Hot Best Seller

Innovation

Availability: Ready to download

Innovation, the sixth and final volume in Peter Ackroyd's magnificent History of England series, takes readers from the Boer War to the Millennium Dome almost a hundred years later. Innovation brings Peter Ackroyd's History of England to a triumphant close. Ackroyd takes readers from the end of the Boer War and the accession of Edward VII to the end of the twentieth centur Innovation, the sixth and final volume in Peter Ackroyd's magnificent History of England series, takes readers from the Boer War to the Millennium Dome almost a hundred years later. Innovation brings Peter Ackroyd's History of England to a triumphant close. Ackroyd takes readers from the end of the Boer War and the accession of Edward VII to the end of the twentieth century, when his great-granddaughter Elizabeth II had been on the throne for almost five decades. It was a century of enormous change, encompassing two world wars, four monarchs (Edward VII, George V, George VI and the Queen), the decline of the aristocracy and the rise of the Labour Party, women's suffrage, the birth of the NHS, the march of suburbia and the clearance of the slums. It was a period that saw the work of the Bloomsbury Group and T.S. Eliot, of Kingsley Amis and Philip Larkin, from the end of the post-war slump to the technicolor explosion of the 1960s, to free love and punk rock, and from Thatcher to Blair. A vividly readable, richly peopled tour de force, Innovation is Peter Ackroyd writing at the height of his powers.


Compare

Innovation, the sixth and final volume in Peter Ackroyd's magnificent History of England series, takes readers from the Boer War to the Millennium Dome almost a hundred years later. Innovation brings Peter Ackroyd's History of England to a triumphant close. Ackroyd takes readers from the end of the Boer War and the accession of Edward VII to the end of the twentieth centur Innovation, the sixth and final volume in Peter Ackroyd's magnificent History of England series, takes readers from the Boer War to the Millennium Dome almost a hundred years later. Innovation brings Peter Ackroyd's History of England to a triumphant close. Ackroyd takes readers from the end of the Boer War and the accession of Edward VII to the end of the twentieth century, when his great-granddaughter Elizabeth II had been on the throne for almost five decades. It was a century of enormous change, encompassing two world wars, four monarchs (Edward VII, George V, George VI and the Queen), the decline of the aristocracy and the rise of the Labour Party, women's suffrage, the birth of the NHS, the march of suburbia and the clearance of the slums. It was a period that saw the work of the Bloomsbury Group and T.S. Eliot, of Kingsley Amis and Philip Larkin, from the end of the post-war slump to the technicolor explosion of the 1960s, to free love and punk rock, and from Thatcher to Blair. A vividly readable, richly peopled tour de force, Innovation is Peter Ackroyd writing at the height of his powers.

30 review for Innovation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicki Markus

    Innovation is a fitting and pleasing conclusion to Ackroyd's excellent History of England series. Perhaps in some ways it's the least interesting of the six volumes, so much of its action being within living memory, but there is still something new to learn from its pages. For me, some of the political discussion was less engaging, particular once we reached the period within my lifetime, but I did enjoy reading about when certain technologies and appliances we take for granted these days were f Innovation is a fitting and pleasing conclusion to Ackroyd's excellent History of England series. Perhaps in some ways it's the least interesting of the six volumes, so much of its action being within living memory, but there is still something new to learn from its pages. For me, some of the political discussion was less engaging, particular once we reached the period within my lifetime, but I did enjoy reading about when certain technologies and appliances we take for granted these days were first introduced, the advent of chain stores etc. In conclusion, this book neatly wraps up the series, which has been a great achievement for Ackroyd, and if you haven't read any of the volumes yet, I highly recommend all history buffs to start with book one and work your way through, as they are all well written and well researched. I received this book as a free ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Full disclosure, I have not read the first five volumes of Ackroyd's History of England, but I don't think it's necessary. Innovation covers the history of England during the twentieth century. That being said, it felt very much like a large majority of the book is written through the viewpoint of interpretation through politics. A large portion of the book seems to address the constant waxing and waning of the various political parties, the prime ministers that stood for them and the inevitable Full disclosure, I have not read the first five volumes of Ackroyd's History of England, but I don't think it's necessary. Innovation covers the history of England during the twentieth century. That being said, it felt very much like a large majority of the book is written through the viewpoint of interpretation through politics. A large portion of the book seems to address the constant waxing and waning of the various political parties, the prime ministers that stood for them and the inevitable changing of the guard when the people grew disenchanted with them. Many of the historical events are addressed by how the played out because of political maneuvering. If you enjoy politics, then this would make this perspective on history perfect for you. Many things, including two World Wars, the suffragette movement at the beginning of the century, arts, entertainment and culture feel largely glossed over. For a book that has the current head of the Royal family on the cover the royalty are barely addressed at all, except when there is a changing of a guard and how it affects political power. The other thing that seems apparent to me is the constant viewpoint of the English to view themselves as superior to everyone - other members of Europe, the United States, India, states in Africa, etc. They only seem to want to be involved in European groups if they don't have to make any personal sacrifices, but want to be seen as a leader and setting the tone. After throwing multiple countries on the Continent under the bus to Mussolini and Hitler to save their own skin (and because Communism is worse!) why would Europe want to concede anything to them? As someone who tends to find politics annoying, exhausting and self-serving I tended to find a lot of this book dry and not likely to be particularly flattering to England from the outsider's perspective.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thank you to NetGalley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review. This book spans from the Boer War and Queen Victoria's death through to Diana, Princess of Wales' death in 1997. It is a busy and sometimes overwhelming century in English history. Certain figures, like Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher stick out, but for the longest time it was a blur to me. Innovation focuses on politics and society rather than royals (despite the cover), so I found that it balanced out my mod Thank you to NetGalley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review. This book spans from the Boer War and Queen Victoria's death through to Diana, Princess of Wales' death in 1997. It is a busy and sometimes overwhelming century in English history. Certain figures, like Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher stick out, but for the longest time it was a blur to me. Innovation focuses on politics and society rather than royals (despite the cover), so I found that it balanced out my modern royal history really well. If you aren't familiar with English political parties, I would say 2-3 minutes of quick reading is all you need to follow this book. It is so rare to find comprehensive books that don't feel like they've been assigned for a secondary school or university course, and Ackroyd's book is anything but a textbook.  If you are a dedicated reader of Ackroyd's History series or want to know more about England in the twentieth century, Innovation is the perfect book for you. (Particular for fans of The Crown who enjoy the royals but maybe could learn a bit more about the political side of things, like me...) 

  4. 4 out of 5

    MookNana

    This history of 20th century England is accessible and comprehensive, but comes across as almost antiseptic. The recitation of facts seems competent enough, but there's little life in the text. That may be due to the fact that these eras have been dramatized in Downton Abbey, The Crown, and countless films and therefore dry prose cannot help but pale in comparison. The sections about life and culture were more interesting than the political discussions but there was a curious unevenness to what This history of 20th century England is accessible and comprehensive, but comes across as almost antiseptic. The recitation of facts seems competent enough, but there's little life in the text. That may be due to the fact that these eras have been dramatized in Downton Abbey, The Crown, and countless films and therefore dry prose cannot help but pale in comparison. The sections about life and culture were more interesting than the political discussions but there was a curious unevenness to what was discussed. I swear there were more words devoted to Lonnie Donnegan than the Holocaust. This format probably worked much better for earlier eras for which sources and histories are much more scarce. It's not unreadable, exactly, just...uninspiring. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Sinclair

    BOOK REVIEW ⭐️⭐️⭐️ This is the final installment of Ackroyd’s The History of England series (part VI). I enjoyed it, but despite the cover, the royals feature only obliquely here (as is fitting in the development of English politics over the centuries, Parliament and PMs are highlighted). I must admit missing the Royals. I’m glad to have read the entire series. #bibliophile #book #bookish #booklover #books #books2021 #booksofinstagram #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #bookstagrammers #bookworm #goodr BOOK REVIEW ⭐️⭐️⭐️ This is the final installment of Ackroyd’s The History of England series (part VI). I enjoyed it, but despite the cover, the royals feature only obliquely here (as is fitting in the development of English politics over the centuries, Parliament and PMs are highlighted). I must admit missing the Royals. I’m glad to have read the entire series. #bibliophile #book #bookish #booklover #books #books2021 #booksofinstagram #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #bookstagrammers #bookworm #goodreads #homelibrary #instabook #instabooks #reader #readers #reading #readingroom #readersofinstagram #bookreview 2021📚 74/84

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lora

    Innovation covers England history from the time of queen Victoria's death until the death of princess Diana in 1997. Really doesn't mention the royal family that much. Just enough so you relate what's going in the royal family to what's going on in England. This is the first book I've read by Peter Ackroyd. I am looking for to reading the previous books In this series. I was kindly provided an e-copy of this book by the publisher and/or author via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Innovation covers England history from the time of queen Victoria's death until the death of princess Diana in 1997. Really doesn't mention the royal family that much. Just enough so you relate what's going in the royal family to what's going on in England. This is the first book I've read by Peter Ackroyd. I am looking for to reading the previous books In this series. I was kindly provided an e-copy of this book by the publisher and/or author via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lara Green

    An engaging political history of England. At

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    This book may be a bit confusing for outsiders that aren’t so familiar with England’s political parties. A majority of this book does focus on politics, so pop culture and other historical events take a backseat to how politics may be affected by them. It is packed full of political history, but as far as history of everything else going on in England at this time? Minimal. However, I did appreciate the easily accessible language used throughout the book, as it made it slightly easier to push th This book may be a bit confusing for outsiders that aren’t so familiar with England’s political parties. A majority of this book does focus on politics, so pop culture and other historical events take a backseat to how politics may be affected by them. It is packed full of political history, but as far as history of everything else going on in England at this time? Minimal. However, I did appreciate the easily accessible language used throughout the book, as it made it slightly easier to push through to the end

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Bohnert

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  12. 4 out of 5

    Colin Lochner

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom Quinn

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bob Wratz

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adam Glantz

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  20. 4 out of 5

    cindy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark Reid

  22. 4 out of 5

    Richard Coombs

  23. 5 out of 5

    Norkie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Christopher

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jesse K

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jane

  27. 5 out of 5

    Danny

  28. 5 out of 5

    Frank

  29. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ron Johnson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...