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They Called Him Marvin

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Duty called. He answered. She, with child, was left behind. He did not come home. "They were the fathers we never knew, the uncles we never met, the friends who never returned, the heroes we can never repay." (B Clinton.) Such a man was 1st Lt Dean Harold Sherman, B-29 Airplane Commander one of the thousands of man-boys, not far from their mother’s apron strings, that lea Duty called. He answered. She, with child, was left behind. He did not come home. "They were the fathers we never knew, the uncles we never met, the friends who never returned, the heroes we can never repay." (B Clinton.) Such a man was 1st Lt Dean Harold Sherman, B-29 Airplane Commander one of the thousands of man-boys, not far from their mother’s apron strings, that learned to fly a B-29 thousands of miles and bomb an enemy. “They Called Him Marvin” is a history of Dean Sherman and his teenage bride Connie’s love, World War 2 and their efforts to create a family. A history of the collision of the raging politics of a global war, young love, patriotism, sacred family commitments, duty and the horrors and tragedies, the catastrophe that war is. **SPOILER ALERT** If you hate the Japanese for attacking Pearl Harbor and other war atrocities, don’t read this book, you will not enjoy it. If, however, you are willing to think about WW2 in terms of it’s effect on every day people on both sides, this book is for you.**SPOILER ALERT** Their history is partially documented through the sixty seven letters exchanged between a twenty year old Dean and his still teenaged pregnant wife. The un-edited letters provide their own words to help tell the story. When Marvin was born, 18 Feb 1945, Dean without knowledge of Marvin's birth wrote: "Whenever I hear nice soft music, I think of you. And when the sun comes up so bright and fresh in the morning, I’m reminded of you. When I take a short walk in the moonlight I have the pleasantest memories of you and all the wonderful times we have spent together. Darling, those things mean all the world to me, an I keep thinking of the something new that has been added to us, and the blessings that have been ours continuously all being added up to make the future all ahead of us better to live for and more to be desired. I guess you know from these things that I am ever so glad I married you, altho it never could have been any different because we were just meant for each other. All the incidents and happenings that brought us together, tho they may seem like accidents, seem to me to have just been part of a plan that been so plain that we just couldn’t see it. I just keep getting more and more in love with you all the time too, Honey." The day Dean was shot down Connie, again without knowledge of his situation confesses in her 14 May 1945 letter: "I’m in a rather odd mood tonight Honey, and it is most all about you and Marvin and me. I have been trying to decide whether or not I would write to you tonight most all evening. I wanted to, but I didn’t know if I could express my feelings as I would want to, and, as I feel them. As you can see Honey, I have made up my mind to try. How well I succeed remains to be seen." A reviewer explains: "I am a fan of historical fiction and this story did not disappoint. It was sweet, tragic, personal, and moving. Gradually and almost imperceptibly, the story of two wartime sweethearts begins circling the drain of a tragedy you know is coming. The book begins with the ending, but by the time you get there you have convinced yourself that it can't possibly be the case. I enjoyed every moment, even the ones that left me in tears. The letters between Connie and Dean provided a fascinating glimpse into wartime life. Reading the experiences of people both at home and abroad was very engaging. I found myself eagerly awaiting the next letter, right along with the young couple! Lastly, the book left me with an overwhelming acknowledgement of the universal trauma and tragedy of war. The Sherman’s are not the only family we meet in the book and the weaving together of several different narratives added a depth to the story that's hard to put into words.
 I definitely encourage anyone to read this book, especially if historical novels are not something you typically read. This is a story about people and you won't want it to end."


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Duty called. He answered. She, with child, was left behind. He did not come home. "They were the fathers we never knew, the uncles we never met, the friends who never returned, the heroes we can never repay." (B Clinton.) Such a man was 1st Lt Dean Harold Sherman, B-29 Airplane Commander one of the thousands of man-boys, not far from their mother’s apron strings, that lea Duty called. He answered. She, with child, was left behind. He did not come home. "They were the fathers we never knew, the uncles we never met, the friends who never returned, the heroes we can never repay." (B Clinton.) Such a man was 1st Lt Dean Harold Sherman, B-29 Airplane Commander one of the thousands of man-boys, not far from their mother’s apron strings, that learned to fly a B-29 thousands of miles and bomb an enemy. “They Called Him Marvin” is a history of Dean Sherman and his teenage bride Connie’s love, World War 2 and their efforts to create a family. A history of the collision of the raging politics of a global war, young love, patriotism, sacred family commitments, duty and the horrors and tragedies, the catastrophe that war is. **SPOILER ALERT** If you hate the Japanese for attacking Pearl Harbor and other war atrocities, don’t read this book, you will not enjoy it. If, however, you are willing to think about WW2 in terms of it’s effect on every day people on both sides, this book is for you.**SPOILER ALERT** Their history is partially documented through the sixty seven letters exchanged between a twenty year old Dean and his still teenaged pregnant wife. The un-edited letters provide their own words to help tell the story. When Marvin was born, 18 Feb 1945, Dean without knowledge of Marvin's birth wrote: "Whenever I hear nice soft music, I think of you. And when the sun comes up so bright and fresh in the morning, I’m reminded of you. When I take a short walk in the moonlight I have the pleasantest memories of you and all the wonderful times we have spent together. Darling, those things mean all the world to me, an I keep thinking of the something new that has been added to us, and the blessings that have been ours continuously all being added up to make the future all ahead of us better to live for and more to be desired. I guess you know from these things that I am ever so glad I married you, altho it never could have been any different because we were just meant for each other. All the incidents and happenings that brought us together, tho they may seem like accidents, seem to me to have just been part of a plan that been so plain that we just couldn’t see it. I just keep getting more and more in love with you all the time too, Honey." The day Dean was shot down Connie, again without knowledge of his situation confesses in her 14 May 1945 letter: "I’m in a rather odd mood tonight Honey, and it is most all about you and Marvin and me. I have been trying to decide whether or not I would write to you tonight most all evening. I wanted to, but I didn’t know if I could express my feelings as I would want to, and, as I feel them. As you can see Honey, I have made up my mind to try. How well I succeed remains to be seen." A reviewer explains: "I am a fan of historical fiction and this story did not disappoint. It was sweet, tragic, personal, and moving. Gradually and almost imperceptibly, the story of two wartime sweethearts begins circling the drain of a tragedy you know is coming. The book begins with the ending, but by the time you get there you have convinced yourself that it can't possibly be the case. I enjoyed every moment, even the ones that left me in tears. The letters between Connie and Dean provided a fascinating glimpse into wartime life. Reading the experiences of people both at home and abroad was very engaging. I found myself eagerly awaiting the next letter, right along with the young couple! Lastly, the book left me with an overwhelming acknowledgement of the universal trauma and tragedy of war. The Sherman’s are not the only family we meet in the book and the weaving together of several different narratives added a depth to the story that's hard to put into words.
 I definitely encourage anyone to read this book, especially if historical novels are not something you typically read. This is a story about people and you won't want it to end."

30 review for They Called Him Marvin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Roger Stark

    “They Called Him Marvin” crosses the boundaries of several genres. New Adult readers can read the letters and a story of someone their own age being in love trying to make a family and fighting a war. Military readers can follow the development of the B-29 and join Dean and the crew on a few missions and even learn what being a “Special Prisoner” in Japan was like. History buffs can expand their knowledge of World War 2 and the interactions of nations. Looking for a love story? Dean and Connie h “They Called Him Marvin” crosses the boundaries of several genres. New Adult readers can read the letters and a story of someone their own age being in love trying to make a family and fighting a war. Military readers can follow the development of the B-29 and join Dean and the crew on a few missions and even learn what being a “Special Prisoner” in Japan was like. History buffs can expand their knowledge of World War 2 and the interactions of nations. Looking for a love story? Dean and Connie have a passionate love for each other, that is why there is a Marvin. Their passion is described with dignity. Finally, the reader interested in religion and spirituality will learn Dean attended a new church with a soldier friend. He liked the church so much he joined it and met a girl he liked so much he married her. His faith carries him through the difficult things he has to endure. Bill Clinton said it best: “They were the fathers we never knew, the uncles we never met, the friends who never returned, the heroes we can never repay. They gave us our world. And those simple sounds of freedom we hear today are their voices speaking to us across the years." Let us remember them and honor the sacrifice of all the Deans and Connies and Marvins.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sasha Hawthorn

    I am a fan of historical fiction and this story did not disappoint. It was sweet, tragic, personal, and moving. Gradually and almost imperceptibly, the story of two wartime sweethearts begins circling the drain of of a tragedy you know is coming. The book begins with the ending, but by the time you get there you have convinced yourself that it can't possibly be the case. I enjoyed every moment, even the ones that left me in tears. The letters between Connie and Dean provided a fascinating glimps I am a fan of historical fiction and this story did not disappoint. It was sweet, tragic, personal, and moving. Gradually and almost imperceptibly, the story of two wartime sweethearts begins circling the drain of of a tragedy you know is coming. The book begins with the ending, but by the time you get there you have convinced yourself that it can't possibly be the case. I enjoyed every moment, even the ones that left me in tears. The letters between Connie and Dean provided a fascinating glimpse into wartime life. Reading the experiences of people both at home and abroad was very engaging. I found myself eagerly awaiting the next letter, right along with the young couple! Lastly, the book left me with an overwhelming acknowledgement of the universal trauma and tragedy of war. The Shermans are not the only family we meet in the book and the weaving together of several different narratives added a depth to the story that's hard to put into words. I definitely encourage anyone to read this book, especially if historical novels are not something you typically read. This is a story about people and you won't want it to end.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Stark

    A great story, Marvin shared it with Roger, Roger shared it with us. It offers great insight into the world of youngsters sent off to war by politicians who do not have to bear the burden. Roger captured the human side of War from both the American view point and the Japanese. Roger's research was accurate and captivating. I could not put it down and learned so much. Thank you Marvin for letting us to get to know your parents. And thank you Roger for telling their story. A great story, Marvin shared it with Roger, Roger shared it with us. It offers great insight into the world of youngsters sent off to war by politicians who do not have to bear the burden. Roger captured the human side of War from both the American view point and the Japanese. Roger's research was accurate and captivating. I could not put it down and learned so much. Thank you Marvin for letting us to get to know your parents. And thank you Roger for telling their story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Townsend-Lyon

    I was delighted to receive an early ARC copy by the author. I will warn you to have some tissues handy while reading this beautifully written novel and story. I am usually not a fan of “wartime” reads; once you begin reading this fascinating story, it is hard to stop. The authors writing style is unique and eloquent. The storyline is not all about war, but it’s rich in history. It’s a little love story woven within the story of those who fought for our freedoms, the unsung heroes who lost their I was delighted to receive an early ARC copy by the author. I will warn you to have some tissues handy while reading this beautifully written novel and story. I am usually not a fan of “wartime” reads; once you begin reading this fascinating story, it is hard to stop. The authors writing style is unique and eloquent. The storyline is not all about war, but it’s rich in history. It’s a little love story woven within the story of those who fought for our freedoms, the unsung heroes who lost their lives during World War II. The story is so multi-faceted that I am not sure how the author could seamlessly incorporate all the elements that make this novel come to life. There were lives unlived, many families touched by this tragic war that became the bloodiest in American history. But this novel is much more than that. The written letters of Commander Dean Sherman, his wife Connie are proof that many lives did not get a happy ending and how Marvin came to be. This novel is an absolute must-read for anyone who enjoys any genre of reads. I still remember when former president Bill Clinton spoke those words quoted in this book back in June 1994 at a seaside cemetery above Omaha Beach and summoned the spirits of heroes past to inspire today’s generations to carry on the mission of the men who gave their lives. “They were the fathers we never knew, the uncles we never met, the friends who never returned, the heroes we can never repay,” said Clinton, gazing out on the rows of still, green graves. “They gave us our world. And those simple sounds of freedom we hear today are their voices speaking to us across the years.” There was more to Clinton’s speech, but it sure sums up the tone and spirit of this book and one that will move you and leave an imprint within your heart. I highly recommend this novel to everyone. Catherine Lyon of Lyon Literary Consulting

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Wetherington

    I don’t often find myself reading much reading a novel such as this. However, to my surprise, I found myself incredibly entrenched within the pages and the wonderful story told within them. It was often very hard to put down. The way the story is told is very multifaceted. We’re brought into the narrative through a mixture of historical quotes, letters, and the authors own words to tie it everything together in a natural and engaging way. The story itself also provides a little something for ever I don’t often find myself reading much reading a novel such as this. However, to my surprise, I found myself incredibly entrenched within the pages and the wonderful story told within them. It was often very hard to put down. The way the story is told is very multifaceted. We’re brought into the narrative through a mixture of historical quotes, letters, and the authors own words to tie it everything together in a natural and engaging way. The story itself also provides a little something for everyone. Love, history, family, spirituality…there is a lot here to make the story feel as human as it possibly can. This book is wonderfully written, and well worth the time of anyone who does so. Equally heart-warming and heart-wrenching. Thank you for sharing this story with all of us. I feel like a better person because of it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    "They Call Him Marvin" is an incredibly special book. It has a bit of everything, from love to history to drama - and the best part is that it's all true! Author Roger Stark took letters from a real couple and crafted a compelling narrative around their correspondence, filled in with the history of World War II and what going into battle can take from all of us. I had the honor of getting to see an early version of this project when taking a class with Roger - the scope, detail, and hard work th "They Call Him Marvin" is an incredibly special book. It has a bit of everything, from love to history to drama - and the best part is that it's all true! Author Roger Stark took letters from a real couple and crafted a compelling narrative around their correspondence, filled in with the history of World War II and what going into battle can take from all of us. I had the honor of getting to see an early version of this project when taking a class with Roger - the scope, detail, and hard work that he's put into this is incredible and very much worth your time. You will be touched by the compelling love story, as well as enraptured by the history. Add it to your list today!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lou

    This book has touched my heart! I smiled, I chuckled, I laughed out loud, had to find the box of kleenex and wept! Dean and Connie become your friends and neighbors you would love to have! I loved how their wartime correspondence through sweet letters evolve throughout the story..and I learned that war is hell no matter which side one is on! This book has given me an understanding of life that's not in history books! God bless Roger for writing this book and God bless Marvin... This book has touched my heart! I smiled, I chuckled, I laughed out loud, had to find the box of kleenex and wept! Dean and Connie become your friends and neighbors you would love to have! I loved how their wartime correspondence through sweet letters evolve throughout the story..and I learned that war is hell no matter which side one is on! This book has given me an understanding of life that's not in history books! God bless Roger for writing this book and God bless Marvin...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mask heid

    This book is not what I normally gravitate towards. I am very glad I expanded my horizons. They Called Him Marvin was beautifully written and heartfelt. I loved the letters they brought the story to life. I felt the turmoil that war caused and the love they held on to during it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Chadwick

    Such a great story - found the descriptions so vivid that I could almost imagine myself there. The story line kept me interested. This one is going on the shelf to share with future grandkids.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Keith Weimer

    A very well written story of love, family and WWII. I thought the letters shared really showed the love these two very young people had for each other. The faith and optimism they shared was incredible for the time they were living. The depth of the war experience that Roger wrote was enlightening, interesting and a bit disturbing. The experiences relating to flying a B-29 and the war on both sides (US and Japan) was told in a very real humanistic way. I enjoyed the book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    DWo

    A history lesson and reminder that being on the “right” side of war is subjective, wrapped up in the most tragic love story. Not just the story of this young couple, but of a generation who experienced the atrocities of war and the sacrifices that were made. Even though we know the ending before the story starts, I was compelled to keep reading, hoping the outcome would somehow be different. Thank you for sharing Dean and Connie’s story with us.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy Hrebien

    Heart wrenching wonderful story that I couldn’t put down! So touching to read the letters from the very real people this book is about. A great reminder that war involves people just like us.

  13. 4 out of 5

    tani mask

    Hard to put this one down. This is a great love story that also shares with us the immense sadness brought upon by war. The reader enjoys a unique experience as we see the affects of this war on families from both sides of this conflict. I especially enjoyed the letters, which makes you feel like you are experiencing their life.

  14. 5 out of 5

    DiAnne Berry

    Step into an intimate look at relationships, history, a world engulfed in war, and the many faces love takes. How are these seminole events still effecting your life today. A read that takes you into the depths of what it is to be human.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

    A book that will leave you crying, with a heart full of both longing and love. A reminder to hold those you love close while you can. The window into a true love story through Connie and Dean's letters surrounded by the realities of horrendous war both broke my heart and filled it with hope. Showcasing their joy and love while describing what life inside the war was like, what lead to each war action and how the air battles transpired is no easy feat. However this book tackled them all with an en A book that will leave you crying, with a heart full of both longing and love. A reminder to hold those you love close while you can. The window into a true love story through Connie and Dean's letters surrounded by the realities of horrendous war both broke my heart and filled it with hope. Showcasing their joy and love while describing what life inside the war was like, what lead to each war action and how the air battles transpired is no easy feat. However this book tackled them all with an engaging narrative that added levity at just the right moments. A difficult, tragic topic to share with the world and so worth reading. I received an ARC copy of this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marci Tanner

    What a beautiful story, and told with such reverence and compassion. It was written so well I could almost feel myself there in person. Roger has an awesome way with words. I was extremely touched at the ending. It made it almost a happy ending. Definitely a must read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    I really enjoyed reading this book. What a marvelous story! If are going to read any book this year I recommend this booK

  18. 4 out of 5

    Craig Vieting

    A well written WWII story. War is messy. It was great to feel a connection to Dan and Connie. Worth the investment to read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Claiborn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is as much history lesson as it is a romance, so if you’re hoping for a sappy romance, it’s not the book for you. Stark takes a deep dive into how the Japanese treated POWs during WWII, and it’s not pleasant. His no-nonsense chronicle of how those men died is pretty brutal, as is the journey they took to get there and why Japan determined they needed to be executed. It was hard to read in places, however, it’s factually accurate. Stark clearly spent a lot of energy researching for this This book is as much history lesson as it is a romance, so if you’re hoping for a sappy romance, it’s not the book for you. Stark takes a deep dive into how the Japanese treated POWs during WWII, and it’s not pleasant. His no-nonsense chronicle of how those men died is pretty brutal, as is the journey they took to get there and why Japan determined they needed to be executed. It was hard to read in places, however, it’s factually accurate. Stark clearly spent a lot of energy researching for this book. The letters themselves are both endearing and heartbreaking. What I found strange was how almost impersonal the letters were, like the couple didn’t know each other very well. It might have been timidity because they knew censors read each letter, but it struck me as odd. It’s sad reading the first-hand love letters from a man who was never able to make it home to his wife and meet his son, and that Marvin never got to know his father. It did leave me a little melancholy. Most of the books I’ve read from that period are emotionally removed, almost clinical, this one is not. The letters themselves are the highlight of this book. It’s definitely worth reading.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather Squires

    Recently my favorite reads are A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles and The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. Both books are well worth a second or even third read. The same goes for Roger Stark’s new novel based on a true story, They Called Him Marvin. It is a delightful and historically informative book, that was a joy to read. Roger is a master story teller and gifted wordsmith. He delivered on telling a complete story of one man’s life as a B-29 pilot in WW2, integrating this story wit Recently my favorite reads are A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles and The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. Both books are well worth a second or even third read. The same goes for Roger Stark’s new novel based on a true story, They Called Him Marvin. It is a delightful and historically informative book, that was a joy to read. Roger is a master story teller and gifted wordsmith. He delivered on telling a complete story of one man’s life as a B-29 pilot in WW2, integrating this story with what was happening states side and in Japan. It reminds me of those I knew who were part of the “greatest generation” and the commitment and service that they gave to generations to come. I loved reading They Called Him Marvin.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julie James

    They Called Him Marvin by Roger Stark is a merger between American and Japanese events during WWII, and the very human reality of one American pilot and his love letters to his wife. The candor in their loving correspondence, and the stark reality of war, clash against each other within the pages of this book. Like the major and minor notes being pulled from an orchestra by a master conductor, history is brought to life and the full impact of war is felt. Excellent must read novel!!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gilion Dumas

    They Called Him Marvin is the intimate history of one family caught up the War in the Pacific during WWII. First Lieutenant Dean Sherman was one of some 570 Allied airmen captured by the Japanese. His wife Connie was home in Utah, raising the baby Dean never met. Roger Stark's new book tells the story of Dean and Connie Sherman in all its historical context, using their own letters as well as primary source materials. I’m impressed by the research the author put into the book and the way he used They Called Him Marvin is the intimate history of one family caught up the War in the Pacific during WWII. First Lieutenant Dean Sherman was one of some 570 Allied airmen captured by the Japanese. His wife Connie was home in Utah, raising the baby Dean never met. Roger Stark's new book tells the story of Dean and Connie Sherman in all its historical context, using their own letters as well as primary source materials. I’m impressed by the research the author put into the book and the way he used the letters and personal story of Dean and Connie to tell the bigger story of the airmen fighting the war in Japan. The book really brings to life the story of the brave men flying B-29 fighters and the harrowing effects the war had on families on both sides.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brian Benson

    Maybe my favorite thing about this book—a vividly-drawn, well-researched, and moving account of a family torn apart by the Second World War—is the fact that Roger Stark, unlike many other writers of wartime stories, goes far beyond a simple victims-and-villains narrative. We do of course come to know and love Dean, Connie, and Marvin Sherman, but we also get a host of fully-realized Japanese characters, all of whom have hopes and fears as real and relatable as those of the American protagonists. Maybe my favorite thing about this book—a vividly-drawn, well-researched, and moving account of a family torn apart by the Second World War—is the fact that Roger Stark, unlike many other writers of wartime stories, goes far beyond a simple victims-and-villains narrative. We do of course come to know and love Dean, Connie, and Marvin Sherman, but we also get a host of fully-realized Japanese characters, all of whom have hopes and fears as real and relatable as those of the American protagonists. Stark has done an admirable job of weaving together the Shermans' letters, reams of research, and a lightly fictionalized narrative that holds it all together. I'm so glad I read this one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John David

    Like many others, I highly recommend “They Called Him Marvin”. I finished reading the book on Memorial Day weekend and that certainly took on added significance for me. I congratulate the author on the contrast he depicted between the realities of war and the carefree life we often take for granted back home. Excellent work Roger! My thanks go out to any of you reading this who have served in our armed forces…thank you for your service! During WWII, my father flew in the Pacific theater as a Nav Like many others, I highly recommend “They Called Him Marvin”. I finished reading the book on Memorial Day weekend and that certainly took on added significance for me. I congratulate the author on the contrast he depicted between the realities of war and the carefree life we often take for granted back home. Excellent work Roger! My thanks go out to any of you reading this who have served in our armed forces…thank you for your service! During WWII, my father flew in the Pacific theater as a Naval radioman on a PV-1 Ventura. I thought about him often while reading this book. Unlike Dean Sherman, he was one of the lucky ones and returned home to his family.

  25. 5 out of 5

    steve opie

    Very moving This was an excellent story of a young American Dean Sherman and his wife Connie during WW2. Joining the Army and becoming a Captain of one of the biggest bombers the B29. From bases in India, China and finally the islands of Guam a very good account of the bombing of Japan. Throughout the story Dean and Connie sharing very moving letters of their love for each other, until the telegram came that Dean was missing in action. Then the story of his fate and a young widow and son coping w Very moving This was an excellent story of a young American Dean Sherman and his wife Connie during WW2. Joining the Army and becoming a Captain of one of the biggest bombers the B29. From bases in India, China and finally the islands of Guam a very good account of the bombing of Japan. Throughout the story Dean and Connie sharing very moving letters of their love for each other, until the telegram came that Dean was missing in action. Then the story of his fate and a young widow and son coping with the ultimate loss.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dianna Myers

    I keep turning and turning the pages of the book, “They Called Him Marvin, A History of Love, War, and Family. And I don’t want to stop reading because the author brings into the mix, the human side of the people which makes me also interested in the military side of the story (which I didn't think I would like, but I did). This book is, indeed, a good read. And especially at this time of Memorial Day, celebrating our military people’s sacrifices they made for others. I keep turning and turning the pages of the book, “They Called Him Marvin, A History of Love, War, and Family. And I don’t want to stop reading because the author brings into the mix, the human side of the people which makes me also interested in the military side of the story (which I didn't think I would like, but I did). This book is, indeed, a good read. And especially at this time of Memorial Day, celebrating our military people’s sacrifices they made for others.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessie Candle

    This is not a genre I would normally read. Every segment if this book was written with such thoughtfulness. Very descriptive and thorough from three different aspects: that of what we knew about WWII, the emotions of being a military wife separated from a spouse during Vietnam and from the view of our enemy at the time. Great job, highly recommend.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lynn

    Roger Stark presents us with a very human experience of WWII. This is the kind of book that should be on every high school curriculum. It is awash with facts, but expressed in such a way as to grip the reader and hold their attention. Packed with historical content, and portrayed with a vibrant pen, I highly recommend this extraordinary book!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Great book! Lots of information about the pacific theatre of WWII and home life during the war. Gives great insight on what it was like to be in the Air Force as well as a woman waiting for her husband to come home. Everything was well put together with the use of narration, information, and real letters. Would recommend for history buffs!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ron Baumer

    An tragic and inspirational book regarding a pilot and his family during WW2. Good first hand accounts and stories makes this a good historical read. Thank you to #NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

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