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Living and Loving in the Age of AIDS: A Memoir

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This is the tale of a devastating pandemic, of lives cut painfully short – it’s also a love story. Derek, a distinguished designer, and J, a pioneering entrepreneur and creator of Heaven, the iconic gay dance club, met and fell in love more than 40 years ago. In the early 1980s their friends began to get sick and die – AIDS had arrived in their lives. When they got tested, J This is the tale of a devastating pandemic, of lives cut painfully short – it’s also a love story. Derek, a distinguished designer, and J, a pioneering entrepreneur and creator of Heaven, the iconic gay dance club, met and fell in love more than 40 years ago. In the early 1980s their friends began to get sick and die – AIDS had arrived in their lives. When they got tested, J received what was then a death sentence: he was HIV Positive. While the onset of AIDS strengthened stigma and fear globally, they confronted their crisis with courage, humour and an indomitable resolve to survive. J’s battle lasted six long years. Turning to spiritual reflection, yoga, nature – and always to love – Derek describes a transformation of the spirit, how compassion and empathy rose phoenix-like from the flames of sickness and death, and how he and J founded the charity Aids Ark, which has helped to save more than 1,000 HIV Positive lives. This is a story of joy and triumph, of facing universal challenges, of the great rewards that come from giving back. Derek speaks for a generation who lived through a global health crisis that many at the time refused even to acknowledge. His is a powerful story chronicling this extraordinary era.


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This is the tale of a devastating pandemic, of lives cut painfully short – it’s also a love story. Derek, a distinguished designer, and J, a pioneering entrepreneur and creator of Heaven, the iconic gay dance club, met and fell in love more than 40 years ago. In the early 1980s their friends began to get sick and die – AIDS had arrived in their lives. When they got tested, J This is the tale of a devastating pandemic, of lives cut painfully short – it’s also a love story. Derek, a distinguished designer, and J, a pioneering entrepreneur and creator of Heaven, the iconic gay dance club, met and fell in love more than 40 years ago. In the early 1980s their friends began to get sick and die – AIDS had arrived in their lives. When they got tested, J received what was then a death sentence: he was HIV Positive. While the onset of AIDS strengthened stigma and fear globally, they confronted their crisis with courage, humour and an indomitable resolve to survive. J’s battle lasted six long years. Turning to spiritual reflection, yoga, nature – and always to love – Derek describes a transformation of the spirit, how compassion and empathy rose phoenix-like from the flames of sickness and death, and how he and J founded the charity Aids Ark, which has helped to save more than 1,000 HIV Positive lives. This is a story of joy and triumph, of facing universal challenges, of the great rewards that come from giving back. Derek speaks for a generation who lived through a global health crisis that many at the time refused even to acknowledge. His is a powerful story chronicling this extraordinary era.

56 review for Living and Loving in the Age of AIDS: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Living and Loving in the Age of AIDS is an intimate, personal, moving account of living through the AIDS crisis in the 80s and 90s but also a memoir of Derek and J’s love story, their lives pre-AIDS and lives up until today. Author and renowned designer Derek Frost and his husband Jeremy 'J' Norman have been married for more than 40 years. Both the Embassy Club, London’s equivalent of New York’s Studio 54, and Heaven, described as Europe’s largest and most iconic Gay club, were their creations, Living and Loving in the Age of AIDS is an intimate, personal, moving account of living through the AIDS crisis in the 80s and 90s but also a memoir of Derek and J’s love story, their lives pre-AIDS and lives up until today. Author and renowned designer Derek Frost and his husband Jeremy 'J' Norman have been married for more than 40 years. Both the Embassy Club, London’s equivalent of New York’s Studio 54, and Heaven, described as Europe’s largest and most iconic Gay club, were their creations, and both made them leaders in the great celebration which accompanied gay liberation. Every night they danced alongside many other young people and there was only joy and sweet pleasure. Tragedy, however, followed quickly on the heels of celebration and AIDS was soon among them. As their young friends died, J also became infected. He was diagnosed as HIV+ in 1991. He fought for six long years to stay alive and every detail of that harrowing time is recorded in the diaries Derek kept then. Luckily, it was the large medical advancements in this field that allowed J to not only survive but thrive. Incredibly, these years were filled with equal measures of isolation, fear, engagement and happiness. It details how they helped to save more than 1,000 HIV+ lives globally, through their charity, AIDS Ark, and about the rich journey that describes their intertwined lives. This extraordinary book tells the story of a couple working in the heart of the gay scene in the midst of the AIDS epidemic – battling a positive diagnosis, whilst still keeping their now 40-year-old love affair alive. It is a touching and deeply inspiring read made possible by the strict diary entries Derek made decades ago in his youth. Series’ like Russell T Davies’ It's A Sin have fed people's appetites to learn more about the truths surrounding the early years of the AIDS outbreak, and the large numbers of young people who died. I found it a compelling, at times heart-wrenching but always hopeful autobiography written with the care, compassion and humanity that can often be missing when LGBT+ topics are explored by those who are not part of the community themselves. A rich, poignant and vivid read not only about the lives of two pioneers but a story of progress and the thanks that all LGBT+ allies owe to fearless heroes such as Derek and J for pushing the boundaries of what was deemed acceptable at the time. Highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rhian Pritchard

    I'm not going to finish this book. I was looking for a memoir that would give me some insight into a period of queer history that I know depressingly little about, and instead I got chapter after chapter of emotionally distant 'this is why we were successful in life' setup. I know that memoir is a difficult medium, that allowing a reader close to the real people in your life is hard - but the people in this book were just names to me after several chapters of introduction. Names, alongside a lis I'm not going to finish this book. I was looking for a memoir that would give me some insight into a period of queer history that I know depressingly little about, and instead I got chapter after chapter of emotionally distant 'this is why we were successful in life' setup. I know that memoir is a difficult medium, that allowing a reader close to the real people in your life is hard - but the people in this book were just names to me after several chapters of introduction. Names, alongside a list of ventures in business that again, I had no context for and little interest in. I did not come here to read about the rise and fall of a handmade pasta chain. This needed a much more vigorous editor.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    What an absolutely enthralling book. Learning of all the people Derek and J mingled with both famous and mundane was wonderful. Learning how they grew together as a couple, all the countries they visited and lived. What full lives they lived. Both being equally as successful as the other in the business world while still finding the time to love each others and dedicate time to friends. Leaning that while in a monogamous relationship they still allowed each other to be sexually free was liberati What an absolutely enthralling book. Learning of all the people Derek and J mingled with both famous and mundane was wonderful. Learning how they grew together as a couple, all the countries they visited and lived. What full lives they lived. Both being equally as successful as the other in the business world while still finding the time to love each others and dedicate time to friends. Leaning that while in a monogamous relationship they still allowed each other to be sexually free was liberating to read. This is such a foreign concept to me but i adore that they were secure enough in their love for one another that this was accepted without causing any issues with them. I am ashamed to admit that although I am aware of how devastating the pandemic of AIDS was, I knew how little it impacted people in my lifetime. I am fortunate enough to be in a position where AIDS was not and is not something that impacts my life. HIV is an easily treated disease and learning how devastating it once was was eye opening. The loss J and Derek faced throughout the AIDS pandemic was heartbreaking. I cannot fathom every having to lose that many friends in that short space. To watch those I care about deteriorate from such a horrible and now preventable disease must have been horrible. My heart shattered for them when they find out J is positive and they describe how they went hoe, closed all the curtains and cried for days. Their work via AIDS Ark and various other charities/hospitals is incredible. They changed the lives of thousands of people and that is something incredible. Bringing medicines to countries which are too poor to fund it but have the highest positivity rates in the world. Learning that, in 2019, homosexuality was still illegal in 72 countries, 35 of them being Commonwealth countries, was horrifying. Why in this day and age are people still being persecuted for something which has no effect on them whatsoever. On a brighter note, after 27 years they got to legally tie the knot and become a married couple. This made my heart so full. They are such a wonderful and incredible couple who deserve all of the happiness in the world. If this book has taught me anything its that I have to further educate myself on the issues raised within. I am shocked at how little I really knew of AIDS and how it was still largely untreated during my early years. Thank you Derek for this incredible book. Its one I wont forget and one I will forever recommend and cherish.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katy Wheatley

    I had to persevere with this book at the beginning. The first section is all about Frost and his partner and their frankly opulent lives. Their great jobs, social lives, friends, privilege etc. There is nothing wrong with any of this, by the way, but I was confused because it didn't really tally with the title or description of the book. Having read it all, it actually works beautifully. You need to know what kind of life Frost and his partner J had in order to fully appreciate their losses that I had to persevere with this book at the beginning. The first section is all about Frost and his partner and their frankly opulent lives. Their great jobs, social lives, friends, privilege etc. There is nothing wrong with any of this, by the way, but I was confused because it didn't really tally with the title or description of the book. Having read it all, it actually works beautifully. You need to know what kind of life Frost and his partner J had in order to fully appreciate their losses that unfurl through the middle section of the book. All the beauty, all the friends, all the sanctuaries, gone, and the life that was left, although admittedly more easy than many people's, was increasingly tarnished and hollow. At one point the book reads like a roll call of the dead. It really is sobering to read. The final section is more redemptive when triple therapy comes along and with the restoration of J's health, the overwhelming need to give something back and help others. The epilogue where Frost explains his reasons for writing the book were also very illuminating and made me think of some of the passages in a clearer light. I think this is an important book in many ways.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aiya

    Thank you netgalley for the e-arc Pub date: April 13, 2021 This book is slightly difficult to get into, but it is very worth it. The first part is very superficial, it’s about Frost and his lover “J” and all of their rich friends clubbing and doing coke and going on fabulous trips to exotic places. But after I finished the book, I completely understood why the first part was like that. As the reader we had to experience how glamorous and exciting their lives were, and just how awful they would bec Thank you netgalley for the e-arc Pub date: April 13, 2021 This book is slightly difficult to get into, but it is very worth it. The first part is very superficial, it’s about Frost and his lover “J” and all of their rich friends clubbing and doing coke and going on fabulous trips to exotic places. But after I finished the book, I completely understood why the first part was like that. As the reader we had to experience how glamorous and exciting their lives were, and just how awful they would become in a few short years. I don’t think the impact of the Aids epidemic would’ve hit as hard in this story if we didn’t have such a clear picture of what the Before was like. This book is a quarter memoir, a quarter history, and a half love letter. It’s the author expressing his pent up rage towards the government and the doctors who failed to save so many of his friends, his worry over his partner during the years where there was no cure and being Positive was basically a death sentence, and most importantly it’s a reminder to all of us that we can never forget how hard the queer community fought to save themselves because no one else would.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rach

    This book made me tear up multiple times, get angry and feel thankful that things have changed even though there is a long way to go still. As someone who's uncle has told me numerous personal stories relating to his friends who died of AIDS in the 80s and 90s it hit me when the author was listing the names of those he loved and lost. The deaths seem never ending and like there is no end in sight, who will be next and for Derek will he loose the love of his life. Dereks partner lived and eventuall This book made me tear up multiple times, get angry and feel thankful that things have changed even though there is a long way to go still. As someone who's uncle has told me numerous personal stories relating to his friends who died of AIDS in the 80s and 90s it hit me when the author was listing the names of those he loved and lost. The deaths seem never ending and like there is no end in sight, who will be next and for Derek will he loose the love of his life. Dereks partner lived and eventually became his husband, they set up a charity to help provide medication to those in need and have saved over a thousand lives. It's a book of survival and love that will sit with you even after you've finished. I received a free copy of this book via netgalley and am voluntarily leaving a review. 4.5 Stars

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This book is not about the AIDS epidemic in the way we are used to. It celebrates as much the lives as it griefs the deaths. As records of personal experience with the AIDS crisis are rare, I find this book would always be important, but it is particularly because “almost exclusively these records have focused on dying rather than surviving”. While the main event may be the fight of Derek Frost’s partner (Jeremy, called J) with the disease, we are also given the context of their lives around it; This book is not about the AIDS epidemic in the way we are used to. It celebrates as much the lives as it griefs the deaths. As records of personal experience with the AIDS crisis are rare, I find this book would always be important, but it is particularly because “almost exclusively these records have focused on dying rather than surviving”. While the main event may be the fight of Derek Frost’s partner (Jeremy, called J) with the disease, we are also given the context of their lives around it; another thing that I find sets this book apart. This seemingly off-topic beginning to the book may turn readers away at first, but I encourage you to keep reading. We read about the aftermath of this fight: the AidsArk charity (founded by Derek and J); this book was initially a tale about the organization. This book is, I think, the story of AidsArk and the life (of the founders) surrounding it. There was a bunch of new things I found out still (about AIDS, queer life, and much more), and I find Frost’s takes on queer culture and queer experience important, bringing nuance and alternative. The chapters at points feel disjointed, but I think it also illustrates what living through that period and experiences was like - after all, think about this: while the first mention of AIDS is at page 60, by page 120 you’ve lost track of the body count. This book is a love letter: from Derek to J, to AidsArk, to lost friends, to lost lives, to people still fighting, to Life itself, to Remembrance. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Malc_SF

    The title of this book was at first to my eyes dubious. I told myself that another pandemic is the last thing I want to read about right now. But I got curious as I realize this is a timely subject to read upon, worth giving today’s pandemic a new perspective. A few pages in and it became difficult to put this book down. I'm upset with the author for transgressing priorities in my daily task-list to the far bottom. I felt compelled to read on, not just as a gay man who can relate to the love sto The title of this book was at first to my eyes dubious. I told myself that another pandemic is the last thing I want to read about right now. But I got curious as I realize this is a timely subject to read upon, worth giving today’s pandemic a new perspective. A few pages in and it became difficult to put this book down. I'm upset with the author for transgressing priorities in my daily task-list to the far bottom. I felt compelled to read on, not just as a gay man who can relate to the love story (or shall we say storieS!) of the author, but also because it felt important not to forget history, this other pandemic which felt far more tragic than Covid-19 only because it was aggravated by pure ignorance, stigma, homophobia and to some extent a slower pace of innovation in science that we today take so much for granted. This is a lifetime biography as much as a deep historical recollection of living during the Aids pandemic. It is an interesting observation how famous and dying artists did not bother to express the pandemic in their art, probably because of the stigma of those times. It is perhaps not surprising to learn how the egocentric Robert Maxwell was only interested in PR when falsely promising Aids funding. And it is touching how the author’s life-time lover – after being diagnosed with Aids – would one day tell him “When you are eighty-five I shall probably be a dim memory for you”. And yet, the couple are alive and healthy today, living proof that there can indeed be light at the end of a very dark and deadly tunnel. I would recommend this book to anyone gay or even merely curious about the injustices suffered by gay people, or anyone who is intrigued in how life should be lived to the full and how life should also be travelled, or anyone who is open to the debate about monogamy and who understands that love can exist in different forms. How embracing it along one’s life is the most natural thing to do. The author’s experience with death at time feels like a living nightmare as he is surrounded with beautiful souls withering away to dust at very young ages. Despite his providing a very eloquent and intimate insight into this horrible years, to imagine the author’s experience will never be quite enough and one probably has to go through it to really feel the pain and suffering. The same as it is difficult to truly imagine a person’s life-long trauma after being abused sexually for several years during his or her childhood. We easily say “I can imagine” but we can never really feel the complex pain and trauma. All in all, I found this book to be quite a page turner and if it thought me something important besides the tragic consequences of the Aids virus and the price of ignorance and homophobia, more poignantly it thought me how grateful we must be each and every morning when we wake up and are able to breath air freely, stand on our own two feet and be simply....healthy! It forces one to be appreciative about our loved ones, friends and lovers, and above all how treasured each and every second is with one’s better half. We should never take our healthy life for granted.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bryony Indecisive Reader

    CW: Death, (terminal) illness, suicide, homophobia This is not my usual read. It took me a while to get into it, and I really appreciated the opportunity to read it by the time I was finished, but I’m not sure if I would have continued reading if it wasn’t an ARC. Not to say it didn’t get better because it did. Despite being about such a sad topic, it offered a story of hope and love and luck, and it offered me a glimpse of LGBTQ+ history I didn’t know anything about before. However, the first pa CW: Death, (terminal) illness, suicide, homophobia This is not my usual read. It took me a while to get into it, and I really appreciated the opportunity to read it by the time I was finished, but I’m not sure if I would have continued reading if it wasn’t an ARC. Not to say it didn’t get better because it did. Despite being about such a sad topic, it offered a story of hope and love and luck, and it offered me a glimpse of LGBTQ+ history I didn’t know anything about before. However, the first part was slow. It was a long introduction to two privileged men, introducing them through all their businesses and with huge swathes of named friends I couldn’t recall as the book went on (which isn’t their fault they have so many people they care about); their privilege does come to play a part because, thanks to this privilege, they were able to found charities that supported people suffering with AIDS, but it was difficult to see at the start. It also took me a while to get into at the start because, and I know it sounds stupid, it was a lot about sex which isn’t something I care to read about (personal preference). Once we were past the first part, I was more or less drawn into the wider world and science and history – I didn’t know how AIDS actually manifests scientifically and I didn’t know how other countries responded. It was a long story and sometimes, sadly, repetitive, reading name after name of suffering friend. It was fascinating to be offered such a wide perspective of the AIDS crisis. Although it primarily tells the story of Derek and his husband J, their position allowed them to touch the lives of so many others – both friends and people in passing. It was so inspiring to hear the story of these two men that made such conscious efforts to improve the lives of others; they used their privelige to help those less fortunate than them. It was shocking to realise how much of an issue it still is. In a modern country like ours, where LGBTQ+ people are more or less accepted, it’s horrible to realise there are so many places where they’re not. It’s also horrible to realise this disease is still going around – and, with the current state of the world, it makes you wonder how quickly we would have responded if it effected everyone. Although an immensely sad book, with lists of deaths of friends and family lost in a short time, it’s an inspiring book too. You learn what people do to support others and what people have fought to get to where they are now. Two men amongst many others used their privilege and their love to try to build a better world, and I’m grateful to have read their story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Harri

    Living and Loving in the Age of AIDS is Frost's memoir of his life before, during and after the AIDS epidemic. It is a beautiful, powerful, tragic, and yet ultimately hopeful love story. It is a personal history of the epidemic that affected so many queer people, about love at a time when the popular opinion was that queer love was nothing more than lust. Frost describes an almost idyllic sounding life prior to crisis. Both he and his husband have privileges that many other people don't, like the Living and Loving in the Age of AIDS is Frost's memoir of his life before, during and after the AIDS epidemic. It is a beautiful, powerful, tragic, and yet ultimately hopeful love story. It is a personal history of the epidemic that affected so many queer people, about love at a time when the popular opinion was that queer love was nothing more than lust. Frost describes an almost idyllic sounding life prior to crisis. Both he and his husband have privileges that many other people don't, like the ability to travel, interesting careers, and financial security most of the time. I've noticed some reviews saying that readers gave up in this part, but really it's worth pushing through, because the comparison between the first part where they have everything, and the onset of the AIDS crisis that takes so much from them, is really powerful. Before AIDS, queer people, or at least certain demographics of them, were feeling more freedom, like the world was progressing, life was getting better, and then AIDS set everything back. This book masterfully expresses the pain and shock of going from liberation, love and freedom, to AIDS, death, stigma and judgement. There are so many names and personal stories that really bring home the horror of the crisis and emphasise how we geniunely lost almost an entire generation of queer men. There is a lot of anger and sadness in this book, but also a lot of love between Frost and his husband, between them and their friends and family. There Frost's own spiritual journey, J's medical journey, and the hope they both held on to. Learning about the founding of AidsArk, the charity the two of them set up, is interesting. I remember in early noughties as a child learning about AIDS charities in Africa through my church but didn't have much of an understanding of it then. I feel like this book really deepened my understanding of exactly why, even after the development of life saving drugs, the crisis continued in many countries. Ultimately, this book is a story about love, hope, and survival. It is an important telling of queer history that the next generation of queer people needs to learn about.

  11. 4 out of 5

    willowdog

    If one ever wondered what an A-List, wealthy, couple of gay men in a long-term relationship did during the late 70s through the horrible years of AIDS before and then after the cocktail of drugs to manage the disease, and into the new millennium, then this is the work for you. The importance of this element of gay men and allies in the fight to raise money for worthwhile causes can not be denied. Derek Frost and his husband certainly put their wealth and notoriety to good use in founding of Aids If one ever wondered what an A-List, wealthy, couple of gay men in a long-term relationship did during the late 70s through the horrible years of AIDS before and then after the cocktail of drugs to manage the disease, and into the new millennium, then this is the work for you. The importance of this element of gay men and allies in the fight to raise money for worthwhile causes can not be denied. Derek Frost and his husband certainly put their wealth and notoriety to good use in founding of AidsArk, a worldwide effort to get the lifesaving drugs to individuals throughout the world. However, the writing comes off as a vanity project. Frost uses his diary to recount the activities being done. Many times this is often just a listing of famous people, places, and activities during the glamorous lives of these two. I came away thinking how fortunate these two men were to have found each other, maybe bit envious of the life. The work is interesting when it examines the conditions in other countries where they pursued AidsArk's efforts to expand the drugs accessibility to those in need. My thanks to Net Galley for this electronic copy in exchange for an unbiased review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura Whitaker

    I found Derek and "J's" journey to be heartbreaking, touching, and utterly timely, considering that we are presently in the midst of another world epidemic. It's harrowing to realize the full spectrum of people lost--only a few decades ago--to a viral pandemic that swept the world. Their story is even more impressive considering that they have devoted their lives since their own battle with AIDS to giving back to those who were less fortunate than they--as the book copy shares, they have saved m I found Derek and "J's" journey to be heartbreaking, touching, and utterly timely, considering that we are presently in the midst of another world epidemic. It's harrowing to realize the full spectrum of people lost--only a few decades ago--to a viral pandemic that swept the world. Their story is even more impressive considering that they have devoted their lives since their own battle with AIDS to giving back to those who were less fortunate than they--as the book copy shares, they have saved more than 1K+ HIV+ lives to date through their non-profit charity, AIDS Ark. A wonderful, magnificent, transformative read that I would recommend highly to anyone looking for a better understanding of the impact of the AIDS epidemic.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janet K

    Living and Loving is an important story about facing some very difficult times and building a lifeline for AIDS patients and doctors around the world. It is at moments exquisitely intimate, like a flower opening, ripening, and spreading its seeds of wisdom in a thousand directions. By telling his stories in the present tense, the author keeps them fresh and alive, and draws the reader in to experience viscerally his and J's fun times, scary times, heartbreaking and heartful times, as if they are Living and Loving is an important story about facing some very difficult times and building a lifeline for AIDS patients and doctors around the world. It is at moments exquisitely intimate, like a flower opening, ripening, and spreading its seeds of wisdom in a thousand directions. By telling his stories in the present tense, the author keeps them fresh and alive, and draws the reader in to experience viscerally his and J's fun times, scary times, heartbreaking and heartful times, as if they are our own. I recommend Living and Loving highly.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sherene Ameen

    This book gives an incredibly moving account of AIDS in the 80s and 90's. A touching memoir that revisits the pain and loss that the gay community went through; it is also is one of the most romantic love stories that I've ever read. Without wanting to give too much away - this is a must read. One to re-visit and share with loved ones and friends. This book gives an incredibly moving account of AIDS in the 80s and 90's. A touching memoir that revisits the pain and loss that the gay community went through; it is also is one of the most romantic love stories that I've ever read. Without wanting to give too much away - this is a must read. One to re-visit and share with loved ones and friends.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe

    Derek Frost presents his story in a beautiful lyrical voice. I felt like I was sitting at a poetry slam event and listening to the flow and cadence of his words. I received a free copy of this book and I am writing a review without prejudice and voluntarily. Check out the rest of my review at Phoebe's Randoms. Link in bio. Derek Frost presents his story in a beautiful lyrical voice. I felt like I was sitting at a poetry slam event and listening to the flow and cadence of his words. I received a free copy of this book and I am writing a review without prejudice and voluntarily. Check out the rest of my review at Phoebe's Randoms. Link in bio.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Hultman

    The name dropping and extensive details of their travels and special treatment J received really turned me off. Paul Monette’s “Borrowed Time” is the best AIDS memoir I’ve read. Monette and his partner, Roger Horowitz, had means, Ivy League (multiple) degrees, and famous friends. However, the reader does not find that out by reading his book. Monette’s “Becoming A Man” is equally magnificent!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robin Ballance

    A difficult subject written with real sensitivity - an excellent read which brought back so many memories of the difficulties faced by AIDS sufferers at that time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Reads

    Review to come.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cherie Waite

  20. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Aitken

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine Chan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Felicity Bentham

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kim Frost

  24. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jack King

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Brown

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yeesh

  28. 5 out of 5

    Branwen Sedai *of the Brown Ajah*

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Chat

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bookietracey

  31. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  32. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  33. 4 out of 5

    Linda Tilling

  34. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Duke

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jillian McKee Loera

  36. 4 out of 5

    Colman Moloney

  37. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  38. 5 out of 5

    Tomas

  39. 5 out of 5

    Clare Wallace

  40. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Pallent

  41. 5 out of 5

    Elsie

  42. 5 out of 5

    Jack Edwards

  43. 4 out of 5

    Molly

  44. 5 out of 5

    Helene

  45. 5 out of 5

    adam

  46. 5 out of 5

    Jesselyn Whiteside

  47. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Clinton-Copeland

  48. 4 out of 5

    Yailene_Reads

  49. 5 out of 5

    Aphra

  50. 4 out of 5

    kareena

  51. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  52. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  53. 5 out of 5

    Natallia

  54. 4 out of 5

    Luka

  55. 4 out of 5

    Ella

  56. 5 out of 5

    Sofia Jensen

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