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Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead

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Gilda, a twenty-something lesbian, cannot stop ruminating about death. Desperate for relief from her panicky mind and alienated from her repressive family, she responds to a flyer for free therapy at a local Catholic church, and finds herself being greeted by Father Jeff, who assumes she’s there for a job interview. Too embarrassed to correct him, Gilda is abruptly hired t Gilda, a twenty-something lesbian, cannot stop ruminating about death. Desperate for relief from her panicky mind and alienated from her repressive family, she responds to a flyer for free therapy at a local Catholic church, and finds herself being greeted by Father Jeff, who assumes she’s there for a job interview. Too embarrassed to correct him, Gilda is abruptly hired to replace the recently deceased receptionist Grace. In between trying to memorize the lines to Catholic mass, hiding the fact that she has a new girlfriend, and erecting a dirty dish tower in her crumbling apartment, Gilda strikes up an email correspondence with Grace’s old friend. She can’t bear to ignore the kindly old woman, who has been trying to reach her friend through the church inbox, but she also can’t bring herself to break the bad news. Desperate, she begins impersonating Grace via email. But when the police discover suspicious circumstances surrounding Grace’s death, Gilda may have to finally reveal the truth of her mortifying existence.


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Gilda, a twenty-something lesbian, cannot stop ruminating about death. Desperate for relief from her panicky mind and alienated from her repressive family, she responds to a flyer for free therapy at a local Catholic church, and finds herself being greeted by Father Jeff, who assumes she’s there for a job interview. Too embarrassed to correct him, Gilda is abruptly hired t Gilda, a twenty-something lesbian, cannot stop ruminating about death. Desperate for relief from her panicky mind and alienated from her repressive family, she responds to a flyer for free therapy at a local Catholic church, and finds herself being greeted by Father Jeff, who assumes she’s there for a job interview. Too embarrassed to correct him, Gilda is abruptly hired to replace the recently deceased receptionist Grace. In between trying to memorize the lines to Catholic mass, hiding the fact that she has a new girlfriend, and erecting a dirty dish tower in her crumbling apartment, Gilda strikes up an email correspondence with Grace’s old friend. She can’t bear to ignore the kindly old woman, who has been trying to reach her friend through the church inbox, but she also can’t bring herself to break the bad news. Desperate, she begins impersonating Grace via email. But when the police discover suspicious circumstances surrounding Grace’s death, Gilda may have to finally reveal the truth of her mortifying existence.

30 review for Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead

  1. 4 out of 5

    MarilynW

    Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead by Emily R. Austin I can't say I liked or enjoyed this book. It is so overwhelmingly depressing, so many people are depressed, and there doesn't seem to be any help for these depressed people, that I too lost the will to go on. At the same time, I felt compassion for all the people we meet. I wanted things to be better for them but then, that's part of the problem of the main character. She seems to think her life might have a scrap of worth if she can o Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead by Emily R. Austin I can't say I liked or enjoyed this book. It is so overwhelmingly depressing, so many people are depressed, and there doesn't seem to be any help for these depressed people, that I too lost the will to go on. At the same time, I felt compassion for all the people we meet. I wanted things to be better for them but then, that's part of the problem of the main character. She seems to think her life might have a scrap of worth if she can only make people smile.  Twenty seven year old animal loving Gilda is also a lesbian and an atheist. She is so depressed that she can't even put her dishes in the sink so she just piles them up in her bedroom, a leaning tower of food rot. She can't remember when she has showered and she loses her latest job because she forgets to go to work. Or was it because she forgot to get out of bed. Whatever. All she can think about is death and she see no reason to exist for herself or anyone else. Nothing matters and she can't even pretend to care. She longs for the day when maggots will eat her rotting flesh.  One day, as Gilda trudges toward a Catholic church that advertises therapy sessions, she accidently gets hired for a job there. Now she is an atheist, lesbian, liar because she has to pretend she's not gay and that she is Catholic and that she knows what she is doing. Maybe it's fitting though that the elderly lady who previously had her job is dead and might have been murdered. That's life, make it to old age and you suffer the indignity of being maybe murdered.  So I'm reading this story and feel like it's not good for me to be reading this story but every now and then, I really, truly laughed out loud! It felt good but the rest of the book's sad state makes it hard to remember why I laughed. I almost gave the story 3 stars because it seems weird to give it 4 stars when it made me feel so bad. Still, it appears there is hope at the end of the story but I can't be sure. Is it an illusion? Publication: July 6th 2021 Thank you to Atria Books and NetGalley for this ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Walsh

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4.5 stars rounded up to 5 This book takes the reader into the turbulent mind of a 26-year-old woman named Gilda. We learn of her thoughts, her difficult interactions with others, her conversations, and her behavior. She lost her job because she frequently slept in and missed her shifts or the effort of getting up was more than she could manage. Dirty dishes pile up as she can't be bothered to clean her apartment. Gilda cannot stop obsessing about death. She worries about nuclear bombs, racism, w 4.5 stars rounded up to 5 This book takes the reader into the turbulent mind of a 26-year-old woman named Gilda. We learn of her thoughts, her difficult interactions with others, her conversations, and her behavior. She lost her job because she frequently slept in and missed her shifts or the effort of getting up was more than she could manage. Dirty dishes pile up as she can't be bothered to clean her apartment. Gilda cannot stop obsessing about death. She worries about nuclear bombs, racism, war, rape, child abuse, disease, climate change, among many other things. She loves animals and searches for a missing cat that she fears may have died when a neighbor's home burned down. Her thoughts are often on her pet rabbit that died when she was 11. Gilda is depressed, frequently suffers from anxiety and panic attacks making her believe she is having a fatal heart attack. She visits the hospital ER so often in an elevated state of anxiety or with some minor injury that the workers all know her by name. She has not followed up on psychiatric referrals but realizes that emotionally and mentally she is in a bad state and in need of help. Sometimes she is in a disassociative state where she feels she is floating and observing herself below and there are memory gaps. Gilda's state was one of continuous upheaval, but the book was filled with good humor. One day she sees a leaflet offering free counseling. Going to the address, she finds it takes place inside a Catholic Church. She works up the courage to enter hoping to get the help she needs and meets Father Jeff. He assumes she is there for a new job that has opened up at their front desk. All the applicants have been elderly and he likes the idea that Gilda is young and can use a computer. She does not want to embarrass the priest by telling him he has made a mistake and leaves with a new job. She is reluctant to reveal to anyone at the church that she is an atheist and a lesbian. Her elderly predecessor, Grace, had died. She starts her office work by checking out the long-neglected e-mails on the desk computer. She finds a lot of personal, friendly e-mails from a woman named Rose to Grace. Not wanting to hurt Rose's feelings by revealing that Grace has died, she answers the messages using Grace's name and they carry out a pleasant correspondence. Gilda is estranged from her parents and alcoholic brother. She busies herself learning the Catholic rituals so that people will not know she is there under pretense. Gilda forgets or neglects to respond to messages from her girlfriend so there is a disruption in their friendship and partnership. A parishioner has set her up with dates with a very persistent man and she runs out of excuses. She reluctantly goes out with him, much to her annoyance. Her work is proceeding satisfactorily, but then a problem arises. It is believed that a nurse killed a number of elderly people including Grace. There is a police investigation. Gilda is suspicious of some of the church workers, but the police suspect Gilda of being involved in the death because of her e-mails using Grace's name. This was an outrageously humorous story, and even knowing Gilda's personal mental state and problems, I could not stop laughing throughout the book. I worried that this must have made me a bad person to find so much of the story, the narration, and the events hilarious. This would have been a 5-star book for me except for a rather lackluster but satisfactory conclusion. I found this a very enjoyable read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cheri

    This story begins with Gilda in her car, the light is green, she isn’t moving, but it takes her a moment before she can recall what just happened. Hit from behind by a minivan, her airbag not only deploys giving her a punch, but the hot coffee that was once in her thermos is now covering her. Gilda is more than a little obsessed with death, ever since her pet rabbit died when she was ten years old, and she was the one to find her lifeless, her eyes wide open. She lives in an almost constant stat This story begins with Gilda in her car, the light is green, she isn’t moving, but it takes her a moment before she can recall what just happened. Hit from behind by a minivan, her airbag not only deploys giving her a punch, but the hot coffee that was once in her thermos is now covering her. Gilda is more than a little obsessed with death, ever since her pet rabbit died when she was ten years old, and she was the one to find her lifeless, her eyes wide open. She lives in an almost constant state of anxiety, and spends more time at the hospital than more people, always seeking a cure for something, and her anxiety continues to plague her. She is there so often, the staff seems to know her by name. She loses her job at a bookstore, and her anxiety grows even more. Finding a flyer offering free therapy, she ends up at a Catholic Church, and when the first thing she is asked is if she is there to apply for a position for a receptionist that’s recently opened up, she doesn’t hesitate to say yes. The former receptionist, she is informed, has recently passed away. She isn’t asked if she is gay or considers herself an atheist, so she doesn’t volunteer that information. Not even when a stranger insists on setting her up with a relative, and when he texts and calls her repeatedly, she eventually runs out of excuses and goes on dates with him. There’s an essence of how Gilda processes information and views life that reminded me of Eleanor Oliphant, that blend of quirkiness alongside a sprinkling of dark humour in this story, a young woman who seems without the social graces required to blend in. Gilda is odd and a little off-center, and doesn’t seem to ‘blend in,’ not that she’s ever known others to take the time to understand her. Even her parents don’t seem to care enough to actually listen to her, still focused on the time she did this or that when she was too young to know better. Add to this a cat that goes missing when the house on her street catches on fire, which she becomes a bit obsessed finding and rescuing, along with a brother who struggles with controlling his substance abuse, it seems the only time she feels accepted is when she’s pretending to be the former, now deceased receptionist, responding to that woman’s friend’s emails. All of this evolves into a somewhat farcical, entertaining story with some laughable situations along with a few lovable characters, and an ending I didn’t see coming, but smiled when it arrived. Published: 06 Jul 2021 Many thanks for the ARC provided by Atria Books

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    2.5 stars rounded to 3 stars Well, this one kind of missed the mark for me. It is good, but not great. Gilda is a 28-year-old atheist lesbian who is fixated on death. Really fixated. She thinks about it almost nonstop. Her situation is complicated by her chronic anxiety, depression, and hypochondriasis, which land her in the local ER so often that she is essentially a celebrity there, even to the janitor. Her family is of no help. Furthermore, somehow she has never received any significant psycho 2.5 stars rounded to 3 stars Well, this one kind of missed the mark for me. It is good, but not great. Gilda is a 28-year-old atheist lesbian who is fixated on death. Really fixated. She thinks about it almost nonstop. Her situation is complicated by her chronic anxiety, depression, and hypochondriasis, which land her in the local ER so often that she is essentially a celebrity there, even to the janitor. Her family is of no help. Furthermore, somehow she has never received any significant psychological help for her issues. Gilda falls into a job as a receptionist for a Catholic Church. See her nonqualifications above. There is a little mystery here in that the 86-year-old woman she is replacing had a “suspicious” death. Who killed poor Grace? Other positives include the fact that the story is easy to read and moves quickly. There are also sweet side tales involving animals, and interspersed throughout the story are some really warm moments. I also love the title and the cover of this one. IMHO, however, Gilda, though having the most “airtime” in this novel, is underdeveloped. We hear her strange thoughts and see her strange actions, but never really get to know her all that well. The supporting characters are a mixed bag. I liked Jeff the priest and Eleanor, Gilda’s girlfriend, but the rest are pretty forgettable. Actually, I won’t remember any of the characters except maybe for Gilda. Maybe. There’s a bit of humor here—not LOL humor, but smile humor. I liked that. But considering the subject matter most of the story is treated on too light a level for me and is just plain sad. There is a lot of stream of consciousness going on, especially towards the end where it was actually kind of anxiety-provoking (as opposed to suspenseful) for me. I ended up skimming a bit, which I never do, especially in the last 10% of a book. The ending had some positivity to it, but gosh, poor Gilda. I recently read another book about mental illness and suicide called Together We Will Go. That one is more thought -provoking and has much better characterization. It left a considerable impact on me and is one of the three best books I’ve read this year. Overall, the story wasn’t what I thought it would be, meaning it really wasn’t what I signed up for, so I was disappointed. Don’t mind me though as its total ratings so far average higher than 4 stars. So read those positive reviews before rejecting this one based on my review. I’m the outlier here. Many thanks to Net Galley, Isabel DaSilva of Atria Books, and Ms. Emily Austin for offering me an ARC. Opinions stated as mine alone and are not biased in any way.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    That title grabbed my attention. Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead is the story of Gilda, who worries nonstop about death. She finds a place offering free therapy at a Catholic church, and she is immediately hired as a receptionist, a job for which she did not apply. She’s also not religious, and some religious duties come along with the job. Did I mention the receptionist she is replacing recently passed away? An old friend of that receptionist emails Gilda, who doesn’t have the heart t That title grabbed my attention. Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead is the story of Gilda, who worries nonstop about death. She finds a place offering free therapy at a Catholic church, and she is immediately hired as a receptionist, a job for which she did not apply. She’s also not religious, and some religious duties come along with the job. Did I mention the receptionist she is replacing recently passed away? An old friend of that receptionist emails Gilda, who doesn’t have the heart to tell her that Grace, the former receptionist, is deceased. This ruse she puts on, while well-meaning, could get Gilda into trouble, as the correspondence continues. Gilda loves animals, which I could completely relate to, and while she’s not perfect and has so much going on, she feels authentic and absolutely sympathetic because she has a heart of gold. The humor bits made me smile and laugh, even if dark at times. I found this portrayal an honest one, and while it may have been hard to read at times, it tackles some meaty issues surrounding mental health. I also loved the style of writing by the author. In the right hands, I think this is gem of a read, especially if you connect to characters like I did. I received a gifted copy. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzi

    *is aggressively read by this book's portrayal of anxiety* *is aggressively read by this book's portrayal of anxiety*

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kerrin P

    Now Available This story is told in the first person by Gilda, a gay 27-year-old atheist with depression and anxiety. She can't keep a job, lies to make other people happy, and is obsessed with death. She goes to the ER so much she is on first-name terms with the janitor. Her parents are in denial about her brother's alcoholism. The main plot is that Gilda goes to an address on a flyer for mental health support. It turns out to be a Catholic church. The priest assumes she is there for a job interv Now Available This story is told in the first person by Gilda, a gay 27-year-old atheist with depression and anxiety. She can't keep a job, lies to make other people happy, and is obsessed with death. She goes to the ER so much she is on first-name terms with the janitor. Her parents are in denial about her brother's alcoholism. The main plot is that Gilda goes to an address on a flyer for mental health support. It turns out to be a Catholic church. The priest assumes she is there for a job interview and hires her on the spot because she knows how to use the internet. The previous secretary had recently died under suspicious circumstances. Gilda must pretend to be a devout Catholic in order to keep the job she so desperately needs. Through a series of odd behaviors, Gilda becomes a suspect in the death of the former secretary who she never met. The paragraphs are written as short train-of-thoughts that randomly occur to Gilda. Her anxiety is palpable. Instead of being humorous, the story came off as bleak and heartbreaking. I just wasn't the right audience for this type of novel. 2.5 stars rounded up to 3. Thank you to Atria Books for my advanced reader copy!!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Erin Clemence

    Special thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a free, electronic ARC of this novel received in exchange for an honest review. Expected publication date: July 6, 2021 Fans of “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” will adore Emily Austin’s debut novel, “Everyone in This Room will Someday be Dead”. Gilda is a twenty-something atheist lesbian, who struggles with hypochondria, anxiety and depression. She also has an obsession with death; how people die, how she is going to die, h Special thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a free, electronic ARC of this novel received in exchange for an honest review. Expected publication date: July 6, 2021 Fans of “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” will adore Emily Austin’s debut novel, “Everyone in This Room will Someday be Dead”. Gilda is a twenty-something atheist lesbian, who struggles with hypochondria, anxiety and depression. She also has an obsession with death; how people die, how she is going to die, how the planet and everyone on it will die. When she inadvertently gets hired as an office assistant in a Catholic church, she definitely founds herself in over her head, as she tries to hide her sexuality and her religion from the congregation and from the priest, Jeff. While she is reviewing emails left unanswered by the previous assistant, Gloria, she comes across one from an old friend of Gloria’s, Rosemary, who has not yet been told that Gloria is dead. Unable to break the news herself, Gilda pretends to be Gloria, and the two continue their back and forth communication. When Gloria’s death turns out not to be an accident, Gilda’s strange behaviour and emails with Rosemary make her the prime suspect. This novel is heartbreaking, hilarious and relatable (sometimes all at once). Gilda is eccentric in every sense of the word, preferring to avoid social interactions and focus on the potentially negative “what ifs” of every situation. Gilda circles between periods of deep depression and anxiety-induced panic attacks, to the point where she is on a first-name basis with the staff at the local hospital. A sad, seemingly naïve character, Gilda is still realistic and charming enough to be someone to root for. Honest and upfront (because she knows no other way) Gilda struggles with forming relationships. There is something about Gilda that everyone can relate to (I promise you I found my kindred spirit in a lot of her behaviours and attitudes about life). The story is told in four main parts, which each part broken down by Catholic holiday (such as “Advent” and “Lent”), so there are no chapters. But it still is easy reading, as each part is broken down into smaller paragraphs, and I flew through each quickly. Gilda narrates the entire novel, adding a uniqueness to the story’s structure. There is a slight lull in the middle of the story that I had to push through, but the ending of the novel pulled me right back in. Although it ended the way I expected, I was sad to see the end of Gilda and her adventures. I love the quirky and eccentric characters that are so different from the regular protagonist characters, and Gilda definitely touched my soul. Thanks to this Canadian author for bringing Gilda into my life. I hope to see more of her.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Alan

    I thought by the title and the cheery cover this would be funnier than it turned out to be. I was expecting dark humor, but this is mostly just dark. Depressing. Bleak. Lots of characters in this novel have mental health and substance abuse issues. Gilda herself is so depressed she stopped going to work, thus losing her job, so when she’s nearly broke and stumbles upon a job opening at a Catholic church, she pretends to be a good Catholic instead of the Atheist lesbian that she is. Despite being I thought by the title and the cheery cover this would be funnier than it turned out to be. I was expecting dark humor, but this is mostly just dark. Depressing. Bleak. Lots of characters in this novel have mental health and substance abuse issues. Gilda herself is so depressed she stopped going to work, thus losing her job, so when she’s nearly broke and stumbles upon a job opening at a Catholic church, she pretends to be a good Catholic instead of the Atheist lesbian that she is. Despite being so depressed she can’t wash a single dish, she manages to date a woman, and, when a parishioner sets her up with her male family member, Gilda initially puts off going on a date, but she ultimately goes out several times with a man she doesn’t like at all, even if she were straight. There were a few funny moments of fish-out-of-water humor as Gilda tries to understand the rules of the Catholic religion. Reading the Bible she thinks: “I can’t help noting the use of the male pronouns. I wonder whether this directive applies to me. Am I subject to a womanly loophole? Whoever wrote this book prioritized men so much, he forgot about the other half of humanity. ‘If a man lies with a man as one lies with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination. They must be put to death.’ . . . I’m disappointed God is so homophobic he forgot about lesbians, but I guess I would rather be forgotten than put to death.” Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to review this novel, which RELEASES JULY 6, 2021.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead is Emily Austin's darkly humorous and yet realistically prescient tale of the ways in which dread and anxiety - and a desire to please people - can spiral our lives out of control. Gilda is an atheist and a lesbian but somehow finds that she's stumbled into a job as a receptionist at a Catholic church. Filling in following the mysterious death of her elderly predecessor, Grace, Gilda finds herself spinning tale after tale to keep the people around her ha Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead is Emily Austin's darkly humorous and yet realistically prescient tale of the ways in which dread and anxiety - and a desire to please people - can spiral our lives out of control. Gilda is an atheist and a lesbian but somehow finds that she's stumbled into a job as a receptionist at a Catholic church. Filling in following the mysterious death of her elderly predecessor, Grace, Gilda finds herself spinning tale after tale to keep the people around her happy. All the while Gilda finds herself spiraling deeper and deeper into apathy and depression as she struggles to find meaning in a world that ends in the blackness of death. As the mystery surrounding Grace's death begins to unravel alongside Gilda's own mental state and her relationships, Gilda is confronted with the idea of living despite the existential dread caused by the reality that everyone dies. Austin's debut novel is truly incredible: the main character, though frustrating and depressing it also in so many ways endearing, perhaps most so because she is so relatable. Gilda acts as a Delphic oracle to a generation of young adults who struggle with the same sorts of apathy, depression, and anxiety that come from living in this world, but Austin uses truly joyful humor to break up the apathy and for that (and for writing Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead I am truly thankful.

  11. 4 out of 5

    DeAnn

    3.5 obsessed with death stars Gilda is a young woman struggling mightily with depression and anxiety. She was recently fired from her job for missing several shifts in a row and she’s in a minor car accident as the book opens. She stumbles into a receptionist job at a Catholic church and doesn’t disclose that she’s an atheist and a lesbian. There are some very humorous moments as she describes various rituals at the church and how absurd they seem! She’s also obsessed with death, and it occupies h 3.5 obsessed with death stars Gilda is a young woman struggling mightily with depression and anxiety. She was recently fired from her job for missing several shifts in a row and she’s in a minor car accident as the book opens. She stumbles into a receptionist job at a Catholic church and doesn’t disclose that she’s an atheist and a lesbian. There are some very humorous moments as she describes various rituals at the church and how absurd they seem! She’s also obsessed with death, and it occupies her thoughts quite often. At times I really enjoyed this character and her journey and other times it was very dark and hard to read. She spends so much time at the emergency room that the staff there all know her. What is very disappointing is that she gets countless referrals to psychiatry and rarely ever gets that help. I think this is likely a sad and true reflection of mental health today. I’m glad this one ended on a hopeful note and I think this author is definitely one to watch! Thank you to Atria Books and NetGalley for the early copy of this one to read. Now available!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maddie Boyd

    This book is a new all-time FAVOURITE. Following Gilda's perspective throughout this novel was a delight. I fell in love with her. I LOVE HER. Gilda's fixation on death is incorporated seamlessly into the narrative, harshly grounding her story in reality. This effectively contrasts the out-of-body feeling that Gilda experiences at many points throughout the novel. As her state of mind flip-flops around, so does her perception of events. Times shifts and warps around her and big chunks of her mem This book is a new all-time FAVOURITE. Following Gilda's perspective throughout this novel was a delight. I fell in love with her. I LOVE HER. Gilda's fixation on death is incorporated seamlessly into the narrative, harshly grounding her story in reality. This effectively contrasts the out-of-body feeling that Gilda experiences at many points throughout the novel. As her state of mind flip-flops around, so does her perception of events. Times shifts and warps around her and big chunks of her memory begin to disappear. Her voice was so sharp and memorable, now carved into my brain forever. A big part of this story is mental illness; Gilda suffers with extreme anxiety as well as depression and dissociation (undiagnosed on-page). For me, this novel depicted living with these (untreated) conditions beautifully. Austin gave Gilda her very own "anxiety/depression voice" that ran alongside her own thoughts. Gilda's rational, witty internal monologue battling her intrusive thoughts/intense worries constantly. I think this would make her narration of the story quite taxing to get through, where it not for the... IMPECCABLE PACING! The reader is thrust from scene to scene, rushing to try and keep up with Gilda. We are inside her head, flitting from person to place, trying desperately to stay present and aware while feeling utterly hopeless. Austin's use of skittish, start-stop and sometimes breakneck pacing was sublime and communicated such vital parts of Gilda's character with no words wasted. It also made this book read (and feel?) like a thriller. This story was so incredibly readable, it had so much momentum and intrigue. I loved the sprinkling of gayness and the depictions of intense love. Gilda's wit made me cackle heartily and often, and when she was ignored or dismissed or not appreciated I cried buckets for her. I love you Gilda, be my wife. Thank you ever so much to the publisher for this wonderful e-arc!! Trigger Warnings: intrusive thoughts (graphic), suicidal thoughts and attempts, death of a pet (on page), homophobia, self harm, suicide (off page, relatively unexplored side character).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katie B

    I finished this book a few days ago and since then I have tried to pinpoint why I didn't connect more with the character and story. I thought for sure when I picked this book up it would be right up my alley as and I would be able to relate to the main character's struggles with anxiety issues. Unfortunately, I just didn't understand her. Gilda is a twenty-something lesbian and she thinks about death quite often. She's a frequent visitor to the ER as well. Due to a misunderstanding she is too emb I finished this book a few days ago and since then I have tried to pinpoint why I didn't connect more with the character and story. I thought for sure when I picked this book up it would be right up my alley as and I would be able to relate to the main character's struggles with anxiety issues. Unfortunately, I just didn't understand her. Gilda is a twenty-something lesbian and she thinks about death quite often. She's a frequent visitor to the ER as well. Due to a misunderstanding she is too embarrassed to correct, she accepts a job working as a receptionist at a Catholic church. Gilda's life is full of one mishap after another. There's a quirky type vibe to the story and there are some moments that are generally funny. I found it lacking in heart though. Gilda is a character I spent the entire book following but yet can't say I know her much better now than when I first started reading the story. It's fair to say I just didn't click with her. And you know what? That's perfectly fine as not every character is going to be an exact match for every reader. The writing style is unique so I would be open to checking out another book by this author. Thank you to Atria Books for providing me with an advance copy! All thoughts expressed are my honest opinion.

  14. 5 out of 5

    luce

    | | blog | tumblr | ko-fi | | 2 ½ stars (rounded up to 3) Sadly Everyone in This Room Will Someday be Dead doesn't bring anything new to the directionless-young-woman-spends-all-her-time-navel-gazing-under-the-torpor-of-ennui subgenre. At times, Austin's brand of cringe comedy tried too hard to be cringey, so much so that I ended up not buying into a certain scene or character. Gilda, a recently unemployed twenty-something lesbian, is obsessed with death. Her preoccupation with death is such tha | | blog | tumblr | ko-fi | | 2 ½ stars (rounded up to 3) Sadly Everyone in This Room Will Someday be Dead doesn't bring anything new to the directionless-young-woman-spends-all-her-time-navel-gazing-under-the-torpor-of-ennui subgenre. At times, Austin's brand of cringe comedy tried too hard to be cringey, so much so that I ended up not buying into a certain scene or character. Gilda, a recently unemployed twenty-something lesbian, is obsessed with death. Her preoccupation with death is such that she thinks of it all the time. For instance, when sitting on a chair she wonders whether the people who sat on it before are dead. She envisions terrible scenarios, in which she or someone else dies. At times she suffers from panic attacks which lead her to make frequent visits to her hospital. No one seems to notice how disconnected Gilda is from her everyday life. As with all the other alienated millennial women populating these novels, Gilda seems unable to perform even the most basic of tasks. She's too depressed to wash herself or the dishes, she often forgets to reply to her maybe girlfriend and seems painfully unaware of the world around her. She has many surreal conversations with others, who often seem blind to Gilda's depression and anxiety. Gilda unintentionally lands herself a job as a receptionist at Catholic church where she discovers that her predecessor died. Gilda, being death-obsessed, tries to learn more about this woman. This novel cemented my dislike for 1st person present tense narratives. Every seemingly mundane action Gilda makes has to be mentioned, so that we have many lines such as these: I drink, I get up, I put the cup on the counter, I move my hand, I walk, I sit, I blink, I look down/up. The way the story is presented on the page also really grated me. On one page there could be three separate paragraphs, each one focusing on a different conversation/moment of Gilda's life. We then end up with one simple dialogue, say between Gilda and that Giuseppe guy, dragging on for pages, and being interrupted by Gilda's conversations with the people from the church or her family. I just found this style choppy and artificial, better suited to a tv show than a book. Speaking of tv shows, this novel tries really hard to be something in the realms of Fleabag, but whereas that show does a fantastic job in making absurd conversations or OTT characters seem believable, here, I just did not buy into what I was reading. For instance, that whole Giuseppe thing was just unnecessary. The guy is the classic fitness-crazed wannabe guru that is a dime a dozen on YouTube and social media. And he speaks in this very contrived way, 24/7. Austin's character lacked nuance, finesse, whatever you wanted it to call it. Giuseppe could have been funny but Austin is too heavy-handed, and the result is an unfunny caricature. Gilda's parents are also painfully one-dimensional. They get barely any page-time and even when they appeared they remained amorphous. Gilda's mother is relegated to the role of mom, and her father is just a generic dad. The scenes they were included in were just there to show how unfair they are to Gilda. While I could believe that some parents would wrongly blame one child instead of the actual guilty child, the way this played out here was just incredibly unrealistic (I am talking about that 'get out' scene). It was so unbelievable that it really pulled me out of the story. The maybe girlfriend is just as generic as Gilda's parents. She makes very few if any appearances and mostly sends texts to our mc asking what she's up to or whatnot. A character that had the potential was Gilda's brother, but, ultimately I didn't like how the story handles him (how delusional is Gilda to think that leaving him a message like that could magically cure his alcoholism and, as Giuseppe would say, 'live his truth'). The people at the church where Gilda works were uninteresting. They are old and think that the internet is a magical and mysterious place. Because they are old you see. Old people don't know anything about the internet as Austin reminds us so many times. Gilda herself was just exhausting and I cared little for her. She overanalysis everything around her, and while at times her observations could amusing or feel authentic, for the most part, it was just boring being in her head (for instance when she goes on about she's had her hands for her whole life and that they fed her everything she has ever eaten so far). Rather incongruously the author seemed to be rying to make Gilda ultra-relatable by making her think or say these trivial things while at the same time emphasizing how different Gilda is from those around her. The setting of this story is so generic that I could not tell you where it takes place. America? Canada? Australia? Maybe this was mentioned once somewhere in the novel but the author doesn't really depict Gilda's environment. A counterargument to this could be that Gilda is too wrapped up in her own head to observe her surroundings, but, what about My Year of Rest and Relaxation? The narrator there is decidedly inward-looking and spends most of the book in the confines of her apartment and yet the author there manages to really give us an impression of the place (New York) and time (2000-20001) the story is taking place in. There were moments now and again that made me smile or that felt particularly spot-on, such as when Gilda gives us a brief rundown of her experience on dating apps. But these genuinely funny were rare. All in all, I found this novel to be more of a flop than a hit. Maybe I have read too many books that feature aimless alienated women in their twenties but, in comparison to My Year of Rest and Relaxation, Luster, and Pretend I'm Dead, Everyone in This Room Will Someday be Dead is quite forgettable. ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sunny

    dude I don’t know… this hit me in the feels the way Eleanor Olliphant is completely fine did except I feel like it’s even more realistic in its portrayal of mental illness and loneliness. I want to give a copy of this book to all of my lgbtq friends who I know are anxious

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    2 stars You can read all of my reviews at Nerd Girl Loves Books. I could not get into this contemporary fiction book about an anxious young woman obsessed with death. Gilda is anxious, can't keep a job and is obsessed with death. She thinks about it all the time. When she responds to an ad for free therapy at a Catholic church, she finds herself accidentally hired as the new church receptionist, despite the fact that she's secretly an atheist, replacing the previous receptionist who died under myst 2 stars You can read all of my reviews at Nerd Girl Loves Books. I could not get into this contemporary fiction book about an anxious young woman obsessed with death. Gilda is anxious, can't keep a job and is obsessed with death. She thinks about it all the time. When she responds to an ad for free therapy at a Catholic church, she finds herself accidentally hired as the new church receptionist, despite the fact that she's secretly an atheist, replacing the previous receptionist who died under mysterious circumstances. At work Gilda starts getting emails from the deceased receptionist's friend and too afraid to let her know her friend is dead, Gilda starts responding. The premise sounds good, but I just couldn't get into the book. I found reading about Gilda's constant running inner dialogue tedious to read and none of her "stories" or thoughts seemed to have a point or relate to each other. I couldn't make it through the book and stopped about half way through. Perhaps I would have enjoyed it had I stuck it out, but if I can't get into a book half-way through, I have to give up. There are way too many books to read to waste the time. I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley and Atria Books. All opinions are my own.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelso

    Plot: "A morbidly anxious young woman stumbles into a job as a receptionist for a Catholic church, where she becomes obsessed with her predecessor's mysterious death." HOLY CRAPOLA Y'ALL. HO-LEE. CRAP-OL-LA. THIS BOOK IS FANTASTIC!!!!! I ate this book up in a matter of HOURS. I related so heavily with Gilda's struggles with a severe anxiety disorder right down to the car accident at the beginning (dang near triggering, since I have done the SAME EXACT MOTIONS the character went through in the first Plot: "A morbidly anxious young woman stumbles into a job as a receptionist for a Catholic church, where she becomes obsessed with her predecessor's mysterious death." HOLY CRAPOLA Y'ALL. HO-LEE. CRAP-OL-LA. THIS BOOK IS FANTASTIC!!!!! I ate this book up in a matter of HOURS. I related so heavily with Gilda's struggles with a severe anxiety disorder right down to the car accident at the beginning (dang near triggering, since I have done the SAME EXACT MOTIONS the character went through in the first few pages when I was in a car accident in my 20s). After the character establishment, the book then pivots to a where-doneit, when Gilda - who through a comedy of errors, finds herself at a new job as a receptionist at a Catholic church - starts becoming obsessed over the recently deceased previous receptionist, Grace. The plot reminds me of a long-lost "Fleabag" episode. It's got the right balance of macabre humor mixed with a little bit of heart. I would LOVE to see this get optioned into a limited series. What a fantastic and funny book. PS - Emily, I'd like my old diary back, please!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    3.5 stars. This is one of those books where there will be two general groups of reactions to it: people who find it funny and even light, and those who find it not very funny at all and quite dark. I am in the latter group. It doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the book or find it interesting, but in scrolling through reviews I found that my impressions were often quite drastically different than others so be prepared for that. (If you want something divisive for your book club to argue about without s 3.5 stars. This is one of those books where there will be two general groups of reactions to it: people who find it funny and even light, and those who find it not very funny at all and quite dark. I am in the latter group. It doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the book or find it interesting, but in scrolling through reviews I found that my impressions were often quite drastically different than others so be prepared for that. (If you want something divisive for your book club to argue about without serious stakes, this would be a good one.) Gilda is depressed and anxious. To a serious degree. To the point that everyone in the ER knows her by name. She has never received any kind of treatment, and this means that sometimes she blows her life up because, for example, she just stops going to work. Gilda catastrophizes and she's quite morbid, these are things I recognized. Sometimes seeing Gilda's brain was a lot like seeing my own brain except I can turn it off and Gilda can't. The central arc of the book is mostly around Gilda's new job that she gets accidentally, as a secretary for a Catholic church, even though Gilda is an atheist and a lesbian. Because it is often easier for Gilda to go along with people around her, this kind of thing happens quite a lot. She has also just started dating someone who actually seems to like her. And she's worried her brother is spiraling into alcoholism while her family pretends everything is fine. This is one of those books where the prose is broken up into small sections. Sometimes that can make it hard for me to read for long stretches but I didn't have that problem here. I found Austin's portrayal of Gilda's inner life to be very real and very relatable for people who have struggled with depression or anxiety. To me it didn't feel fun or light because those things are so very real and because I wasn't really sure that Gilda would be able to get herself to a more functional place. But it felt emotionally true, which is more important.

  19. 4 out of 5

    charlotte,

    On my blog. Rep: lesbian mc with anxiety & depression, trans(?)/gnc(?) side character with alcohol & painkiller addiction CWs: ableism, self harm, suicidal ideation Galley provided by publisher As someone who, at best, only ever likes adult contemporary lit, I went into Everyone in This Room Will Someday be Dead with my expectations appropriately lowered. And then I loved it. The story follows Gilda, who’s just been in a car crash. She then, somehow, ends up with a job as a church secretary, after On my blog. Rep: lesbian mc with anxiety & depression, trans(?)/gnc(?) side character with alcohol & painkiller addiction CWs: ableism, self harm, suicidal ideation Galley provided by publisher As someone who, at best, only ever likes adult contemporary lit, I went into Everyone in This Room Will Someday be Dead with my expectations appropriately lowered. And then I loved it. The story follows Gilda, who’s just been in a car crash. She then, somehow, ends up with a job as a church secretary, after the previous incumbent died in what soon are revealed to be suspicious circumstances. As an atheist and a lesbian, she’s in a bit of a sticky situation with regards to the job at a church and, among other things, finds herself accidentally dating one of the churchgoer’s relatives. The best thing about this book is that it’s fun. It’s kind of absurd, but the believable sort, that you might hear from a friend who has an uncanny ability to find themselves in odd situations. From the moment I picked this one up, the story (and the characters) wholly grabbed me. Not to repeat myself overly, but I can count on one hand just how many adult contemporary books I’ve really enjoyed. This one shot to the top of that list. It’s helped a whole lot by its narrator, who has the kind of voice that’s dryly humorous and also very sympathetic. Gilda is what carries this book really — you read it primarily for her and her, somewhat misguided it must be said, adventures. All of which to say, perhaps I will tentatively start reading more adult contemporary. Provided it’s gay, of course.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    I'm familiar with author, Emily Austin. I very much enjoyed her kooky novella, Oh Honey. I was so excited to read her upcoming debut novel, "Everyone in this Room Will Someday Be Dead" - and boy it did not disappoint! Also, the cover is adorable. Emily Austin's writing style is quirky, hilarious, and surprisingly touching. Our protagonist, Gilda is in her late twenties, she suffers from crippling anxiety and depression. She's also a hypochondriac lesbian whom doesn't believe in God. And yet she I'm familiar with author, Emily Austin. I very much enjoyed her kooky novella, Oh Honey. I was so excited to read her upcoming debut novel, "Everyone in this Room Will Someday Be Dead" - and boy it did not disappoint! Also, the cover is adorable. Emily Austin's writing style is quirky, hilarious, and surprisingly touching. Our protagonist, Gilda is in her late twenties, she suffers from crippling anxiety and depression. She's also a hypochondriac lesbian whom doesn't believe in God. And yet she accidentally applies for a job working as a receptionist at a Catholic church all because of a misleading flyer, supposedly offering free therapy. It took me a while to warm up to Gilda, she is a bit MUCH in the beginning of this novel, but I ended really liking and relating to her. I've always devoured novels like these that perfectly balance humor and heart. The characters are always so endearing, messed-up, chaotic, morbid, but overall well-fleshed out. I loved reading about Gilda's dysfunctional family, especially her alcoholic brother. I also liked all the secondary characters, Father Jeff, Eleanor, and Giuseppe. I can't wait to read more from Emily Austin in the future. She's the real deal. Thank you, Netgalley and Atria for the digital ARC. Release date: July 6, 2021

  21. 4 out of 5

    chloe

    i want to eat this book

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna Avian

    Depressing, mundane and chaotic. All of the characters were one dimensional and very dull. It just went aimlessly on and on until it got tiresome. What was the point of this story anyways?

  23. 4 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    Laugh out loud funny, deeply morbid and thoroughly engaging! This is my first time reading Emily Austin and it will not be the last. In Everyone In This Room Will Be Dead Someday we meet Gilda a twenty something lesbian, atheist, and one time book store employee who got fired. Gilda cannot seem to hold down a job and is constantly going to the emergency room because she feels as if she is going to die. In an effort to get her life together and deal with her past she shows up at a Catholic chu Laugh out loud funny, deeply morbid and thoroughly engaging! This is my first time reading Emily Austin and it will not be the last. In Everyone In This Room Will Be Dead Someday we meet Gilda a twenty something lesbian, atheist, and one time book store employee who got fired. Gilda cannot seem to hold down a job and is constantly going to the emergency room because she feels as if she is going to die. In an effort to get her life together and deal with her past she shows up at a Catholic church for free therapy and is mistaken for someone looking for a job. Gilda ends up being a receptionist at a Catholic Church and finds herself having to lie so no one will know that she is a lesbian and an atheist. Added to this, Gilda has made it her mission to find out what happened to the receptionist before her… how does she remain employed and not blow her cover? Gilda is definitely a character I will remember to ages to come. I am not sure why she reminds me so much of Eleanor Ophilant but she does… in a drier/ darker way. She is a character you hope will snap out of it, but understands why she cannot just “shake that feeling” she’s got anxiety and never ending panic attacks that sets her back daily. I think what got me was how sensitive the writer was in talking about mental illness and how it impacts others around them. I am still shaken about Gilda going to the emergency room Doctor and telling them “I cannot believe there is a skeleton inside me” and that is something I cannot even think about. If you love a book with dry humour and a character you cannot seem to shake, I highly recommend this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    i originally picked this up because i wanted to read something that would make me cry and this seemed like it would fuck me up just the right amount. i didn't cry but i still liked this book. it's literally written in a way my internal monologues sound when i'm depressed and that just really spoke to me. it is mostly depressing but it also has so many funny moments because the main character just unintentionally finds herself in weird situations due to her depression and anxiety. i don't think this i originally picked this up because i wanted to read something that would make me cry and this seemed like it would fuck me up just the right amount. i didn't cry but i still liked this book. it's literally written in a way my internal monologues sound when i'm depressed and that just really spoke to me. it is mostly depressing but it also has so many funny moments because the main character just unintentionally finds herself in weird situations due to her depression and anxiety. i don't think this book - especially the writing style and story structure (time jumps etc.) - is for everyone but it worked perfectly for me. 4 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lou Jacobs

    Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead June 11, 2021 Book Review Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead Emily R. Austin reviewed by Lou Jacobs readersremains.com | Goodreads A heady mix of themes exploring death, sexuality, and mental health explodes with a heavy dose of humor in this debut gem by Emily Austin. Our reluctant heroine, Gilda, a twenty-seven-year-old anxious atheist and self-professed lesbian cannot stop ruminating about death. She’s constantly thinking about the glaciers that ar Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead June 11, 2021 Book Review Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead Emily R. Austin reviewed by Lou Jacobs readersremains.com | Goodreads A heady mix of themes exploring death, sexuality, and mental health explodes with a heavy dose of humor in this debut gem by Emily Austin. Our reluctant heroine, Gilda, a twenty-seven-year-old anxious atheist and self-professed lesbian cannot stop ruminating about death. She’s constantly thinking about the glaciers that are thawing, the sea turtles going extinct, and often will surf the net and click on articles, such as: “Weird Ways People Die.” She recently has been fired from her job at the bookstore, as her employer felt she was untrustworthy and irresponsible and not fit for customer service. It wasn’t her problem that she had difficulty waking up and was rarely on time and frequently missed shifts. She admittedly is consumed about thinking about litter, nuclear bombs , racism, child abuse, and how disgusting humans are. Imagine every human being has a butt—and how disgusting is that! Gilda is worried about paying her next rent. She doubts there is much of a market for lesbian sex workers, and since she is such a bad actress, straight sex work is out of the question. She has a collection of dirty dishes in her bedroom. Adding one atop another feels like building a castle, with each addition more risky. The thought of washing them, feels a lot like going for a jog. She will do it tomorrow. And then, our bumbling and kindhearted Gilda is involved in an auto accident. Although her arm is obviously broken, she refuses an ambulance. “I do not like to be a spectacle. I would rather be run over by another van than be surrounded by paramedics touching me inside such a conspicuous vehicle.” She drives herself to the emergency room, and is met by a nurse, who asks about the problem today. Even the janitor recognizes her and greets her, with a “Hey, girl” She is known in hospital vernacular as a “frequent flyer.” She has been told a multitude of times that “nothing is wrong with you” and you’re probably experiencing a panic attack and is referred to a psychiatrist. This time her arm is casted, but not before she is questioned about the possibility of being pregnant. She emphatically states that there is no chance of that. And muses to herself that they think she is celibate. I am not. I am just gay and thus blessedly exempt from the hazard of pregnancy. Gilda coming to the realization that she needs help coping with her mental health, responds to a flyer for “free therapy” and finds herself at the doorstep of a Catholic Church. Father Jeff greets her, assuming she’s here for a job interview, to replace his loyal and recently deceased receptionist Grace. His interview is sparse with little in the way of significant substance and quickly hires her when she admits to being familiar with the computer and the internet. He fails to even obtain her name, address, or phone number. When Gilda shows up and checks the Church inbox emails, she notes an ongoing stream of unanswered emails from Rosemary, apparently a dear friend of Grace. She can’t bear to ignore the emails and doesn’t have the courage to tell her the “bad news.” Instead, Gilda strikes up an email correspondence with Rosemary, impersonating Grace by email. This reluctant Catholic is consumed trying to learn about the mass and other “Catholic things” and attends mass daily and listens intently to Father Jeff’s sermons. She learns it is an abomination if a man lies with another man and must be put to death. “Yikes! Thank God this doesn’t seem to apply to women. I’m disappointed that God is so homophobic, but glad that he’s forgotten about lesbians. I guess I would rather be forgotten than put to death.” (Much of the humorous repartee takes place in Gilda’s mind.) Another musing of Gilda’s that must be recounted. “It turns out the crackers I stole are the body of Christ. After eating more than half the bag, in which I paired Cracker Barrel cheese with God’s transubstantiated body … I googled the crackers so I could leave a review … I planned on writing … Boring. These crackers are tasteless and bland.” In one of Father Jeff’s sermons he proclaims: “One day you are going to die … everyone in this room will someday die… It’s important to remember every day that passes brings us closer to the day we die.” Gilda muses: I wish he had chosen a different topic. Gilda has been known in conversation to say, “I’m dying.” When queried with: “Yikes, how long do you have?” she answers gravely, ‘I have no idea.” Gilda’s life starts to unravel the day she fields a call from Deputy Parks from the city police department. Apparently, the death of Grace may have occurred under suspicious circumstances. Grace was one of the patients of nurse Laurie Damon, who has recently confessed that she intentionally over injected elderly patients with drugs to end their life and suffering. Emily Austin on her first outing has provided a literary “screwball comedy” that explores multiple significant themes with aplomb and hilarious understated humor. Her propulsive prose demands out loud laughing and page-turning. Her darkly funny meanderings may provide some offense to the religiously inclined. Under all this humor, we are treated to a deep and moving portrayal of everyday life, while coping with depression and anxiety, in order to establish relationships and a meaningful life. It allows us to appreciate the fragility of mental health and the tribulations of sexuality. Shining through this warm hearted and tender narrative is the essence and fragility of the human condition. We can all relate to the cringeworthy and unusual predicaments that plague Gilda’s life. It’s important to know Gilda’s thoughts about the question: When did you come out? “I never know how to answer that question, because I don’t feel like I am out. I feel like I am in a constant state of coming out, and likely I always will be. I have to come out every time I meet someone.” Thanks to NetGalley and Atria Books for providing an Uncorrected Proof of this novel in exchange for an honest review. I sincerely cannot wait to read Emily Austin’s next offering, considering this gem is actually her debut muse. This review was also published at Magazine of Mystery and Suspense. Available on Amazon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    On one hand, some of the lines really resonated with me but on the other hand, this book is told in four parts and in fragments. It makes it not really cohesive though it's not hard to follow and is a quick read. Some of it is is just Gilda's thoughts and actions. She has her witty moments but she deals with major anxiety and depression. Thank you to Isabel from Atria books and Netgalley for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. On one hand, some of the lines really resonated with me but on the other hand, this book is told in four parts and in fragments. It makes it not really cohesive though it's not hard to follow and is a quick read. Some of it is is just Gilda's thoughts and actions. She has her witty moments but she deals with major anxiety and depression. Thank you to Isabel from Atria books and Netgalley for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emma Griffioen

    i really enjoyed this book! i related so strongly to the main character gildas anxiety and like the amount she thought about things. she was constantly asking the people around her questions that had to do with what she’s spiralling on in that moment and their responses were “what why would you think about that?” which i have experienced so much!! however, this wasn’t a 5 star read because i thought the plot was only average, and even though i related to her anxiety so much, the book overall was i really enjoyed this book! i related so strongly to the main character gildas anxiety and like the amount she thought about things. she was constantly asking the people around her questions that had to do with what she’s spiralling on in that moment and their responses were “what why would you think about that?” which i have experienced so much!! however, this wasn’t a 5 star read because i thought the plot was only average, and even though i related to her anxiety so much, the book overall was a little bit depressing! i feel like this is the kind of writing/deep thinking that i wanted when i read the midnight library, but the midnight library had a more interesting concept. if these two books were put together it would be the ultimate “contemplating life/live life to the fullest” book lol

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Grabski

    I absolutely loved this book because in so many ways I identified with Gilda (especially me back in my 20s). Do you know what an amazing feeling it is to read a book where a character thinks so much like yourself? So many thoughts in here I have thought myself. The hypochondria, anxiety, depressive thoughts and having to sit back and really focus on why others act the way they do. But I can understand that this book may not be everyone's cup of tea. I absolutely loved this book because in so many ways I identified with Gilda (especially me back in my 20s). Do you know what an amazing feeling it is to read a book where a character thinks so much like yourself? So many thoughts in here I have thought myself. The hypochondria, anxiety, depressive thoughts and having to sit back and really focus on why others act the way they do. But I can understand that this book may not be everyone's cup of tea.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sheree | Keeping Up With The Penguins

    Gilda's anxious apathy and her unsentimental delivery make an otherwise-dark story a hilarious and relatable read. Plus, it’s got a quick and neat resolution, a relief after the intensity of the previous pages, and it ends on a hopeful note (but not a saccharine one). Loved it! My full review of Everyone In This Room Will Someday Be Dead can be found on Keeping Up With The Penguins. Gilda's anxious apathy and her unsentimental delivery make an otherwise-dark story a hilarious and relatable read. Plus, it’s got a quick and neat resolution, a relief after the intensity of the previous pages, and it ends on a hopeful note (but not a saccharine one). Loved it! My full review of Everyone In This Room Will Someday Be Dead can be found on Keeping Up With The Penguins.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bam cooks the books ;-)

    I'm giving this novel high marks for originality. Gilda is 27, an atheist, a lesbian, depressed, anxious and out of work. She responds to an advertisement for therapy at a local Catholic church and is mistaken for a job applicant by the priest and hired as church secretary. She hides that she is gay and pretends that she is Catholic. Grace, the previous secretary, recently died unexpectedly and Gilda tries to keep the news of her death from her long-distance friend by continuing to email her. Is I'm giving this novel high marks for originality. Gilda is 27, an atheist, a lesbian, depressed, anxious and out of work. She responds to an advertisement for therapy at a local Catholic church and is mistaken for a job applicant by the priest and hired as church secretary. She hides that she is gay and pretends that she is Catholic. Grace, the previous secretary, recently died unexpectedly and Gilda tries to keep the news of her death from her long-distance friend by continuing to email her. Is it okay to pretend everything is okay when it's not? That's what Gilda's family has always done but things in their lives seem to be spinning out of control. But the big question on everyone's mind is: What if Gloria was murdered? Overall, this story is quite sad--mainly because no one seems to take the steps needed to help Gilda, even though she makes weekly visits to the ER for panic attacks and other problems, even though her family and friends notice her erratic behavior. But there are moments of dark humor and, even though Gilda is totally focused on death, she is still very likable and kind. Some part of her just wants people to be happy, after all. I received an arc of this unique novel from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. Many thanks.

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