Hot Best Seller

Greedy: Notes from a Bisexual Who Wants Too Much

Availability: Ready to download

A hilarious and whip-smart collection of essays, offering an intimate look at bisexuality, gender, and, of course, sex. Perfect for fans of Lindy West, Samantha Irby, and Rebecca Solnit—and anyone who wants, and deserves, to be seen. If Jen Winston knows one thing for sure, it’s that she’s bisexual. Or wait—maybe she isn’t? Actually, she definitely is. Unless…she’s not? Je A hilarious and whip-smart collection of essays, offering an intimate look at bisexuality, gender, and, of course, sex. Perfect for fans of Lindy West, Samantha Irby, and Rebecca Solnit—and anyone who wants, and deserves, to be seen. If Jen Winston knows one thing for sure, it’s that she’s bisexual. Or wait—maybe she isn’t? Actually, she definitely is. Unless…she’s not? Jen’s provocative, laugh-out-loud debut takes us inside her journey of self-discovery, leading us through stories of a childhood “girl crush,” an onerous quest to have a threesome, and an enduring fear of being bad at sex. Greedy follows Jen’s attempts to make sense of herself as she explores the role of the male gaze, what it means to be “queer enough,” and how to overcome bi stereotypes when you’re the posterchild for all of them: greedy, slutty, and constantly confused. With her clever voice and clear-eyed insight, Jen draws on personal experiences with sexism and biphobia to understand how we all can and must do better. She sheds light on the reasons women, queer people, and other marginalized groups tend to make ourselves smaller, provoking the question: What would happen if we suddenly stopped?​​ Greedy shows us that being bisexual is about so much more than who you’re sleeping with—it’s about finding stability in a state of flux and defining yourself on your own terms. This book inspires us to rethink the world as we know it, reminding us that Greedy was a superpower all along.


Compare

A hilarious and whip-smart collection of essays, offering an intimate look at bisexuality, gender, and, of course, sex. Perfect for fans of Lindy West, Samantha Irby, and Rebecca Solnit—and anyone who wants, and deserves, to be seen. If Jen Winston knows one thing for sure, it’s that she’s bisexual. Or wait—maybe she isn’t? Actually, she definitely is. Unless…she’s not? Je A hilarious and whip-smart collection of essays, offering an intimate look at bisexuality, gender, and, of course, sex. Perfect for fans of Lindy West, Samantha Irby, and Rebecca Solnit—and anyone who wants, and deserves, to be seen. If Jen Winston knows one thing for sure, it’s that she’s bisexual. Or wait—maybe she isn’t? Actually, she definitely is. Unless…she’s not? Jen’s provocative, laugh-out-loud debut takes us inside her journey of self-discovery, leading us through stories of a childhood “girl crush,” an onerous quest to have a threesome, and an enduring fear of being bad at sex. Greedy follows Jen’s attempts to make sense of herself as she explores the role of the male gaze, what it means to be “queer enough,” and how to overcome bi stereotypes when you’re the posterchild for all of them: greedy, slutty, and constantly confused. With her clever voice and clear-eyed insight, Jen draws on personal experiences with sexism and biphobia to understand how we all can and must do better. She sheds light on the reasons women, queer people, and other marginalized groups tend to make ourselves smaller, provoking the question: What would happen if we suddenly stopped?​​ Greedy shows us that being bisexual is about so much more than who you’re sleeping with—it’s about finding stability in a state of flux and defining yourself on your own terms. This book inspires us to rethink the world as we know it, reminding us that Greedy was a superpower all along.

30 review for Greedy: Notes from a Bisexual Who Wants Too Much

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Powerful. Hilarious. Iconic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian

    A memoir in essays structured around the author's bisexuality and embracing rather than shamefully rejecting the stereotypes of being greedy, confused, slutty and indecisive. In theory I love this approach. In practice I don't have much in common with Winston and those experiences-- which hey, cool, the bi+ community is very diverse! But I did struggle to emotionally connect with some pieces (except for one about sexual assault which I found quite powerful). The voice is very millenial, chatty, A memoir in essays structured around the author's bisexuality and embracing rather than shamefully rejecting the stereotypes of being greedy, confused, slutty and indecisive. In theory I love this approach. In practice I don't have much in common with Winston and those experiences-- which hey, cool, the bi+ community is very diverse! But I did struggle to emotionally connect with some pieces (except for one about sexual assault which I found quite powerful). The voice is very millenial, chatty, and Internet-speaky, in a way that felt familiar to me but also made the author's individual personality a bit opaque. That said, it's a super readable book, one that I picked up intending to just have a look and then realized "Oh I guess I'm reading this now." There's a bit at the end about coming to a non-binary identity and using she/they pronouns. I was especially interested in hearing more about that journey, especially as it's compared to the flux and fluidity of bisexuality. But maybe that's their next book! I'm glad I read this book. It's one of those that didn't always necessarily speak to me, but that I am grateful is out in the world and that I know will be important to a lot of bi+ folks. Fans of Gaby Dunn's work will like this, I think. My favourite line was "It's like the gay and straight communities are our parents, and each thought the other was going to pick us up from school."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dara

    I wanted to like this more than I did…it was okay, but overall I just didn’t really connect with the author’s voice, which is the biggest thing I want from a collection of essays. Parts of it felt pretty performative for me 😬 Several chapters felt like they learned something from an Instagram post and then turned around and wrote an essay on it as if they were the expert. Much of it felt *too* fresh, if that makes sense; a series of personal revelations presented as minor treatises.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Qian

    hilarious, honest, unputdownable. like hanging out with your coolest and funniest friend. whether you identify as bi or not, you need to read this book. it’ll make you laugh, it’ll make you think, it’ll make you see everything around you just a little bit differently. thank you Jen Winston for this gift of a book!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brynn

    "Is bisexuality queer? In your head you know it is—another few years and you'll realize you're just as entitled to Chromatica Oreos as twinks are. But in your heart, you can't deny that bisexuality has never felt queer enough. It's never felt queer enough to talk about. It's never felt queer enough to take up space. It's never felt queer enough to lead you to community, or to show you who you are." (xix) "Back then you thought of yourself as straight plus gay—an identity made of old ingredients r "Is bisexuality queer? In your head you know it is—another few years and you'll realize you're just as entitled to Chromatica Oreos as twinks are. But in your heart, you can't deny that bisexuality has never felt queer enough. It's never felt queer enough to talk about. It's never felt queer enough to take up space. It's never felt queer enough to lead you to community, or to show you who you are." (xix) "Back then you thought of yourself as straight plus gay—an identity made of old ingredients rather than something all its own. The only thing you knew was that you didn't know for sure—another bisexual who couldn't 'pick a side.'" (xxi) "Bi culture is everything. Which means bi culture is nothing. As annoying as this logic loop might be, it reflects exactly what it's like to be bisexual: to be told simultaneously that you are asking for too much and that you don't exist." (6) "Gay and lesbian bars, safe havens for some, are rarely safe havens for bi people. But where does that leave us to go? It's like the gay and straight communities are our parents and each thought the other would pick us up from school. We're left sitting on the curb, moping with our lunch box, until we decide to walk home." (12) "We became nightlife snobs (far and away the worse kind of snob—self-righteousness and ketamine make for a lethal combination), spending most of our time at warehouse parties so we could stay out after the bars closed." (79) "By this point I knew for certain that I needed to label my sexuality—if I didn't explicitly name my queerness, it seemed too slippery, like a bar of soap that would fly out of my hands. The word 'bisexual' gave me something external to hold on to, an 'oh shit' handle I could grab as the earth shifted beneath my feet." (188) "When I say Queer Love, I mean love that makes its own rules. Love that exists without borders and thrives without clean lines. Love that creates more space than it takes up." (244) "In that moment you must see the future, because somehow you know that this word—their name—will be important. A lump forms in your throat, but in a good way—like you're at the top of a roller coaster ready to drop." (248)

  6. 4 out of 5

    kyndal

    2.5 stars. I went into reading Greedy extremely optimistic as a queer person who identifies as bi or bi adjacent. And there are some standout essays here: Knots, The Neon Sweater, the essay on Brinley. Ultimately, however, this book reads like a 280 page Instagram feed or Buzzfeed article written by someone who falls between Florence Given and Lena Dunham. While the author strives for self-awareness for me personally it didn’t land rather sounded obtuse and obligatory/self righteous. Winston’s uppe 2.5 stars. I went into reading Greedy extremely optimistic as a queer person who identifies as bi or bi adjacent. And there are some standout essays here: Knots, The Neon Sweater, the essay on Brinley. Ultimately, however, this book reads like a 280 page Instagram feed or Buzzfeed article written by someone who falls between Florence Given and Lena Dunham. While the author strives for self-awareness for me personally it didn’t land rather sounded obtuse and obligatory/self righteous. Winston’s upper middle class background underpins its entirety, perhaps making it relatable for some but for me it felt alienating and a flaunting of privilege more than anything. As a whole, it felt like an intro to social justice for someone who’d never read any other sources or works. The continual referral to Munoz, Audre Lorde and others feels like a brief summary of brilliant minds; save your time and read those thinkers instead.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sophie - biblisophagist

    Greedy is honest, fast-paced, and truly laugh-out-loud funny. Each essay feels more like a conversation with a friend as you get to know them better and better through silly anecdotes and tough traumas. I connected to so much and felt so seen throughout this book even as each essay considered a new issue: desirability, consent, dating app culture, gender, girl crushes, etc. all tying back to bi culture and erasure. As a bi woman, it felt like a very validating read and helped me realize that it i Greedy is honest, fast-paced, and truly laugh-out-loud funny. Each essay feels more like a conversation with a friend as you get to know them better and better through silly anecdotes and tough traumas. I connected to so much and felt so seen throughout this book even as each essay considered a new issue: desirability, consent, dating app culture, gender, girl crushes, etc. all tying back to bi culture and erasure. As a bi woman, it felt like a very validating read and helped me realize that it is OKAY to always question and grow and learn and unlearn. Interesting formatting in some of the essays and footnotes made the whole experience just as visually interesting and I felt educated even as I laughed along to some of Winston’s cringe childhood moments that mirrored my own. This book also gave me a whole list of references to other works that I can't wait to check out! I adored this book and I can't wait for more from Jen Winston! Thank you so much to @atriabooks and @netgalley for my copies of this book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    As someone who identifies as bisexual, it was refreshing to hear another talk about the issues that arise dealing with both the hetero and queer communities. "Pick a side", "It's all about sex", "you're just greedy". Winston approaches the subject with more than a little humor, self observation, and stories that many of us can connect to. As someone who identifies as bisexual, it was refreshing to hear another talk about the issues that arise dealing with both the hetero and queer communities. "Pick a side", "It's all about sex", "you're just greedy". Winston approaches the subject with more than a little humor, self observation, and stories that many of us can connect to.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Brill

    “Finding stability in a state of flux” who wouldn’t want to be enlightened on this topic that applies to every aspect of our lives, personally, professionally and sexually. Kudos to Jen, just your ‘anything but average’ gal I met on a bus in a foreign land ... and keeps it authentically honest.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

    Finished this morning, the day after release, after being unable to put it down. This book is a wonderful exploration of what it means to be bi, a modern human, and a misfit unsure of one's place in a world that assumes the way things are are the way things always should be. Rebellious and funny, candid and tender, brave and humble. Great read! Finished this morning, the day after release, after being unable to put it down. This book is a wonderful exploration of what it means to be bi, a modern human, and a misfit unsure of one's place in a world that assumes the way things are are the way things always should be. Rebellious and funny, candid and tender, brave and humble. Great read!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Krantz

    I loved this book. It was so relatable to me as a bisexual, and i learned so much from it. It's also funny, well-researched, kind, and vulnerable. I loved this book. It was so relatable to me as a bisexual, and i learned so much from it. It's also funny, well-researched, kind, and vulnerable.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

    As a bisexual femme, I found this collection of essays to be affirming and validating. I really appreciated the honesty and vulnerability that sheds a little bit of light onto the weight bisexual and queer folks carry with them. We need more media that speaks honestly about bisexuality and works to break the stigmas that exist. This book is an example of that. Thank you to the author for sharing their experiences while also being mindful and aware of their privileges.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    This book. Damn. So I had originally read Gabrielle Korn’s book earlier this year and after finishing that, found this book alongside it on a list of queer books coming out this year. So I waited for this one to be published, which meant I came in with pretty high expectations which was perhaps unfair to this book. It doesn’t even matter in the end because it exceeded every expectation I could have had. I found myself on most pages. Reading it felt like finding parts of myself that I really like This book. Damn. So I had originally read Gabrielle Korn’s book earlier this year and after finishing that, found this book alongside it on a list of queer books coming out this year. So I waited for this one to be published, which meant I came in with pretty high expectations which was perhaps unfair to this book. It doesn’t even matter in the end because it exceeded every expectation I could have had. I found myself on most pages. Reading it felt like finding parts of myself that I really like that I forgot were there. And then those pieces of myself were affirmed. What a gift! Jen’s writing is smart and funny. Their voice is aware of how it came to be. She is unafraid to be messy-vulnerable. And I, a hot mess, ADHD, bisexual femme feel very seen. TL;DR: down with binary choices, more bisexual stories, read this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ari

    This book feels like curling up with a warm, hilarious, caring friend. And — just as some great friendships offer — this book also lands like a personal meditation, reflecting on the kinds of questions, challenges, and social dynamics that have surrounded my life since childhood and through adulthood. I love how the author Jen Winston dances between playful and painful. In moments I felt like I was comfortably seated on a highly-entertaining ride through Jen's experiences and personal stories, o This book feels like curling up with a warm, hilarious, caring friend. And — just as some great friendships offer — this book also lands like a personal meditation, reflecting on the kinds of questions, challenges, and social dynamics that have surrounded my life since childhood and through adulthood. I love how the author Jen Winston dances between playful and painful. In moments I felt like I was comfortably seated on a highly-entertaining ride through Jen's experiences and personal stories, only to realize after a bit that I'd been effortlessly transported right into the heart of some of the most complex and necessary questions of our time around the intersections of gender, sexuality, power, erotics, and liberation. The writing in "Greedy" is fun and fluid, wounded and questioning, and rightfully seeking space for both – aka, this book is deeply bisexual. Highly recommend.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Finola Austin

    I flew through this! Greedy is a series of entertaining and readable essays about Winston’s journey with sexuality, gender and relationships. Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in these topics, especially anyone who’s ever felt confused or ashamed about not having it all figured out. ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roslyn Simmons

    I heard Jen doing an interview about the book on my way to work and instantly wanted to read this book. It was very open and honest, serious yet funny. I learned new terms and their meanings. I a new and different level of love and respect my LGBTQ friends. Thank you for sharing your truth with all of us.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Medea Ghijsen

    Hilarious. Chaotic. Finally filled that void inside my soul.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Blake

    I could not put this book down - it made me laugh, made me cry, and made me cringe so many times. Jen Winston’s writing is relatable and deeply thoughtful. While reading this, I even had the courage to come out as bisexual to my own mom. Her work is just that powerful. I wish I could wipe this book from my memory just to experience it for the first time again. I know I’ll be referring back to this text for years to come.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bernstein

    funny and made me feel ~seen. Loved 5/5

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kobi

    I seriously don't think I've ever read such an engaging work of non-fiction. It literally felt like having a conversation with my friends outside of a gay bar we spontaneously dropped by, only to end up chain-smoking outside with a group of people we just met (one of them being a girl my friend had previously gone a date with but blew off) and guessing each other's zodiac signs (this did actually happen). I can honestly say right now that I don't think I've ever had an original experience in my I seriously don't think I've ever read such an engaging work of non-fiction. It literally felt like having a conversation with my friends outside of a gay bar we spontaneously dropped by, only to end up chain-smoking outside with a group of people we just met (one of them being a girl my friend had previously gone a date with but blew off) and guessing each other's zodiac signs (this did actually happen). I can honestly say right now that I don't think I've ever had an original experience in my life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Sedran

    This book was so refreshing and made me feel 10000% valid in my experiences as a bi woman. Jen is both hilarious and real at the same time. Absolutely recommend this to anyone who struggles with imposter syndrome and feeling like they’re “not queer enough”… this book will make you feel less alone.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mike De Socio

    What an absolute delight to read. Jen has knocked it our of the park with this. I felt seen, but also challenged and brought along for the ride. I’m already sad it’s over and can’t wait for her next book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jess Christensen

    Absolutely adored this book. Witty and poignant. I’m a weepy baby, so I frequently found myself tearing up. Everything I could want in a book about the nuances of one person’s experience with bisexuality. Perfect for anyone who falls under the Bi+ umbrella, has questioned their sexuality, or wondered if it was “too late” for them to come out.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Green

    I read this in two sittings and it was incredible. So funny, witty, heartfelt and made me feel so seen.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    One Sentence Review: Hilariously validating.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Filipa Lemcke

    I have never been a memoir person but I loved this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    A breezy, conversational memoir examining the author's experiences and challenges with being bi. Lots of good stuff here about labels and queer relationships. Great on audio. A breezy, conversational memoir examining the author's experiences and challenges with being bi. Lots of good stuff here about labels and queer relationships. Great on audio.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kate Bailey

    Jen shares her story with thoughtfulness, humor, and a strong splash of millennialism. I loved it. And it helped me better understand my own journey as a bi, queer woman. This book adds an important POV and is a joy to read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sydney W.

    No singular review can put into words how important this book is. I’m shaken to my core by it’s humor, honesty, and humility.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Claire Ryan

    “Onstage you made a fool of yourself- you became a broken record, trying to check your ‘bi privilege’ by repeatedly insisting that you shouldn’t take up space. You did this ad nauseam, trying to de-center yourself by talking about yourself, ultimately making the conversation all about you…You’d hogged the mic to talk about how white cis women need to pass the mic.” This passage in which Jen describes how she felt after speaking at a particular LGBT panel perfectly describes how I felt reading the “Onstage you made a fool of yourself- you became a broken record, trying to check your ‘bi privilege’ by repeatedly insisting that you shouldn’t take up space. You did this ad nauseam, trying to de-center yourself by talking about yourself, ultimately making the conversation all about you…You’d hogged the mic to talk about how white cis women need to pass the mic.” This passage in which Jen describes how she felt after speaking at a particular LGBT panel perfectly describes how I felt reading the entire book. She consistently downplays her right to take up space as a white woman, yet she wrote an entire book that she presumably wants people to buy and read. She repeatedly talks about the importance of listening to other marginalized voices, yet spends chapters detailing her (mundane) journey learning about various social issues, and in doing so makes the conversation about her. I also grew tired and disinterested reading about her relationships and hookups with men. The book often felt less like a memoir and more like a really long explanation of her relationship history. The three stars is for making me feel seen, and for some genuinely funny writing. As a fellow late-bloomer bisexual who is now in a relationship with a non-binary person, I definitely related a lot to Jen’s experiences and feelings.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...