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The Brides of Maracoor

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Multimillion-copy bestselling author Gregory Maguire unveils the first in a three-book series spun off the iconic Wicked Years, featuring Elphaba’s granddaughter, the green-skinned Rain. Ten years ago this season, Gregory Maguire wrapped up the series he began with Wicked by giving us the fourth and final volume of the Wicked Years, his elegiac Out of Oz. But “out of Oz” isn Multimillion-copy bestselling author Gregory Maguire unveils the first in a three-book series spun off the iconic Wicked Years, featuring Elphaba’s granddaughter, the green-skinned Rain. Ten years ago this season, Gregory Maguire wrapped up the series he began with Wicked by giving us the fourth and final volume of the Wicked Years, his elegiac Out of Oz. But “out of Oz” isn’t “gone for good.” Maguire’s new series, Another Day, is here, twenty-five years after Wicked first flew into our lives. Volume one, The Brides of Maracoor, finds Elphaba’s granddaughter, Rain, washing ashore on a foreign island. Comatose from crashing into the sea, Rain is taken in by a community of single women committed to obscure devotional practices. As the mainland of Maracoor sustains an assault by a foreign navy, the island’s civil-servant overseer struggles to understand how an alien arriving on the shores of Maracoor could threaten the stability and wellbeing of an entire nation. Is it myth or magic at work, for good or for ill? The trilogy Another Day will follow this green-skinned girl from the island outpost into the unmapped badlands of Maracoor before she learns how, and becomes ready, to turn her broom homeward, back to her family and her lover, back to Oz, which—in its beauty, suffering, mystery, injustice, and possibility—reminds us all too clearly of the troubled yet sacred terrain of our own lives.


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Multimillion-copy bestselling author Gregory Maguire unveils the first in a three-book series spun off the iconic Wicked Years, featuring Elphaba’s granddaughter, the green-skinned Rain. Ten years ago this season, Gregory Maguire wrapped up the series he began with Wicked by giving us the fourth and final volume of the Wicked Years, his elegiac Out of Oz. But “out of Oz” isn Multimillion-copy bestselling author Gregory Maguire unveils the first in a three-book series spun off the iconic Wicked Years, featuring Elphaba’s granddaughter, the green-skinned Rain. Ten years ago this season, Gregory Maguire wrapped up the series he began with Wicked by giving us the fourth and final volume of the Wicked Years, his elegiac Out of Oz. But “out of Oz” isn’t “gone for good.” Maguire’s new series, Another Day, is here, twenty-five years after Wicked first flew into our lives. Volume one, The Brides of Maracoor, finds Elphaba’s granddaughter, Rain, washing ashore on a foreign island. Comatose from crashing into the sea, Rain is taken in by a community of single women committed to obscure devotional practices. As the mainland of Maracoor sustains an assault by a foreign navy, the island’s civil-servant overseer struggles to understand how an alien arriving on the shores of Maracoor could threaten the stability and wellbeing of an entire nation. Is it myth or magic at work, for good or for ill? The trilogy Another Day will follow this green-skinned girl from the island outpost into the unmapped badlands of Maracoor before she learns how, and becomes ready, to turn her broom homeward, back to her family and her lover, back to Oz, which—in its beauty, suffering, mystery, injustice, and possibility—reminds us all too clearly of the troubled yet sacred terrain of our own lives.

30 review for The Brides of Maracoor

  1. 4 out of 5

    Scratch

    I'm at a bit of a loss. I enjoyed the earlier books in this universe. Generally, Gregory Maguire can deliver. However, I have always had a handicap in that I actually read all the original Oz books, so I know exactly what Quadling Country and Tick-Tock and all the rest are supposed to be like. This universe was always a weird alternate reality compared to the original children's books, if for no other reason than because people in Oz are supposed to be immortal. Everyone in Oz can choose to stop I'm at a bit of a loss. I enjoyed the earlier books in this universe. Generally, Gregory Maguire can deliver. However, I have always had a handicap in that I actually read all the original Oz books, so I know exactly what Quadling Country and Tick-Tock and all the rest are supposed to be like. This universe was always a weird alternate reality compared to the original children's books, if for no other reason than because people in Oz are supposed to be immortal. Everyone in Oz can choose to stop aging at whatever age they choose; and they are so completely immortal that, if chopped to tiny pieces, each individual piece of flesh will still be alive and conscious to a degree. But I digress. No, this universe has very little in common with the original Oz books. Hell, even the book that started all this, Wicked, has almost nothing in common with the famous musical that was made out of it. The books in this universe usually have a melancholy tone. The protagonists are usually unsure of themselves, making seriously flawed decisions in a seriously flawed world. There are usually themes of agnosticism. Elphaba and Liir, the protagonists we had in Wicked and Son of a Witch (Rain's grandmother and father, respectively) bounced from career to career seemingly by accident. We watched their lives lurch forward at an uneven, rushed pace, as the books would gloss over years at a time. This book? At a minimum, I have a serious problem with its pacing. We agonized for hundreds of pages (or hours of the audiobook) about the fact Rain landed on a small island with a policy that there must be exactly 7 women on it. No more, no fewer. Then we kept rehashing this idea over and over again. Talking about whether Rain would count as one of the seven "brides," and whether they should be allowed to order her to leave. Over and over and over again. There were a few references to magic, but they were so brief and never followed up on, they probably needn't have been included at all. Back in Wicked, magic was more something that happened to Elphaba, and not something she studied or had any serious control over. They were more like unsolicited miracles, further muddying the possibility of there being a god in this universe. In this book, the references to magic are too brief and different to even compare. In previous books we watched in shock as Maguire fast-forwarded through years of Elphaba's and Liir's lives. Suddenly, we find out that Elphaba somehow spent years basically living as a nun (a "Maud"). We find out that Liir joined the army, seemingly just as accidentally as his mother joined a convent. But here, we have the opposite problem. Hundreds of pages following as nothing much in particular happens to Rain. Rain has amnesia, which is probably necessary for the plot, but frustrating for the reader. I will note that amnesia is arguably a recurring theme in this series, as both Elphaba and Liir had memory problems about conceiving/birthing their children. (Elphaba suffered a blow to the head and doesn't remember giving birth to Liir, and Liir was unconscious when Candle mounted him and conceived Rain.) Why does this family have such a propensity for amnesia? Rain can no longer ride a flying broomstick, which previously was basically the only cool thing she did. Just when things start to get exciting again, the novel is over. So now we have to just accept that this book is an overly long introduction to a new series, and the author didn't understand how badly he needed to edit. Just disappointing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karena Pezzullo

    I always enjoy reading a book by Gregory Maguire but especially enjoyed this one as I won an advanced readers copy in a Goodreads giveaway (thank you, Goodreads)! As always with Maguire’s books, I was enraptured with the story right from the beginning. There are section blocks that are written from different character perspectives which keeps the tale interesting and propels it forward. Sometimes this tactic can make the story confusing and Maguire did a wonderful job avoiding that! The only down I always enjoy reading a book by Gregory Maguire but especially enjoyed this one as I won an advanced readers copy in a Goodreads giveaway (thank you, Goodreads)! As always with Maguire’s books, I was enraptured with the story right from the beginning. There are section blocks that are written from different character perspectives which keeps the tale interesting and propels it forward. Sometimes this tactic can make the story confusing and Maguire did a wonderful job avoiding that! The only downside to reading this book is having to wait a while for the next one to come out. It was wonderful to have the Oz story continued through Rain and her experience with the Brides of Maracoor. Does anyone else need a dictionary on hand when reading anything of Maguire’s? He uses the BEST words, but some I have never heard of before. Just another reason why his writing is so great because I learn so many new words! Please tell me I’m not alone in this 😅 Absolutely get your hands on this book when it hits the shelves this October!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jason Trammell

    **UPDATE ON OCTOBER 13 – THERE IS A MAP! Haha!** If you liked THE WICKED YEARS series by Gregory Maguire, you will enjoy this new book that picks up where OUT OF OZ left off. Thank Lurline we’re back in this world! Or should I be thanking Mara? 🤔 The book shines best at world building - the culture is fascinating! I loved reading about the customs, architecture, religion, temples and more. Maguire does a fantastic job at placing you right there in the world with his characters. I can still smell t **UPDATE ON OCTOBER 13 – THERE IS A MAP! Haha!** If you liked THE WICKED YEARS series by Gregory Maguire, you will enjoy this new book that picks up where OUT OF OZ left off. Thank Lurline we’re back in this world! Or should I be thanking Mara? 🤔 The book shines best at world building - the culture is fascinating! I loved reading about the customs, architecture, religion, temples and more. Maguire does a fantastic job at placing you right there in the world with his characters. I can still smell the sea salted air, and with a brisk breeze, inhale the temple incense mixed with sparkling green grass and tart apple. No spoilers from me, but I do enjoy the pacing of events, and the few plot twists that I didn’t see coming - from my point of view, it kept me reading and wanting more. I would read again, and I would recommend. The book comes out in October 2021 and I have an advanced reader’s copy. I would like to own this in hardback and plan on buying upon release. I hope the published retail version has maps, but if not, no biggie.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    Maguire takes us back to the land of Oz…or at least to an adjacent continent. Elphaba’s granddaughter Rain finds herself marooned on an island of women practicing obscure religious rituals while guarding a precious relic. Her appearance causes problems for a mid level civil servant just trying to get home to his family. Maguire’s excellent world building skills are on full display. The setting feels rich, inhabited, and plausible. I’m very excited to be back in the land of talking Animals, green Maguire takes us back to the land of Oz…or at least to an adjacent continent. Elphaba’s granddaughter Rain finds herself marooned on an island of women practicing obscure religious rituals while guarding a precious relic. Her appearance causes problems for a mid level civil servant just trying to get home to his family. Maguire’s excellent world building skills are on full display. The setting feels rich, inhabited, and plausible. I’m very excited to be back in the land of talking Animals, green-skinned women, and harrowing bureaucracy. NetGalley provided me with an arc in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    August Thompson

    I keep thinking one of these days I'm going to get tired of Gregory Maguire, having read almost all of his books. It has yet to happen. I got sucked into Maracoor as easily as I was sucked into Oz, if not more; the island occupied by the brides is such a weird little insulated world and I loved living in it. I do think this works pretty well as a standalone but it's worth reading at least "Wicked" and "Out of Oz" for context. I keep thinking one of these days I'm going to get tired of Gregory Maguire, having read almost all of his books. It has yet to happen. I got sucked into Maracoor as easily as I was sucked into Oz, if not more; the island occupied by the brides is such a weird little insulated world and I loved living in it. I do think this works pretty well as a standalone but it's worth reading at least "Wicked" and "Out of Oz" for context.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex Barndollar

    10 years ago, the Wicked series ended with Rain flying out to sea to see what future awaited her anywhere but Oz. And now, 10 years later, we pick up right where we left off. An amnesiac Rain has washed up on an island inhabited by the seven Brides of Maracoor, women chosen to perform a life of devotional practices. On the mainland, an invading army has taken advantage of the same storm Rain flew in on to mount an assault on the capitol. How these two events are related becomes more clear the fu 10 years ago, the Wicked series ended with Rain flying out to sea to see what future awaited her anywhere but Oz. And now, 10 years later, we pick up right where we left off. An amnesiac Rain has washed up on an island inhabited by the seven Brides of Maracoor, women chosen to perform a life of devotional practices. On the mainland, an invading army has taken advantage of the same storm Rain flew in on to mount an assault on the capitol. How these two events are related becomes more clear the further in the story progresses. Let me state plainly, I am a huge Oz fan. The 1939 film is one of my favorite movies, the 1900 novel one of my favorite books. I've devoured all Oz media I can get my hands on, and the Wicked books were no exception. Even though they ended up being a 4 book series, none of them was written in a way that indicated another book in the series would follow. The same cannot be said here. As clearly stated on the front and back covers, this is the first book in a trilogy, and boy can you tell. The first half of the book is a lot of very slow buildup to set up the politics and religions present in this new land; what little "action" we receive is saved for the back half. While I was excited to read more of Rain, the amnesia trope means she isn't really the Rain we grew to love in Out of Oz. The very end of the book, when Oz references started becoming more prevalent, were the only times I really got any enjoyment out of this one. Maguire writes in his usual elegant style, and while I think a third of this book could have been edited out, the prose we got was beautiful and heady and in some places, too dense for me to comprehend a full meaning. So, classic Gregory Maguire! I am interested to see how this trilogy continues and ends, but I think I'm inclined to wait for both books to come out before I dive back in. While I understand this is being viewed as a spinoff rather than a sequel, I would still like to deal with the fallout of the events of Out of Oz and how Rain processes them, and I hope we see an actual return to Oz in the final book, but my hopes are low on that one. Thank you to William Morrow & HarperCollins for an ARC, my first ever!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    This is not my usual read but i won this on goodreads and happily jumped in. Very curious mythical and fantastical book ,i was in the mood for imaginary life for a bit. The setting reminds me of greek myths the stony windswept islands. ,the talking goose and strange apparitions some very scary. I love the sea as the background and the tides and moon controlling it all especially love the green girl Rain with her cool calm head and bravery.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    *I was provided with an ebook copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in Exchange for an honest review* When I first heard that Gregory Maguire was going to once again return to Oz for a new trilogy, I was thrilled! Wicked has been one of my favorite books since I read it a few years after it was published, and I cherish my signed first-edition copies of all four books in the Wicked Years saga. I even had the honor of meeting Mr. Maguire on his tour for the final book in that series, “Ou *I was provided with an ebook copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in Exchange for an honest review* When I first heard that Gregory Maguire was going to once again return to Oz for a new trilogy, I was thrilled! Wicked has been one of my favorite books since I read it a few years after it was published, and I cherish my signed first-edition copies of all four books in the Wicked Years saga. I even had the honor of meeting Mr. Maguire on his tour for the final book in that series, “Out of Oz”. But with this news came a bit of curiosity and a few reservations: how would he be able to return us to the world? After all, Rain had snuck away and left Oz for destinations unknown at the end of “Out of Oz”. When I read the description of “The Brides of Maracoor”, I felt my reservations peak out. This book doesn’t seem to have anything to do with Oz… is it going to be connected or satisfying? Thankfully the answer is a full-throated “Yes!”. “The Brides of Maracoor” finds Rain washed up on an unknown shore with her Goose companion Iskinaary. She has lost all memories of who she is, what she was doing, and where she is from. All she can remember is being tossed out of the skies by a vicious storm and landing on the shores of Maracoor Spot. It is here that she meets the Brides of Maracoor, seven women who spend their lives in seclusion on the island, piously stringing together nets that represent time. They rub their feet raw until they bleed each morning in a sign of piety and discipline. Their whole world is rocked to its core by Rains arrival. Some embrace her and seek to help. Others are wary and distrustful and want her gone. A power struggle ensues and ends in tragedy. Meanwhile, the women receive their annual visit from Lucikles, a member of the Maracoor mainland who is charged with ensuring that there are still 7 brides on Maracoor and that they have all of the supplies they need. He arrives to chaos and confusion due to Rain and the power struggle. He leaves and promises to return to solve this issue. Yet when he arrives home, he finds a country in distress after a massive attack from a foreign army. He travels across the country to find his family but is eventually called back to make his report on his trip. The leadership deem the attack the fault of Rain and her appearance and they send Lucikles back to Maracoor Spot to retrieve Rain and one of the brides to face charges. More chaos ensues after the trial, resulting in the rescue of Rain and the bride by the flying monkeys and the return of Rains memories. That’s a very oversimplified recap but it the story. However, it was incredible! Do not go into looking for another Wicked or Out of Oz - this book is not that. This novel is a fresh story about memory and power and grief. It is about the power of misinformation and gossip. It is deep and makes you think but doesn’t get too stuck in the weeds to become overwhelming. Gregory Maguire is an amazing world builder, and you can tell how much he really enjoyed doing that with this novel. It’s the first time he can wholly invent a brand new world on this book series as it is the first to not have basis in Oz or other fairy tales. The governing ideals of Maracoor are fascinating, and the Brides and their job are too. Give this book a shot - you’ll be glad you did! I cannot wait to get my hands on the next one!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Arend

    A slog, like a dreadful homework. After 100 pages the portentiousness (not a typo) of it all drained the momentum of the story. This felt like the second, not the first volume, of a trilogy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Clift

    I didn't spend a lot of time yearning to read this and it's probably just as well. The setting of Maracoor was intriguing and the service of the brides was well described. I loved the youngest bride and felt for her through the strangeness of the events that occurred and the barbed community that she lived in but in the end it was that community that I found difficult to accept. Despite emphasizing the story of the brides arriving as infants and living in a community that never exceeded 7 women I didn't spend a lot of time yearning to read this and it's probably just as well. The setting of Maracoor was intriguing and the service of the brides was well described. I loved the youngest bride and felt for her through the strangeness of the events that occurred and the barbed community that she lived in but in the end it was that community that I found difficult to accept. Despite emphasizing the story of the brides arriving as infants and living in a community that never exceeded 7 women they were extraordinarily able to understand social mores when they did encounter them. The saving grace is Gregory Maguire's exquisite use of descriptive language. Perhaps if it had not been so long since I read his other Oz books I might have been more drawn in.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maggies Daisy

    It will always amaze me how often women are the focal point of some hatred or superstition that makes a woman unclean, evil, and worthless. To be feared above all else. The first part of the book was a little dry, but then it got going for me. I was able to read the novel in a few short days due to the rain, and I was getting intrigued as to what will happen at the very end...no peeking. I plan on reading some more from the author; in fact, I have Wicked on my shelf. If your looking for Dorothy It will always amaze me how often women are the focal point of some hatred or superstition that makes a woman unclean, evil, and worthless. To be feared above all else. The first part of the book was a little dry, but then it got going for me. I was able to read the novel in a few short days due to the rain, and I was getting intrigued as to what will happen at the very end...no peeking. I plan on reading some more from the author; in fact, I have Wicked on my shelf. If your looking for Dorothy or Toto from the original OZ in this book, you will be disappointed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scotty

    Well this book isn’t Wicked (what else is?) but as usual I find that Maguire’s stories set in that universe are his best. I would actually put this book squarely in the middle of the Oz books (with Wicked and Son of Witch the better books). There is some interesting philosophy on the nature of choice and responsibility and at least one old trope gets turned on it’s head. I’d put this one at almost 3.5 stars, and I will definitely read the next books in the series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I didn't quite know what to expect going into this book; although I've read several of Gregory Maguire's books, the only Oz-related one I'd read was Wicked several years back. However, The Brides of Maracoor really drew me in despite my lack of background knowledge. The setting is sparse and at times haunting; the characters come across as very real as they struggle with life events outside of their control and towards self-discovery. To me, the book reads like a journey rather than doing anythi I didn't quite know what to expect going into this book; although I've read several of Gregory Maguire's books, the only Oz-related one I'd read was Wicked several years back. However, The Brides of Maracoor really drew me in despite my lack of background knowledge. The setting is sparse and at times haunting; the characters come across as very real as they struggle with life events outside of their control and towards self-discovery. To me, the book reads like a journey rather than doing anything too surprising plot-wise. All in all, I think this might actually be one of my favorites by Macguire so far. (Note: I received an ARC of this book via a Goodreads Giveaway)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kim McGee

    There are times that I feel like I am the only person left who has not read this popular series so I was happy to begin a spinoff series that can stand alone. The brides are a very devout order with strong ties to nature and the sea. They lead a quiet life spending their whole lives on the island doing sea related offerings and self flagellation with almost no interaction with the outside world. When Rain washes up on their shores and is taken in by the brides her presence shakes up the order al There are times that I feel like I am the only person left who has not read this popular series so I was happy to begin a spinoff series that can stand alone. The brides are a very devout order with strong ties to nature and the sea. They lead a quiet life spending their whole lives on the island doing sea related offerings and self flagellation with almost no interaction with the outside world. When Rain washes up on their shores and is taken in by the brides her presence shakes up the order along with the realization that the outside world may be closing in. Quiet magic with an emphasis on nature makes me think that fans of Alice Hoffman will also enjoy this. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Justin Difazzio

    An interesting start… Clearly Gregory Maguire knows how to build a world. But is it a world worth exploring this time? Continuing to follow Rain’s story is rewarding in the end, or, at least it promises to be before the last page leaves you waiting for fulfillment. I found the other storyline, following Lucikles and Leorix to be…frustrating and at times boring. I’m still not sure why Maguire had us following them when there was so little about them to like and his other characters seemed far more An interesting start… Clearly Gregory Maguire knows how to build a world. But is it a world worth exploring this time? Continuing to follow Rain’s story is rewarding in the end, or, at least it promises to be before the last page leaves you waiting for fulfillment. I found the other storyline, following Lucikles and Leorix to be…frustrating and at times boring. I’m still not sure why Maguire had us following them when there was so little about them to like and his other characters seemed far more interesting. But I’m willing to go with him on this new journey, even with it’s apparent flaws. We all know he weaves a thrilling ending. It just so,etc,es takes him 3 or 4 books to get there.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I’m a huge fan of the author and the Wicked series so was really looking forward to this, the start of a new trilogy set many years later. I enjoyed this book a lot. The dramatic ending set the way for the next volume which I look forward to devouring. You don’t need to have read or even heard of the Wicked series to enjoy The Brides of Maracoor. The book stands on it’s own. There’s a lot going on this book and I didn’t fully grasp it all until the final f https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I’m a huge fan of the author and the Wicked series so was really looking forward to this, the start of a new trilogy set many years later. I enjoyed this book a lot. The dramatic ending set the way for the next volume which I look forward to devouring. You don’t need to have read or even heard of the Wicked series to enjoy The Brides of Maracoor. The book stands on it’s own. There’s a lot going on this book and I didn’t fully grasp it all until the final few chapters which meant I was frantically turning the pages trying to work it all out.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robby Bear

    It has been a long time since I read Wicked by this same author, and I had forgotten how much I enjoy his storytelling, told from the perspective of the main characters. I found myself enjoying his descriptive writing and collected several quotes such as these and more: “Childhood, which seems endless to children, is the most finite span of moments in the history of a life.” “Regret could disguise itself in a thousand veils; you could perish before having the strength to drag the last one away.” “Her It has been a long time since I read Wicked by this same author, and I had forgotten how much I enjoy his storytelling, told from the perspective of the main characters. I found myself enjoying his descriptive writing and collected several quotes such as these and more: “Childhood, which seems endless to children, is the most finite span of moments in the history of a life.” “Regret could disguise itself in a thousand veils; you could perish before having the strength to drag the last one away.” “Her flyaway blond hair a nimbus, suggestive of that sanctity of childhood when childhood wasn’t in its demonic mode.”

  18. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    This was a new experience for me. I won this on goodreads and have to say was very surprised by how much I enjoyed it. I felt like I was present in every scene due to descriptions and characters. Also was a fast paced read for me and I love those! I would definitely recommend trying this author even if this isn’t your genre.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Flyingnutress

    This was 40 pages of plot stretched into 368. Quite the slog to force myself though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    3.5 stars

  21. 4 out of 5

    Traci Yates

    Just 25 years after Maguire turned the Wicked Witch of the West into a hermaphrodite born out of rape by The Wizard of Oz himself, the first book of the new series featuring Elphaba’s granddaughter does not disappoint.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Sakash

    Maguire excels at describing fantasy worlds and I enjoy his quirky wit; but sometimes I feel his writing is hampered by excessive politics. I knowingly read this first book of a planned series, so was not surprised when it ended with the story unresolved. I will most likely read the rest and not remember most of the plot, as usual.

  23. 5 out of 5

    kalindi mcpherson

    A fun book to read!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Hmmm, not sure if I'll read the rest of this series, but it was an interesting idea for a start. Hmmm, not sure if I'll read the rest of this series, but it was an interesting idea for a start.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon Johnson

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The publisher's summary pretty much tells the entirety of this novel. There is no hidden storyline that wasn't included in order to keep the summary spoiler-free. As the first installment of new trilogy, the majority of this book is world-building and what I can only guess is the build up to the real action. To tell the truth, I was pretty bored by the lack of action but Maguire's talented storytelling kept me inv I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The publisher's summary pretty much tells the entirety of this novel. There is no hidden storyline that wasn't included in order to keep the summary spoiler-free. As the first installment of new trilogy, the majority of this book is world-building and what I can only guess is the build up to the real action. To tell the truth, I was pretty bored by the lack of action but Maguire's talented storytelling kept me invested. While I was a bit let down by this book on its own, I have high hopes for the next releases. I absolutely LOVED and recommend this to anyone who loved the WHOLE Wicked series, not just the first book, because the later books have heavier ethical and political storylines which is where I see this series (Another Day) going. Come chat with me about books here, too: Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tonya Mathis

    First off, I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you to Goodreads and to the author. Second, I only read the first two books of the Wicked Years, so if I missed anything out of the last two books that were prevalent to this one that's on me. Although this book could be read as a stand alone it would probably be better to be read after Out of Oz due to characters mentioned by Rain. Either way, I enjoyed this story, the characters on the different islands and hope to read more about them First off, I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you to Goodreads and to the author. Second, I only read the first two books of the Wicked Years, so if I missed anything out of the last two books that were prevalent to this one that's on me. Although this book could be read as a stand alone it would probably be better to be read after Out of Oz due to characters mentioned by Rain. Either way, I enjoyed this story, the characters on the different islands and hope to read more about them in the next books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    3.5 stars-hard to rate this one! I did generically enjoy it, the worldbuilding was interesting and I'll read the sequel when it releases but did it have basically anything to do with the four books in the Wicked series that preceded it? Very little, at least so far. I haven't read the original Oz series so I have no idea if some of Maracoor references things from the original story, but this basically sets Rain down in a completely new setting. Which is fine! But don't go into it expecting much 3.5 stars-hard to rate this one! I did generically enjoy it, the worldbuilding was interesting and I'll read the sequel when it releases but did it have basically anything to do with the four books in the Wicked series that preceded it? Very little, at least so far. I haven't read the original Oz series so I have no idea if some of Maracoor references things from the original story, but this basically sets Rain down in a completely new setting. Which is fine! But don't go into it expecting much reference to the Wicked series, at least not from this first volume.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carol (Kimiko)

    A great book to read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elise

    Wow, just wow! I haven't been able to put this book down one of the best book's I've ever had the privilege of reading! Only on the first few chapters and it's getting better and better. From the wording; it's like poetry, to the storyline. More from me later, one word read this book! Wow, just wow! I haven't been able to put this book down one of the best book's I've ever had the privilege of reading! Only on the first few chapters and it's getting better and better. From the wording; it's like poetry, to the storyline. More from me later, one word read this book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Storrs

    I'm not an objective reviewer of this book by any means; I am a librarian who just happens to love the Wicked Years. Know that, when you read my review, I've taken up residence at the Chancel of the Ladyfish simply to read and be reunited with my Oz Compatriots. End of Dramatic Interlude. This book is classic. There were moments in his latest books, Egg and Spoon being one of them, where I would be set adrift. Not so here. It is as if Maguire wished to return as badly as we did to the lives of E I'm not an objective reviewer of this book by any means; I am a librarian who just happens to love the Wicked Years. Know that, when you read my review, I've taken up residence at the Chancel of the Ladyfish simply to read and be reunited with my Oz Compatriots. End of Dramatic Interlude. This book is classic. There were moments in his latest books, Egg and Spoon being one of them, where I would be set adrift. Not so here. It is as if Maguire wished to return as badly as we did to the lives of Elphaba's ancestors and was just as eager to be with them as we. This book breathes. It breathes in ocean salt and pain and the same strength of character we have always loved. by reading it, we once again call the lost forward. Do not miss it.

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