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To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876

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From the #1 bestselling author and anchor of Fox News Channel’s Special Report with Bret Baier comes a riveting reassessment of Ulysses S. Grant, arguing that the great Civil War commander’s battle to save the Union continued to the very end of his presidency when a crisis threatened to fracture the still fragile nation once again. In this follow-up to his acclaimed “Three From the #1 bestselling author and anchor of Fox News Channel’s Special Report with Bret Baier comes a riveting reassessment of Ulysses S. Grant, arguing that the great Civil War commander’s battle to save the Union continued to the very end of his presidency when a crisis threatened to fracture the still fragile nation once again. In this follow-up to his acclaimed “Three Days” trilogy, Bret Baier’s To Rescue the Republic dramatically illuminates the life of one of America’s most consequential yet misunderstood leaders, Ulysses S. Grant, whose actions both as general and as president played an unparalleled role in preserving the United States. Born a tanner’s son in rugged Ohio in 1822 and battle-tested by the Mexican American War, Grant met his destiny on the bloody fields of the Civil War. His daring and resolve as a general gained the attention of President Lincoln, then desperate for bold leadership. Lincoln appointed Grant as Lieutenant General of the Union Army in March 1864. Within a year, Grant’s forces had seized Richmond and forced Robert E. Lee to surrender. Four years later, the reunified nation faced another leadership void after Lincoln’s assassination and an unworthy successor completed his term. Again, Grant answered the call. At stake once more was the future of the Union, for though the Southern states had been defeated, it remained to be seen if the former Confederacy could be reintegrated into the country—and if the Union could ensure the rights and welfare of African Americans in the South. Grant met the challenge by boldly advancing an agenda of Reconstruction and aggressively countering the Ku Klux Klan.   In his final weeks in the White House, however, Grant faced a crisis that threatened to undo his life’s work. The contested presidential election of 1876 produced no clear victory for either Republican Rutherford B. Hayes or Democrat Samuel Tilden, who carried most of the former Confederacy. Soon Southern states vowed to revolt if Tilden was not declared the victor. Grant was determined to use his influence to preserve the Union, establishing an electoral commission to peaceably settle the issue. Grant brokered a grand bargain: the installation of Republican Hayes to the presidency, with concessions to the Democrats that effectively ended Reconstruction. This painful compromise saved the nation, but tragically condemned the South to another century of civil-rights oppression. Deep with contemporary resonance and brimming with fresh detail that takes readers from the battlefields of the Civil War to the corridors of power where men decided the fate of the nation in back rooms, To Rescue the Republic reveals Grant, for all his complexity, to be among the first rank of American heroes. 


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From the #1 bestselling author and anchor of Fox News Channel’s Special Report with Bret Baier comes a riveting reassessment of Ulysses S. Grant, arguing that the great Civil War commander’s battle to save the Union continued to the very end of his presidency when a crisis threatened to fracture the still fragile nation once again. In this follow-up to his acclaimed “Three From the #1 bestselling author and anchor of Fox News Channel’s Special Report with Bret Baier comes a riveting reassessment of Ulysses S. Grant, arguing that the great Civil War commander’s battle to save the Union continued to the very end of his presidency when a crisis threatened to fracture the still fragile nation once again. In this follow-up to his acclaimed “Three Days” trilogy, Bret Baier’s To Rescue the Republic dramatically illuminates the life of one of America’s most consequential yet misunderstood leaders, Ulysses S. Grant, whose actions both as general and as president played an unparalleled role in preserving the United States. Born a tanner’s son in rugged Ohio in 1822 and battle-tested by the Mexican American War, Grant met his destiny on the bloody fields of the Civil War. His daring and resolve as a general gained the attention of President Lincoln, then desperate for bold leadership. Lincoln appointed Grant as Lieutenant General of the Union Army in March 1864. Within a year, Grant’s forces had seized Richmond and forced Robert E. Lee to surrender. Four years later, the reunified nation faced another leadership void after Lincoln’s assassination and an unworthy successor completed his term. Again, Grant answered the call. At stake once more was the future of the Union, for though the Southern states had been defeated, it remained to be seen if the former Confederacy could be reintegrated into the country—and if the Union could ensure the rights and welfare of African Americans in the South. Grant met the challenge by boldly advancing an agenda of Reconstruction and aggressively countering the Ku Klux Klan.   In his final weeks in the White House, however, Grant faced a crisis that threatened to undo his life’s work. The contested presidential election of 1876 produced no clear victory for either Republican Rutherford B. Hayes or Democrat Samuel Tilden, who carried most of the former Confederacy. Soon Southern states vowed to revolt if Tilden was not declared the victor. Grant was determined to use his influence to preserve the Union, establishing an electoral commission to peaceably settle the issue. Grant brokered a grand bargain: the installation of Republican Hayes to the presidency, with concessions to the Democrats that effectively ended Reconstruction. This painful compromise saved the nation, but tragically condemned the South to another century of civil-rights oppression. Deep with contemporary resonance and brimming with fresh detail that takes readers from the battlefields of the Civil War to the corridors of power where men decided the fate of the nation in back rooms, To Rescue the Republic reveals Grant, for all his complexity, to be among the first rank of American heroes. 

30 review for To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876

  1. 5 out of 5

    Spectre

    If your knowledge of U.S. Grant comes primarily from history classes in high school and college, you learned that Grant was the commander who won the Civil War accepting Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox and later became a two term president. You were taught little to nothing about his childhood, his military campaigns from Mexico through the Civil War itself, or his administration’s policies nor did you learn of his role during reconstruction or his personal involvement settling the conte If your knowledge of U.S. Grant comes primarily from history classes in high school and college, you learned that Grant was the commander who won the Civil War accepting Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox and later became a two term president. You were taught little to nothing about his childhood, his military campaigns from Mexico through the Civil War itself, or his administration’s policies nor did you learn of his role during reconstruction or his personal involvement settling the contested presidential election of 1876. This book offers you an opportunity to eliminate those gaps in your knowledge of the 18th President of the United States. Bret Baier covers the Civil War in 85 pages! Obviously, this abridged narrative leaves out many aspects of the war and Grant’s role in it but it was never the author’s goal to compete with the James McPhersons’s, the Shelby Foote’s, or any of the other popular and well read historians of that timeframe. His objective was to convey a sense of the man himself and his nation saving actions. In this, he succeeds! I particularly enjoyed Chapter 9 (The Battleground of Reconstruction) and Part Four (A Grand Bargain) for there the real U.S. Grant is revealed. If you are one who believes that the 2000 (Bush v Gore) or the 2020 (Trump v Biden) were disputed and unfair, you will find that the election of 1876 very interesting. This is a book worth reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nolan

    This is a 10-star book in a five-Star World. I really enjoyed listening to the audio narration, which was fantastic as you might expect. When I wasn't able to be near my book player, I read much of the book in Bookshare. They must have used a publisher copy. It was beautifully paginated and there were no errors. This is essentially the story of President Grant the unifier. I must admit that, having read a variety of Grant biographies, I knew at least much of what I read in the early chapters. I This is a 10-star book in a five-Star World. I really enjoyed listening to the audio narration, which was fantastic as you might expect. When I wasn't able to be near my book player, I read much of the book in Bookshare. They must have used a publisher copy. It was beautifully paginated and there were no errors. This is essentially the story of President Grant the unifier. I must admit that, having read a variety of Grant biographies, I knew at least much of what I read in the early chapters. I was initially a little disappointed, thinking perhaps this would not provide me with anything I didn't know already. I was extremely wrong! First, you need to know that this is well written. It's a compelling book about one of the great presidents in our history. The authors accurately portray Grant as a man of peace who was forced to deal with war. He was sickened by blood loss and he was revolted by human suffering. When the Civil War ended, it was his rather magnanimous surrender terms that helped unite the country. But a scant 11 years later, the nation would once again be in trouble. The famous election of Rutherford Hayes and Samuel Tilden would divide the nation dangerously and in ways not seen since the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. This is a great set of chapters. You read about Grant's efforts to find compromise. He was in the final weeks of his presidency, but he knew that to do nothing would be national suicide. Emotions ran high, and many in Congress brought pistols with them into the session. These final chapters are extremely compelling and will keep you reading to the back of the book. This is a highly sympathetic book toward Ulysses Grant. I was thrilled to see it that way. It would have meant a great deal less to me had this been some kind of slash-and-trash book. The bottom line is this will probably go down as my favorite nonfiction book of the year. It really is just that good! I learned many things I didn't know, and the authors kept me interested in the story with every page and every word. I have read this duo's other books, and they, too, were very much worth my time. This one will not disappoint by any measure! Just a quick personal note, if I may: I am dealing with a significant arthritis flare today, which meant that I used the Microsoft Edge dictation features to craft this review. I think I have gone over it quite well in terms of some of the quirky things that can happen when you dictate, but if there is a number 2 instead of the word to or too, I apologize for not catching it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tony Siciliano

    This is a work of history written by a news reporter. It's not a scholarly work that delves into the arcane details of Grant's life. In this case, that's not a bad thing. Being a history buff, I was prepared to hate the writing as cheap popularization of history with a bit of conservative philosophy thrown in the mix. I was wrong on all counts. I found Baier's writing simple and clear. He describes and explains complex events, like the disputed presidential election of 1876, in a way that's unde This is a work of history written by a news reporter. It's not a scholarly work that delves into the arcane details of Grant's life. In this case, that's not a bad thing. Being a history buff, I was prepared to hate the writing as cheap popularization of history with a bit of conservative philosophy thrown in the mix. I was wrong on all counts. I found Baier's writing simple and clear. He describes and explains complex events, like the disputed presidential election of 1876, in a way that's understandable and which makes no claim to legitimize either political party's activities. Nor does he hide the darker side of politics. Baier humanizes Grant and seems to have dispelled the notion of Grant as a dim-witted drunk who permitted corruption while in office. Grant appears as a man of single purpose, utterly dedicated to not only ending slavery, but to pulling all Americans together in one hard-working and prosperous community. He was utterly devoted to his family, and eternally loyal to friends, even those who did not deserve his loyalty. Americans saw something in him that caused them to elect him twice with overwhelming margins. He was intensely popular, in both the North and the South, and widely admired for his Lincoln-like compassion. He lost his battle to bringing full equality to African Americans as the nation tired of the tensions that wracked this country for so many years after the Civil War. It would take nearly one hundred more years before the nation seriously addressed that agenda again. This was an intelligent, well-researched book, and I would recommend it to anyone interested in this country's history and, especially, on this country's long, long journey to equality that is not yet complete.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joan Starr

    I see two people gave less than sterling stars. Without explaining why they opted to give 3 stars is not any help. Thus, I ignore.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pegg

    I've been fascinated by the Civil War since Jr. High. I've read widely on the subject, and so it's always fun when I stumble across a new book that adds something I haven't read before. I was able to attend Bret Baier's talk at the Reagan Library in late October, so I had a good idea what was in the book, but I still found a few nuggets that intrigued me. The first half of the book is about Grant and brings us up through the end of the war. There was one new - and startling - fact I found in ther I've been fascinated by the Civil War since Jr. High. I've read widely on the subject, and so it's always fun when I stumble across a new book that adds something I haven't read before. I was able to attend Bret Baier's talk at the Reagan Library in late October, so I had a good idea what was in the book, but I still found a few nuggets that intrigued me. The first half of the book is about Grant and brings us up through the end of the war. There was one new - and startling - fact I found in there. I won't put a spoiler in here though. Then the end of the book was about Reconstruction and the election of 1876. I didn't know nearly as much about Reconstruction as I did about the war, so I learned quite a bit. Probably the most intriguing part of the whole book is the horse-trading that went on during the 1876 election. The claims of massive fraud (some of which proved to be true - some of it couldn't be proven) and the possibility of a second war erupting kept me turning the pages. This wasn't dry, dusty history. Baier does a good job of telling the story and keeping the reader engaged. I haven't read his other books, which are more recent history, but I may have to pick them up after reading this one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bobbi

    I thought I knew a lot about Grant, but I had only scratched the surface. Bret Baier made Grant human, not just statistics, but his thoughts, his failures, his love for family, his beliefs and his strict code of conduct. He believed in preserving the union and did everything he could to make that happen. I had no idea how he had a major role in making sure that another civil war would occur during reconstruction. Our country today is eerily reminiscent of the period after the Civil War. Baier is I thought I knew a lot about Grant, but I had only scratched the surface. Bret Baier made Grant human, not just statistics, but his thoughts, his failures, his love for family, his beliefs and his strict code of conduct. He believed in preserving the union and did everything he could to make that happen. I had no idea how he had a major role in making sure that another civil war would occur during reconstruction. Our country today is eerily reminiscent of the period after the Civil War. Baier is a great writer, brings the subject alive and making you regret the book has to end. I particularly enjoyed that he narrated the book. I am definitely going to read his other books.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Cook

    Really good book. I've read several books about how Lincoln saved the union, but never much about what Grant did outside the military victories in the Civil War. This book was great because rather than go into a ton of detail about each battle, Baier talks about the major battles and their context in the overall war. As bad as things are now in our country with just about every institution having been overtaken by a bunch of elites seemingly intent on their marxist dream, it seems like things we Really good book. I've read several books about how Lincoln saved the union, but never much about what Grant did outside the military victories in the Civil War. This book was great because rather than go into a ton of detail about each battle, Baier talks about the major battles and their context in the overall war. As bad as things are now in our country with just about every institution having been overtaken by a bunch of elites seemingly intent on their marxist dream, it seems like things were even worse back then. So I guess there is hope. Maybe we'll have a Lincoln or Grant step up again soon.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mark Mears

    To Rescue the Republic I enjoyed the book. Mostly because it focused on one of my favorite presidents, President Grant. I cannot say I learned much new, but that is likely because I have already read President Grant’s memoir, Ron Chernow’s book and several others. If you have not read up on General Grant, you will find this book very informative and interesting. Baier’s writing style is compelling. I do not agree with the comparison to January 6, 2020. Since Baier states he was already well into To Rescue the Republic I enjoyed the book. Mostly because it focused on one of my favorite presidents, President Grant. I cannot say I learned much new, but that is likely because I have already read President Grant’s memoir, Ron Chernow’s book and several others. If you have not read up on General Grant, you will find this book very informative and interesting. Baier’s writing style is compelling. I do not agree with the comparison to January 6, 2020. Since Baier states he was already well into researching and writing the book when those events occurred, it seems likely the focus of the book was changed in an attempt to make it relevant to a larger audience. It does illustrate the fact that the divisions of today are nothing new. They have always existed, and likely always will.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Fulcoly

    Excellent book! Was not aware of the tight election of 1876 and enjoyed learning of the controversies and chaos that resulted and how Grant influenced the outcomes. Politics were quite rough and tumble back then! Brett brings Grant to life in a very readable way. With all Grant did to promote and expand civil rights, his is one statue not to knock over! I can’t wait for the next of Brett’s books!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Monteleone

    I am loathe to ever pick up a book “written” by a t.v talking head. They tout their best selling book while shilling every day on their show. But President Grant is one of (if not my) favorite President. So I felt compelled. It’s a great intro into the man. If you’re somewhat interested in learning about this President, I recommend it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Larry White

    Rising to the Occasion; Who Today? Fox News anchor Bret Baier’s timely biography of the 18th President of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant, offers not only a highly readable and interesting historical record, but also a perspective that shines a bright light on the contemporary American political and ideological divisiveness. It also demonstrates that there can be hope, both for individuals and for a nation divided. Baier provides an honest appraisal of Grant’s ordinary nature and dearth of acc Rising to the Occasion; Who Today? Fox News anchor Bret Baier’s timely biography of the 18th President of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant, offers not only a highly readable and interesting historical record, but also a perspective that shines a bright light on the contemporary American political and ideological divisiveness. It also demonstrates that there can be hope, both for individuals and for a nation divided. Baier provides an honest appraisal of Grant’s ordinary nature and dearth of accomplishments early in his life. Although he showed signs of perseverance, determination, integrity and care as a youth, his was a decidedly undistinguished life until circumstances changed everything. He would never have been predicted to rise beyond the ordinary. His academic record, a blemished initial military career, his brief foray into farming, and his unpromising and capitulating career into his family’s retail business all indicated an unremarkable life at best. Even his physical bearing and modest stature portended an undistinguished future. Throughout, however, his basic integrity, love for his family and care for others were unwavering, if sometimes misunderstood. And he was supported by an adoring wife and children, which always is a sign of character. The onset of the Civil War was the turning point. Just before his 39th birthday, Grant was drawn back into service. While the volunteers from his hometown sought his leadership, he started off modestly until unfolding circumstances caused him to demonstrate leadership that previously was not apparent. Much of Baier’s book deals with Grant’s exceptional military career during the conflict, his emergence as a heroic national figure, and his rise to a populist presidency that focused on restoring the war-broken Union. All well-told and of compelling interest. A tale of redemption in many ways. But the crowning part of the story is the election of 1876. The popular President (even many in the South admired his lack of vindictiveness toward the region’s failed and bloody secession) made the magnanimous decision to follow Washington’s example and not seek a third term, putting the office up for play. It was a highly contentious election, as are so many, but the stakes were higher than usual with the ideological division between North and South still threatening the Union. Falling so soon after the Civil War, the election of 1876 is not fully appreciated for its significance in American history. Without going into the details in this review, Grant assumed a peacemaker’s role and catastrophe was narrowly averted. There is debate about the consequences of the compromise of the election, but surely America survived to the benefit of the world, even though some aspects of the American freedom journey have been too slowly realized. Yet, what would have been the consequences if the Union had failed at this critical juncture? After relating the final years of Grant’s life Baier concludes with a comparison to the American political and ideological divisions of today. Certainly, there is hope that a divided America can come together again if it was able to overcome the greater divisions of Grant’s lifetime. The comparisons are imperfect as they always are. It’s unlikely that a contentious election could be resolved as it was in 1876. And our geographical divisions are less stark than then, adding, perhaps, to our ideological divisions. But the causes of freedom and Union are powerful, and present circumstances cry out for leadership to emerge as it did in 1876. But who will that be?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Since the author is with Fox News, I admit that I was skeptical. Fox News has been repeating Republican lies that the presidential election of 2020 was rigged and has been defending the pro-Trump insurrectionists who stormed the US Capitol on January 6, 2021. I have heard some Trump allies call for the federal government to convene a commission to decide the true outcome of the election and I have heard them cite the commission set up under Grant to sort through the results of the disputed elect Since the author is with Fox News, I admit that I was skeptical. Fox News has been repeating Republican lies that the presidential election of 2020 was rigged and has been defending the pro-Trump insurrectionists who stormed the US Capitol on January 6, 2021. I have heard some Trump allies call for the federal government to convene a commission to decide the true outcome of the election and I have heard them cite the commission set up under Grant to sort through the results of the disputed election of 1876. So, I suspected that Baier's book might have been an elaboration of that argument, using more history. Baier says otherwise. As he has claimed in interviews about his book, like many media outlets, Fox maintains a firewall between opinion and news. And while commentators like Sean Hannity have been repeating Trump talking points about the 2020 election, news anchors on the network have stuck close to the facts. Baier says that he is aware of no evidence to call the election into question and that he was horrified by the Capitol insurrection. I was still skeptical but once I started his Grant book, I discovered that I need not have worried. It appears to be a fair and historically accurate history well documented with primary and secondary sources of the kind you'd find from an academic historian. But unlike their books, Baier's is written for a general reader and so is more accessible and frankly, more entertaining than the average Grant biography. I don't know if Baier or co-writer Catherine Whitney deserves more of the credit for producing a gripping narrative that also seems to be solid history, but somebody deserves thanks and praise. The book is an excellent introduction to Grant for anyone, spending about half its pages on a summary of his life and career through the end of the Civil War. For a reader already aware of that part of Grant's story, the other half of the book offers much value. It tells the story of Grant's post-war generalship, his presidency and the climax of his work to save the nation by overseeing the process to determine the winner of the 1876 presidential race. Grant himself was immensely proud of his role in finding a compromise that would work for both sides, in his mind preventing a renewal of open violence that threatened to become a second Civil War. Baier shows much sympathy for Grant and especially for his efforts to protect the civil rights of Black Southerners, and his text is keenly aware of the tragedy that the compromise of 1876 wound up ending Reconstruction. This is a story that needs to be told today more than ever and with this engaging book, Baier has proven that he may just be one of the best people to tell it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Craig Beam

    An epic history spanning the battlefields of the Civil War, the violent turmoil of Reconstruction, and not forgotten electoral crisis that nearly fractured a reunited nation, Brett Baier’s To Rescue the Republic dramatically reveals Ulysses S. grant’s essential yet underappreciated role in preserving the United States during an unprecedented period of division. Born a tanner’s son in ruggedOhio in 1822 and battle tested by the Mexican-American War, Grant met his destiny on the bloody fields of t An epic history spanning the battlefields of the Civil War, the violent turmoil of Reconstruction, and not forgotten electoral crisis that nearly fractured a reunited nation, Brett Baier’s To Rescue the Republic dramatically reveals Ulysses S. grant’s essential yet underappreciated role in preserving the United States during an unprecedented period of division. Born a tanner’s son in ruggedOhio in 1822 and battle tested by the Mexican-American War, Grant met his destiny on the bloody fields of the Civil War. Desperate for bold leadership, President Lincoln appointed Grand Lieutenant General of the Union Army in 1864. Within a year, Grant had forced Robert E. Lee to surrender. Four years later, the reunited nation faced another leadership void after Lincoln’s assassination. Again, Grant answered the call. At stake once more was future of the Union, for through the Southern states had been defeated, it remained to be seen if former Confederacy could be reintegrated into the country - and if the Union could ensure the rights and welfare of Blacks in the South. Grant met the challenge by boldly advancing an agenda of Reconstruction and aggressively countering the Ku Klux Klan. In his final weeks in the White a house, however, Grant faced a crisis that threatened to undo his life’s work. The presidential election of 1876 produced no clear clear victory for either Republican Rutherford B. Hayes or Democrat Samuel J. Tilden, who carried most of the former Confederacy. Southern states vowed to revolt if Tilden was not declared the victor. Grant was determined to use his influence to preserve the Union-but at what price? Brimming with contemporary resonance and fresh details, To Rescue the Republic reveals Ulysses S. Grant, for all of his complexity, to be among the first rank of American heroes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    Compelling and informative, this audiobook highlights the nearly-forgotten life of one of America's greatest and most important presidents. While not as long as Chernow's excellent tome, Baier's research sets the stage for the many watershed moments in Grant's life and decisions, when he indeed did rescue the American Republic. A few nuggets: - Grant realized that the nature of the relationship between masters and slaves made "kindness" impossible, in spite of the fact that self-proclaimed "kind" Compelling and informative, this audiobook highlights the nearly-forgotten life of one of America's greatest and most important presidents. While not as long as Chernow's excellent tome, Baier's research sets the stage for the many watershed moments in Grant's life and decisions, when he indeed did rescue the American Republic. A few nuggets: - Grant realized that the nature of the relationship between masters and slaves made "kindness" impossible, in spite of the fact that self-proclaimed "kind" masters justified their treatment of slaves as such. (Ch. 3) - Once upon entering a tavern in Galena (IL), a group of lawyers who were sitting around a fire conversing noticed Grant's disheveled look and asked him if he had travelled through hell. Grant replied that he had. When asked how he found things in hell, Grant responded, "Much the same as in Galena; lawyers nearest to the fire." (Ch. 3) - Grant understood that it wasn't so much Lincoln's plan for reconstruction or his philosophy of the South that had made Lincoln a valuable guardian of the fragile nation after the Civil War, but it was Lincoln's temperament--his goodness of heart and generosity and yielding disposition, his desire to have everybody happy. (Ch. 6) - While Grant was president, he appointed the first Indian Commissioner of Indian Affairs. He also helped organize a coalition led by representatives of various Protestant denominations including Quakers in an effort to make right the past abuses of Native Americans. (Ch. 8) - After Grant's death, his close friend George Childs remarked of Grant that his most conspicuous qualities were "justice, kindness, and firmness." (Ch. 10)

  15. 5 out of 5

    William Troy

    Bret Baier claims to bring a reporter's perspective to this book about Ulysses S. Grant. He does it well! This is not so much a history as it is a reporting of the events and political and social climate within America pre, during and post Civil War. Baier does tell the reader about Grant's childhood, West Point and initial Army life and about Grant's struggles upon leaving the Army. This serves to give the reader insight into Grant's character. Grant's failures and successes during the Civil Wa Bret Baier claims to bring a reporter's perspective to this book about Ulysses S. Grant. He does it well! This is not so much a history as it is a reporting of the events and political and social climate within America pre, during and post Civil War. Baier does tell the reader about Grant's childhood, West Point and initial Army life and about Grant's struggles upon leaving the Army. This serves to give the reader insight into Grant's character. Grant's failures and successes during the Civil War are also covered with the emphasis on his underlying strength of character and firmness of purpose, the restore the Union. Grant was not in favor of slavery however he was given a slave by his Father-in-Law and Grant's spouse owned slaves. He freed his slave and of course his spouse was made to release her slaves from bondage. Grant did not hate his enemy but he realized that the South would have to be defeated to restore the Union. A separate peace was not acceptable. We know the North won and Grant was propelled into the presidency because of his popularity. The America of Grant's Presidency was still in crisis. Reconstruction was still underway although President Johnson had done much to lessen the restrictions on the South. Freed slaves were making progress but it was strongly resisted by white Southerners, especially the former slave owners. The KKK was formed and began to terrorize Southern Blacks and intimidate them to stop them from exercising their newly gained rights especially voting. President Grant used the Army to combat the KKK under the Enforcement Act. It allowed the President to send federal forces or federalized National Guard forces to states where there were severe civil disturbances or insurrection. This pretty much reduced the effectiveness of the KKK but as we know did not end the tensions. President Grant had the Civil Rights Act of 1875 passed that open all public institutions equally to Blacks. It was declared unconstitutional in 1883 and it took 81 years for another such act to be passed. Grant chose not to run for a third term. The election of 1876 created a quandary. Some Southern states sent two sets of electoral college votes to the Congress to be counted. President Grant was instrumental in establishing an electoral commission to count the votes and choose which votes would be official from those states sending two sets of votes. In the end, Rutherford B. Hayes was elected President over Samuel J. Tilden. Grant's compromise quite possibly avoided a resumption of civil war. It did not end the tensions underlying the country though. Grant had flaws but he was a strong believer in the United States of America and the underlying good of its people. He was steadfastly honest but trusted many who were not. President Grant is rated as the 18th best President in some polls. He wasn't the best and is far from the worst. This is a good read for those interested in Grant, Reconstruction and election fraud, and the Electoral College.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    To Rescue the Republic By Bret Baier This is the story of Ulysses S. Grant, winning general of the Civil War, President of the United States, and a hero of the Republic. Mr. Baier and his associate, Catherine Whitney, have done a wonderful job of exploring the life and times of a truly great – yet often underappreciated – man. Grant was not the picture we all seem to have of our heroes – tall, handsome, flawless – infallible. He was human, with all the strengths and failings which all of us exhibit To Rescue the Republic By Bret Baier This is the story of Ulysses S. Grant, winning general of the Civil War, President of the United States, and a hero of the Republic. Mr. Baier and his associate, Catherine Whitney, have done a wonderful job of exploring the life and times of a truly great – yet often underappreciated – man. Grant was not the picture we all seem to have of our heroes – tall, handsome, flawless – infallible. He was human, with all the strengths and failings which all of us exhibit throughout our everyday lives. Yet Mr. Grant rose above his mistakes and foibles to be the strong leader that the country so desperately needed in its darkest hour. Mr. Baier and Ms. Whitney have managed to shine the light of truth on this great American, and in so doing, they have illuminated fairly how Grant – both as general and president – did indeed rescue the Republic. My thanks to both for this fine book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eric Lindner

    A terrific reminder of our nation’s legacy of stellar leadership - and vital lesson in the virtues of truth, forgiveness, reconciliation, and unification. And grit. Such a quick read because it was so great - I didn’t want to put it down. As Bret Baier and Catherine Whitney so clearly and entertainingly convey - our nation’s debt to Grant is enormous. Amidst all the crowing by dandies in the North and South, Grant quietly went about his business, preferring the company (and attire) of the man on the A terrific reminder of our nation’s legacy of stellar leadership - and vital lesson in the virtues of truth, forgiveness, reconciliation, and unification. And grit. Such a quick read because it was so great - I didn’t want to put it down. As Bret Baier and Catherine Whitney so clearly and entertainingly convey - our nation’s debt to Grant is enormous. Amidst all the crowing by dandies in the North and South, Grant quietly went about his business, preferring the company (and attire) of the man on the street to the elite, modeling the humility that the Allies should have repeated at Versailles, and displaying as much selfless courage while battling cancer as he did at Vicksburg and elsewhere. Absent Grant, what would Lincoln have been able to accomplish? Would Lee and the Confederacy have prevailed?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    If you enjoy military history and American politics, you won’t be disappointed with Bret Baier’s new book: “To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876.” Bret Baier, the chief political anchor for Fox News and the host of the nightly “Special Report with Bret Baier,” has succeeded in writing about a time period of epic history spanning the battlefields of the Civil War, the violent turmoil of Reconstruction, and a forgotten electoral crisis that nearly fra If you enjoy military history and American politics, you won’t be disappointed with Bret Baier’s new book: “To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876.” Bret Baier, the chief political anchor for Fox News and the host of the nightly “Special Report with Bret Baier,” has succeeded in writing about a time period of epic history spanning the battlefields of the Civil War, the violent turmoil of Reconstruction, and a forgotten electoral crisis that nearly fractured a newly reunited nation. Underappreciated, Grant played an essential role in preserving the United States during these difficult times. Well researched, richly detailed, and often suspenseful, the parallels with today’s political unrest in America are striking. A great Christmas gift, worthy of 5-stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Mebes

    Well written The history that I have previously heard and read has been that Grant was a great general but had a scandal ridden presidency. This book has given me a new appreciation of Grant as good man who had great accomplishments even during his presidency which was during extremely trying times. Compared to Chernow's epic book about Grant this is a short book but still captures a love for Grant . A similar love that the country had for at the time. Baier has the ability to make you laugh at G Well written The history that I have previously heard and read has been that Grant was a great general but had a scandal ridden presidency. This book has given me a new appreciation of Grant as good man who had great accomplishments even during his presidency which was during extremely trying times. Compared to Chernow's epic book about Grant this is a short book but still captures a love for Grant . A similar love that the country had for at the time. Baier has the ability to make you laugh at Grant's humor and then cause a lump in your throat as he writes of his humility, misfortune and love for the country. A sign of a good or maybe an excellent writer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Don Rudy

    Total Fraud book... This book is a fraud just like you are Baier. I couldn't even get through the prelude. You're just another Trump hating leftie liar. Why would I believe anything you've got to say in this rag book of yours. I haven't watched your show in years, because of your loathsome views. And I thought perhaps you'd changed to be a little more fair. You've not. You're a pathetic leftie just like your buddies Chris Wallace, Shep Smith and Neil Cavuto. I regret being fooled and spending $10 Total Fraud book... This book is a fraud just like you are Baier. I couldn't even get through the prelude. You're just another Trump hating leftie liar. Why would I believe anything you've got to say in this rag book of yours. I haven't watched your show in years, because of your loathsome views. And I thought perhaps you'd changed to be a little more fair. You've not. You're a pathetic leftie just like your buddies Chris Wallace, Shep Smith and Neil Cavuto. I regret being fooled and spending $10 on your book. It won't happen again.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Greatest book ever This book was amazing. I loved everything about it. As I read along, I could hear the words spoken by Brett. I would recommend this book to anyone and have. Thank you, Brett for such a great job in writing this, you definitely brought out every aspect of the life of this great general. I also confer the sadness in my heart to see his statue come down and like you, never understood why. But this younger generation do not understand who Grant really was. Again, thank you for your Greatest book ever This book was amazing. I loved everything about it. As I read along, I could hear the words spoken by Brett. I would recommend this book to anyone and have. Thank you, Brett for such a great job in writing this, you definitely brought out every aspect of the life of this great general. I also confer the sadness in my heart to see his statue come down and like you, never understood why. But this younger generation do not understand who Grant really was. Again, thank you for your writing of this wonderful book. Bless you!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Imbeau

    Very well done A thoughtful, careful history of President Grant...any winning General of a civil war is hard to characterize. But Bret Baier, famous himself, has done so with care mixed with admiration. Nobody is perfect in impossible situations. Our modern American cancel culture usually does not care about or understand historical context. Baier and Whitney present the truth of an American hero and his times with courage and respect. kudos to a Job Well Done. A Great Read

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fred Leland

    Outstanding Read I am normally apt to purchase news anchors for a book on history. Ulysses Grant however I am a huge fan. He is one of my favorite leaders and I have rad just about everything there is to read on him and his life. This book was a pleasant surprise well researched and very well written. It covers Grant in a fair and imperial way, highlighting both his strengths and weaknesses and his value to our great country.

  24. 5 out of 5

    C E Wilson

    Correction's in the book Just a couple of things from the book. Grant did not ride to Shiloh on a horse as the book says. He was staying at the Cherry mansion in Savanah, TN nursing a bad ankle from falling off a horse. He heard the firing at Pittsburg landing. Got in a boat and went there by boat. Also, from the book, General Jackson was not replaced by General Longstreet General Lee added a third Corp after Jackson's death. He was replaced by General's Hill and Ewell. Correction's in the book Just a couple of things from the book. Grant did not ride to Shiloh on a horse as the book says. He was staying at the Cherry mansion in Savanah, TN nursing a bad ankle from falling off a horse. He heard the firing at Pittsburg landing. Got in a boat and went there by boat. Also, from the book, General Jackson was not replaced by General Longstreet General Lee added a third Corp after Jackson's death. He was replaced by General's Hill and Ewell.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David L. Hanson

    Pay attention to this important and absorbing history lesson. This interesting book should be read by everyone that is concerned about the divisions that are so evident in our country today. Let this review of history reassure us that we as a as a striving people have survived far greater divisions. We must trust and support our Constitution and respect the rights of all our peoples. Each of us are responsible for the survival of our great nation.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christine Barth

    Interesting and timely book about a president I knew little about. Many eerie parallel to today. The author did a good job of neither romanticizing or villainising Grant and also explaining complex political issues in laymens terms. The analysis at the end was quite good. I did want to know more about reconstruction from a black perspective, but that was a bit outside the scope. I'm sure there are many other books that delve into that. Interesting and timely book about a president I knew little about. Many eerie parallel to today. The author did a good job of neither romanticizing or villainising Grant and also explaining complex political issues in laymens terms. The analysis at the end was quite good. I did want to know more about reconstruction from a black perspective, but that was a bit outside the scope. I'm sure there are many other books that delve into that.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kelley

    A tribute to misunderstood President who not only saved the Union but also prevented a future clash of arms in 1876. The book is not a scholarly treatise but is written in a free flowing style that captures the nature of Grant. It is a fun book to read not only for the military historian but also the average reader who has an interest in American history.

  28. 4 out of 5

    robert e. rayunas

    What is wrong with peace? The General saved the country, that Lincoln wanted to be saved! Freedom for the rebels was a great arrangement! Hard to understand that Democrats, had to fight over and over to rule over our black population. Freedom is the word for all, that the author tried to have us understand. He did.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beth Thornton

    Well worth your time. The rich historical account of the life and times of President Ulysses S. Grant is filled with stories of the Civil War Era, most likely unknown by many. I learned much. I listened to the audio version read by author Bret Baier which added to my enjoyment. I do also have the hard copy, and it’s a keeper!

  30. 5 out of 5

    larry palmer

    Fresh prospective Grants life and struggles are very appropriate to our current days and the growth we have attained and what the future can hold for our republic. Everyone can learn from this strong compassionate man and we should all endeavour to embrace his ideals. Thank you Mr. Baker for this book. Simply marvelous! Larry Palmer

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