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Master of the Game: Henry Kissinger and the Art of Middle East Diplomacy

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A perceptive and provocative history of Henry Kissinger's diplomatic negotiations in the Middle East that illuminates the unique challenges and barriers Kissinger and his successors have faced in their attempts to broker peace between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Twenty-two years have elapsed since the United States last brokered a peace agreement between the Israelis and A perceptive and provocative history of Henry Kissinger's diplomatic negotiations in the Middle East that illuminates the unique challenges and barriers Kissinger and his successors have faced in their attempts to broker peace between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Twenty-two years have elapsed since the United States last brokered a peace agreement between the Israelis and Palestinians. In that time, three presidents have tried and failed. Martin Indyk--a former United States Ambassador to Israel and special envoy for the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations in 2013--has experienced these political frustrations and disappointments firsthand. Now, in an attempt to understand the arc of American diplomatic influence in the Middle East, he returns to the origins of American-led peace efforts and the man who created the Middle East peace process--Henry Kissinger. Based on newly available documents from American and Israeli archives, extensive interviews with Kissinger, and Indyk's own interactions with some of the main characters, the author takes readers inside the negotiations. Here is a roster of larger-than-life characters--Anwar Sadat, Golda Meir, Yitzhak Rabin, Hafez al-Assad, and Kissinger himself. Indyk's account is both that of a historian poring over the records of these events, as well as an inside player seeking to glean lessons for Middle East peacemaking. He makes clear that understanding Kissinger's design for Middle East peacemaking is key to comprehending how to--and how not to--make peace.


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A perceptive and provocative history of Henry Kissinger's diplomatic negotiations in the Middle East that illuminates the unique challenges and barriers Kissinger and his successors have faced in their attempts to broker peace between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Twenty-two years have elapsed since the United States last brokered a peace agreement between the Israelis and A perceptive and provocative history of Henry Kissinger's diplomatic negotiations in the Middle East that illuminates the unique challenges and barriers Kissinger and his successors have faced in their attempts to broker peace between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Twenty-two years have elapsed since the United States last brokered a peace agreement between the Israelis and Palestinians. In that time, three presidents have tried and failed. Martin Indyk--a former United States Ambassador to Israel and special envoy for the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations in 2013--has experienced these political frustrations and disappointments firsthand. Now, in an attempt to understand the arc of American diplomatic influence in the Middle East, he returns to the origins of American-led peace efforts and the man who created the Middle East peace process--Henry Kissinger. Based on newly available documents from American and Israeli archives, extensive interviews with Kissinger, and Indyk's own interactions with some of the main characters, the author takes readers inside the negotiations. Here is a roster of larger-than-life characters--Anwar Sadat, Golda Meir, Yitzhak Rabin, Hafez al-Assad, and Kissinger himself. Indyk's account is both that of a historian poring over the records of these events, as well as an inside player seeking to glean lessons for Middle East peacemaking. He makes clear that understanding Kissinger's design for Middle East peacemaking is key to comprehending how to--and how not to--make peace.

43 review for Master of the Game: Henry Kissinger and the Art of Middle East Diplomacy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

    An interesting book written by one of America's most experienced diplomats examining the actual art and practice of diplomacy. How does one convince other countries to follow your lead or work towards your objectives? How do you bridge the chasm between cultures to find a meeting of the minds. This is not a commentary of the objectives, but an analysis of the tools and practice of diplomacy. An interesting book written by one of America's most experienced diplomats examining the actual art and practice of diplomacy. How does one convince other countries to follow your lead or work towards your objectives? How do you bridge the chasm between cultures to find a meeting of the minds. This is not a commentary of the objectives, but an analysis of the tools and practice of diplomacy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Right. Now there is peace in Israel. And there is a Palestine. The Iraq has a free zone with Iran. And since Kissinger there hasn't been a gunshot wound in the Middle East. Or back to reality: the deification of a moronic bureaucrat. Right. Now there is peace in Israel. And there is a Palestine. The Iraq has a free zone with Iran. And since Kissinger there hasn't been a gunshot wound in the Middle East. Or back to reality: the deification of a moronic bureaucrat.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jad

  4. 4 out of 5

    Turgut

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lewis Bart Stone

  6. 5 out of 5

    Omar Burhanuddin

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard L Jablow MD

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dayna Rubin

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  10. 5 out of 5

    Arthur

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alon

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Wissam Nabulsi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hany

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jb

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mishal

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  19. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Onofre

  20. 4 out of 5

    JS

  21. 4 out of 5

    Faryal

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe Crescente

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Talbot

  24. 5 out of 5

    Saâd

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Lopez Portillo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Craig Hodges

  28. 5 out of 5

    Henrik Södergrann

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kovan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shaunterria

  31. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  32. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo

  33. 5 out of 5

    Iddo Schejter

  34. 4 out of 5

    Yossi

  35. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  36. 4 out of 5

    Abdulla Rasti

  37. 5 out of 5

    Bdot

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

  39. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

  40. 4 out of 5

    Gideon Belete

  41. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed El adl

  42. 5 out of 5

    Kendrick Frankel

  43. 5 out of 5

    Josh

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