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Where They Wait

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Recently laid-off from his newspaper and desperate for work, war correspondent Nick Bishop takes a humbling job: writing a profile of a new mindfulness app called Clarity. It’s easy money, and a chance to return to his hometown for his first visit in years. The app itself seems like a retread of old ideas—relaxing white noise and guided meditations. But then there are the Recently laid-off from his newspaper and desperate for work, war correspondent Nick Bishop takes a humbling job: writing a profile of a new mindfulness app called Clarity. It’s easy money, and a chance to return to his hometown for his first visit in years. The app itself seems like a retread of old ideas—relaxing white noise and guided meditations. But then there are the “Sleep Songs.” A woman’s hauntingly beautiful voice sings a ballad that is anything but soothing—it’s disturbing, really, more of a warning than a relaxation—but it works. Deep, refreshing sleep follows. So do nightmares. Vivid and chilling, they feature a dead woman who calls Nick by name and whispers guidance—or are they threats? And soon her voice follows him long after the song is done. As the effects of the nightmares begin to permeate his waking life, Nick makes a terrifying discovery: no one involved with Clarity has any interest in his article. Their interest is in him. Because while he might not have any memory of it, he’s one of twenty people who have heard this sinister song before and the only one who is still alive.


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Recently laid-off from his newspaper and desperate for work, war correspondent Nick Bishop takes a humbling job: writing a profile of a new mindfulness app called Clarity. It’s easy money, and a chance to return to his hometown for his first visit in years. The app itself seems like a retread of old ideas—relaxing white noise and guided meditations. But then there are the Recently laid-off from his newspaper and desperate for work, war correspondent Nick Bishop takes a humbling job: writing a profile of a new mindfulness app called Clarity. It’s easy money, and a chance to return to his hometown for his first visit in years. The app itself seems like a retread of old ideas—relaxing white noise and guided meditations. But then there are the “Sleep Songs.” A woman’s hauntingly beautiful voice sings a ballad that is anything but soothing—it’s disturbing, really, more of a warning than a relaxation—but it works. Deep, refreshing sleep follows. So do nightmares. Vivid and chilling, they feature a dead woman who calls Nick by name and whispers guidance—or are they threats? And soon her voice follows him long after the song is done. As the effects of the nightmares begin to permeate his waking life, Nick makes a terrifying discovery: no one involved with Clarity has any interest in his article. Their interest is in him. Because while he might not have any memory of it, he’s one of twenty people who have heard this sinister song before and the only one who is still alive.

30 review for Where They Wait

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Just like Edgar Allan Poe said:”All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.” This book is a horrifying, jaw dropping, haunted the story of former war correspondent Nick Bishop who spent long time in Kabul, leaving the place with restricted traumatic experiences and PTSD, returning his hometown Maine to stay at the camp located at Rosewater. He’s jobless and his mother suffers from Alzheimer’s, living in the care house. So coming back to hometown, spending more time with her, finding ne Just like Edgar Allan Poe said:”All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.” This book is a horrifying, jaw dropping, haunted the story of former war correspondent Nick Bishop who spent long time in Kabul, leaving the place with restricted traumatic experiences and PTSD, returning his hometown Maine to stay at the camp located at Rosewater. He’s jobless and his mother suffers from Alzheimer’s, living in the care house. So coming back to hometown, spending more time with her, finding new job opportunities seem like the most logical move. As soon as he gets an interesting offer to write about a visionary app aims to shape dreams, he drives to the company headquarters to meet with eccentric CEO and his assistant Renee. He realizes that red head woman she recently talked on the phone is very same Renee from his childhood which helps him break the ice before the interview. But when Bryce Lermond, the founder of app insists to use Nick as his test subject, Renee seems like irritated, trying to convince Nick reject the offer. But Nick accepts. Interestingly one of the reasons of his last relationship’s ending is his dreamless state: he never sees any dream even a nightmare! But as soon as he tries to app, teasing the meditation parts, he realizes a woman starts singing an ominous song and a few minutes later, he just dozes off and with the sudden breaking sound of his chair, he wakes up, finding Renee stands in front of him. Renee insists he shouldn’t use the app, because it’s not completely finished and he’s better delete it. This is a little exaggerated reaction: driving through all the way from her workplace to tell him this. Nick gets intrigued and acts like he’s erased the app! He doesn’t have any idea what kind of trouble he’s getting into! Now a death woman is following him and he cannot get rid of those nightmares. He might have been careful what he’s wished for! I am not giving extra spoilers. I already told enough! I enjoyed this book which scared the living daylights out of me! Especially the ending was breathtaking. The plot was also unique, smart, progression and development were well constructed. It earned my four haunted, nightmarish, screaming, somebody shut this eerie lady’s mouth stars! Special thanks to NetGalley and Atria Books for sharing this digital reviewer copy with me in exchange my honest opinions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    LOVE The Chill by Scott Carson/Michael Koryta, but to be honest I couldn't get into this book. The beginning was spoooky, but it felt like a chore to get to 50%. Can't do it. LOVE The Chill by Scott Carson/Michael Koryta, but to be honest I couldn't get into this book. The beginning was spoooky, but it felt like a chore to get to 50%. Can't do it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Luvtoread

    Nick Bishop recently laid off from his newspaper job in Florida travels to Maine where he has been offered a temporary job to write an appreciative piece about a new mindfulness app called Clarity. Nick still owned a home in Maine, on the water front where he had lived with his parents for many years until his father died in a tragic car accident caused by black ice. Memories (good and bad) arise for Nick while he's beginning to research the Clarity app bringing about many questions for the CEO Nick Bishop recently laid off from his newspaper job in Florida travels to Maine where he has been offered a temporary job to write an appreciative piece about a new mindfulness app called Clarity. Nick still owned a home in Maine, on the water front where he had lived with his parents for many years until his father died in a tragic car accident caused by black ice. Memories (good and bad) arise for Nick while he's beginning to research the Clarity app bringing about many questions for the CEO and his assistant that they can't or won't answer so they convince Nick to listen to the app and say that is where he will find the answers he's looking for. The first time Nick listens to Clarity, he finds himself in a dream-like state with also hearing a soothing haunting melody until the singer appears in the dream and then becomes a nightmare visage when she then whispers Nick's name and starts to appear at other times while he is not listening to the app. When Nick realizes this app is fatally dangerous he also comes to the conclusion that he has been set up and the people behind the Clarity app didn't just want him to write a story, what they only wanted was Nick himself. This was an eerie and intriguing and story very pertinent to the technology applications on the internet that we see today but this was a whole different ballgame. There was a lot of science involved but it was written where the majority of readers would have an easy time understanding the story. What appeared as a innocent app to help the listener's dreams to produce more mindfulness in their daily life in reality hid a sinister and probably fatal result if they followed through with most of the steps of the Clarity app while in their dream-like state. Unbeknownst to Nick, this app was not ready for consumer use and should have been only conducted and monitored in a science laboratory while micro-dosing the information in Clarity to the listener. What Nick discovers about the app and also his own past will literally bring him to his knees and also bring about his death and others, unless he finds a way to stop the creative genius who envisions himself as a new world Dr. Frankenstein. I highly recommend this novel and plan on reading more of "Scott Carson's books". UPDATE: I was browsing book lists this week and came across a book called " MINDFULNESS"! The first line stated: "Do you long for more calm and CLARITY in your life?". How creepy was that? Twilight Zone for me that's for sure! I want to thank the publisher " Atria Books" and Net galley for the opportunity to read this complimentary copy and any thoughts or opinions expressed are unbiased and mine alone! I have given this spooky novel a rating of 4 EERIE AND FANTASTIC 🌟🌟🌟🌟 STARS!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    OutlawPoet

    Okay, I’m going to be that person. I liked it. I even liked it liked it (yes I have a 13-year-old). But I didn’t love it. While I was thoroughly intrigued by the app, and definitely creeped out by a lot that happens in the book, I found the storytelling style to be a little meandering. Now, I admit that’s more an ‘it’s not you, it’s me’ sort of thing and that my mood may have played a part, but I sort of wanted more to happen between the odd dream sequences. The reason behind everything is incredib Okay, I’m going to be that person. I liked it. I even liked it liked it (yes I have a 13-year-old). But I didn’t love it. While I was thoroughly intrigued by the app, and definitely creeped out by a lot that happens in the book, I found the storytelling style to be a little meandering. Now, I admit that’s more an ‘it’s not you, it’s me’ sort of thing and that my mood may have played a part, but I sort of wanted more to happen between the odd dream sequences. The reason behind everything is incredibly unique. I completely loved the why and how of that. And the eerie elements were well done. But, it just wasn’t a book that I had trouble putting down. I put down a few times – the good thing is that I liked it enough to keep picking it up again. If you’re a things-go-boom kind of reader, you’ll find that there’s little in the book that moves with intensity, but as a slow burn it does definitely work. *ARC provided via Net Galley

  5. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    3.5 stars rounded up. Had its issues but nothing too bad.

  6. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    This sounds creepy. I'll bite!!! Thanks for the ARC, Atria Books. This sounds creepy. I'll bite!!! Thanks for the ARC, Atria Books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    Wow. Awesome. The cover states this is a thriller and sure enough, this book thrills. Mind you, thrillers are ubiquitous these days and most of them involve cheating and/or murderous spouses/bffs/strangers, secrets from the past and/or stolen babies/monies/goods. This one is more about stolen sanity. Sure, there are the prerequisite secrets from the past, but they are of a singularly unpredictable variety. In fact, this novel defies the standard definition and formula for the thriller genre at e Wow. Awesome. The cover states this is a thriller and sure enough, this book thrills. Mind you, thrillers are ubiquitous these days and most of them involve cheating and/or murderous spouses/bffs/strangers, secrets from the past and/or stolen babies/monies/goods. This one is more about stolen sanity. Sure, there are the prerequisite secrets from the past, but they are of a singularly unpredictable variety. In fact, this novel defies the standard definition and formula for the thriller genre at every turn so terrifically, that to just call it thriller is pretty reductive. Might be a good marketing ploy, but reductive all the same. For one thing it negates all of its supernatural leanings. Of which there are many. For another it presupposes clichés, of which there are few if any. Mind you, this is a very slick very glossy professional sort of a book that screams bestseller, dynamic, fast paced with pages practically turning themselves and each chapter ending so dramatically, you simply got to get to the next one, this is a tough book to put down. And you’ll have to, at nearly 400 pages this isn’t exactly a one sitting read, but it is in spirit. So, this is a book about an app. Very modern. I just read one of those, Ruth Ware’s One by One, her latest desperate attempt to establish herself as the new Agatha Christie. That wasn’t original at all outside of the app idea itself. This is very, very original. It seems like yet another one of those mindfulness apps at first, something that yogatalks you into relaxation and lullabies you to sleep and yet beneath the initial gimmickness there’s a terrifying secret layer of mind control and nightmares beyond your wildest…well, nightmares. This is the sort of thing the novel’s protagonist, a recently laid off and restless journalist, Nick, stumbles into when he takes a seemingly easy, paid gig of doing a promo on a local app entrepreneur. It seems like a good idea, at first, get out of stagnant Tampa and come back to Maine, see his mom, see his old camp (summer cabin in Mainespeak), see his old bff…and yet, of course, nothing’s ever simple about going back. And then there’s the app and its sinister siren song, calling, calling Nick to the darkest corners of his mind and beyond. It’s a deadly tune and so far it has killed all those who heard it, but Nick is a perfect test subject for it, for he is a nightmare proof man, someone who doesn’t dream. And so, frightening as it is, a man who can’t dream finds himself in the middle of a living nightmare, one he can’t seem to wake up from. Will he survive the test? Read and find out. It’s so, so worth it. Aside from the excellent dynamic writing, the thing that really stood out about this book, the thing that really made it work is the clever interweaving of real historical tragedy with the modern technology advancements and situations straight out of the news. It’s such a terrific mix of real and speculative. Plus, it gives the narrative a haunting, terrifying backstory. All in all, this was excellent. Mind you’, I’d probably change the title to Burn the Night, a much more evocative and less clichéd, it seems, but at any rate, this was a great read. Riveting, exciting, terrifying, this is what literary scares ought to look like. Recommended. Thanks Netgalley. This and more at https://advancetheplot.weebly.com/

  8. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Scott Carson writes good books. And his story concepts are original, interesting and not predictable. He has a conversational easy writing style with believable well developed characters. Nick Bishop is a character I was rooting for from the beginning. An investigative reporter whose life had hit pause, he did not dissappoint. But the story line was a little jerky and disconnected at times. Lots of moving parts. Carson pulled it all together in the end, but I liked the last book "The Chill" more Scott Carson writes good books. And his story concepts are original, interesting and not predictable. He has a conversational easy writing style with believable well developed characters. Nick Bishop is a character I was rooting for from the beginning. An investigative reporter whose life had hit pause, he did not dissappoint. But the story line was a little jerky and disconnected at times. Lots of moving parts. Carson pulled it all together in the end, but I liked the last book "The Chill" more. 4 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Trussoni

    Mindfulness apps are frightening beasts, but a mindfulness app that delves deep inside the psyche to control dreams? Pure horror. The premise of WHERE THEY WAIT, Scott Carson’s compulsively readable psychological horror novel, rests upon anxiety and a need to soothe it. Nick Bishop, an unemployed journalist, is hired to write a profile of Bryce Lermond, a wealthy tech entrepreneur whose mindfulness app, Clarity, is about to hit the market. Nick is skeptical, but when he tries it, he discovers th Mindfulness apps are frightening beasts, but a mindfulness app that delves deep inside the psyche to control dreams? Pure horror. The premise of WHERE THEY WAIT, Scott Carson’s compulsively readable psychological horror novel, rests upon anxiety and a need to soothe it. Nick Bishop, an unemployed journalist, is hired to write a profile of Bryce Lermond, a wealthy tech entrepreneur whose mindfulness app, Clarity, is about to hit the market. Nick is skeptical, but when he tries it, he discovers that it is the “Inception” of mindfulness apps. In a series of chilling sessions, we experience the mind-warping power of Clarity’s incantations called “sleep songs,” meditations taken from an ancient source and sung by a ghostly voice, “an eerie, whispering wail, a sound caught between a warning and an invitation, a sound that could conjure thoughts of a night hunt with hounds and now one of a tall, ancient church with stained-glass windows and high ceilings and flickering candles” that inspires all who hear it to commit suicide. Think Enya with a razor blade. Carson’s storytelling is like the Clarity app: It’s easy to get hooked and hard to forget. After reading “Where They Wait,” you may find that earbuds take on a sinister quality, and downloading an app — especially one that is supposed to promote mindfulness — calls up a strange, haunting voice in your head.

  10. 5 out of 5

    LIsa Noell "Rocking the Chutzpah!"

    My thanks to Atria, Scott Carson and Netgalley. This story got under my skin. Just the sheer scope of it, and what happened and was done unto someone else? Freaking horrifying! I dreamed this book. Mostly? I was appalled. Only by the story, mind you, and the events. The book? Crikey! Read it!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ray Palen

    Typically, when I learn that the writer of a book I am reading is actually using a pen name for a best-selling author, I find myself spending much of the read trying to figure out who it is. I experienced this during the first Scott Carson novel, THE CHILL. However, that story was so engaging I quickly became engrossed in it and forgot all about looking for clues to unmask the author. Well, I don’t have to play that guessing game anymore as it has since been revealed that Scott Carson is crime fi Typically, when I learn that the writer of a book I am reading is actually using a pen name for a best-selling author, I find myself spending much of the read trying to figure out who it is. I experienced this during the first Scott Carson novel, THE CHILL. However, that story was so engaging I quickly became engrossed in it and forgot all about looking for clues to unmask the author. Well, I don’t have to play that guessing game anymore as it has since been revealed that Scott Carson is crime fiction author Michael Koryta, who has now firmly ensconced himself as a top-notch writer of supernatural thrillers. His second work of horror, WHERE THEY WAIT, is sure to provide many chills and thrills for those wanting to be a bit spooked and unsettled this time of year. Nick Bishop is down on his luck. The former war correspondent and newspaper journalist currently finds himself between jobs and is game for any decent opportunity. His prayers appear to be answered when his old friend, Pat Ryan, offers him five grand for a puff piece to be written about a new mindfulness app called Clarity. It will involve Bishop returning to his home in Maine from his current residence in Tampa. The trip will additionally provide him a chance to see his mother, Alice Jane Bishop, who was once a preeminent scholar in the field of memory research now ironically suffering the effects of Alzheimer’s Disease. When Bishop returns to Maine, he steps into his family home and finds not much has changed, including his busy-body neighbor Mr. Beauchamp. This will not be the last reunion he experiences. Upon visiting the offices of Clarity, he is met by a woman introducing herself as Renee. She ends up being Renee Holland, old friend, and flame of Bishop’s. She works as the company COO and accompanies Bishop to his meeting with CEO Bryce Lermond. They explain that Clarity is still in Beta testing, but they give him access to the app which is primarily focused on helping people get to sleep. Falling asleep has always been an issue for Nick Bishop. Even more surprising, he claims to have never dreamt anything --- only experiences pure blackness from sleep to awakening. This is all about to change with the assistance of Clarity. Not only does the sleep app immediately knock him out with a strange and somewhat familiar song sung by a female voice, but he also swears he experienced a visitation from a ghostly female figure who seems to be speaking directly to him. She delivers cryptic messages to him that he will have to work to decipher. Unfortunately for Bishop, this will be far from the most alarming situation he will uncover with his return home. The biggest whopper is when he learns that the death of his father when he was a teen-ager, an event he always believed was the result of his father speeding to catch a flight and hitting a bad patch of black ice, ends up being revealed to him as something completely different. He finds out that his father was not alone in the vehicle in the accident that claimed his life, his teen-aged son was at the wheel. As it turns out, Nick’s mother was able to use her expertise to remake his memories to the point where he will have no recollection of being connected to his father’s death. The problem is that everyone close to Nick knows the truth --- including Renee and Pat. Regrettably for Nick, he cannot confront his mother about this in her current state. It turns out some of the answers he may seek can be found in his sessions with the Clarity app. His sessions continue to involve this mysterious, dead woman and he questions whether he was conscious or asleep for the interactions with her. Each successive version of the app contains more of the eerie tune which we will later learn is an ancient folk song. Things take a dangerous turn when Bishop returns to his home, where he had been spending time together with Pat Ryan, to find Pat missing. He soon finds that Pat has climbed to the very top of the tree that overhangs the pond in which his home sat next to. Bishop is shocked to see his friend step across the top branch to the point where he falls from the dangerous height. Unfortunately, the fall does not land him in the pond but across a large rock that sat at its’ base. This accident will end with Pat being taken to the hospital in an unconscious state from which he will eventually perish. When Bishop learns that Pat not only made up the writing assignment, he lured him back to Maine for it will not be the biggest revelation between them. Bishop also finds that Pat had listened to the Clarity app prior to climbing the tree and falling to his eventual death. Upon confronting Renee, she admits that Clarity is actually a weapon that combines the most futuristic ideas of neuroscience with a ballad that’s older than this country. What transpires next is Bishop using all his journalistic skills to dig into the true origins of Clarity and finding out why he was selected for this mission. The end result will be a chilling expose of Nick Bishop’s own past but also a frightening voyage into mind control that threatens his very existence. WHERE THEY WAIT is definitely a story that will infect the dreams of readers and leave them with some unsettling imagery masterfully crafted by author Scott Carson. Reviewed by Ray Palen for Book Reporter

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brittany (bees.horror.haunts)

    What if someone told you that they never dream? Their sleep is a vast and endless blackness; would you believe them? Clarity, the new app for mindfulness. It will help with everything from anxiety and depression, with the added focus of sleep songs, helping you drift into a blissful sleep. But deep inside this app lies a more sinister motive. Something old, a folk legend that whispers sweet nothings into your subconscious mind. Nick who is recently unemployed becomes a beta tester for Clarity. An What if someone told you that they never dream? Their sleep is a vast and endless blackness; would you believe them? Clarity, the new app for mindfulness. It will help with everything from anxiety and depression, with the added focus of sleep songs, helping you drift into a blissful sleep. But deep inside this app lies a more sinister motive. Something old, a folk legend that whispers sweet nothings into your subconscious mind. Nick who is recently unemployed becomes a beta tester for Clarity. And he begins to unravel exactly who helped create this app, his own mother. The concept of this novel was brilliant. I love books that mix science in. But I felt like it was a bit too slow and long. And I feel like the ending was a bit rushed. Which is disappointing because the synopsis drew me in like a moth to a flame.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

    Returning to the family cabin in Maine, unemployed journalist Nick Bishop takes up a friend’s offer to write a piece about a new mindfulness app called Clarity. After listening to its haunting song, Nick finds himself dreaming for the first time. But the dreams become nightmares and he learns that his mother may have altered his memory about the accident that killed his father, and that he may be the only one to survive after listening to it. Did his mom hurt him or help him? “Memory is identity Returning to the family cabin in Maine, unemployed journalist Nick Bishop takes up a friend’s offer to write a piece about a new mindfulness app called Clarity. After listening to its haunting song, Nick finds himself dreaming for the first time. But the dreams become nightmares and he learns that his mother may have altered his memory about the accident that killed his father, and that he may be the only one to survive after listening to it. Did his mom hurt him or help him? “Memory is identity. Unwinding one destroys the other.” As always Koryta’s ability to create an atmosphere that enables the reader to suspend belief shines through. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an early copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Kennedy

    Wow! Mr. Kory…er, Carson has done it again! This one is even better than The Chill. One creepy ride and well worth the trip. Pick this up the day it’s released. Don’t be scared. You will be.

  15. 4 out of 5

    VICKI HERBERT

    Some circuits Stay Lit... No spoilers. 5 stars. Just in time for the Halloween season comes this exceptional spooky story... Nick Bishop was never a dreamer but he slept well... After being laid off from his journalism job, Nick returned to his hometown of Hammel, Maine to do a profile story... ... on a tech who had developed a mindfulness app called Clarity... ... where he was asked by the CEO to beta test the app and when he agreed to do it, the app was downloaded onto his phone... Clarity's menu co Some circuits Stay Lit... No spoilers. 5 stars. Just in time for the Halloween season comes this exceptional spooky story... Nick Bishop was never a dreamer but he slept well... After being laid off from his journalism job, Nick returned to his hometown of Hammel, Maine to do a profile story... ... on a tech who had developed a mindfulness app called Clarity... ... where he was asked by the CEO to beta test the app and when he agreed to do it, the app was downloaded onto his phone... Clarity's menu contained guided meditations, breathing exercises, focus enhancers, motivation melodies, and... Sleep songs like Sleep Song #1: If they come for me, if they take us away Do not fear, oh do not fear For others have gone there before... As we drift away, as they circle around The night wind calls us forward And dark seas welcome us down... No course is clear to us now, no guide but the voices we hear Down, down in the dark, No stars, no guide but fear... We hear them thrashing around And know our hour draws near If you feel you must stay, now is the time But if you follow me dear, I'll ask you to rise without fear... Far, far down we go, Fearless though we are prey Nothing ahead that we know But all behind we must flee So run, run on with me, Dive, dive in with me Swim, swim deep with me Rise, rise now with -- After listening to Sleep Song #1, Nick was visited by a dead woman who whispered into his ear... ... Darkness rises, fog just behind, and once you're lost there... It is the end. So burn the night, not the daylight... ... Nick had finally had a dream. Some circuits stay lit. The Clarity app was a weapon with an ancient twist... This was an extraordinary story. At 75% I couldn't turn the pages fast enough. I'm guessing that as this story ages it will be a classic. Happy Halloween!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Darlene

    4.5 stars Published on Peeking Between the Pages: https://peekingbetweenthepages.com/20... This was such a good book! Who doesn’t love one of those books that you start and just can’t put down. I love them! I’ve never read anything by Scott Carson before and I see this is his second novel, with The Chill being the first. I am looking forward to listening to that one very soon. This book really had me thinking. Mindfulness apps are all the rage these days yet I doubt any of us think mindfulness app 4.5 stars Published on Peeking Between the Pages: https://peekingbetweenthepages.com/20... This was such a good book! Who doesn’t love one of those books that you start and just can’t put down. I love them! I’ve never read anything by Scott Carson before and I see this is his second novel, with The Chill being the first. I am looking forward to listening to that one very soon. This book really had me thinking. Mindfulness apps are all the rage these days yet I doubt any of us think mindfulness app with mind control in the same sentence. It’s a scary thought and after listening to this book I may never think of them the same again! Lol. The story centres on Nick, a war correspondent, who was recently laid off from his job. When an offer to profile a new mindfulness app called Clarity comes his way he decides to take the job plus it’s back in his home town so he can spend some time with his mother. While the app seems much like any of the others out there Nick soon learns that it is not. He has horrible, scary nightmares and when they begin to control his waking hours as well Nick knows he is in more danger than he could have imagined. What an awesome story and audio! It’s narrated by Robert Petkoff who does a great job with any book he narrates but I found him perfect for this one. He truly brought this chilling tale to life for this listener! Highly recommend!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Swalls

    Oh man I really loved this book! It was so different I feel like from what I normally read. It was one of those books I kept wanting to read to find out what was going to happen. It had a little bit of creepy/horror to it while also touching on mystery/thriller. The visuals were phenomenal and honestly I think it would make a great movie or short tv series. I definitely want to read more from this author! I am give it 4.5 stars

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ary

    Just didnt come together for me as well as the chill. I wish the backstory had been more thoroughly explored.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Misha

    11/16/21: Three chapters in and I'm having to get past issues with how my former profession is being portrayed. I am eyerolling hard at this unemployed journalist who balks at taking an assignment that pays FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS to write a light puff piece, and that he thinks will just be a phoner. Bitch, are you for real? Take that easy money and pay your fucking rent. Also, the writer uses the movie shorthand of "war correspondent" to say that this reporter was at the top of his game before he 11/16/21: Three chapters in and I'm having to get past issues with how my former profession is being portrayed. I am eyerolling hard at this unemployed journalist who balks at taking an assignment that pays FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS to write a light puff piece, and that he thinks will just be a phoner. Bitch, are you for real? Take that easy money and pay your fucking rent. Also, the writer uses the movie shorthand of "war correspondent" to say that this reporter was at the top of his game before he got laid off. I'm so tired of this lazy-ass trope. There are so many other kinds of newspaper reporters (although this guy apparently worked for a wire service, but the author seems to not understand the difference) who make excel at what they do and make meaningful contributions as journalists. Not everyone wants to be a war correspondent, Scott. But, the book was recommended to me by another writer, so I'm putting aside my former newspaper reporter gripes and moving on in hopes there's a compelling story here.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adelina Tombleson

    Loved this book! I didn’t want to put it down and hoped to finish before having my baby but went into labor early and during my sleepless delirium I kept wishing I had the energy to find out what happens next. The thing I love about Michael Koryta’s writing is that he always puts me right there in the story, feeling what the characters are feeling and fearing what they are fearing. He can call himself whatever he wants but I will read whatever he writes! Can’t wait for his next book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    Do you dream? What if your nightmares could be replaced with sweet dreams - or just taken away altogether? What if there was an app that could promise just that? Where They Wait is a slow burn thriller with a twist of horror for good measure. I especially love books where I don’t know who I can trust, as well as those with the kind of horror that might actually happen, and this perfectly fits both those bills. I read a lot of mystery/thrillers, and as much as I love them, the serial killer/murde Do you dream? What if your nightmares could be replaced with sweet dreams - or just taken away altogether? What if there was an app that could promise just that? Where They Wait is a slow burn thriller with a twist of horror for good measure. I especially love books where I don’t know who I can trust, as well as those with the kind of horror that might actually happen, and this perfectly fits both those bills. I read a lot of mystery/thrillers, and as much as I love them, the serial killer/murderer on the loose gets old sometimes, but this was a truly novel take on the genre. Well written and researched, and very definitely creepy, though I did think the plot lost a little steam in the second half. While all the loose ends were nicely tied up, the end seemed maybe just a little too neat. Still, I know I will be checking out Mr. Carson’s other book, The Chill very soon.... And maybe deleting a few apps from my phone, just in case. (Just kidding -- but Where They Wait is definitely recommended!) I’m grateful to NetGalley and Atria/Emily Bestler Books for the opportunity to read and review Where They Wait.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    No offense to this book because I’m sure it’s good, but I’ve made it a point to stop reading when a woman is described as having “red hair and green eyes.”

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne Albertine Cohen

    This book officially comes out in October FYI- Very much a Stephen king type thriller, so not my usual page turner mystery.. but still a page-turner, just Scary! My mom had to put it down after 85 pages. This was an extremely creative read with a generous dose of dramatic horror in its pages. The author writes really well, so the story flowed seamlessly. The very first & very last paragraphs of the book are thought-provoking, so don’t miss them!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller

    Typically, when I learn that a writer whose work I am reading is using a pen name, I find myself spending much of my time trying to figure out who it is. This happened when I read Scott Carson’s first novel, THE CHILL. However, that story was so engaging that I quickly became engrossed in it and forgot all about looking for clues to unmask the author. Well, I don’t have to play that guessing game anymore as it has since been revealed that Scott Carson is crime fiction author Michael Koryta, who h Typically, when I learn that a writer whose work I am reading is using a pen name, I find myself spending much of my time trying to figure out who it is. This happened when I read Scott Carson’s first novel, THE CHILL. However, that story was so engaging that I quickly became engrossed in it and forgot all about looking for clues to unmask the author. Well, I don’t have to play that guessing game anymore as it has since been revealed that Scott Carson is crime fiction author Michael Koryta, who has now firmly ensconced himself as a top-notch writer of supernatural thrillers. His second work of horror, WHERE THEY WAIT, is sure to provide many chills and thrills for those wanting to be a bit spooked and unsettled this time of year. Nick Bishop is down on his luck. The former war correspondent and newspaper journalist finds himself between jobs and is game for any decent opportunity. His prayers appear to be answered when his old friend, Pat Ryan, offers him five grand for a puff piece to be written about a new mindfulness app called Clarity. It will require Nick to travel from his current residence in Tampa to his hometown in Maine. The trip also will give him a chance to see his mother, who was once a preeminent scholar in the field of memory research and is now ironically suffering the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Upon his arrival, Nick steps into his family home and finds that not much has changed, including his busy-body neighbor, Mr. Beauchamp. This will not be his last reunion. While visiting the offices of Clarity, Nick runs into Renee Holland, his old friend and flame. She’s their COO and accompanies him to his meeting with CEO Bryce Lermond. They explain that Clarity is still in beta testing, but they give him access to the app, which is primarily focused on helping people get to sleep. Falling asleep has always been an issue for Nick. Even more surprising, he claims to have never dreamt anything and only sees pure blackness. This is all about to change. Not only does Clarity immediately knock him out with a strange and somewhat familiar song sung by a female voice, he swears that he has been visited by a ghostly female figure who seems to be speaking directly to him. She delivers cryptic messages that he will have to work hard to decipher. Unfortunately for Nick, this will be far from the most alarming experience he will have in Maine. The end result will be a chilling expose of his own past but also a frightening voyage into mind control that threatens his very existence. WHERE THEY WAIT is a story that will infect the dreams of readers and leave them with some unsettling imagery, all of which has been masterfully crafted by a talented author who keeps adding to his already impressive resume. Reviewed by Ray Palen

  25. 4 out of 5

    The Library Ladies

    (originally reviewed at thelibraryladies.com ) Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an eARC of this novel! At one point I requested the Scott Carson horror novel “The Chill” from the library, and when it came I waffled about starting it, and then only got a couple chapters in before giving up. I wasn’t sure if it was the book itself or something that was gelling with my reading needs at the time, but I returned it and went on to the next. When I saw he had a new book coming out called “ (originally reviewed at thelibraryladies.com ) Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an eARC of this novel! At one point I requested the Scott Carson horror novel “The Chill” from the library, and when it came I waffled about starting it, and then only got a couple chapters in before giving up. I wasn’t sure if it was the book itself or something that was gelling with my reading needs at the time, but I returned it and went on to the next. When I saw he had a new book coming out called “Where They Wait”, and that it involved a mindfulness app that could have deadly influence, I decided to bite. After all, as an anxious person who has barely been getting by during a full on global pandemic, I’ve done my time with meditation apps on my phone. So why not scare the piss out of myself in regards to some of the things that actually calm me down during an anxiety spiral?! That’s a joke. Kind of. Anyway, I was fully in, expecting full on tech horror. But “Where They Wait” took me by surprise. “Where They Wait” is a slowly building horror novel that makes you think it’s going to go in one way, but it takes you in a completely different way instead. The mystery surrounding the Clarity app and Nick’s connection to it are slowly revealed as the book goes on, and it builds at a good pace and ratchets the tension up accordingly. As Nick dives deeper and deeper into the various sleep and relaxation programs on the mindfulness app Clarity, strange things start to happen, from bad dreams (dreaming being something he was never able to remember until now) to shady and cagey interactions with the makers and associates of the app. One of whom is his teenage years friend Renee. But what I thought was going to be fully tech and corporate conspiracy horror was a bit more complicated than that. In that realm, the book hits a lot of beats we’d expect it to. Nick clearly has an unknown connection to Clarity, specifically the strange song that he keeps hearing, and the song that, he finds out, has done some serious damage to other people just by listening to it. I loved following Nick as he started to piece together the origins of the song, and how they connected to him, and where those origins eventually took us in terms of setting and horror type. Again, I thought that we were going to be going into science fiction tech horror, but Carson surprised me by taking us down a different path. Well, at least in terms of the origins of the song. Those behind Clarity have the obvious motivations to harness a song that has a violent fall out, and it definitely references recent ‘in the news’ themes of things like Havana Syndrome, and how something like that could be unleashed on a tech hungry populace. So yes, there are definite tech horror aspects to this book, but there are also more primal horrors about what happens when we dream, and how vulnerable we are when it comes to our subconscious. When Nick is in what is possibly a dream (or is it?), there is a sense of ethereal dread that Carson just nails in tone and eeriness, be it the way that the song is written out or the descriptions of visions of a dead woman that is guiding Nick through his dreamscapes. But along with that are the fears of what we may do without realizing as our subconscious takes over, be it lost time, manipulated memories, or full on inability to control ones actions. Nick is the one bearing the brunt of this, though his experience is a bit of an exception to a rule that makes him a very sought after player for those who are pulling the strings. This whole aspect of the book was very unnerving in terms of the psychological manipulations, and I found these parts, especially in his dreams, to be very trippy and intense. Overall I enjoyed “Where They Wait”. It makes me want to go back and give “The Chill” another try, as Carson taps into some basal fears and makes them very, very unsettling.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    Mix history with modern-technology, blend in a flavour of neuroscience, add a sprinkle of the paranormal, and finally garnish that with a somewhat interesting, cynic (journalist) narrator facing down deranged assholes, and you have this. This book definitely sets the eerie, unsettling atmosphere right away. It hooks you. It is slow, yes. The ending was too rushed in my opinion, that is also true, because the whole story has been cooking this awful tale of genocide, dreams and nightmares, memories Mix history with modern-technology, blend in a flavour of neuroscience, add a sprinkle of the paranormal, and finally garnish that with a somewhat interesting, cynic (journalist) narrator facing down deranged assholes, and you have this. This book definitely sets the eerie, unsettling atmosphere right away. It hooks you. It is slow, yes. The ending was too rushed in my opinion, that is also true, because the whole story has been cooking this awful tale of genocide, dreams and nightmares, memories and trauma – and then the ending happened and it made me think: wait, what? that be it? Yeah. But did I enjoy it, and would I recommend? 100%. This book also made me hungry. I cannot remember a single meal that Nick had, aside from the countless beers which don't even count as a meal, so you get the gist. This is completely irrelevant to the plot, as I'm sure you know. Maybe Nick was a ghost all along. Alright, bye. 3.5 stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    Imagine an app that will shape your dreams. Replacing nightmares with sweet dreams. Would you use it? Nick is recently unemployed and does a favor for a friend by writing an article for his alma mater about a tech wizard. He heads back to his hometown to research and write the story. As an added bonus, he can see his mother who is in a nursing home after having a stroke that has affected her memory. When he meets with the tech wizard, he’s given an app that claims to relax and help you meditate. Imagine an app that will shape your dreams. Replacing nightmares with sweet dreams. Would you use it? Nick is recently unemployed and does a favor for a friend by writing an article for his alma mater about a tech wizard. He heads back to his hometown to research and write the story. As an added bonus, he can see his mother who is in a nursing home after having a stroke that has affected her memory. When he meets with the tech wizard, he’s given an app that claims to relax and help you meditate. This book really gave me a Stephen King vibe crossed with a twisty thriller. When Nick uses the app, all sorts of weird things happen. While he never dreams, the app causes nightmares. It appears to affect his memory and he isn’t sure what is up. There is a whole cast of interesting characters that I couldn’t decide who he should trust. There are clues that Nick may be an unreliable narrator, but that remains unclear. And things he knew from his past, may not be all true. I was all in. I only buy into horror that I believe still has a foot in reality and this one did. The further I made it in, the more shocked and scared I was. I sometimes think my ipad can read my mind, so when Nick agreed to test the app, it was like those horror movies all over again where you yell at the TV to not go anywhere alone. And I would never have guessed that ending in 100 tries. I really think horror fans will like this one. While it starts out slow and normal, the book picks up speed and progresses into a true horror story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen.Books.Cats.Travel.Food.

    I could use a sleep app, just not the sleep app mentioned in this book. In Where They Wait our main character who was recently laid off takes a job writing for a new mindfulness app, but then he is given the app to test and begins to have vivid nightmares. I did a read listening combo to this one back in October and I loved it. I flew through the audio portion. This one is classified as an atmospheric and haunting thriller that is perfect for our times and I definitely agree. I’ve always found dr I could use a sleep app, just not the sleep app mentioned in this book. In Where They Wait our main character who was recently laid off takes a job writing for a new mindfulness app, but then he is given the app to test and begins to have vivid nightmares. I did a read listening combo to this one back in October and I loved it. I flew through the audio portion. This one is classified as an atmospheric and haunting thriller that is perfect for our times and I definitely agree. I’ve always found dreams to be fascinating and love the idea of a sinister app as well. I found this book to be super unique and perfect on audio. The narrator did a great job of bringing me into the story too. Horror lovers add this to your holiday wish list! Many thanks to @atriabooks @atriathrillers @simon.audio for my arc, finished copy, audio.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Denice Langley

    A first class thriller sure to give you nightmares. Just hope you wake from them with your sanity. When he agreed to test a harmless app designed to help users relax and fall asleep, Nick Bishop takes a step into a mind altering program, one it seems is designed just for him. As he dreams in a manner he never has before, he will find some truths he did not know he was missing. A very original twist on any number of subjects, all designed to have you looking at downloadable apps in a new and wary A first class thriller sure to give you nightmares. Just hope you wake from them with your sanity. When he agreed to test a harmless app designed to help users relax and fall asleep, Nick Bishop takes a step into a mind altering program, one it seems is designed just for him. As he dreams in a manner he never has before, he will find some truths he did not know he was missing. A very original twist on any number of subjects, all designed to have you looking at downloadable apps in a new and wary manner.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stacy40pages

    Where They Wait by Scott Carson. Thanks to @atriabooks @netgalley and @thisisedelweiss for the gifted e-Arc ⭐️⭐️⭐️ When Nick begins beta testing a new sleep app, he doesn’t figure it can hurt anything. He doesn’t dream anyways. But he soon starts to dream. And they aren’t pleasant. I love the idea here… a haunted app on your phone. It’s a classic haunting tale, but with a very modern twist. It was spooky. There were some vividly terrifying scenes. It was reminiscent of Poltergeist for me but more Where They Wait by Scott Carson. Thanks to @atriabooks @netgalley and @thisisedelweiss for the gifted e-Arc ⭐️⭐️⭐️ When Nick begins beta testing a new sleep app, he doesn’t figure it can hurt anything. He doesn’t dream anyways. But he soon starts to dream. And they aren’t pleasant. I love the idea here… a haunted app on your phone. It’s a classic haunting tale, but with a very modern twist. It was spooky. There were some vividly terrifying scenes. It was reminiscent of Poltergeist for me but more modern. I enjoyed that it had a pretty decent (and psychological) backstory too. “It’s the worst of all worlds. A weapon that combines the most futuristic ideas of neuroscience with a ballad that’s older than this country.” Where They Wait comes out 10/26.

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