking the universe down in a predictable pattern, starting with Newton or sometimes Galileo or sometimes Democritus and building - or should I say, deconstructing - the universe up - down - into its most constituent parts. Even with those books released in the last year or two, I just keep swipe-swipe-swiping, internally shouting, "YES YES WE KNOW. GET TO THE GOOD STUFF, YOU KNOW, THE WEIRD STUFF. C'MON MAN, I NEED A HIT OF THOSE QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS." ... Just me? Anyway, yes, I often find myself doing that. I did not do this this time. It completely baffles me that this is Harry Cliff's (file under names that are also common nouns, which is in the same document organizer as the list of names that are declarative phrases a la Harry Styles and Jeremy Irons) first book. His writing is so fluid, so familiar, so... So goddamn funny. Yes, reader, this was one of those books where I would try to read a passage aloud to my partner because it was one of the funniest goddamned things I'd ever read, and to my dismay he would not even crack a smile, and I would say, "Well first let me tell you about sphalerons. So, you know about wave-particle duality?" and he would invariably say no, and I would exclaim my indignity at his lack of understanding or even knowledge of the double slit experiment, and I would demand to know just how on earth I could tell him about one of the funniest goddamn things I'd ever read if he didn't even know how electrons worked. And he, invariably, would not care. But I, reader, I cared. Because it was one of the funniest god damned things I'd ever read. I sure hope Harry Cliff writes more books, because his utterly unique retelling of that oft-told tale of how we all got here, for the first time in a long time, made me care again. Made me want to learn again. Made me want to reexamine the things I maybe hadn't really understood the first time around so that I could better understand whatever it might be that comes next - or maybe just so that I could better tell my partner utterly hilarious sphaleron anecdotes. Mr. Cliff, sir, you do Carl Sagan proud. And, spoilers: It ends with an actual apple pie recipe. And a recipe for the universe.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    Woe betide the Martha Stewart acolyte who fails to read the subtitle of this cozy-sounding tome—i.e., “In Search of the Recipe for Our Universe, from the Origins of Atoms to the Big Bang.” While British particle physicist Harry Cliff does indeed include a recipe for apple pie here—the title is inspired by cosmologist Carl Sagan’s quote, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe”—this is a nuts-and-bolts (or quarks and bosons, if you will) history of the d Woe betide the Martha Stewart acolyte who fails to read the subtitle of this cozy-sounding tome—i.e., “In Search of the Recipe for Our Universe, from the Origins of Atoms to the Big Bang.” While British particle physicist Harry Cliff does indeed include a recipe for apple pie here—the title is inspired by cosmologist Carl Sagan’s quote, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe”—this is a nuts-and-bolts (or quarks and bosons, if you will) history of the development of the “standard model” of the physical makeup of the universe, along with the numerous holes (including black) that still require explanation. I confess that I have struggled to the end of numerous similarly-themed guides, starting with the late Stephen Hawking’s famous 1988 coffee-table book “A Brief History of Time” (which few actually read, and fewer understood), and all of them start out with an avuncular voice promising a wondrous journey through the mysteries of the universe, but at some point (let’s say muon antineutrinos, for instance), one starts to feel like Wile E. Coyote, frantically foot-pedaling over decidedly non-firma terra. Which is not to say I don’t take something away from these books—I do, every time, but I must concede that I will never have more than a layman’s faint grasp of particle physics. “How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch” starts off with an excellent history of the basic ingredients that make up everything that exists, highlighting the most relevant of the 92 elements that comprise the periodic table, while detailing how early scientists were able to accurately predict the appearance of missing elements based on the emerging laws of physics. That story is both scientifically impressive and comforting in a God-does-not-play-dice-with-the-universe kind of way, but once quantum mechanics enters the picture, all bets are off. Many of us have a basic understanding of how light can act like both a wave and a particle and are acquainted with Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and Schrödinger’s famous cat (all duly touched on by Cliff). But eventually the narrative must wade into the particle soup and though the author makes a gallant effort to explain right-handed and left-handed particle spin, the “colors” of quarks, and the ability of sphalerons to convert “excess antileptons into ordinary matter particles,” a fair amount of this is reach-for-the-Excedrin stuff. Somewhat ironically, the more Cliff tries to explain the symmetrical beauty underlying the universe, the more one senses that we are living in a total Rube Goldberg clusterfuck, a jury-rigged contraption in which every new discovery seems to usher in a host of fresh conceptual and logistical problems—including the holy grail Higgs boson. To Cliff’s credit, he does offer a tempered view of the prospect of ever fully understanding the origins of the universe (no Ted Lasso-level hope), while still rightfully celebrating those enquiring minds who contributed so much to what we know and offering some inspiration for the current crop of would-be physicists. Other reviewers have heavily praised Cliff’s book and I partially concur, but would add a note of caution—regardless of claims otherwise, particle physics simply does not completely translate into popular science. That being said, I still learned a lot and I appreciated Cliff’s amiable persona of cool nerd, even if some of his Brit slang will be lost on stateside readers (“whacked off its tits” will likely conjure up a very different mental image for Americans than for Brits, who will instantly understand the phrase to mean “drunk” and/or “high”).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ekul

    I didn't understand every word, but I understood a lot and I feel smarter for it. God bless Harry Cliff for writing such a readable and fascinating book about particle physics. I didn't understand every word, but I understood a lot and I feel smarter for it. God bless Harry Cliff for writing such a readable and fascinating book about particle physics.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee Bree

    If you've ever wondered what elements are responsible for forming the universe we live in, or which ingredients are required to create matter, preserve energy, enforce gravity, making life as we know it possible, then this book needs to make a speed of light descent into your hands. And I mean soon. What's inside is a story. A recipe. An accessible yet comprehensive history, really, where the author details how scientists have slowly uncovered the fundamental components of matter over the last c If you've ever wondered what elements are responsible for forming the universe we live in, or which ingredients are required to create matter, preserve energy, enforce gravity, making life as we know it possible, then this book needs to make a speed of light descent into your hands. And I mean soon. What's inside is a story. A recipe. An accessible yet comprehensive history, really, where the author details how scientists have slowly uncovered the fundamental components of matter over the last couple of centuries and have traced their origins back billions of years, to the violent spectacle of The Big Bang and beyond. With a wooden spoon in hand, the author, Harry Cliff, swirls readers into a scientifically cooked and still cooking quest for understanding about the cosmos. Where does matter come from? Which parts of the atom are divisible? How many different kinds of forces are there? What are they? How did quantum fields come to be considered the building blocks of all matter? Does supersymmetry exist in nature? Where? How? Why are neutrinos called "ghostly" particles? What is the ultimate origin of everything? Are we closer to having the answer or will it continue to remain out of reach, impossible to explain? These are the kinds of questions Cliff ladles into readers' purview, straining them into easily digestible curdles of information which highlight both how far we've come in being able to find, know, and predict the building blocks of the universe and how much farther we still have to go. Step by step, ingredient after ingredient, he sprinkles in summaries of some of science's greatest discoveries, from the atom to relativity to the Higgs boson. He stirs in explanations of complicated concepts like up and down quarks, cosmic microwave backgrounds, and quantum and Higgs fields, underlining their significance with relatable metaphor and analogy so the layperson can wrap their head around what they are. He also sifts through the major hurdles or roadblocks scientists still face in the road ahead. Like the idea that reductionism could be false. Like how there are no particles or quantum fields in the standard model that could be dark matter or energy. Like the fact that no one understands why the Higgs field settled at the perfect Goldilocks value that has made the existence of atoms possible. Like how, on their own, quantum mechanics and general relativity both fail the closer they approach the moment of The Big Bang. For someone who has only a perfunctory grasp of particle physics, chemistry, and cosmology, I came out of this book feeling full. I wasn't stuffed with so much technical knowledge I was intimidated by it. Rather, I felt satisfied to be enlightened with a more well-rounded understanding of what elements make the universe...the universe. An engaging, electron banging read all around! Many thanks to NetGalley and Doubleday Books for the ARC. BOOK BLOG

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angie Boyter

    You start with an electron... How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch gets its title from Carl Sagan, who once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” In this book, author Harry Cliff tells the stories of the many talented scientists and thinkers who have searched to answer the question of just what ARE the ingredients that make up our universe and that apple pie you plan to bake for dinner. Cliff refers to Sagan many times, and the two have in com You start with an electron... How to Make an Apple Pie from Scratch gets its title from Carl Sagan, who once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” In this book, author Harry Cliff tells the stories of the many talented scientists and thinkers who have searched to answer the question of just what ARE the ingredients that make up our universe and that apple pie you plan to bake for dinner. Cliff refers to Sagan many times, and the two have in common a contagious enthusiasm for science. Sagan’s enthusiasm is for the science itself, though, whereas Cliff’s interest shines brightest when he talks about the paths scientists follow as they try to learn more about the building blocks of our world and how our universe came into being. Harry Cliff is a particle physicist at the University of Cambridge who works on the Large Hadron Collider, so he knows intimately how science is done and does a wonderful job of showing how the work of one scientist leads to the success of the other. After a short acknowledgment to the ancients like the early Greeks, he picks up the story with eighteenth-century chemist Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier , brings us up to date through projects like the Large Hadron Collider, and foresees work continuing into the future in a closing chapter that takes place in 843 million CE. Oh, he also gives us that recipe for apple pie! Even those who were wrong get credit for their accomplishments; it was fun to learn that, although Joseph Priestley never abandoned the theory that “phlogiston” is a substance to be found in all combustible bodies , we can thank him the next time we sip our favorite soft drink. If your goal is to learn what is the current-day thinking about the nature of matter and the universe, there are probably better books for you. If , however, you are interested in how scientists have worked in the past to get us where we are and how they are continuing to try to expand our understanding, I think this book is one you will definitely enjoy. I received an Advance Review copy of this book from Edelweiss and the publisher.

  7. 4 out of 5

    meg

    “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe” - Carl Sagan We all know about what it takes to make an Apple Pie. You start with the apples, the flour, and the sugar. But let’s break that down further. What makes up the apples, the carbohydrates, the protons and neutrons? In order to know what the universe is made of, we have to find it. This book dives into the fundamental building blocks of the world as we know it, by taking you on a journey of where we are “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe” - Carl Sagan We all know about what it takes to make an Apple Pie. You start with the apples, the flour, and the sugar. But let’s break that down further. What makes up the apples, the carbohydrates, the protons and neutrons? In order to know what the universe is made of, we have to find it. This book dives into the fundamental building blocks of the world as we know it, by taking you on a journey of where we are and where we have left to go. As a particle physicist at the CERN collider, Harry Cliff gives an insider's view on the creation and troubleshooting of this machine and what it has done for science. Review: From the very beginning, Cliff draws on the analogy Carl Sagan posed. It is the focal point of the book and he circles back to it, keeping this book grounded with a clear goal. We start off with a history of what we know. He breaks down the notable figures in science and chemistry who lead us to the atomic structure we know today. He goes into the rocky subjects we are studying now, like quarks and leptons and then keeps going into what we definitely do not know. He takes you through the theories that were incorrect and also currently opposing theories being debated. Overall, I was IN LOVE with this book. Cliff doesn’t write this like a college lesson, he writes it like a story. I have heard a breakdown of the Gold Foil Experiment more times than I can count, but I still learned something new in Cliff’s version. He gave you the facts but spins the narrative to include fun information you might not know. Also, I am fascinated by CERN. I think it is one of the best modern machines we have made and is bordering on science fiction. To hear Cliff tell you how it works, how it is assembled, the liquid nitrogen used with the magnets, I couldn’t get enough. Thank you so much to Doubleday for this review copy! I learned SO much from this book (I actually understand plasma and quark-gluon plasma now). This is science at its best and leaves you with hope for what is to come. Highly Recommend.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yanique Gillana

    5 Stars accessible, fun, informative I am grateful to Doubleday Books for sending me a copy of this book for review. This is the book I will be recommending to people now who are interested in particle physics but have a limited scientific background. I think it accomplished everything it set out to do. The strength of this book is its structure. The book reads like an interesting narrative that presents the information and concepts in a very digestible way. I bet you wouldn't expect me to describe 5 Stars accessible, fun, informative I am grateful to Doubleday Books for sending me a copy of this book for review. This is the book I will be recommending to people now who are interested in particle physics but have a limited scientific background. I think it accomplished everything it set out to do. The strength of this book is its structure. The book reads like an interesting narrative that presents the information and concepts in a very digestible way. I bet you wouldn't expect me to describe a non-fiction physics book as a "multiple timeline story" or to talk about the writing style of the author, but here we are. Cliff presents us with two timelines: one where he chronicles his journey through his scientific career, and another where he takes us chronologically through the history of the field. We are introduced to the big name movers and shakers of physics, but him connecting this history to his own experiences makes it read more like a novel than a textbook. The second thing that stands out is the overall tone of the writing. The light conversational tone made the information here feel very accessible and almost casual. I did NOT feel like a text book in any way. The author maintained two consistent themes throughout; referencing Carl Sagan's Cosmos, and the whole apple pie recipe concept. The recipe format really served to simplify the explanations, and the cohesiveness of it made the reading experience fun. Let's talk about the information itself. I think the strength of this book is in how accessible it makes these topics. Of course the information here is nothing new and there are numerous books that cover these topics, but I think this book is one of the most balanced and well constructed I've come across. I think this is a great popular science book, and I recommend this to anyone with an interest in learning about particle physics, chemistry, or quantum mechanics regardless of your level of science knowledge.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Gabriel

    I really enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone trying to cement their lay person's understanding of particle physics. The author starts with the basics which you've likely read elsewhere, but quickly moves into a detailed account of the groundbreaking experiments and theories which have led to a deeper understanding of the nature of matter and reality. The book is both basic (math free for instance) and very complex - talking through the relationships of multiple types of particles I really enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone trying to cement their lay person's understanding of particle physics. The author starts with the basics which you've likely read elsewhere, but quickly moves into a detailed account of the groundbreaking experiments and theories which have led to a deeper understanding of the nature of matter and reality. The book is both basic (math free for instance) and very complex - talking through the relationships of multiple types of particles, bosons, neutrinos, and the like at a level I haven't found detailed in other popular science books. The author adds plenty of humor and wit - my favorite coming from his summary of quantum fields being singular, meaning all matter is part of the same collection of fields... "You and I, dear listener, are connected to each other. Each of our atoms is a ripple in the same cosmic ocean. We are one with each other and with all of creation. At the risk of getting a bit too Neil deGrasse Tyson, that also means we are all one with all sorts of unpleasant stuff; the Ebola virus, dog shit, and Piers Morgan, for instance." The book is worth a second time through, I think.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Edward Canade

    If it’s been a while since your last physics class and you’d like a refresher and update, in a friendly, understandable version, this may be the book for you. Harry Cliff takes us from ancient postulates through early theories of atoms and element and on to relativity and up to modern quantum mechanics. He takes us inside the Large Hadron Collider and many other modern particle physics experiments. He includes research into gravitational waves, neutrinos, anti particles, Higgs quantum fields, an If it’s been a while since your last physics class and you’d like a refresher and update, in a friendly, understandable version, this may be the book for you. Harry Cliff takes us from ancient postulates through early theories of atoms and element and on to relativity and up to modern quantum mechanics. He takes us inside the Large Hadron Collider and many other modern particle physics experiments. He includes research into gravitational waves, neutrinos, anti particles, Higgs quantum fields, and string theory. But he doesn’t stop there. He looks into the near and distant future trying to give us a feel for what may lie ahead. This book is a whirlwind tour naming many many of the movers and shakers of science who got us to where we are and many those leading us beyond. I should add, he does have a sense of humor however subtle at times it may be.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    On the TV show Cosmos, Carl Sagan said "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe." Harry Cliff actually tries to discuss how that would work in this book. Exploring particle physics from the first understandings of molecules and atoms down through supersymmetry and string theory, we get a primer of the biggest ideas in the field in the last 150 years or so. Overall, Dr. Cliff is an excellent writer and it's very easy to follow what he's talking about. Alt On the TV show Cosmos, Carl Sagan said "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe." Harry Cliff actually tries to discuss how that would work in this book. Exploring particle physics from the first understandings of molecules and atoms down through supersymmetry and string theory, we get a primer of the biggest ideas in the field in the last 150 years or so. Overall, Dr. Cliff is an excellent writer and it's very easy to follow what he's talking about. Although these are some big, complicated topics, he focuses on only as much detail as we really need to get a grasp on the topic and he writes in a very casual, conversational style that makes it enjoyable. I definitely like getting an overview of particle physics without a lot of math. I look forward to seeing anything else this author decides to write!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Wenger

    How did the universe begin? How did we end up with a universe where life on Earth is possible? That's the subject of this book. It tells the history of how the elementary particles were discovered, and how (we believe) they were created in the first microseconds after the Big Bang. This book is easy to read and comprehensive. I had no more than a cursory knowledge of particle physics before reading this book, and now I feel like I have a good grounding in it. The author's style is conversational How did the universe begin? How did we end up with a universe where life on Earth is possible? That's the subject of this book. It tells the history of how the elementary particles were discovered, and how (we believe) they were created in the first microseconds after the Big Bang. This book is easy to read and comprehensive. I had no more than a cursory knowledge of particle physics before reading this book, and now I feel like I have a good grounding in it. The author's style is conversational and often humorous, making this book entertaining as well as informative to read. Thanks, NetGalley, for the ARC I received. This is my honest and voluntary review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael Mitchell

    Particle physics and how to get to the elements making up a pie from the bing bang on. Lots of history behind various experiments at CERN. I don’t know whether the intent was to sound young and hip or to be humorous, but the vulgarity throughout really detracted from the physics. Maybe I’m just old.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary Coder

    Read my thoughts on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/p/CSxzkaJNm... Read my thoughts on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/p/CSxzkaJNm...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dawn A Denton

    I loved this book! It's not really a book you can read in a few sittings. You need to spend time thinking and absorbing. Quirky and fun! I loved this book! It's not really a book you can read in a few sittings. You need to spend time thinking and absorbing. Quirky and fun!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mohamad

  17. 5 out of 5

    Doubleday Books

  18. 5 out of 5

    At

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mikael Springer

  20. 5 out of 5

    theearthpeoples

  21. 4 out of 5

    Harry Wang

  22. 5 out of 5

    Miguel

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pætur Zachariasson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Arthur Vomvas

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tim Donaldson

  26. 5 out of 5

    David Esteban

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  28. 4 out of 5

    ወያናይ ትግራዋይ ጀግንነት WOYANAY HEROISM TIGRAY TPLF

  29. 4 out of 5

    Z R

  30. 5 out of 5

    Philip Orange

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