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There Will Be Lobster: Memoir of a Midlife Crisis

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You know her. You’ve seen her. You may even see yourself in her. If you’re arriving to the midlife crisis party—the one that’s serving low self-esteem, desperation, unreliable behavior, forgetfulness, carelessness, and the loneliness of loss—the stories and anecdotes in this memoir will assure you that you are not alone.  For Sara Arnell, it took a rogue lobster, a dying ro You know her. You’ve seen her. You may even see yourself in her. If you’re arriving to the midlife crisis party—the one that’s serving low self-esteem, desperation, unreliable behavior, forgetfulness, carelessness, and the loneliness of loss—the stories and anecdotes in this memoir will assure you that you are not alone.  For Sara Arnell, it took a rogue lobster, a dying rock star, an eighteen-pound tumor, a meditation guru, a famous medium, and a former monk to put her on a path toward light, hope, and healing. If reading this book helps even one person, according to Sara, then telling this story is all worth it. “Sara Arnell is the only writer I know who can make self-deprecation and wisdom look like the same thing. There Will Be Lobster is a darkly funny memoir with a big heart, and it’s the exact comeback story we all need right now.” —David Hollander, author of Anthropica and L.I.E. “This book is a deeply personal story that’s not afraid to show you the crazy moments that we all have, but often don’t admit to. Read this memoir if you want to learn how honesty, vulnerability, and sheer perseverance can help you step into your light and illuminate a new path—one that is happy, healthy, and full of hope.” —André Leon Talley, author of New York Times bestseller The Chiffon Trenches and former Vogue editor-at-large


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You know her. You’ve seen her. You may even see yourself in her. If you’re arriving to the midlife crisis party—the one that’s serving low self-esteem, desperation, unreliable behavior, forgetfulness, carelessness, and the loneliness of loss—the stories and anecdotes in this memoir will assure you that you are not alone.  For Sara Arnell, it took a rogue lobster, a dying ro You know her. You’ve seen her. You may even see yourself in her. If you’re arriving to the midlife crisis party—the one that’s serving low self-esteem, desperation, unreliable behavior, forgetfulness, carelessness, and the loneliness of loss—the stories and anecdotes in this memoir will assure you that you are not alone.  For Sara Arnell, it took a rogue lobster, a dying rock star, an eighteen-pound tumor, a meditation guru, a famous medium, and a former monk to put her on a path toward light, hope, and healing. If reading this book helps even one person, according to Sara, then telling this story is all worth it. “Sara Arnell is the only writer I know who can make self-deprecation and wisdom look like the same thing. There Will Be Lobster is a darkly funny memoir with a big heart, and it’s the exact comeback story we all need right now.” —David Hollander, author of Anthropica and L.I.E. “This book is a deeply personal story that’s not afraid to show you the crazy moments that we all have, but often don’t admit to. Read this memoir if you want to learn how honesty, vulnerability, and sheer perseverance can help you step into your light and illuminate a new path—one that is happy, healthy, and full of hope.” —André Leon Talley, author of New York Times bestseller The Chiffon Trenches and former Vogue editor-at-large

30 review for There Will Be Lobster: Memoir of a Midlife Crisis

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Memoirs are hard to review because this is someone's life. You either rate how much you enjoyed reading about that life or stay more generic and just review how well the book was technically written. I'm doing a little of both (but mostly the former) in this review. As far as a technical review is concerned, this book is a 3.5 for me. It's a fine memoir. As a fellow middle aged woman, I got where the author was coming from. She nicely outlines her journey through depression and anxiety (while th Memoirs are hard to review because this is someone's life. You either rate how much you enjoyed reading about that life or stay more generic and just review how well the book was technically written. I'm doing a little of both (but mostly the former) in this review. As far as a technical review is concerned, this book is a 3.5 for me. It's a fine memoir. As a fellow middle aged woman, I got where the author was coming from. She nicely outlines her journey through depression and anxiety (while that's not how this book is being promoted, that is indeed what it is about.) The stories within it are vividly told with a cohesive narrative. But sadly the story itself very much rubbed me the wrong way. As the author mentions at one point, her life was "filthy with compromise, self-loathing, and pity, and that's very much the tone of the entire book. That made reading the book feel like work for me, personally. I know fellow women who have gone through horrible events in mid-life who did a lot of deep soul searching and were able to recover. So, reading about this woman bottoming out in the same (or lesser) circumstances but (and this is the important part) never diving deeper to understand the reasons why or seeking any help from anyone for her mental health was baffling. I wasn't looking for a rosy, sanitized tale. But I WAS looking for a transformative one, and this book didn't seem to provide that perspective. I also found her relationships with her young adult children to be manipulative and lacking in boundaries, and reading about those interactions REALLY bothered me as a parent. At one point she says, "I'm your parent. I forget this a lot," and I couldn't help but agree. She treats her children like they are her friends. However, unlike the authors of many other memoirs where parenting issues are in play, she never seems to have any reckoning with herself that this behavior is unhealthy for them both. I guess I was willing to forgo all these things and rate my review at a 3-ish stars and leave it at that. Unfortunately then I doubled back and read the book's intro and that set me off. In it, the author preemptively addresses the reason why she chose not to work on her mental health with a qualified professional by saying, "I rejected therapy because it felt like an insult to my intelligence." Holy wow is that a highly judgmental and unlikeable sentiment. So by that logic are people who DO work with a therapist dumb? Is it better to wallow in your depression for a year and make your kids bear the burden of that experience? This line was kind of the final straw that broke the camel's back and made me drop my review to 2 stars. I received an ARC of this book courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    This book is for every woman facing this time in their life. It's about a life stage that comes at a time of life when everything's changing. Kids are leaving home. Work is looking different. The body is changing, and sometimes, not in a good way. The author talks about a challenging period in her life that was hard to manage. The book, in essence, is about change. Can we change? How do we change? And what do we change? The stories and anecdotes in this memoir will assure you that you are not al This book is for every woman facing this time in their life. It's about a life stage that comes at a time of life when everything's changing. Kids are leaving home. Work is looking different. The body is changing, and sometimes, not in a good way. The author talks about a challenging period in her life that was hard to manage. The book, in essence, is about change. Can we change? How do we change? And what do we change? The stories and anecdotes in this memoir will assure you that you are not alone during this time in your life. One passage I loved said, "I was beginning to disappear into my own head. I wanted to cover all my mirrors with black cloth and stop the clocks. I wanted to mourn the passing of the self I used to be. I promised myself that in the future, when someone told me they were depressed or sad, I would never say the words 'cheer up.' I couldn't think of a more useless and unhelpful suggestion. I was sick of hearing it. I felt ashamed for all of my own past lackluster efforts, the way I'd always deflected requests for help or advice from someone who is feeling down. I had been ignorant to the realities of depression and sorry for anyone that had ever come to me for assistance. I was unsympathetic and cold. I didn't get it. I wished I could go back in time knowing what I do now, knowing how I feel now, knowing that I could never cheer up just because someone told me to. I had no reason or motivation to do anything except look in the mirror and gasp at what I had let myself become, or rather, what I would not let myself become. I didn't think I deserved happiness or joy, or contentment. I could not cheer up." To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/sar...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: May 5, 2021 Publication date: July 20, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #thirdwave ( #fourthwave #fifthwave?) is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exc Date reviewed/posted: May 5, 2021 Publication date: July 20, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #thirdwave ( #fourthwave #fifthwave?) is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. You know her. You’ve Seen Her. You May Even See Yourself In Her. If you’re arriving at the midlife crisis party—the one that’s serving low self-esteem, desperation, unreliable behaviour, forgetfulness, carelessness, and the loneliness of loss—the stories and anecdotes in this memoir will assure you that you are not alone. For Sara Arnell, It took a rogue lobster, a dying rock star, an eighteen-pound tumour, a meditation guru, a famous medium and a former monk to help put her on a path toward light, hope and healing. If reading this book helps even one person, according to Sara, then telling this story is all worth it. It is really hard to describe why I liked this book - it is one of those ones that you need to read to understand why it was so awesome. I laughed, I cried, I craved shellfish.  I will recommend this book to friends, family, patrons, bookclubs as it is an awesome uplifting autobiography! Take this book to the beach (or your back yard, porch or balcony) and enjoy it - just wear a tonne of SPF110 as you will lose track of time as you read this. - If we are in the 5th or 6th wave/mutation of COVID19 by then, stay inside: no tan is worth dying for nor is burn that will make you the colour of that lobster. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🦞🦞🦞🦞🦞

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Kerry

    There Will Be Lobster: Memoir of a Midlife Crisis is one of the best book on healing , self-care and self-love that should be on your bookshelf. There are so many books out there, that it is hard to know which ones are the better ones, particularly when it comes to the softer science of dealing with feelings, emotions and metaphysics and There Will Be Lobster: Memoir of a Midlife Crisis by Sara Arnell is one of them. This book will not only help you to understand the emotions , honesty, vulnerabi There Will Be Lobster: Memoir of a Midlife Crisis is one of the best book on healing , self-care and self-love that should be on your bookshelf. There are so many books out there, that it is hard to know which ones are the better ones, particularly when it comes to the softer science of dealing with feelings, emotions and metaphysics and There Will Be Lobster: Memoir of a Midlife Crisis by Sara Arnell is one of them. This book will not only help you to understand the emotions , honesty, vulnerability you’ve been experiencing throughout your life, but it will help you understand more fully what they are, what each emotion means and how to effectively utilize your new awareness of them.  This book will help bring a more heightened awareness of your own thoughts and feelings and connect you with that realm and your family and friends more. As you read, you’ll appreciate and make peace with where you are right now, even though there is so much more that you might desire. Learning to live in the present moment can be challenging for all of us, but it is definitely a key to surviving and thriving more in life, and after completing this book you'll learn to embrace yourself more fully and it will help you transform your life and relationships and accept more of who you are.  I hope this review will inspire you to read this amazing book. It will definitely going to help you overcome some of life's challenges, whatever they are and in turn, learn to accept yourself more fully and live your life to your fullest potential.  Highly Recommended!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    Bare and very honest. I was interested at first because I thought there be more about the advertising industry and how’d she’d be able to pick herself up by the bootstraps and restart in the field or in some other entrepreneurial way, but any real need to work never really manifested. But possibly the author’s goal was the bigger story of how the perfect storm of the layoff, her youngest going off to college, and binge-drinking problems triggered a deeper depression.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    This is a very powerful book. At times I found the style of writing difficult to handle, but the subject matter is difficult and I think the style was warranted. A must read for anyone who has been through addiction, depression, rejection, or any other midlife crisis.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Thank you NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review. Being a middle-age woman overrun with books about 20 somethings, I was excited to preview this book. We call all relate at some point to the issues in the book, however I found the manner in which they were told to be slightly off putting. I could not garner sympathy or understanding and I felt there was no result of deeper understanding or resolution. Because of this it was somewhat difficult to stay engaged in t Thank you NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review. Being a middle-age woman overrun with books about 20 somethings, I was excited to preview this book. We call all relate at some point to the issues in the book, however I found the manner in which they were told to be slightly off putting. I could not garner sympathy or understanding and I felt there was no result of deeper understanding or resolution. Because of this it was somewhat difficult to stay engaged in the story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yesenia

    I genuinely wondered how I’d be able to connect to this book and I am floored at how much I actually enjoyed this book. From the beginning of her midlife crisis to the last page of her memoir, you can feel the pain (as well as the joys) that Arnell went through. I cried, genuinely laughed out loud, joined her on her spiritual journey, and rooted for her throughout. Along with it being a memoir, you get a full picture of the complexities of being a parent, the great bonds and patience of loving c I genuinely wondered how I’d be able to connect to this book and I am floored at how much I actually enjoyed this book. From the beginning of her midlife crisis to the last page of her memoir, you can feel the pain (as well as the joys) that Arnell went through. I cried, genuinely laughed out loud, joined her on her spiritual journey, and rooted for her throughout. Along with it being a memoir, you get a full picture of the complexities of being a parent, the great bonds and patience of loving children, and the genuine inner reconstruction of someone who has /gone through it/. Some phrases that stood out to me: • “My, how the mighty have fallen” • “The guru said that the solution is to stay and play” • “You have the power of perspective and you need to use it for your benefit. For your sanity.”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beatrix Starling

    I have received this book from #Netgalley as a digital advance reader copy in exchange for an honest review. There are simply not enough books out there about women's midlife crisis. There may come a time in everyone's life when the walls cave in around them and life forces us to face painful loss and change. It is always the time when one needs to dig deep and face whatever comes up. I felt that a lot of people would be able to relate to the writer. It is helpful to understand that you are not al I have received this book from #Netgalley as a digital advance reader copy in exchange for an honest review. There are simply not enough books out there about women's midlife crisis. There may come a time in everyone's life when the walls cave in around them and life forces us to face painful loss and change. It is always the time when one needs to dig deep and face whatever comes up. I felt that a lot of people would be able to relate to the writer. It is helpful to understand that you are not alone going through tough times. I liked the wide open honesty, the no holds barred truthfulness in all the horrible lows the writer experienced. However i would have loved to see her come out of it like a shining beacon - to give hope to the readers. I felt the book was just steeped in depression and percieved failure, with little progress. It felt like it was just the beginning of a good book that still needed its happy ending.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Thanks to Net Galley, the publisher and the author for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. To be honest, I struggled with this book. A seemingly strong, professional woman finds her life falling apart when her youngest child is preparing to head off to college. Her business goes under, she will be an empty nester on her own and she falls down the rabbit hole of a major mid-life crisis. I will admit that while reading I found myself put off of her high drama accounts. It all came together b Thanks to Net Galley, the publisher and the author for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. To be honest, I struggled with this book. A seemingly strong, professional woman finds her life falling apart when her youngest child is preparing to head off to college. Her business goes under, she will be an empty nester on her own and she falls down the rabbit hole of a major mid-life crisis. I will admit that while reading I found myself put off of her high drama accounts. It all came together by the end but not in a satisfactory way. 3.5

  11. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Sara Arnell's titled her memoir of a midlife crisis There Will Be Lobster after an incident on New Year's Day in 2015 when she awoke on the bathroom floor covered in her own vomit after an evening of drinking way too much. She had a black eye, cuts on her face, and her cheek burned from passing out on the radiant-heated tiles in the bathroom. She had to pull herself together to cook brunch for her adult children and some of their friends. As she entered the living room, a lobster that was suppose Sara Arnell's titled her memoir of a midlife crisis There Will Be Lobster after an incident on New Year's Day in 2015 when she awoke on the bathroom floor covered in her own vomit after an evening of drinking way too much. She had a black eye, cuts on her face, and her cheek burned from passing out on the radiant-heated tiles in the bathroom. She had to pull herself together to cook brunch for her adult children and some of their friends. As she entered the living room, a lobster that was supposed to be sitting in a pot ready to be boiled crawled out from under the couch. Sara was having a bad day after a bad few years. She shares stories about the 18 pound tumor her daughter had surgically removed, (a tumor that no one knew the young woman had), her paralyzing fear of being an empty nester, and losing her job as the CEO of a once prominent advertising agency when the agency lost nearly all of its clients. She was losing her identity. When she lost her job, Sara spent her days in bed watching Bravo TV's Housewives reality shows, not showering for days, wearing her son's sweatpants. She drank way too much, including one infamous Thanksgiving at her son's apartment with his friends where she impressed (mortified?) the young men with her ability to play drinking games with them. Sara felt "old, ugly and useless", like it was the end of the world. She couldn't shake herself out of this funk. She didn't have friends she could call to get a cup of coffee, calling herself "an accidental socializer", incapable of making plans with anyone, only speaking to people she ran into accidentally. I discovered that Sara grew up in the small town of Saugerties, where my husband's family is from, and that added an extra layer of interest for me. There Will Be Lobster is a quick read, with most chapters just a few pages and only 164 pages in total, but Sara packs a punch in this slim memoir. The main point to her story is that if she can pull herself out of a really bad time, maybe you can too.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    The thing that struck me most about Sara Arnell’s serio-comic memoir, There Will Be Lobster, is that her conversational style immediately makes the reader feel like a friend, rather than an outsider peeking into someone’s life. I wouldn’t go so far as to call Arnell breezy, as that implies a level of fluffiness that this book does not have, but her written words flow as easily as spoken ones do. The second thing that struck me about this book is that it’s so relatable. I don’t have children, adul The thing that struck me most about Sara Arnell’s serio-comic memoir, There Will Be Lobster, is that her conversational style immediately makes the reader feel like a friend, rather than an outsider peeking into someone’s life. I wouldn’t go so far as to call Arnell breezy, as that implies a level of fluffiness that this book does not have, but her written words flow as easily as spoken ones do. The second thing that struck me about this book is that it’s so relatable. I don’t have children, adult or otherwise, but I know what it is to want to reconnect with family, and I know that sometimes a good buzz can cloud the recollection of a bad night, or enhance the memory of a good one. Which is not to imply that Arnell is drunk throughout this memoir. The book simply opens with the memory of a drunken experience. Written as a series of anecdotal essays, this book doesn’t really have a plot – it’s a memoir, after all – but there is a theme of aging, of self-awareness, and of wanting to restore severed ties to people and places once beloved. This book isn’t for every woman, but it’s for a broad spectrum of women of all ages, who need a nudge toward being honest with themselves about who they are and what they really want out of life. Less self-help than simply setting an example, There Will Be Lobster is both witty and engaging, and I highly recommend it, especially to women my age (I’ll be 51 next Tuesday.) Goes well with: A lobster roll and a bottle of your favorite microbrew, but nothing too hoppy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan Tunis

    Wow, I did not enjoy this memoir. Usually, I'm a big fan of audiobook memoirs read by the author. Who better to tell their life story, right? Not this lady, apparently. She didn't come across as authentic or even remotely likeable. As you can guess from the subtitle, this lady is a hot mess. She feels the need to state the big message of her book in the prologue--it's that important. "When things change inside you, things change around you." Yes, that is the level of depth and profundity you can Wow, I did not enjoy this memoir. Usually, I'm a big fan of audiobook memoirs read by the author. Who better to tell their life story, right? Not this lady, apparently. She didn't come across as authentic or even remotely likeable. As you can guess from the subtitle, this lady is a hot mess. She feels the need to state the big message of her book in the prologue--it's that important. "When things change inside you, things change around you." Yes, that is the level of depth and profundity you can expect here. Also, entirely too many references to vomit. This got two stars for being coherently, if unexcitingly, written. Sara Arnell is an odd duck. For someone supposedly very successful, she has a lot of strange ideas and pursues a lot of psychics, tarot readers, and other forms of quackery. I did not find the author to be particularly intelligent, insightful, or funny. But most unforgivably, when it comes to a memoir, she just wasn't interesting. Thank God it was a short book. I'm sorry to be so harsh, because I know she's a real person who could conceivably read these words, but I really, really did not enjoy my time in her company.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jane Dennish

    It’s always hard to rate a memoir, because you feel like you are judging someone’s actions or beliefs. But for me, my rating on this book is not based on what the author did in the book but on how the book was written. For me, there were too many jumps in time, which left the story disjointed. I didn’t care about the author as much as I should have because the events did not connect. I also did not feel the pain she was going through. The writing felt robotic at times, like she was telling me wh It’s always hard to rate a memoir, because you feel like you are judging someone’s actions or beliefs. But for me, my rating on this book is not based on what the author did in the book but on how the book was written. For me, there were too many jumps in time, which left the story disjointed. I didn’t care about the author as much as I should have because the events did not connect. I also did not feel the pain she was going through. The writing felt robotic at times, like she was telling me what happened instead of showing me. The last 10% of the book was well written and I felt the pain. I just don’t think she dug deep enough to show us her pain. It felt like she didn’t want to be vulnerable. We never found out the source of the pain. Vulnerability is a must for a great memoir. Thank you to Net Galley for a gifted e copy to read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lou Barber

    There Will Be Lobster is a short read but packed with content. It chronicles a period of time in the author's life where she felt like everything had fallen apart. Jobless, directionless and utterly bereft of joy or hope, she was descending further and further into depression. Her children had left home and she saw no point in even getting dressed or showering. Sick and tired of feeling sick and tired, she found herself drawn to meditation and this daily practise helped her cope when she receive There Will Be Lobster is a short read but packed with content. It chronicles a period of time in the author's life where she felt like everything had fallen apart. Jobless, directionless and utterly bereft of joy or hope, she was descending further and further into depression. Her children had left home and she saw no point in even getting dressed or showering. Sick and tired of feeling sick and tired, she found herself drawn to meditation and this daily practise helped her cope when she received a diagnosis of leukaemia. I think this read more like an extended article than a memoir, focusing as it did on a short period of time. But nevertheless it was a moving account of one woman's midlife crisis in the true sense of the word.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    I loved the title of this book and the bold cover. That's about all I liked. I found the author to be whiny and do wildly inappropriate things. She would say that her grown children were her life and then treat them so irrespectively. This reminded me a little of Eat, Pray, Love (which I also hated) in that the author seemed to whine and want to "find herself" but took no real actions and seemed to have money to sustain her anyway. This author never worried about money (strangely) which made it I loved the title of this book and the bold cover. That's about all I liked. I found the author to be whiny and do wildly inappropriate things. She would say that her grown children were her life and then treat them so irrespectively. This reminded me a little of Eat, Pray, Love (which I also hated) in that the author seemed to whine and want to "find herself" but took no real actions and seemed to have money to sustain her anyway. This author never worried about money (strangely) which made it hard for me to really emphasize with her hardships. I did feel bad for hating her later in the book but she quickly reminded me why I couldn't root for her. Thank you to NetGalley for the advance copy for review. We now know this book was not for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I won this book in a GoodReads giveaway and struggle to know what to say about it. I too have struggled with depression and anxiety recently as I'm also unemployed and feel lost in life. So, it was difficult to read another person's deep despair. However, I was hoping to read a story with redemption and to learn from someone who has turned it around. Instead, it ended with the author being diagnosed with cancer. I suppose that's life for you, but it wasn't what I was prepared to read. I applaud I won this book in a GoodReads giveaway and struggle to know what to say about it. I too have struggled with depression and anxiety recently as I'm also unemployed and feel lost in life. So, it was difficult to read another person's deep despair. However, I was hoping to read a story with redemption and to learn from someone who has turned it around. Instead, it ended with the author being diagnosed with cancer. I suppose that's life for you, but it wasn't what I was prepared to read. I applaud the author for being so honest and I enjoyed the way the book is written. It was a quick read that was ok but left me wanting something else.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Diane Pomerantz

    ... disappointing because I felt that the book lacked the "soul" which would have made it more relatable to other women in a similar position. As a reader, I felt that the author was trying very hard "to not tell too much" of the back-story and so the crisis never quite felt like anything I could connect with - I understood that there was the loss of a huge business/ professional position but the underpinnings of the crisis are barely alluded to and I found that to be frustrating for me. The tra ... disappointing because I felt that the book lacked the "soul" which would have made it more relatable to other women in a similar position. As a reader, I felt that the author was trying very hard "to not tell too much" of the back-story and so the crisis never quite felt like anything I could connect with - I understood that there was the loss of a huge business/ professional position but the underpinnings of the crisis are barely alluded to and I found that to be frustrating for me. The transformation that was alluded to was not demonstrated in the book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nikita

    That rarest of beasts: the perfect inspiring non-fiction. This extraordinary novel set my blood fizzing―I quite literally couldn't put it down. I told myself I'd just dip in; eleven hours later―it's now 5:47 a.m.―I've finished it, absolutely dazzled. Hypnotic, rattling.... Time collapses as, minute by minute, krakauer rivetingly and movingly chronicles what ensued, much of which is near ecstasy to read.... A brilliantly told storyline that won't go begging when the year's literary honors are dole That rarest of beasts: the perfect inspiring non-fiction. This extraordinary novel set my blood fizzing―I quite literally couldn't put it down. I told myself I'd just dip in; eleven hours later―it's now 5:47 a.m.―I've finished it, absolutely dazzled. Hypnotic, rattling.... Time collapses as, minute by minute, krakauer rivetingly and movingly chronicles what ensued, much of which is near ecstasy to read.... A brilliantly told storyline that won't go begging when the year's literary honors are doled out

  20. 4 out of 5

    Callie Oakman

    This is a woman’s journey thru a challenging time in her life (losing her job and children leaving home) which led her into depression. While sad, I felt the author did a good job of showing true feelings and obstacles and the essays were short enough to not drag. The author definitely has an advantage over most of us in that she didn’t seem to have to worry about money which isn’t realistic for most of us. This is a subject that should be discussed more and glad the author was willing to put he This is a woman’s journey thru a challenging time in her life (losing her job and children leaving home) which led her into depression. While sad, I felt the author did a good job of showing true feelings and obstacles and the essays were short enough to not drag. The author definitely has an advantage over most of us in that she didn’t seem to have to worry about money which isn’t realistic for most of us. This is a subject that should be discussed more and glad the author was willing to put herself out there.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Thank you #Netgalley for the advanced read! We follow Sara during her midlife crisis, she is single, her last child headed off to college, her company closed. What should she do? This follows Sara as she tries to navigate where she fits into the world by herself. I appreciated her honesty around addiction, depression, rejection, though at times it was a bit hard to read as I began to feel bad about what she was experiencing.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dana Goldstein

    From the very first pages of the book, I could feel the author's despair. I had hoped to connect with this memoir, being in midlife myself. I'm not sure if the intent of the author was to keep a reader at arms length, but I felt Arnell was holding back, like she was skimming the top layer of her crises. I liked the style of writing, but was hoping for more emotion, more anecdotal experiences than what was delivered. From the very first pages of the book, I could feel the author's despair. I had hoped to connect with this memoir, being in midlife myself. I'm not sure if the intent of the author was to keep a reader at arms length, but I felt Arnell was holding back, like she was skimming the top layer of her crises. I liked the style of writing, but was hoping for more emotion, more anecdotal experiences than what was delivered.

  23. 5 out of 5

    The Reviewera

    Five Stars One of the best books I have read this month! Highly recommend it! I only leave positive feedback and reviews when I love the book. Feel free to ask anything regarding this book. A must read for sure. I'd recommend this book to everyone who would like to read an inspiring memoir. The book is written in a very interesting way . A must read for sure Five Stars One of the best books I have read this month! Highly recommend it! I only leave positive feedback and reviews when I love the book. Feel free to ask anything regarding this book. A must read for sure. I'd recommend this book to everyone who would like to read an inspiring memoir. The book is written in a very interesting way . A must read for sure

  24. 5 out of 5

    GG

    I won this book in a Good Reads giveaway. I couldn’t put this book down. I think every woman of a certain age should read this book. If we haven’t faced the exact same challenges, we’ve gone thru the same reactions and coping mechanisms. It took a lot of courage for Sara to share her story, but I think it should be required reading for anyone who is going thru a “midlife crisis”

  25. 5 out of 5

    mrsboomreads

    I read There Will be Lobster in one sitting, smirking, cringing, heart plummeting, and needing to know things would be alright for Sara Arnell. Her unflinchingly honest account of several years of her mid-life, with challenges, failures and eventual reckoning were captivating.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara Goldenberg

    It was dark and sad and not at all the funny book i was expecting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    There Will Be Lobster is not about Lobster. Although the lobster does make an appearance. The lobster in question (or questions) are a Road to Damascus moment, and for the author a symbol of hope. Lobsters aside, this memoir is an honest account of a successful woman’s midlife crisis; her crash and burn (literally in a heap in the bathroom floor) and her picking herself and getting her life on track. Sara’s crash and burn is brutal, and her children must have been saints for sticking with her. Sh There Will Be Lobster is not about Lobster. Although the lobster does make an appearance. The lobster in question (or questions) are a Road to Damascus moment, and for the author a symbol of hope. Lobsters aside, this memoir is an honest account of a successful woman’s midlife crisis; her crash and burn (literally in a heap in the bathroom floor) and her picking herself and getting her life on track. Sara’s crash and burn is brutal, and her children must have been saints for sticking with her. She leaves bits out of as in where the father of her children is. Where she gets her money when she is clearly out of work, and how does she survive in general. She also leaves her novel hanging there in that for me it just finishes– I came away with a burning desire to know who she was getting along now. Maybe there will a second part, or maybe she felt that she had poured out enough of herself and it was time to get on with her life. And possibly she left the gaps because it was her memoir and she wanted to. This memoir may not be for everyone but for me it’s a timely reminder of how life’s lessons and picking yourself up when you feel that you can’t.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne Niemann

  30. 4 out of 5

    Denise

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