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Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution

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From the bestselling author of The Storm Before the Storm and host of the Revolutions podcast comes the thrilling story of the Marquis de Lafayette’s lifelong quest to defend the principles of liberty and equality A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A #1 ABA INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE BESTSELLER   Few in history can match the revolutionary career of the Marquis de Lafayette. Over fifty From the bestselling author of The Storm Before the Storm and host of the Revolutions podcast comes the thrilling story of the Marquis de Lafayette’s lifelong quest to defend the principles of liberty and equality A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A #1 ABA INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE BESTSELLER   Few in history can match the revolutionary career of the Marquis de Lafayette. Over fifty incredible years at the heart of the Age of Revolution, he fought courageously on both sides of the Atlantic. He was a soldier, statesman, idealist, philanthropist, and abolitionist.   As a teenager, Lafayette ran away from France to join the American Revolution. Returning home a national hero, he helped launch the French Revolution, eventually spending five years locked in dungeon prisons. After his release, Lafayette sparred with Napoleon, joined an underground conspiracy to overthrow King Louis XVIII, and became an international symbol of liberty. Finally, as a revered elder statesman, he was instrumental in the overthrow of the Bourbon Dynasty in the Revolution of 1830.   From enthusiastic youth to world-weary old age, from the pinnacle of glory to the depths of despair, Lafayette never stopped fighting for the rights of all mankind. His remarkable life is the story of where we come from, and an inspiration to defend the ideals he held dear.


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From the bestselling author of The Storm Before the Storm and host of the Revolutions podcast comes the thrilling story of the Marquis de Lafayette’s lifelong quest to defend the principles of liberty and equality A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A #1 ABA INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE BESTSELLER   Few in history can match the revolutionary career of the Marquis de Lafayette. Over fifty From the bestselling author of The Storm Before the Storm and host of the Revolutions podcast comes the thrilling story of the Marquis de Lafayette’s lifelong quest to defend the principles of liberty and equality A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A #1 ABA INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE BESTSELLER   Few in history can match the revolutionary career of the Marquis de Lafayette. Over fifty incredible years at the heart of the Age of Revolution, he fought courageously on both sides of the Atlantic. He was a soldier, statesman, idealist, philanthropist, and abolitionist.   As a teenager, Lafayette ran away from France to join the American Revolution. Returning home a national hero, he helped launch the French Revolution, eventually spending five years locked in dungeon prisons. After his release, Lafayette sparred with Napoleon, joined an underground conspiracy to overthrow King Louis XVIII, and became an international symbol of liberty. Finally, as a revered elder statesman, he was instrumental in the overthrow of the Bourbon Dynasty in the Revolution of 1830.   From enthusiastic youth to world-weary old age, from the pinnacle of glory to the depths of despair, Lafayette never stopped fighting for the rights of all mankind. His remarkable life is the story of where we come from, and an inspiration to defend the ideals he held dear.

59 review for Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Review of Duncan's other book, The Storm before the Storm I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway, so yay for me For the non-Pod Heads out there, Mike Duncan is a titan in the history podcast field. First with his The History of Rome podcast, one of the first history podcasts produced and an immensely influential one and then with his current running but soon to end (tear) series on political Revolutions . Both are fantastic series and I highly recommend you, my dear reader, check them out. It Review of Duncan's other book, The Storm before the Storm I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway, so yay for me For the non-Pod Heads out there, Mike Duncan is a titan in the history podcast field. First with his The History of Rome podcast, one of the first history podcasts produced and an immensely influential one and then with his current running but soon to end (tear) series on political Revolutions . Both are fantastic series and I highly recommend you, my dear reader, check them out. It is from the latter series that Hero of Two Worlds draws inspiration in the figure of the Marquis de Lafayette, a pivotal figure in not one, not two, but three significant political revolutions. Duncan chronicles Lafayette's life from his privileged, but tragic, childhood in rural France to the international mourning that followed his passing in 1834 and everything in between. While I think it is clear Duncan admires Lafayette, this work is by no means a hagiography. On multiple occasions Lafayette screws up or is cripplingly naïve and Duncan does not soften or argue away these shortcomings. For instance Lafayette, a great lover of liberty, comes to the Americas with stars and idealism in his eyes. He effectively becomes the surrogate son of George Washington and befriends many of the key figures of the American revolution. But as anyone with a modicum of understanding of the time can tell you (much to the chagrin of anti-history nationalists) the blessings of liberty fought for did not extend to the population of enslaved Africans. Lafayette never directly or strongly confronts his American friends about the gap between the Revolutionary rhetoric and the real world results. While he would fund and support several abolitionist causes, when push came to shove Lafayette did not extend his neck for the liberty of the enslaved like he did for other causes. What is interesting about Duncan's approach to this story is how much Lafayette dips in and out of the wider historical narrative. He'll spend time in America when important things are happening but also head back to France, taking the book's focus away from the American Revolutionary War to follow Lafayette. Likewise much of the more popularly know portions of the French Revolution (reign of terror, Napoleon's rise and fall) are only briefly mentioned and given a cursory explanation because when these events were occurring Lafayette was rotting (possibly literally for a while) away in a Prussian of Austrian prison and completely cut off form the outside world. And that is fine by me. If I wanted to learn about the American or French Revolutions there are scads of books and other resources (like the Revolutions podcast :-P) I can reference. This is a book about Lafayette and I appreciated understanding that even great, influential figures in history can be sidelined and insulated from major world events. But what a life Lafayette lived when he was not in jail: hero of the American revolution, head of the National Guard during the French Revolution, opponent of Napoleon's corrupt and absolutist turn, revolutionary conspirator during the restoration of the Bourbons, and the bestower of a republican kiss that ushered in a new French King (though a kiss he would later regret). He collected influential and notable friends by the dozens and kept up a correspondence with many of them through till the end. He was a staunch proponent of liberty in spite of a hostile European atmosphere to such ideals. Duncan does an excellent job guiding the reader through all these momentous events and noteworthy figures, providing an easy to follow narrative augmented by primary source quotations to drive home important points and themes. The book read smooth while painting a nuanced and accessible view of this influential and oft overlooked hero of two worlds. What stands out most to me about the life of Lafayette is just how little his political views changed over the course of his life. Deepened and fleshed out from his idealistic youth, certainly, but his bedrock belief in liberal ideals (free press, equality under the law, freedom of worship, popular governments to name a few core tenants) remained with him his entire life. Within the context of the French revolution he rapidly changed from being viewed as a radical liberal to a reactionary counter-revolutionary old guard in a span of a few years ("Like Saturn, the revolution devours its children) even as his fundamental beliefs remained unchanged. I can think of no better way to end this review than to borrow a quote at the end of the book:He [Lafayette] is a tower amid the waters, his foundation is upon a rock, he moves not with the ebb and flow of the stream. The storm may gather, the waters may rise and even dash above his head, or they may subside at his feet... still he stands unmoved. We know his sight and his bearings, and with the fullest confidence we point to where he stood six and fifty years ago. He stands there now. The winds have swept him, the waves have dashed around him, the snows of winter lighted upon him, but still he is there.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Faith

    Lafayette had one of the more impactful and interesting lives of any person. As a teenager, he fought in the American Revolution. When he returned to France he was instrumental in the French Revolution. His life was full of contradictions. He was an abolitionist, but also a close friend of the slave owners George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. He fought for liberty and equality, while remaining loyal to French nobility. He was devoted to his wife and children, while having successive mistresse Lafayette had one of the more impactful and interesting lives of any person. As a teenager, he fought in the American Revolution. When he returned to France he was instrumental in the French Revolution. His life was full of contradictions. He was an abolitionist, but also a close friend of the slave owners George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. He fought for liberty and equality, while remaining loyal to French nobility. He was devoted to his wife and children, while having successive mistresses. This book is excellent and does his life justice. I knew more about his life in America from reading about the American Revolution, but I haven’t read much French history. Fortunately, this book goes into that in detail. Lafayette remained true to his principles, but didn’t break with the kings and wound up being mistrusted by both sides of the French Revolution. The story of the time he spent in prison (where he was voluntarily joined by his wife and daughters) was compelling. He bounced back and forth from opposing the French government, to being a part of it, to being excluded from it. On the other hand, in America he was, and is, revered and made a triumphal tour of all 24 states in 1825. The audiobook is read by the author. He does a better job of narrating than most author’s do. I received a free copy of this audiobook from the publisher.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Mike Duncan could make the phone book an interesting read, so given a topic as fascinating as the Lancelot of the Revolutionary Set, it was impossible to put this down at times. Many many thanks to Hachette for the ARC! I'm coming back to revise my review a bit; it was written in haste, and now that it seems people are actually seeing my review, I want to stress this one point: if your only opinion of Lafayette is based on anything related "Hamilton," please do yourself the favor of reading this. Mike Duncan could make the phone book an interesting read, so given a topic as fascinating as the Lancelot of the Revolutionary Set, it was impossible to put this down at times. Many many thanks to Hachette for the ARC! I'm coming back to revise my review a bit; it was written in haste, and now that it seems people are actually seeing my review, I want to stress this one point: if your only opinion of Lafayette is based on anything related "Hamilton," please do yourself the favor of reading this. Lafayette was so much more than a costar in the American Revolution, and I actually feel kind of bad for referencing the play in my initial review. It doesn't pay him or his legacy proper tribute. This telling of his life story held my attention all the way through, and I'll be honest, I was crying as I read the last pages. Even if you're not a big history/biography reader (like me), this is absolutely worth your time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Liviu

    Compelling and interesting especially for someone who while quite interested in the period under consideration here never really read that much about the Marquis per se.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kahlia

    I’m a big fan of Mike Duncan’s podcasts (as, I imagine, are many of the people who will pick up this book), and it didn’t disappoint. Part of that is the subject matter - it’s hard to think of anyone who had more of a front row seat to witness this era of history than Lafayette. But Duncan has really found his groove as a historian here, in terms of being able to tell a story about someone who he clearly finds personally interesting and inspiring, while also knowing when to take a longer view of I’m a big fan of Mike Duncan’s podcasts (as, I imagine, are many of the people who will pick up this book), and it didn’t disappoint. Part of that is the subject matter - it’s hard to think of anyone who had more of a front row seat to witness this era of history than Lafayette. But Duncan has really found his groove as a historian here, in terms of being able to tell a story about someone who he clearly finds personally interesting and inspiring, while also knowing when to take a longer view of history and acknowledge Lafayette’s flaws. There are obviously many, but: dude, you really should have spent more time with your wife (though I’m very glad you came round on slavery relatively quickly). I knew a reasonable amount about the American and French revolutions heading into this book, but Duncan includes a lot of details about Lafayette’s specific role that I wasn’t aware of, and knows when to ruminate in detail and when to skip over large swathes of someone’s life. I knew less about France in the 1820s-1830s, so there was plenty to learn there. The primary sources are well blended, rather than clunkily referenced, which always helps. There were a few issues with audio quality that I expect may have been down to this being an ARC (including some excessively long silences between chapters that made me think my wireless earphones had suddenly died), but anyone who has listened to Duncan’s work will also know him as an excellent narrator - energetic and lively. I’m not sure what Duncan has planned next, but I’ll be keeping an eye out.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Erickson

    Mike Duncan's a great disseminator of the most interesting parts of a historical story and how to put those parts together in a compelling way. His voice is also great for listening to, so after listening to his Rome stuff and the Revolutions podcast, listening to the audiobook for everyone's favorite fighting Frenchman (LAFAYETTE! I'mTakingThisHorseByTheReignsMakinRedCoatsRedderWithBloodStains!....sorry) was a no-brainer. I didn't know much about Lafayette before this book, despite taking an en Mike Duncan's a great disseminator of the most interesting parts of a historical story and how to put those parts together in a compelling way. His voice is also great for listening to, so after listening to his Rome stuff and the Revolutions podcast, listening to the audiobook for everyone's favorite fighting Frenchman (LAFAYETTE! I'mTakingThisHorseByTheReignsMakinRedCoatsRedderWithBloodStains!....sorry) was a no-brainer. I didn't know much about Lafayette before this book, despite taking an entire course on the French Revolution and getting a B in it. Why, you ask? Because my professor and the textbooks I read were BORING, and so I've spent YEARS thinking the French revolution was a complete snoozefest. Duncan proves me wrong here, making every element of Lafayette's life very compelling. He was a complex man, involved in many important events on two continents, and Duncan paints a vivid picture of the man himself and the situations he found himself continously involved in. Small note, the Netgalley copy of the audiobook I received (thanks, Netgalley + publisher!) cut off in the middle of the final chapter, which was very frustrating. So I have no idea how this book ends. But, that's not the fault of the book obviously, so it doesn't affect my rating or review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Funes

    Wow, I knew this was going to be great book and expected that Mike Duncan would not have a sophomore slump. I only had high level knowledge of Marquis de Lafayette but as I read the book it made me want to meet and talk with him. But alas, its been nearly 187 years since his death. This is the first book I listened with audible which enhanced the book since it was Mike Duncan himself who read it. Mike Duncan is not only a great writer but his reading performance elevated the book. I felt I was w Wow, I knew this was going to be great book and expected that Mike Duncan would not have a sophomore slump. I only had high level knowledge of Marquis de Lafayette but as I read the book it made me want to meet and talk with him. But alas, its been nearly 187 years since his death. This is the first book I listened with audible which enhanced the book since it was Mike Duncan himself who read it. Mike Duncan is not only a great writer but his reading performance elevated the book. I felt I was with Lafayette every step of the way. From orphan to young man in the American revolution to the French revolution to dying peacefully in 1830. Mike Duncan you beautiful bastard you did it again! So like Samuel B Morse's toast to Lafayette "I ask you therefore ... to drink with me in honor of General Lafayette".

  8. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    HERE IS MY DITTY ABOUT LAFAYETTE.....Please forgive me, Lin Manuel Maria. 🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼 Lafeyette, do you know him yet? This great book is a sure bet. He does not sing, he does not dance ...this dude was all the way from France. 🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼 Date reviewed/posted: May 22, 2021 Publication date: August 24, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #thirdwave (#f HERE IS MY DITTY ABOUT LAFAYETTE.....Please forgive me, Lin Manuel Maria. 🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼 Lafeyette, do you know him yet? This great book is a sure bet. He does not sing, he does not dance ...this dude was all the way from France. 🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼🎼 Date reviewed/posted: May 22, 2021 Publication date: August 24, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #thirdwave (#fourthwave #fifthwave?) is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. Plus it is hot as all heck and nothing is more appealing than sitting in front of a fan with a kindle! I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. From the massively popular podcaster and New York Times' bestselling author comes the story of the Marquis de Lafayette's lifelong quest to protect the principles of democracy, told through the lens of the three revolutions he participated in: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and the Revolution of 1830. Few in history can match the breadth and depth of the revolutionary career of the Marquis de Lafayette. Over fifty incredible years at the heart of the Age of Revolution, he fought as one with righteous revolutionaries on both sides of the Atlantic. As an idealistic and courageous teenager serving in the American Revolution, he used his considerable wealth and savvy to help the Americans defeat the British. Then he returned home and was a principal player in the French Revolution. And in his final act, at seventy years old, he was instrumental in the dramatic overthrow of the Bourbon Dynasty during the Revolution of 1830. All the while, he never wavered from the principles he had written into the Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789: That men are born and remain free and equal, deserving of liberty, property, safety, freedom of speech, and the ability to resist oppression. Through this age of upheaval, Lafayette remained unshakably committed to the principles he had outlined. From the time that he was an enthusiastic 19-year-old to the time, he was a world-weary 74-year-old, his resolve never wavered. As the saying goes, if we don't learn from history, we are doomed to repeat it. Today, the values codified and practiced by Lafayette are increasingly taken for granted. His life is thus the story of where we came from and what we stand to lose if we abandon the ideals for which he fought. Most people these days know who Le Marquis was based on his appearance in the broadway's phenomenon Hamilton but there is more...much more to the man. This biography was well constructed and it will appeal to lovers of history and good books as it brings up so many points to ponder on. (we don't study US history in Canada so my knowledge of him and what he did in the US is Hamilton-related and Hamilton-related only!) I do not listen to podcasts or the radio but I will try to find the author's podcast online for hubby to listen to. I will highly recommend this excellent book to friends, patrons and book clubs alike as it will appeal to so many of them. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🥧🥧🥧🥧🥧 (no one does pastry like the French!)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ozymandias

    There are many books about the Marquis de Lafayette. He has been a popular subject of American biographers almost since his death. The man was a national hero, a beloved icon of the Revolutionary generation. And best of all, he was one who didn’t have to be there – a foreigner who tied his flag to the American colonies solely to further the cause of liberty. But perhaps because people found him so appealing he’s always seemed a bit of an enigma to me. The natural desire to remove all a hero’s fa There are many books about the Marquis de Lafayette. He has been a popular subject of American biographers almost since his death. The man was a national hero, a beloved icon of the Revolutionary generation. And best of all, he was one who didn’t have to be there – a foreigner who tied his flag to the American colonies solely to further the cause of liberty. But perhaps because people found him so appealing he’s always seemed a bit of an enigma to me. The natural desire to remove all a hero’s faults (think Washington and his mythic cherry tree) leaves nothing but an empty font of virtuous deeds. Whitewashing leaves one colorless. Which is why I was so excited when I heard Mike Duncan was writing a biography on the dear Marquis. And one written in Paris making full use of the archives there. That last point is important because it emphasizes a key strength here that proved to be a failing in every biography I’ve seen: it focuses on Lafayette’s whole life and not just the few formative years he spent in America. The man had a long and fascinating career in his native France, but all we ever hear about is his time serving with Washington. I understand the reasons for it – Lafayette’s a clear hero in America, but really a bit player in France. And a controversial one at that who left enemies on all sides as he tried to chart a middle way. That plus the complexity and confusion of the French Revolution means it’s much simpler for a biographer to just focus on his period as an unambiguous hero. But Duncan has of course already unraveled the French Revolution as part of his Revolutions podcast. He understands the broader context and how Lafayette fit into it. And more importantly he understands just how important the revolution was to Lafayette’s life. Duncan is exceptionally good at detailing motives and shifting opinions in a way that seems founded in fact and not pop psychology. He has a keen instinct for what Lafayette cared about and when he doesn’t have the evidence to know for sure he doesn’t just guess. Lafayette’s privileged upbringing is portrayed here much as he must have seen it: as a gilded cage trapping him in a setting where he would never fit in. He may have been rich, but that had come as a surprise to his minders who kept having to increase the privilege of his schooling to match. The country son of a soldier, he was suddenly thrust into the upper reaches with no real training. One can easily understand how someone with modest military ambitions would resent being pushed towards a life at court where his rustic manners and awkwardness would be endlessly mocked. You can also understand why he’d jump at the chance to join in a revolution overseas, even aside from all that liberty and justice. Which brings up another point Duncan does very well – trace the evolution of Lafayette’s liberal ideals. The Young Marquis’s understanding of what liberty meant was naturally very simplistic at first. He had an ideal with no real practical sense of how to achieve it. When he said he was there to learn not to teach that was what he meant. But when it solidified over time it became the rock that would define his career. And I found it pretty astounding both how early in his life this occurred and how seriously he took it. His political ideals didn’t really change in fifty years, which suggests a pretty dogged determination as well as perhaps a certain lack of imagination. At a minimum the man was stunningly naïve in some things and tried to play the role of Washington without realizing that, in politics even more than war, compromise and coalitions are necessary. But what really impressed me was the utter seriousness with which he took his convictions. Once Lafayette defined a principle he followed it through to the bitter end. Many of the Founding Fathers had moral objections to slavery, but when it came down to actual actions they quailed. Slavery was an evil but one they couldn’t purge without losing their wealth and power, and that they’d never do. Alone among the leading Revolutionary War generals Lafayette actually put into action a plan to bring an end to slavery. We might consider it a relatively modest one but it was practical – he bought a plantation complete with slaves with the express purpose of freeing them to show by example that freed blacks made better workers than enslaved ones. The tragic disrupting of this plan (technically a cruel commentator could point out they were freed only when he lost ownership and his first act on regaining them was to sell them) was hardly his fault and the fact that he tried at all is astounding. As was his effort to promote the cause of abolition wherever he could. Once the man discovered a principle he never let it go. It was never Lafayette’s brilliance or intellect that drove his success but his sheer dogged determination. Which was probably why he peaked so young. Speaking of peaking young, his revolutionary career in France is explored in an immensely satisfying way. I’ve read quite a bit on the French Revolution and I know how hard it is to know what’s going on if you lack the background on it. But the book always explains exactly what it needs to and passes over all that is superfluous to Lafayette’s life. It always seemed odd to me that a man of his principles would be entirely absent during the key early moments of the revolution, but the compromises he found himself making to assume such a role in his homeland seem an early example of how he struggled to adapt Washingtonian virtue to a more fluid situation. There was an air of naivete about Lafayette that ultimately limited his rise. While understanding the overall flow of the Revolution isn’t necessary, for those who are familiar with it there is a lot that is clarified by following an individual life amidst the storm. The Declaration of the Rights of Man for example has often been criticized for being an aspiration rather than a law, as the American Bill of Rights was. But Duncan explains this by locating it in time – Lafayette expected martyrdom at any moment. The king was sure to call in the army and forcibly close the National Assembly. Imprisonment was not unlikely. He wanted a clear statement of ideals so that future revolutionaries would know what they stood for when they tried to pick up the pieces. Seen in that light it’s not surprising the document lacked legal force. It’s closer to the Declaration of Independence in that sense. One thing I did miss though was Lafayette’s views on the whole active/passive citizen divide. I got the impression from this that (contrary to what I thought) he was not pleased with this, but it was never really stated definitively. Another interesting fact I didn’t know: Noailles, who stood up in the National Assembly to propose the complete abolishment of noble privilege, was Lafayette’s oldest friend and brother-in-law. No reason to mention that unless your book is about Lafayette. It was good to see that the book dedicated as much time to Lafayette’s third and final act as the first two. This was the section I knew little about, for if most biographies rush through his time in the French Revolution they positively leap through everything after, and it proved to be far more interesting than I expected. Napoleon considered him a rival of sorts! The lone unrepentant and uncompromising revolutionary in France. Admittedly Napoleon saw this as something of a joke, but if a man is judged by his enemies Lafayette chose well. He even played an important role in Napoleon’s Hundred Days by forcing the emperor to resign a second time. Even the restoration of the Bourbons wasn’t enough to dampen his enthusiasm for revolution. He immediately got himself elected to the assembly and tried to push through a liberal agenda. But after years of waiting and plotting with carbonari groups he finally got to play the starring role in the Revolution of 1830. The result was not all that he could have hoped for. His naivete was on full display when he chose Louis-Philippe as the next King of France without securing his terms in writing. And then offering his resignation to apply pressure. To the end he believed selfless displays of virtue could sway men to display virtue of their own. Which… wasn’t exactly what usually happened. At the end of his life (which came not long after) he was unquestionably the elder statesman of the revolutionary movement – one of the few leaders to survive and possibly the only one to come through with ideals intact. He really deserves to be better remembered in France, particularly when everyone knows those snakes Robespierre and Danton. So I liked this. Not sure what more there is to say. The understanding of who Lafayette was is first rate, as is the general understanding of the period he lived through. I wouldn’t necessarily recommend it as someone’s introduction to the period since there’s much you’ll miss out, but if you read it unprepared you won’t be at a loss either. And that’s tough to manage with a period as fastmoving and complicated as this one. The writing is generally excellent. I hadn’t planned to read this right away but I couldn’t put it down once I picked it up (be warned). The essential argument of the book, exemplified by the Hero of Two Worlds title, is that Lafayette’s career can’t be understood without looking at his career as a whole. I consider that proved quite effectively.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    My second biography on Lafayette, and definitely my favorite of the two I've read. Structure/Formatting 4.5/5 I love a chronological history book, and the structure and flow of this worked very well for me. One thing I was sad about was the lack of photos! I love seeing what photos are chosen to be included in books (and which artist's depictions), but this gave me none of that. Thoroughness of Research 4.5/5 I would have loved a new record set or new deep-dive into an old record set, but otherwis My second biography on Lafayette, and definitely my favorite of the two I've read. Structure/Formatting 4.5/5 I love a chronological history book, and the structure and flow of this worked very well for me. One thing I was sad about was the lack of photos! I love seeing what photos are chosen to be included in books (and which artist's depictions), but this gave me none of that. Thoroughness of Research 4.5/5 I would have loved a new record set or new deep-dive into an old record set, but otherwise this was very well researched and used a lot of primary sources. I also have some new history books to check out to learn more about the period. Storytelling 5/5 This was such a great, easy read. Even for the parts where I knew what was going to happen next, I needed to keep reading to find out. Enjoyment 5/5 This was such a fun one. I would recommend this to anyone who wants to learn more about "America's favorite fighting Frenchman." Prior Knowledge Needed 4/5 I am fairly well read on the American Revolution at this point, but my knowledge on the French Revolution is fairly minimal. This book did a fantastic job of breaking down the pieces of the war relevant to Lafayette in a way that, while I may still not understand the whole war, I understood his role in it. If you've seen Hamilton, you probably know enough of the American Revolution to understand the pieces mentioned in that section of the book. :-)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Hero of Two Worlds by Mike Duncan is a great nonfiction/historical biography of the fascinating figure, the Marquis de Lafayette. I loved this one. I have always been fascinated by Lafayette, heck I have even stumbled upon several societies that revolve around his history and legacy and all of this research has only poured fuel onto that fire. Obviously, I was super excited to be able to read more about this complicated, intricate, and fascinating larger than life historical figure. The author cl Hero of Two Worlds by Mike Duncan is a great nonfiction/historical biography of the fascinating figure, the Marquis de Lafayette. I loved this one. I have always been fascinated by Lafayette, heck I have even stumbled upon several societies that revolve around his history and legacy and all of this research has only poured fuel onto that fire. Obviously, I was super excited to be able to read more about this complicated, intricate, and fascinating larger than life historical figure. The author clearly has done his research, and it most certainly shows in his presentation. Lafayette was so many things for so many groups/causes. He has incredible highs and lows in his life, contributed to many ideals and causes, and placed himself into many a precarious situation during these revolutions. Was he perfect? Nope. But despite his flaws, imperfections, and mistakes, he believed in what he supported, and the world was forever altered and changed because of it. An excellent biography for an excellent figure. 5/5 stars Thank you NG and Public Affairs/Perseus Books for this wonderful arc and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mshelton50

    Mike Duncan has done a fine job telling the story of the Marquis de Lafayette. Unlike other biographies I have read, Duncan doesn't focus solely on the earlier, "revolutionary," phase of Lafayette's life, but also explores Lafayette's role in the Napoleonic period, the Bourbon Restoration, and the July Monarchy. What I found very helpful was Duncan's emphasis on the Marquis's Classical education--being fed a steady diet of the Roman Republic, young Gilbert du Motier questioned an absolutist mona Mike Duncan has done a fine job telling the story of the Marquis de Lafayette. Unlike other biographies I have read, Duncan doesn't focus solely on the earlier, "revolutionary," phase of Lafayette's life, but also explores Lafayette's role in the Napoleonic period, the Bourbon Restoration, and the July Monarchy. What I found very helpful was Duncan's emphasis on the Marquis's Classical education--being fed a steady diet of the Roman Republic, young Gilbert du Motier questioned an absolutist monarchy from his early days. Duncan also makes the point that Lafayette--unlike a Napoleon or a Talleyrand--was no schemer; indeed, because he tended to view others as being as virtuous as himself, he almost never saw the intrigues swirling around him. Highly recommend.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fin Quinlan

    An amazingly well-written book. It's a coon theme I have noticed in which all I can write for a book is that it has 'good prose' but this has jumped out at me. Almost impossible to put down Duncan keeps you desperate to read on what could have very easily been a dense hardback history textbook. I have come out of this book at a loss of what to read next because I have been so overwhelmed by the brilliance of this. An amazingly well-written book. It's a coon theme I have noticed in which all I can write for a book is that it has 'good prose' but this has jumped out at me. Almost impossible to put down Duncan keeps you desperate to read on what could have very easily been a dense hardback history textbook. I have come out of this book at a loss of what to read next because I have been so overwhelmed by the brilliance of this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    James Penny

    i bonded more with the marquis de lafayette than i have with my family, 5/5

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    This man of principles at every age was shaped by his environment as well as his choices. The publisher's blurb is a good overview of this *warts and all* biography. I found the writing style to be quite engaging and not at all the dry (and often misogynistic) manner commonly used regarding historical personages. Shame on me as a former American Rev War re-enactor that I had not known the man's first name before now (Gilbert) nor had any notion of what the man did after leaving the western hemis This man of principles at every age was shaped by his environment as well as his choices. The publisher's blurb is a good overview of this *warts and all* biography. I found the writing style to be quite engaging and not at all the dry (and often misogynistic) manner commonly used regarding historical personages. Shame on me as a former American Rev War re-enactor that I had not known the man's first name before now (Gilbert) nor had any notion of what the man did after leaving the western hemisphere. Of course I learned a lot, but I am surprised to relate that I really enjoyed reading this book! I requested and received a free ebook copy from Perseus Books, PublicAffairs via NetGalley. Thank you!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Becca for Paperback Treasures

    I was really quite thrilled to receive the Hero of Two Worlds early. I am a longtime listener of both of Mike Duncan's stellar podcasts. I didn't read his first book because I wasn't super interested in the period that it covered. However, when I heard that he was writing about about Lafayette, I was immediately intrigued. Even before Hamilton made his name synonymous with charm, I was fascinated by this young French man who decided to take up the cause of liberty. I knew that I would enjoy list I was really quite thrilled to receive the Hero of Two Worlds early. I am a longtime listener of both of Mike Duncan's stellar podcasts. I didn't read his first book because I wasn't super interested in the period that it covered. However, when I heard that he was writing about about Lafayette, I was immediately intrigued. Even before Hamilton made his name synonymous with charm, I was fascinated by this young French man who decided to take up the cause of liberty. I knew that I would enjoy listening to this book because it brings a narrator I love to a topic that fascinates me. But, it was not a guarantee that I would actually like the book itself. Writing a 30 minute podcast episode is not exactly the same as writing a book. I was not sure if Duncan's style would work well. I was pleasantly surprised that everything in the book really exceeded my expectation. Duncan provides a well-researched, popular history book that will be accessible to non-historians. To those who may have listened to Duncan's Revolutions podcast the book may feel somewhat repetitive. Duncan takes you through the American and French revolutions, makes some small stops in the Haitian revolution, then brings you back to the removal of the Bourbons for good. All things he's covered on the podcast, but there is no doubt that Lafayette is a really amazing lens to view each of these events. It just feels like sometimes Lafayette can be a bit more of a background player in his own book. Duncan typically course corrects quickly to re-center the narrative but it is noticeable. The other thing that I noticed is that the book sometimes lacks depth in providing a nuanced portrait of Lafayette. I think considering that this is aimed at the general public that it's completely fine that this is the case, but I doubt that the book sheds any new light on Lafayette, the person. Whereas, it does give a good idea of his role within large historical events. I think that this book will intrigue many amateur historians or those looking to learn more about Lafayette after seeing Hamilton. Academic history it is not, but it's a perfectly delectable popular history book. I would not hesitate to recommend this hoping to learn more! Thank you so much to NetGalley for providing the free copy in advance in exchange for my honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    *I received an audio ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.* As a huge fan of Mike Duncan's podcasts (if you haven't checked out The History of Rome or Revolutions then where have you been) I immediately requested access to this audiobook when I saw it available. And boy did it not disappoint. Throughout this biography, Duncan shows Lafayette grow from an idealistic provincial teenager into an icon of liberty and the man now known in popular culture as "America's favorite fighting Fre *I received an audio ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.* As a huge fan of Mike Duncan's podcasts (if you haven't checked out The History of Rome or Revolutions then where have you been) I immediately requested access to this audiobook when I saw it available. And boy did it not disappoint. Throughout this biography, Duncan shows Lafayette grow from an idealistic provincial teenager into an icon of liberty and the man now known in popular culture as "America's favorite fighting Frenchman," thanks to the success of Lin Manuel-Miranda's Hamilton. I appreciated that Duncan did not shy away from calling out the flaws and shortcomings of the Marquis. He commented on, among other things, Lafayette's naïveté, the contradictory nature of his personal opinions towards abolition compared to his actions in that regard, and his complete lack of understanding about personal finance multiple times. Despite these shortcomings, it is also clear that the Marquis was a man of strong convictions who throughout his life did not waver from the principles he fought for on both sides of the Atlantic. Though the people of France called him both a radical liberal and part of the old guard/a reactionary counter-revolutionary depending on the year, it was the political climate that changed and never his beliefs. For anyone with a passing historical knowledge, I think this book is an excellent deep dive into one of the most influential figures of his era. Even without much previous knowledge, Duncan does a good job of touching on major moments in history as they relate to Lafayette. And Revolutions seasons 2, 3, and 6 cover the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and the July Revolution, respectively, if you find you need more information. As usual Duncan presents a huge amount of research in a fun, conversational manner, and I found listening to this book to be a truly enjoyable experience. I would highly recommend!

  18. 4 out of 5

    James Schisler

    A great biography of the Marquis de Lafayette, written by perhaps the preeminent history podcaster. The pacing of this book really stood out- the chapters are well spaced, and the narrative rarely, if ever, gets bogged down. I woul have liked to see a little more about Lafayette, the man, dealing with the contradictions in his views. Sure, Duncan consistently discusses in some detail the disconnect between Lafayette's words and actions around slavery, but I do think more time spent there would h A great biography of the Marquis de Lafayette, written by perhaps the preeminent history podcaster. The pacing of this book really stood out- the chapters are well spaced, and the narrative rarely, if ever, gets bogged down. I woul have liked to see a little more about Lafayette, the man, dealing with the contradictions in his views. Sure, Duncan consistently discusses in some detail the disconnect between Lafayette's words and actions around slavery, but I do think more time spent there would have made this a stronger book. Duncan's central thesis is, essentially, that Lafayette advocated openly and powerfully for the same set of beliefs continually ever after his days in the American revolution. And Duncan does support this claim well. I'm struck also by the fact that numerous times when he was young, and still sometimes when he was old, Lafayette refused to participate in "politicking" or working behind the scenes to build infrastructure or alliances to carry his agenda forward. At times, that looks like a great weakness. But it's easy to wonder: If Lafayette was involved in scheming and maneuvering behind the curtain, could he have so firmly retained his republican principles? Would he have repeatedly turned away from the opportunity to be the leader of his country? I'm not sure- that's what makes it fascinating to consider. Lafayette was a remarkable person, not without flaws, but with incredible strengths. He represented the famous Jefferson quote better than its speaker: "In matters of style, flow with the current. In matters of principle, stand like a rock." Stand Lafayette did, whether impeding forward progress, serving as a cornerstone, or preventing backsliding. Duncan captures it all.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brian Mikołajczyk

    Gilbert du Motier, the Marquis de Lafayette, was a hero of the American Revolution, the French Revolutions of 1789 and 1830, and a world-renown proponent of Liberty everywhere and slave abolition. Raised in the milieu of the French aristocracy, Lafayette was an outcast. He didn't fit into the balls and dances of his contemporaries. He decided to join the army to make something of himself. After being laid-off by the King from the army along with many other aristocrat officers, he joined an expedi Gilbert du Motier, the Marquis de Lafayette, was a hero of the American Revolution, the French Revolutions of 1789 and 1830, and a world-renown proponent of Liberty everywhere and slave abolition. Raised in the milieu of the French aristocracy, Lafayette was an outcast. He didn't fit into the balls and dances of his contemporaries. He decided to join the army to make something of himself. After being laid-off by the King from the army along with many other aristocrat officers, he joined an expedition to America to help in the American Revolutionary War. After being appointed a General, Lafayette showed his skills in the Battle of Brandywine and solidified his position as a hero of the revolution. He didn't stop there, though, after this battle he successfully lead the coalition to have France join the war against Britain on the side of the Colonies which ultimately won the war for the Americans. After the American revolution, he returned to France with honor and was seen by the aristocracy as a formidable power. He used this power to spread the message of liberty and egalitarianism in a country still ruled by a monarch. This eventually led to the start of the French Revolution which Lafayette guided and participated in. He survived Madame Guillotine, the Napoleonic Wars, and a five-year stint in an Austrian prison only to return to France and continue politicking (sometimes against his own will to retire) to ultimately participate in the revolution of 1830 culminating in the abolition of the monarchy. Truly a Hero of Two Worlds. An excellent read!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike Dettinger

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. If most of what you know about Lafayette is from Hamilton, you need to understand that that was just his beginnings. One of the richest men in all of France (orphaned), he ran off to America when he was about 22 yrs old and dug in to join Washington and the revolutionaries, leading important campaigns and demonstrating tremendous bravery, wit and dedication time and again before THAT was all over. Then back in France, immensely popular as a hero of the American Revolution, he drafted a first cut If most of what you know about Lafayette is from Hamilton, you need to understand that that was just his beginnings. One of the richest men in all of France (orphaned), he ran off to America when he was about 22 yrs old and dug in to join Washington and the revolutionaries, leading important campaigns and demonstrating tremendous bravery, wit and dedication time and again before THAT was all over. Then back in France, immensely popular as a hero of the American Revolution, he drafted a first cut at the Rights of Man and Citizenry as well as plans for a constitution with a popular monarch embedded in republican structures. He was a leader of the initial phases of the French Revolution before being driven out into the dank prisons of the Austrians during the Terror and Napoleonic Wars, returning to a period of enforced anonymity, then acclaim in the US, and then acted as THE leader of the final ouster of the reinstated Bourbon dynasty and institution of the Orleans reign. He has been described as the one leader who always represented and fought for a single ideal, liberty, throughout his life and career. Mike Duncan, the author, pretty much invented podcasting, and with this book he brings all his talents to bear on a fascinating, inspiring history. And of course his narration is 100%.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather Perkins

    I have listened to both of Mike Duncan's podcasts, but you don't need to know him to find this book as fascinating as it is. I enjoy history, but somehow my knowledge of American Revolutionary history is lacking. However, even with that I know that Lafayette is a hero of the Revolution who did not have to risk his life for our cause. This book's first third follows Lafayette's youth in France and how he finds himself fighting on the side of the revolutionaries in America, and while I did know he I have listened to both of Mike Duncan's podcasts, but you don't need to know him to find this book as fascinating as it is. I enjoy history, but somehow my knowledge of American Revolutionary history is lacking. However, even with that I know that Lafayette is a hero of the Revolution who did not have to risk his life for our cause. This book's first third follows Lafayette's youth in France and how he finds himself fighting on the side of the revolutionaries in America, and while I did know he did I had more of a mental idea of him like Washington, not a teenager. It then follows him back to France and how he gets involved in the French Revolution. This area I had more of a base knowledge from Duncan's Revolution's podcast, but even here we see how Lafayette's connection with America came through for him when he could do nothing. Through it all we see Lafayette as a full person with mistakes and ideals and with Mike Duncan's signature talent of weaving a wonderful story. If you happen to listen to his podcast there will be gems for you, if you don't I highly recommend them. I listened to this in audiobook, and he reads it himself. Thank you to NetGalley and Hachette Audio for this Advance Reading Copy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    4.5 I knew a little about The Marquis de Lafayette, but only that he was close with close with Washington and that he was instrumental during the American Revolution in obtaining vital assistance from the French. Mike Duncan has written a biography which surveys his entire life and presents him as an active but moderate in the continual struggle of societies between Liberty and Order. As a consequence, Lafayette often found himself the villain of both extremes. He lived long and was politically a 4.5 I knew a little about The Marquis de Lafayette, but only that he was close with close with Washington and that he was instrumental during the American Revolution in obtaining vital assistance from the French. Mike Duncan has written a biography which surveys his entire life and presents him as an active but moderate in the continual struggle of societies between Liberty and Order. As a consequence, Lafayette often found himself the villain of both extremes. He lived long and was politically active much of the time, mostly in France after he returned as a young man having acquitted himself well in America. Mike Duncan does not approach history as a scholar although he knows his stuff. He is a well respected podcaster, popular among history buffs. His podcasts are detailed and seem accurate. This is his second book. I plan to read the first, The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic as well.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scott Carle

    Excellent exploration of the life of Lafayette, and the social and political landscapes around the American and French revolutions from the lens of his life. This book is introspective, detailed and accessible. I don't generally seek out biographies to read, but I'm glad I read this one, the author did a great job, and the subject matter was fascinating. I suspect, that in reading about Lafayette's internal and external struggles, daring gambits, glorious successes and absolute catastrophes, throug Excellent exploration of the life of Lafayette, and the social and political landscapes around the American and French revolutions from the lens of his life. This book is introspective, detailed and accessible. I don't generally seek out biographies to read, but I'm glad I read this one, the author did a great job, and the subject matter was fascinating. I suspect, that in reading about Lafayette's internal and external struggles, daring gambits, glorious successes and absolute catastrophes, through his flaws and his virtues, you'll find an element of the human spirit that is both honest and inspirational. In enormous stakes, in the cataclysmic crashes between idealism and reality, you'll see how power and people interact. I recommend this book highly. If you aren't familiar with the author, and want a sample of his work, check out his podcasts. The History of Rome, and Revolutions.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Viragos Reading Odyssey

    Hero of Two Worlds The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution by Mike Duncan Narrated by Mike Duncan I listened to an audiobook arc from NetGalley and Hachette Audio in exchange for an honest review. I was not familiar with the author prior to listening to this book and while I knew the generalities of the Marquis de Lafayette in the America Revolution there were so many new things that I learned from this book. His path through history and the references to how we know things and how events p Hero of Two Worlds The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution by Mike Duncan Narrated by Mike Duncan I listened to an audiobook arc from NetGalley and Hachette Audio in exchange for an honest review. I was not familiar with the author prior to listening to this book and while I knew the generalities of the Marquis de Lafayette in the America Revolution there were so many new things that I learned from this book. His path through history and the references to how we know things and how events progressed and transpired were genuinely fascinating. The narration was excellent on par with a PBS Ken Burns documentary. It was rather longer than my usual audiobooks but there was a lot of information to cover and none of it felt superfluous. 5/5 I will definitely be checking out Mike Duncan’s other works.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mackay

    An accessible, engrossing biography of Lafayette - the man we thought we knew turns out to be far more weighty and important than the cliched images paint him. I found the research underpinning this book impeccable, even if some of the writing itself is clunky, but what really reached me were the parallels between France on the cusp of revolution and the West now. How exaggerations and lies overwhelm facts and truth; how people act for short-term personal gain even in the face of desperate socie An accessible, engrossing biography of Lafayette - the man we thought we knew turns out to be far more weighty and important than the cliched images paint him. I found the research underpinning this book impeccable, even if some of the writing itself is clunky, but what really reached me were the parallels between France on the cusp of revolution and the West now. How exaggerations and lies overwhelm facts and truth; how people act for short-term personal gain even in the face of desperate societal need; how easily politics become divisive and rigid. Duncan doesn't draw attention to these parallels, but they are presented in such a way that the attentive reader cannot but see them and fear them. In all, a most interesting subject enlightenedly portrayed.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Shelton

    I've really enjoyed listening to Mike Duncan's podcasts on the American and French revolutions. The book is a great addition and helped me understand these events in a whole new light. I would recommend that anyone who reads the book listens to the podcasts or reads up on these periods prior to reading, because it shows how amazing and unique the Marquis de Lafayette was to have lived through and played a major role in them. With that being the case I would recommend the book to anyone who is int I've really enjoyed listening to Mike Duncan's podcasts on the American and French revolutions. The book is a great addition and helped me understand these events in a whole new light. I would recommend that anyone who reads the book listens to the podcasts or reads up on these periods prior to reading, because it shows how amazing and unique the Marquis de Lafayette was to have lived through and played a major role in them. With that being the case I would recommend the book to anyone who is interested in the subject. The book is very well written and has just about the perfect amount of detail. He could have easily written 800 or 1000 pages on Lafayette, but by keeping it around 450 the narrative flows much better, and I blew through it in just a couple of days.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel LoBasso

    As an American, I knew Lafayette was an important guy. Served with Washington...I think. But WOW, what a life. If you care about early American history and it’s impact on global events, read this book. If you want to learn about 18th-19th century European politics and it’s players, with a focus on France, read this book. If you want to hear the tales of perhaps the most principled person of a generation, read this book. If you want to be inspired to hold onto convictions worth holding onto, read As an American, I knew Lafayette was an important guy. Served with Washington...I think. But WOW, what a life. If you care about early American history and it’s impact on global events, read this book. If you want to learn about 18th-19th century European politics and it’s players, with a focus on France, read this book. If you want to hear the tales of perhaps the most principled person of a generation, read this book. If you want to be inspired to hold onto convictions worth holding onto, read this book. Mike made the harrowing events surrounding the good general’s life vivacious and alluring. Great writing, didn’t want to put it down. Sad it’s over.

  28. 4 out of 5

    John Corey

    I needed to read a book about someone who, though flawed like everyone else, had principles that are inspiring. I am a huge fan of Mike Duncan's work, and this is his best yet. I liked it so much I am not even mad about all the time he took off the podcast to finish it. I can recommend it to any fan of history, even the most casual reader. It was enjoyable to hear Duncan cover a lot of topics I heard him cover in his podcast, but this time from the perspective of Lafayette. I read it about 25% in I needed to read a book about someone who, though flawed like everyone else, had principles that are inspiring. I am a huge fan of Mike Duncan's work, and this is his best yet. I liked it so much I am not even mad about all the time he took off the podcast to finish it. I can recommend it to any fan of history, even the most casual reader. It was enjoyable to hear Duncan cover a lot of topics I heard him cover in his podcast, but this time from the perspective of Lafayette. I read it about 25% in the paper copy, and then the rest in the audio book, which is read by the author (who is a professional podcaster, so you know it is good).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Hero of Two Worlds is a biography of Gilbert du Motier, better known as the Marquis de Lafayette, hero of the American Revolution who went on to try to bring similar ideals to France. As the title might suggest, the biography focuses more on Lafayette's influences on the American and French Revolutions and how the public of both countries viewed the man, less on his personal life. Mike Duncan, the author did a phenomenal job of researching this book, providing an objective look at Lafayette's li Hero of Two Worlds is a biography of Gilbert du Motier, better known as the Marquis de Lafayette, hero of the American Revolution who went on to try to bring similar ideals to France. As the title might suggest, the biography focuses more on Lafayette's influences on the American and French Revolutions and how the public of both countries viewed the man, less on his personal life. Mike Duncan, the author did a phenomenal job of researching this book, providing an objective look at Lafayette's life, and narrating the audiobook. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about Lafayette. Many thanks to NetGalley for providing me an ARC of this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  32. 4 out of 5

    Michael Guehrer

  33. 4 out of 5

    Cj

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cait

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  37. 4 out of 5

    Dmitry

  38. 5 out of 5

    David H.

  39. 5 out of 5

    Michael Farrell

  40. 4 out of 5

    Graham

  41. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

  42. 4 out of 5

    Derek

  43. 4 out of 5

    Xavier

  44. 4 out of 5

    Randy Whitworth

  45. 4 out of 5

    Christian

  46. 4 out of 5

    Z

  47. 4 out of 5

    CR

  48. 5 out of 5

    Joe Rigodanzo

  49. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  50. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  51. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  52. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  53. 4 out of 5

    Brent Pitchford

  54. 4 out of 5

    Christian Foglar

  55. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  56. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  57. 4 out of 5

    Melchshake

  58. 5 out of 5

    Ben Voytas

  59. 4 out of 5

    Tanja

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