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Weather For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech))

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What's going on up there when the rain falls, when the wind blows, when the clouds roll in and the lightning flashes? How do hurricanes arise and where to tornadoes come from? Why do seasonal conditions sometimes vary so much from one year to the next? Our ways of life, our very existences depend on knowing the answers to questions like these. Economies have been wiped out What's going on up there when the rain falls, when the wind blows, when the clouds roll in and the lightning flashes? How do hurricanes arise and where to tornadoes come from? Why do seasonal conditions sometimes vary so much from one year to the next? Our ways of life, our very existences depend on knowing the answers to questions like these. Economies have been wiped out, civilizations have risen and fallen, entire species have come into being or gone extinct because of a temperature shift of just a few degrees, or a brief shortage or glut of rainfall. With so much riding on the weather, it makes you wonder how you've lived this long without knowing more about it.Don't worry it's never too late to find out about what makes the weather tick. And there's never been an easier or more enjoyable way to learn than "Weather For Dummies." In know time, you'll know enough of weather basics to be able to: Identify cloud typesMake sense of seasonal differences in the weatherUnderstand what causes hurricanes, tornadoes, and other extreme eventsMake your own weather forecastsAvoid danger during severe weatherUnderstand the global warming debateGet a handle on smog, the greenhouse effect, El Nino, and more Award-winning science writer John D. Cox brings the science of meteorology down to earth and, with the help of dozens of cool maps and charts and stunning photographs of weather conditions, he covers a wide range of fascinating subjects, including: What is weather and how it fits into the entire global ecosystemWhat goes into making a professional daily weather forecastThe basic elements of weather, including air pressure, clouds, and humidityStorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, monsoons, and other extreme forms of weatherSeasonal weather effects and why they varyLightening, rainbows, sundogs, haloes, and other special effects Featuring clear explanations, stunning illustrations, and fun, easy experiments and activities you can do at home, "Weather For Dummies" is your guide to making sense of the baffling turmoil of the ever-changing skies above.


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What's going on up there when the rain falls, when the wind blows, when the clouds roll in and the lightning flashes? How do hurricanes arise and where to tornadoes come from? Why do seasonal conditions sometimes vary so much from one year to the next? Our ways of life, our very existences depend on knowing the answers to questions like these. Economies have been wiped out What's going on up there when the rain falls, when the wind blows, when the clouds roll in and the lightning flashes? How do hurricanes arise and where to tornadoes come from? Why do seasonal conditions sometimes vary so much from one year to the next? Our ways of life, our very existences depend on knowing the answers to questions like these. Economies have been wiped out, civilizations have risen and fallen, entire species have come into being or gone extinct because of a temperature shift of just a few degrees, or a brief shortage or glut of rainfall. With so much riding on the weather, it makes you wonder how you've lived this long without knowing more about it.Don't worry it's never too late to find out about what makes the weather tick. And there's never been an easier or more enjoyable way to learn than "Weather For Dummies." In know time, you'll know enough of weather basics to be able to: Identify cloud typesMake sense of seasonal differences in the weatherUnderstand what causes hurricanes, tornadoes, and other extreme eventsMake your own weather forecastsAvoid danger during severe weatherUnderstand the global warming debateGet a handle on smog, the greenhouse effect, El Nino, and more Award-winning science writer John D. Cox brings the science of meteorology down to earth and, with the help of dozens of cool maps and charts and stunning photographs of weather conditions, he covers a wide range of fascinating subjects, including: What is weather and how it fits into the entire global ecosystemWhat goes into making a professional daily weather forecastThe basic elements of weather, including air pressure, clouds, and humidityStorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, monsoons, and other extreme forms of weatherSeasonal weather effects and why they varyLightening, rainbows, sundogs, haloes, and other special effects Featuring clear explanations, stunning illustrations, and fun, easy experiments and activities you can do at home, "Weather For Dummies" is your guide to making sense of the baffling turmoil of the ever-changing skies above.

30 review for Weather For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech))

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    Well, Bill, I feel a little let down by your recommendation (Bill Gates touted Weather for Dummies as the best book to explain the link between climate change and current weather). While there is some good, there is also bad, and some plain ugly... Because I'm feeling annoyed, I have to start with the bad. I really dislike the title of this whole series: "For Dummies." It seems to me that the very act of seeking out a book to learn something one doesn't know disqualifies one from being a "dummy." Well, Bill, I feel a little let down by your recommendation (Bill Gates touted Weather for Dummies as the best book to explain the link between climate change and current weather). While there is some good, there is also bad, and some plain ugly... Because I'm feeling annoyed, I have to start with the bad. I really dislike the title of this whole series: "For Dummies." It seems to me that the very act of seeking out a book to learn something one doesn't know disqualifies one from being a "dummy." I get that the information is "dumbed down" to be less technical and easier for the lay audience to digest, but there are many places one can go to find that without being insulted by a title! Each chapter begins with a page that was a bit too "dumb" for me - some sort of "attention-catching" intro that I found myself skipping. My next complaint is that this book edition, published 2021, only seems to use data from 2000 and before. Cox's temperature charts, pollution graphs and so forth end in 1999 or 2000. In a whole chapter talking about devastating hurricanes, there is no mention of Katrina (2005), the costliest storm in US history. In the chapter about climate change there is vague discussion of the increased frequency of storms and forest fires, but none of the data or specifics from the last 20 years that prove the point. Obviously this is a reprint of an earlier publication, but why on earth would a publisher create a new edition on such a timely subject, yet ignore the past two decades??? Wait, let me guess. Gates made his recommendation, and they hustled out a reprint of the old 2000 edition without updating one single thing to capitalize on his endorsement. Slick. There is a definitely a lot of good in the book as well. Bill Gates is correct that Cox does an excellent job of helping the reader understand weather and climate. I was particularly enlightened by his discussions of ocean currents, high and low pressure systems that shift with the earth's rotations, and the formations of storms. I was surprised the chapter on man-made climate change wasn't more extensive given Gates' recommendation, but it did have excellent if at times outdated information. And the ugly... the last few chapters are just silly. Cox goes through a bunch of weather myths (like "mare's tails and mackerel scales") and suggests what they might be based on. The worst is the chapter "Ten Crafty Critters" which throws out a bunch of folk weather forecasting based on the behavior of ants, cats, dogs, frogs, birds, and so forth, but this time without analyzing if there's any truth behind the myths. And a chapter on simple at-home weather experiments? Really? Some of the chapters were 4.25 stars, some were terrible. And I can't get past the complete absence of the 21st century. 3 stars overall, even though I learned so much!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Harry

    A really excellent resource. If it didn't have the stupid dummy comments sprinkled throughout it would be 5 stars. Searching for e-books on weather I found only children's books and academic tomes for big bucks. I just wanted to learn about weather in more detail. Good book for that. A really excellent resource. If it didn't have the stupid dummy comments sprinkled throughout it would be 5 stars. Searching for e-books on weather I found only children's books and academic tomes for big bucks. I just wanted to learn about weather in more detail. Good book for that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sanjay Banerjee

    I picked up this book to read after Bill Gates highly recommended this book for both as a primer and reference book on weather and climate-related events and phenomena (in his latest book on Climate Change that I finished a few days ago). The book explains various weather and climate related phenomena very well even for a layperson.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Trina

    First off, any book for dummies has gotta have pictures. Weather is practically made for photography: Clouds! Storms! Rainbows! Anything to break up the charts, graphs, and diagrams... Except for the cover, the only photos in this book are grainy black & white shots🤦🏻‍♀️ Second, Weather for Dummies is thick, heavy, and dense (350+pages!) Do we really need a section on “experiments & activities you can do at home”?🤷‍♀️ Third, bad puns like “Hail of Fame”, “Putting on airs”, “Pressure-it’s a gas” do First off, any book for dummies has gotta have pictures. Weather is practically made for photography: Clouds! Storms! Rainbows! Anything to break up the charts, graphs, and diagrams... Except for the cover, the only photos in this book are grainy black & white shots🤦🏻‍♀️ Second, Weather for Dummies is thick, heavy, and dense (350+pages!) Do we really need a section on “experiments & activities you can do at home”?🤷‍♀️ Third, bad puns like “Hail of Fame”, “Putting on airs”, “Pressure-it’s a gas” don’t help. They might appeal to child readers but those of us dummies expecting the mysteries of weather to be revealed will find the wordplay lame.🙆🏽‍♀️

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lee Tyner

    Meh I recently bought a 5-in-1 weather station and wanted to learn more. I've enjoyed other Dummies books but found this one too sophomoric in humor and content. I wanted more info. about understanding the weather on my local news and in my backyard. Thus, rather than Top Ten Disasters and sub tropical jet streams, I would have liked more on the basics. Frankly, I considered giving it two stars. Meh I recently bought a 5-in-1 weather station and wanted to learn more. I've enjoyed other Dummies books but found this one too sophomoric in humor and content. I wanted more info. about understanding the weather on my local news and in my backyard. Thus, rather than Top Ten Disasters and sub tropical jet streams, I would have liked more on the basics. Frankly, I considered giving it two stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carolee

    A gift for my husband who insists on treating the Weather Channel just like every other regular channel ... I hear it droning on & on & on from every corner of the house.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael Reilly

    Bill Gates recommended it as the best book to explain how weather works. I thought it was OK. Cox covers a huge amount of territory. Necessarily, as promised in the title, he is pretty superficial. He tells us what happens with ocean currents or warm fronts or El Nino or cloud formation but he is very light on the why or the science behind it. His goal seems to be to help you understand a weather report. It is a noble but limited goal. The graphics are ok but not great. Good graphics should be a p Bill Gates recommended it as the best book to explain how weather works. I thought it was OK. Cox covers a huge amount of territory. Necessarily, as promised in the title, he is pretty superficial. He tells us what happens with ocean currents or warm fronts or El Nino or cloud formation but he is very light on the why or the science behind it. His goal seems to be to help you understand a weather report. It is a noble but limited goal. The graphics are ok but not great. Good graphics should be a priority in this kind of books. The graphics on how wind moves around the planet or what happens when a cold front meets a warm front are confusing and don't really explain what's going on. The problem is probably that I have a very little knowledge about weather and this book is aimed at someone who has no knowledge of weather. I am surprised about Gates' recommendation since he has a good amount of knowledge about weather. I suspect that this is what he thinks someone with no knowledge could use.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mark Vargas

    This book is written as a reference book where the reader should just jump to whatever section they are interested in. I read it front to back, so there was (justifiably) a lot of recycled material. The author wrote the book aiming for an American audience as 95%+ of the examples and interesting systems/phenomena were based on weather affecting the United States. There were several problems with the book... the author wrote about 75% of the book for the lowest common denominator, with quite a bit This book is written as a reference book where the reader should just jump to whatever section they are interested in. I read it front to back, so there was (justifiably) a lot of recycled material. The author wrote the book aiming for an American audience as 95%+ of the examples and interesting systems/phenomena were based on weather affecting the United States. There were several problems with the book... the author wrote about 75% of the book for the lowest common denominator, with quite a bit of material that I would think is somewhat general (or uninteresting) knowledge. For the remainder of the book, the parts with interesting and more complicated thoughts, he would just gloss over and not give the reasons or science behind them. When he would dive a bit deeper and get into some of the science, he would not connect the dots and did a horrendous job of explaining it. Weather is however an amazing part of nature and thus there was still plenty of new and good information to keep the reader interested.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michal

    It is undoubtedly a good encyclopedia about the weather. The word encyclopedia is crucial. It was not evident to me when I was purchasing the e-book version. Such a version is hard to follow, but I'm sure it is good on paper. Also, it is not meant to be read from front to back. You should use it as a reference guide when you are curious about some specific topic. Everything will be there—any knowledge essential for more sections will be repeated in both or more places. I don't understand why the It is undoubtedly a good encyclopedia about the weather. The word encyclopedia is crucial. It was not evident to me when I was purchasing the e-book version. Such a version is hard to follow, but I'm sure it is good on paper. Also, it is not meant to be read from front to back. You should use it as a reference guide when you are curious about some specific topic. Everything will be there—any knowledge essential for more sections will be repeated in both or more places. I don't understand why the e-book version exists. But I will not buy it on paper anyway because it is too US-centric—most of the data and explanations are for the US. It is sometimes limiting for European readers like me. Some information is not even necessary at all outside US. Anyway, it can explain some basics about weather well. I learned several useful tips and tricks alongside with facts.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Wagner

    If all you are interested in are the nuts and bolts of weather and don't mind the cute "Dummies" language, this book is ok. My problem is that the Kindle version I bought was supposedly a 2020 edition; however the material appears to be at least 20 years old. For example the climate change chapter was clearly written in about 2000 and lot's has happened on that subject in the last 21 years. In the section on hurricanes, descriptions of storms from the 1990's but not a word about Katrina, etc.. If all you are interested in are the nuts and bolts of weather and don't mind the cute "Dummies" language, this book is ok. My problem is that the Kindle version I bought was supposedly a 2020 edition; however the material appears to be at least 20 years old. For example the climate change chapter was clearly written in about 2000 and lot's has happened on that subject in the last 21 years. In the section on hurricanes, descriptions of storms from the 1990's but not a word about Katrina, etc..

  11. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    This edition was published in 2000 so might have been dated in some ways but I no longer feel like a dummie when it comes to Weather! My favorite part was learning about clouds and I've been using that knowledge every day when I'm outside. I feel like I have a better grasp of things so if I watch a weather report I will now understand more about low and high pressure, winds, etc. I wish they would change the title however-you aren't a dummie if you are trying to learn! Maybe Weather for the Unin This edition was published in 2000 so might have been dated in some ways but I no longer feel like a dummie when it comes to Weather! My favorite part was learning about clouds and I've been using that knowledge every day when I'm outside. I feel like I have a better grasp of things so if I watch a weather report I will now understand more about low and high pressure, winds, etc. I wish they would change the title however-you aren't a dummie if you are trying to learn! Maybe Weather for the Uninitiated....

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Good starter book about weather forecasting. Unfortunately it's about 20 years old thus I'm sure the information could be updated due to technological advances over that timeframe. It did give me some good basics about the weather and things I should have known already but didn't. Good starter book about weather forecasting. Unfortunately it's about 20 years old thus I'm sure the information could be updated due to technological advances over that timeframe. It did give me some good basics about the weather and things I should have known already but didn't.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Vincent

    Weather seems to be more complex than it shows up in real life.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael R

    Easy reading recommended to me by Bill Gates.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    Very informative. Both technical and superficial (as one would expect from a "Dummies" book). Recommended as a good overview of weather science. Very informative. Both technical and superficial (as one would expect from a "Dummies" book). Recommended as a good overview of weather science.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alan Eyre

    Suboptimal wheat to chaff ratio, but covered the basics

  17. 5 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    O

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marcel Schwarz

    Well written and good Infos, especially also very good Information about climate change. Nevertheless, at times i wished it was a little less US centric.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tom Beck

    Great overview on the weather

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark Clarkson

    Interesting book, but too USA centric.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Roberts

    The book I read to research this post was Weather For Dummies by John D Cox which is an excellent book which I bought from kobo. This book tells you all the basics of weather forecasting as well as looking at weather systems in general around the world. A lot of it is focused on the weather in the USA and there isn't all that much on the weather in Europe which could be because they have a fairly mild climate. Apparently in the North West Pacific is an area called Typhoon Alley which gets loads The book I read to research this post was Weather For Dummies by John D Cox which is an excellent book which I bought from kobo. This book tells you all the basics of weather forecasting as well as looking at weather systems in general around the world. A lot of it is focused on the weather in the USA and there isn't all that much on the weather in Europe which could be because they have a fairly mild climate. Apparently in the North West Pacific is an area called Typhoon Alley which gets loads of hurricanes and the US protectorate of Guam is in this area. In the USA in an area by the Gulf of Mexico which includes Texas & Kansas is an area called Tornado Alley. Tornadoes are rare outside this area. A lot of hurricanes come into the USA from the Atlantic & Pacific. Thomas Jefferson was the 1st person to realise that hurricanes actually travel from 1 area to the next. He couldn't understand why the hurricane didn't travel in the direction it was blowing. We know now that there are strong winds in the upper atmosphere that direct the hurricane around. These winds or thermals often blow at 100 MPH & in times of storms can reach 210 MPH. They are caused by the change in temperature between the different parts of the atmosphere. It's interesting that some of the biggest supercomputers in the world are used to predict the weather. They often have huge amounts to process involving things like temperature measurements around the world and some of these supercomputers can simulate the complete weather system around the world.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matúš Kapusta

    Very interesting read, though a little too detailed for someone who is not living in the USA. On the other hand, it was easy to skip some very regional stuff and focus on more global information, which there is plenty of in this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steffi De la montagne

    Easy to read, but also very informative. A good start for those who want to learn more about the subject, with a touch of humor :)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Very helpful in explaining numerous different weather scenarios and why weather is what it is during certain times of the year. Will make for a good reference too

  25. 4 out of 5

    chris zabel

    I'm a weather freak and this book has everything I ever wanted to know without sitting in a classroom. It makes me want to change my profession. I'm a weather freak and this book has everything I ever wanted to know without sitting in a classroom. It makes me want to change my profession.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    this a good book for weather lovers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    M_agunngh

    Bahasa riset di kemas dengan bahasa umum dan lebih enak dimengerti, fenomena cuaca sampe iklim di gambarkan dengan perumpamaan yang bakalan semua orang tahu. its great...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Scott Monster

    It's an ok book. It's written for someone with some science background. It's an ok book. It's written for someone with some science background.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Silva

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hilliard Macbeth

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