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The Pickwick Murders

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In a reimagining of Charles Dickens' classic The Pickwick Papers, Heather Redmond's fourth Victorian-era mystery in the Dickens of a Crime series finds a young Charles tossed into Newgate Prison for a murder he didn't commit, and his fiance Kate Hogarth striving to clear his name... London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles is intrigued In a reimagining of Charles Dickens' classic The Pickwick Papers, Heather Redmond's fourth Victorian-era mystery in the Dickens of a Crime series finds a young Charles tossed into Newgate Prison for a murder he didn't commit, and his fiance Kate Hogarth striving to clear his name... London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles is intrigued by an invitation to join the exclusive Lightning Club. But his initiation in a basement maze takes a wicked turn when he stumbles upon the corpse of Samuel Pickwick, the club's president. With the victim's blood literally on his hands, Charles is locked away in notorious Newgate Prison. Now it's up to Kate to keep her framed fianc� from the hangman's noose. To solve this labyrinthine mystery, she is forced to puzzle her way through a fiendish series of baffling riddles sent to her in anonymous poison pen letters. With the help of family and friends, she must keep her wits about her to corner the real killer--before time runs out and Charles Dickens meets a dead end...


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In a reimagining of Charles Dickens' classic The Pickwick Papers, Heather Redmond's fourth Victorian-era mystery in the Dickens of a Crime series finds a young Charles tossed into Newgate Prison for a murder he didn't commit, and his fiance Kate Hogarth striving to clear his name... London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles is intrigued In a reimagining of Charles Dickens' classic The Pickwick Papers, Heather Redmond's fourth Victorian-era mystery in the Dickens of a Crime series finds a young Charles tossed into Newgate Prison for a murder he didn't commit, and his fiance Kate Hogarth striving to clear his name... London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles is intrigued by an invitation to join the exclusive Lightning Club. But his initiation in a basement maze takes a wicked turn when he stumbles upon the corpse of Samuel Pickwick, the club's president. With the victim's blood literally on his hands, Charles is locked away in notorious Newgate Prison. Now it's up to Kate to keep her framed fianc� from the hangman's noose. To solve this labyrinthine mystery, she is forced to puzzle her way through a fiendish series of baffling riddles sent to her in anonymous poison pen letters. With the help of family and friends, she must keep her wits about her to corner the real killer--before time runs out and Charles Dickens meets a dead end...

30 review for The Pickwick Murders

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This had so much promise but unfortunately it did not deliver. I struggled immediately with the way the Charles Dickens character was portrayed, although his fiancee, Kate Hogarth, had great promise. But then the story became too unrealistic for me and it was an effort to read though to the end. I suppose representing a well known person in a fiction book is always going to be a risk. Readers will all have their own views on how they should act and sound and what kind of lives they really led. My This had so much promise but unfortunately it did not deliver. I struggled immediately with the way the Charles Dickens character was portrayed, although his fiancee, Kate Hogarth, had great promise. But then the story became too unrealistic for me and it was an effort to read though to the end. I suppose representing a well known person in a fiction book is always going to be a risk. Readers will all have their own views on how they should act and sound and what kind of lives they really led. My mental version of Mr. Dickens was totally different to that of this author so this book was never going to work for me. There is still a good story in there though and I am sure many people will enjoy it very much. My thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dana-Adriana B.

    Kate is trying to help her fiancee, Charles Dickens, from prison by solving the murder he is accused of. To much talk, slow action. I enjoyed Kate, a determined young girl, well-mannered. This review is not intended to change your mind if you want to read the book, it wasn't for me, that's all. Thank you Netgalley, the publisher and the author for the book. Kate is trying to help her fiancee, Charles Dickens, from prison by solving the murder he is accused of. To much talk, slow action. I enjoyed Kate, a determined young girl, well-mannered. This review is not intended to change your mind if you want to read the book, it wasn't for me, that's all. Thank you Netgalley, the publisher and the author for the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laur

    London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles Dickens is intrigued by an invitation to join the exclusive and prestigious Lightning Club, whereby members are scientists, poets, or prominent sportsmen. On the night he goes for initiation to the club, he thinks that all the members will be waiting for him after he proves his superior wit in going through and finding his way successfully through a maze. However, the complicated basement maze takes a deadly turn when London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles Dickens is intrigued by an invitation to join the exclusive and prestigious Lightning Club, whereby members are scientists, poets, or prominent sportsmen. On the night he goes for initiation to the club, he thinks that all the members will be waiting for him after he proves his superior wit in going through and finding his way successfully through a maze. However, the complicated basement maze takes a deadly turn when he discovers the corpse of Samuel Pickwick, the club’s very president. With the victim’s blood literally on his hands, he is wrongfully accused of the man’s murder and is hauled off, locked away in notorious Newgate Prison until he can appear before the magistrates. Meanwhile, Kate, his fiancee, is tasked with trying to save his life, getting him out of prison, and clearing his name. As a evil unknown enemy is toying with Dicken’s life, soon, Kate’s life is also being toyed with as she receives several sealed letters on different occasions that contain poetic riddles that she must solve in 24 hrs to save her beloved fiancee, if she wants to receive the next letter with another clue. Things get more complicated as another dead body shows in Dickens prison cell, and Kate and some family intend to go back to the original maze where this all started to see if anything has been left behind. Time is desperately running out for all of them! Plenty of mystery and secondary mystery, Some red herrings, and a surprised ending I didn’t see coming, A bit of a slow story pace at times, but overall an enjoyable read with a satisfying ending, 3.5 Stars rounded up. My thanks to NetGalley and the Publisher for an ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rainelle

    I found this book has some entertainment to it. I liked where the story was taking me. However, the setup confused me. There was a number of repeated storylines and storylines that were written prior to the actual real-time of the story. It was just confusing for me. As I said the story plot is good. The intensity to Charles being confronted by the constables was good. The anticipation during this time was great.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I had trouble accepting both features of the extreme plot in this book as well as unlikely situational dialogue in the midst of crime and Newgate imprisonment. A particularly odious man achieves a seat in Parliament, and Dickens profiles him in the newspaper. This results in the most insidious plot against Dickens as well as the death of another and torture of a young woman. The young woman Dickens is soon to marry is put in the role of crusader and combatant during a period that it would be inc I had trouble accepting both features of the extreme plot in this book as well as unlikely situational dialogue in the midst of crime and Newgate imprisonment. A particularly odious man achieves a seat in Parliament, and Dickens profiles him in the newspaper. This results in the most insidious plot against Dickens as well as the death of another and torture of a young woman. The young woman Dickens is soon to marry is put in the role of crusader and combatant during a period that it would be inconceivable for a young woman to have that level of freedom. 2.5 stars Advance Reader Copy through NetGalley

  6. 4 out of 5

    S.M. LaViolette

    I've been WAITING for this book and it did not disappoint! I've read all 4 books in this series and I'm hugely invested in Redmond's complex characters. These stories have such a great sense of history. I hope this series is a LONG one! I've been WAITING for this book and it did not disappoint! I've read all 4 books in this series and I'm hugely invested in Redmond's complex characters. These stories have such a great sense of history. I hope this series is a LONG one!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jannath Fazli

    Okay, so this was a very boring read. There is not much of a plot or a story except Kate Hogarth having to go on a wild goose chase that bored me to sleep (multiple times). By the time I struggled through 70% of the book, I was so freaking dead on the inside. I didn't give a damn about the characters or the story, it just ceased to hold my interest. On top of that, some sentences sounded kinda homophobic to me. Thanks to the publisher and author for providing me with an ARC via Netgalley to revie Okay, so this was a very boring read. There is not much of a plot or a story except Kate Hogarth having to go on a wild goose chase that bored me to sleep (multiple times). By the time I struggled through 70% of the book, I was so freaking dead on the inside. I didn't give a damn about the characters or the story, it just ceased to hold my interest. On top of that, some sentences sounded kinda homophobic to me. Thanks to the publisher and author for providing me with an ARC via Netgalley to review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    "The Pickwick Murders" is a mystery set in 1836 in London. It's the fourth in a series. You don't need to read the previous book to understand this one, and this book didn't spoil the previous mysteries. However, minor characters from the previous mysteries do show up in this one. Vivid historical and setting details were woven into the story, creating a distinct sense of the time and place. The author tried to stay true to what is known about Charles Dickens' career and lifestyle in his early tw "The Pickwick Murders" is a mystery set in 1836 in London. It's the fourth in a series. You don't need to read the previous book to understand this one, and this book didn't spoil the previous mysteries. However, minor characters from the previous mysteries do show up in this one. Vivid historical and setting details were woven into the story, creating a distinct sense of the time and place. The author tried to stay true to what is known about Charles Dickens' career and lifestyle in his early twenties (minus the being thrown in prison part, which didn't really happen). The main characters were interesting and acted realistically. I cared about what happened to them. However, there were a couple of tales that were thrown in that had nothing to do with the main story. Kate also had to solve a series of riddles rather than work on solving the main whodunit mystery, which was frustrating for her and soon felt like filler to me. Once Charles friends got down to investigating, they solved the mystery pretty quickly. Though a realistic ending, it wasn't a very satisfying one. The people behind the evil weren't really punished. There was one use of British bad language. There was no sex. Overall, I'll probably keep on reading the series because of the wonderful, accurate historical detail, so I guess I'd recommend this book to fans of historicals. I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through Netgalley.

  9. 4 out of 5

    thereadingowlvina (Elvina Ulrich)

    The Story: Set in London 1836, young journalist Charles Dickens is excited to be invited to join the exclusive Lightning Club and this was around the time when his first book was about to be published. Prior to be accepted fully as a member, Dickens must prove his intelligence by successfully completing a maze. Things take a turn for the worse, when Dickens stumbles upon the body of Samuel Pickwick, the club's president in the maze. Before he knew it, Dickens is locked away in the notorious The Story: Set in London 1836, young journalist Charles Dickens is excited to be invited to join the exclusive Lightning Club and this was around the time when his first book was about to be published. Prior to be accepted fully as a member, Dickens must prove his intelligence by successfully completing a maze. Things take a turn for the worse, when Dickens stumbles upon the body of Samuel Pickwick, the club's president in the maze. Before he knew it, Dickens is locked away in the notorious Newgate Prison. His fiancee, Kate Hogarth must find a way to prove his innocence and saves him from the death penalty. My thoughts: I remember reading the first book - A Tale of Two Murders and it was okay for me. Skipped the next two books and decided to read this book four of A Dickens of Crime series. Guess what?! I enjoyed this one more than the first book! Ha! Not only the plot was an intriguing one, it was really interesting to see how Kate got out of her comfort zone to help solve the murder. There was quite a bit going on and with the labyrinthe storytelling, it seemed confusing at first. But in the end everything worked out great! It was a clever mystery indeed! I liked the characters and find both Kate and Charles are such an endearing couple! Overall, this was a fun cozy historical murder mystery and I think I want to read book two and three now! I loved that this book has a very Dickensian vibe and there was a cast of characters list in the beginning of the book with some characters based on real historical figures! An interesting and helpful list! Pub. Date: Oct 26th, 2021 ***Thank you Kensington Books and author Heather Redmond for this gifted review copy. All opinions expressed are my own.***

  10. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    I thought this book sounded really interesting. It’s book four in the series which I haven’t read any previous ones. I’m not sure if that has any bearing on this book. I found the start of the book a bit confusing. After several chapters it gets better but then it just drags. The characters seem to be running in circles at times and I found myself loosing interest. I do think it was a good depiction of the time period. Historical fiction fans especially with Dickens in the story will enjoy this b I thought this book sounded really interesting. It’s book four in the series which I haven’t read any previous ones. I’m not sure if that has any bearing on this book. I found the start of the book a bit confusing. After several chapters it gets better but then it just drags. The characters seem to be running in circles at times and I found myself loosing interest. I do think it was a good depiction of the time period. Historical fiction fans especially with Dickens in the story will enjoy this book Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the early copy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    It still being October, and the third book in the series being A Christmas Carol Murder, I opted to skip ahead to the eARC sitting on my NetGalley shelf and read the fourth book out of order. I'm not sure I'll bother to backtrack. Or continue. If you read my Double-Feature Friday post about the first two books then you already know that I've had issues with the pacing and overabundance of unnecessary information. Word drivel. I was hopeful that by the fourth book the editing would be a bit tighter It still being October, and the third book in the series being A Christmas Carol Murder, I opted to skip ahead to the eARC sitting on my NetGalley shelf and read the fourth book out of order. I'm not sure I'll bother to backtrack. Or continue. If you read my Double-Feature Friday post about the first two books then you already know that I've had issues with the pacing and overabundance of unnecessary information. Word drivel. I was hopeful that by the fourth book the editing would be a bit tighter and the pacing a bit faster. I wasn't expecting something as gripping and un-put-downable as, say, Robert Bryndza ... but I still held out hope.  The description indicated a heavier focus on Kate and I've grown quite fond of Kate and several of the other characters. I complained that the first book had too much information and dragged. The second one's pacing was slightly better but the story itself? I skipped full paragraphs (and pages) and didn't feel like I missed out on anything.  This time? If anything it was even more scattered and sluggish.   The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (aka The Pickwick Papers) was originally published and read as nineteen separate installments over a matter of twenty months. All together it is a huge marvelous piece of work and, next to A Christmas Carol, it is my favorite Dickens. I can't ever read it all at once, though. I don't think I can read Redmond all at once, either. Maybe that was the intention.  For me, it didn't work, even with the extra Kate. Maybe you'll love it.  These are just my ramblings, after all.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan Ballard

    London 1836, and a young journalist named Charles Dickens is invited to join the exclusive Lightning Club. During a secretive initiation to test his wits (think an escape room), Charles stumbles upon the dead body of the club’s president, Samuel Pickwick. Charles finds himself thrown into Newgate Prison, and with his first book due to be published. It would appear that Charles’ only hope is his bright and brave fiancee, Kate. Kate uses anonymous letters mailed to her and Charles to unravel who mi London 1836, and a young journalist named Charles Dickens is invited to join the exclusive Lightning Club. During a secretive initiation to test his wits (think an escape room), Charles stumbles upon the dead body of the club’s president, Samuel Pickwick. Charles finds himself thrown into Newgate Prison, and with his first book due to be published. It would appear that Charles’ only hope is his bright and brave fiancee, Kate. Kate uses anonymous letters mailed to her and Charles to unravel who might be trying to frame Charles before it’s too late. Working together with others, including Fred, Charles’ loyal brother and Julia, an actress of the day, this riddle seems to be connected with a young missing girl. The question is can Kate find the answer before Charles must say his final words? This story had a very Dickens-like feel to me. Although the mystery itself may be a bit of a wild goose chase, Redmond makes keen observations of the disparity between the classes and the overstuffed politics much as Charles Dickens so loved to do. You’ll feel as though you’re walking down the streets of Victorian-Era London. If you're a Charles Dickens fan or even a Sherlock fan, I think you’ll have some fun with this one.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Morgan

    Very atmospheric in 1836 London. Charles Dickens finds himself in Newgate Prison after being invited to join an exclusive club but finds the body of the clubs president instead, a murder he has been charged with. On the outside, Kate, his fiancé, knows it's up to her and their families to solve the crime before it's too late. Besides the main mystery, Kate receives letters with riddles she has to solve within a 24 hour period to keep Charles safe. The solution of the riddles lead Kate on a wild g Very atmospheric in 1836 London. Charles Dickens finds himself in Newgate Prison after being invited to join an exclusive club but finds the body of the clubs president instead, a murder he has been charged with. On the outside, Kate, his fiancé, knows it's up to her and their families to solve the crime before it's too late. Besides the main mystery, Kate receives letters with riddles she has to solve within a 24 hour period to keep Charles safe. The solution of the riddles lead Kate on a wild goose chase and yet more riddles. Will Kate and company solve the riddles as well as who the real killer is before something bad befalls Charles? I really enjoy historical fiction set in this time period if done well like this one. I was there in the chilling rain with the characters on their quest. I was there in the dank and dangerous prison with Charles as he tries to stay alive. Although it's a contemporary novel it has the feel and reads like a classic. The fact that it's primarily based on real people and settings added to my enjoyment of the story. This is the fourth in a series but not having read the previous three did not leave me feeling like I missed something. If you enjoy novels set in 1800's London with recognizable characters and a classics vibe, I highly recommend you give this one a go. . . Thank you to the author, Kensington Publishing and Suzy Approved Book Tours for the gifted ARC and including me on this tour.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cassie’s Reviews

    I have not read the previous book but I didn’t have any problem getting into the story line. Set in 1836 in London The Pickwick Murders is the fourth book. An upcoming journalist Charles Dickens receives an exclusive invite to join the Lightening Club. It immediately grabs his attention, until the initiation takes a dark turn. A dead body that appears the causes murder. Soon Charles finds himself being charged with murder, and he arrives at the Newgate Prison. Fighting to survive the prison and I have not read the previous book but I didn’t have any problem getting into the story line. Set in 1836 in London The Pickwick Murders is the fourth book. An upcoming journalist Charles Dickens receives an exclusive invite to join the Lightening Club. It immediately grabs his attention, until the initiation takes a dark turn. A dead body that appears the causes murder. Soon Charles finds himself being charged with murder, and he arrives at the Newgate Prison. Fighting to survive the prison and knowing his only chance to ever get out, is his friends and family proving he’s innocent. Kate Hogarth is Charles fiancée and finds herself receiving mysterious letters filled with puzzles and the only way to save Charles is to solve the twisted puzzles. I loved reading about Catherine, she’s a strong heroine and intelligent, it was a refreshing change! Four stars!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    I read A CHRISTMAS CAROL MURDER (Book 3 in the Dickens of a Crime series) last winter, and I absolutely enjoyed the historical fiction Victorian-era mystery. The writing was incredibly immersive and so much fun to read. Perfect for those cold and dark winter nights with a cup of hot cocoa warming your hands, and the peace and quiet of the comfort of having a book in your hand. Yep this is the perfect book for those nights! In this installment, young Charles Dickens is framed for murder and locke I read A CHRISTMAS CAROL MURDER (Book 3 in the Dickens of a Crime series) last winter, and I absolutely enjoyed the historical fiction Victorian-era mystery. The writing was incredibly immersive and so much fun to read. Perfect for those cold and dark winter nights with a cup of hot cocoa warming your hands, and the peace and quiet of the comfort of having a book in your hand. Yep this is the perfect book for those nights! In this installment, young Charles Dickens is framed for murder and locked up in the notorious Newgate Prison with only his fiancée Kate’s wit and determination in solving this mystery through riddles by way of poisoned pen letters to keep Charles from the hangman’s noose. This was a fun read I throughly enjoyed!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Star Gater

    Please see the synopsis, I don't repeat it or give spoilers. Being my first (and voluntarily last) reimagining book, I was disappointed. Early on rather than reading the story I was trying to fill out a pop quiz in my head. Would Dickens do this? What was the time period of Downton Abbey? Would it be appropriate for Kate to be so active? I just couldn't connect. While 2.5 stars for me, I'm going to round up. Should this book be picked up without any preconceived ideas, the writing may stand on its Please see the synopsis, I don't repeat it or give spoilers. Being my first (and voluntarily last) reimagining book, I was disappointed. Early on rather than reading the story I was trying to fill out a pop quiz in my head. Would Dickens do this? What was the time period of Downton Abbey? Would it be appropriate for Kate to be so active? I just couldn't connect. While 2.5 stars for me, I'm going to round up. Should this book be picked up without any preconceived ideas, the writing may stand on its own; too late for me. Thank you NetGalley for accepting my request to read and review The Pickwick Murders. #NetGalley #HeatherRedmond #Reimagining #KensingtonBooks .

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nicki

    This was okay. I liked the narrator but the story was very slow. The mystery got much better towards to end but there was too many side stories that were unrelated and felt like filler to me. I much prefer the J.C. Briggs Charles Dickens Investigates stories instead.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jodie (Geauxgetlit)

    Read this if you enjoy… Historical fiction especially from the Victorian Era Charles Dickens Murder Mysteries

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Graham

    When I was offered the chance to review this book, I thought the book sounded really interesting. It is the fourth book in the series and the first one I have read. I had a little trouble staying with this book. The characters seemed to be running in circles through the story. A particularly evil man receives a seat in parliament, during the election the man is accused of kidnapping a woman. Dickens writes an article in the paper about the incident that sets the story and the series of unfortuna When I was offered the chance to review this book, I thought the book sounded really interesting. It is the fourth book in the series and the first one I have read. I had a little trouble staying with this book. The characters seemed to be running in circles through the story. A particularly evil man receives a seat in parliament, during the election the man is accused of kidnapping a woman. Dickens writes an article in the paper about the incident that sets the story and the series of unfortunate events into motion. There were interesting parts of the story, some a little far fetched than others. It did have a good plot and intriguing mystery. A man is murdered and a woman tortured. I just feel that some of the running in circles could have been left out. Maybe it would have helped if I had read the other books in the series. You can preorder the book now for the October 26 release date. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for and advanced copy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    I love this creative spin on a Dickens tale! By chapter three, I could not put it down and pressed on, holding my breath, until the final page. I knew this was part of a series and thought the continued character development was well done. I have really enjoyed the first three books in the series. I was drawn to the cover and the premise and would have been perfectly satisfied picking up the series in book four. I love how the story is set up and enjoyed the pace of how it all comes unraveled an I love this creative spin on a Dickens tale! By chapter three, I could not put it down and pressed on, holding my breath, until the final page. I knew this was part of a series and thought the continued character development was well done. I have really enjoyed the first three books in the series. I was drawn to the cover and the premise and would have been perfectly satisfied picking up the series in book four. I love how the story is set up and enjoyed the pace of how it all comes unraveled and clear to the reader. I will excitedly anticipate any future installments. I received a complimentary copy from the publisher via NetGalley and all opinions expressed are my own, freely given.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    I keep reading historical mysteries with Charles Dickens as the detective. Given Dickens' skill in plotting novels and his presence as both a writer and a public thinker, I'm convinced there's the potential for something really wonderful out there. But I continually find myself underwhelmed. I've read volumes from four different Dickens-as-detective series, and none of them are bad—they're just predictable. That's the case with The Pickwick Murders. Heather Redmond makes some nice moves here: on I keep reading historical mysteries with Charles Dickens as the detective. Given Dickens' skill in plotting novels and his presence as both a writer and a public thinker, I'm convinced there's the potential for something really wonderful out there. But I continually find myself underwhelmed. I've read volumes from four different Dickens-as-detective series, and none of them are bad—they're just predictable. That's the case with The Pickwick Murders. Heather Redmond makes some nice moves here: one of the best is trapping Dickens in Newgate and leaving his fiancée Kate to do the detecting. But the mystery just isn't all that complex, and the characters aren't lively or interesting enough to compensate for that. If you like historical mysteries, you'll find The Pickwick Murders acceptable, but not anything that stands out from the usual historical-mystery-with-not-enough-mystery fare. If you're a Dickens fan looking for new ways to encounter the writer, I'd say to skip the historical mystery genre and look elsewhere—unless you really, truly feel compelled to read everything connected to Dickens. (I get that was about Sherlock Holmes, so I understand.) I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher via NetGalley; the opinions are my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Fritsen

    It's definitely obvious that it is past of a series. However it can be read without reading the others. You get more mystery when you do not know the background. The only reason I rated it as a 4 was because I haven't read the others. It's definitely obvious that it is past of a series. However it can be read without reading the others. You get more mystery when you do not know the background. The only reason I rated it as a 4 was because I haven't read the others.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elodie’s Reading Corner

    📜 The Pickwick Murders 📜 A Dickens of a Crime Book 4 ✒️ Heather Redmond https://heatherredmond.com Release Date 10/26/2021 Publisher Kensington Books ➪ https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VF93F81/... 𝗕𝗹𝘂𝗿𝗯 In this latest reimagining of Dickens as an amateur sleuth, Charles is tossed into Newgate Prison on a murder charge, and his fiancée Kate Hogarth must clear his name . . .   London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles is intrigued by an invitation to join the exclusive Lig 📜 The Pickwick Murders 📜 A Dickens of a Crime Book 4 ✒️ Heather Redmond https://heatherredmond.com Release Date 10/26/2021 Publisher Kensington Books ➪ https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VF93F81/... 𝗕𝗹𝘂𝗿𝗯 In this latest reimagining of Dickens as an amateur sleuth, Charles is tossed into Newgate Prison on a murder charge, and his fiancée Kate Hogarth must clear his name . . .   London, January 1836: Just weeks before the release of his first book, Charles is intrigued by an invitation to join the exclusive Lightning Club. But his initiation in a basement maze takes a wicked turn when he stumbles upon the corpse of Samuel Pickwick, the club’s president. With the victim’s blood literally on his hands, Charles is locked away in notorious Newgate Prison.   Now it’s up to Kate to keep her framed fiancé from the hangman’s noose. To solve this labyrinthine mystery, she is forced to puzzle her way through a fiendish series of baffling riddles sent to her in anonymous poison pen letters. With the help of family and friends, she must keep her wits about her to corner the real killer—before time runs out and Charles Dickens meets a dead end . . . 𝗥𝗲𝘃𝗶𝗲𝘄 Can they overcome this deadly trap … Being French Dickens was not part of my upbringing reads, school fed me with Hugo, Balzac, Zola… mostly saddening tales with a dash of romanticism in, but the romantic view of love in French point of view seems to be such a tragic tale. I discovered Dickens with a tv show retelling his Christmas Carols novel, I have read it since but my knowledge of his work stops there. When I read the previous book, I googled a bit to learn more about Dickens himself, what a life he had, and as the story focus of his relationship with his bride-to-be, knowing how they ended, I decided to view them as representative of their namesake from a parallel reality with a much happier ending. This book offers this time two points of view, Charles and for the first time, Kate’s, and I much loved it, as she is this time as much a leading character in this tale as Charles. Kate is the main character in this tale and by putting her into the limelight, it enhances her wit and cleverness but also the shackles her condition as a woman of good birth wears. And while the inquest is an exhausting wild chase for Kate and a close to death sentence for Charles, it progresses slowly, as she restrained by the status of her sex and the limitations of move during this era. And as the case thickens, the clues do not pile up but Kate is running ragged while Charles’ safety is threatened more and more all the while they seem to walk backward at time instead of progressing. I enjoyed this book even more than the previous one with Kate being entirely part of the investigation, reading her thoughts, having to deal with her fears, the impediments of her being a woman and the challenges she has to face to undo the layered trap set for Charles. She of course does not work alone, and with William, Julie and Fred, they all band together to rescue Charles. 4.5 stars 𝗦𝘁𝗲𝗮𝗺 𝗹𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗹 none I have been granted an advance copy by the publisher Kensington Books, here is my true and unbiased opinion. https://www.instagram.com/tv/CVQ-PgTD... https://www.facebook.com/429830134272... #bookstagram #historicalfiction #suspense #romancebookblog #romancebookblogger #bookblog #historicalmystery #bookblogger #2021read #bookstagrammer #bookreview #romancebookreviewer #arcreader #bookquote #romancestagram #readersofinstagram

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sue F

    Doesn’t quite live up to its premise… I hadn’t read any of the previous books in this series, but I usually really like books featuring famous individuals (Queen Elizabeth I, Josephine Tey, Giordano Bruno, Jane Austen, even Agatha Christie herself) as fictional detectives. So I was excited to try out Heather Redmond’s series featuring a very young Charles Dickens as the protagonist. Sadly, The Pickwick Murders, the fourth book in the series, didn’t really live up to its premise. The story itself Doesn’t quite live up to its premise… I hadn’t read any of the previous books in this series, but I usually really like books featuring famous individuals (Queen Elizabeth I, Josephine Tey, Giordano Bruno, Jane Austen, even Agatha Christie herself) as fictional detectives. So I was excited to try out Heather Redmond’s series featuring a very young Charles Dickens as the protagonist. Sadly, The Pickwick Murders, the fourth book in the series, didn’t really live up to its premise. The story itself isn’t too bad. Dickens is reporting on a provincial election, during which the Tory candidate, Sir Augustus Smirke, is accused of kidnapping (or worse) one of his housemaids. Unfortunately, the Tory wins, but Dickens includes the incident as part of his article for the liberal Morning Chronicle, and thereby makes an enemy of Smirke, now a powerful Member of Parliament. So when, shortly thereafter, Dickens is framed for the murder of the President of the Lightning Club, Samuel Pickwick, it seems as if Smirke and/or his minions must have been behind it. Dickens is thrown into Newgate Prison, and it falls to Dickens’ brother, Frederick; his real-life fiancée, Kate Hogarth; her family; and a few other fictional characters to figure out what really happened and clear his name. Sadly, the execution is lacking. The writing feels flat, and could have used a good edit for pace. In addition, I just couldn’t bring myself to care much about Kate, who is really the lead in this fourth book, but spends a lot of time solving a series of riddles – a plot maneuver that just exceeded my ability to suspend my disbelief. Finally, Dickens himself comes across as arrogant, which he may have been, and might even have deserved to be, but that didn’t really make me want to read more about him either. All-in-all, The Pickwick Murders dragged, and I had trouble finishing it, which is quite rare for me. I did like the background a lot. The descriptions of the provincial election process, the British criminal justice system, Newgate prison itself, even the odd-ball private clubs of the time – all seem well researched and consistent with what I already know about the period. The author also provides a useful cast of characters at the beginning, identifying which were real and which were not. That helped too, especially since I was jumping into the series on the fourth book. I would still recommend this book for people who are huge Dickens fans (I’m at best a middling fan), or have read and liked the earlier books, or who are especially interested in this time period and its social movements. Without the historical strength, I probably would have given The Pickwick Murders two stars, but am giving it three because I liked the background so much. And finally, my thanks to the publishers, Kensington Books, and to NetGalley for the advance review copy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Seriesbooklover

    I received a free review copy from NetGalley and Kensington Books in exchange for my honest, unedited feedback. Charles Dickens is an up and coming journalist and writer in 1836 when he receives an intriguing invitation to join the exclusive Lightning Club. But his initiation takes a sinister turn when he stumbles across a dead body and is accused of murder. Dickens finds himself in Newgate prison fighting for survival and dependent on his friends and loved ones to prove his innocence. Kate Hogar I received a free review copy from NetGalley and Kensington Books in exchange for my honest, unedited feedback. Charles Dickens is an up and coming journalist and writer in 1836 when he receives an intriguing invitation to join the exclusive Lightning Club. But his initiation takes a sinister turn when he stumbles across a dead body and is accused of murder. Dickens finds himself in Newgate prison fighting for survival and dependent on his friends and loved ones to prove his innocence. Kate Hogarth, his fiancé, finds herself targeted by a mysterious letter writer who demands she solves increasingly twisted puzzles to keep Charles safe but she soon realised the cost of failure isn’t just Charles’s safety but also her family’s. I watched a documentary on the amazing Catherine Dickens born Hogarth who was incredibly talented herself as a writer, wife and mother but found herself subject to a painful divorce when Dicken’s found someone else. So, I was interested to read this book which features a young Kate deeply in love trying to solve a murder. I haven’t read the previous books in the series but it was easy to jump into the story without having read the older books in the series. I found Kate a refreshing heroine and her descriptions of her taking on the role of the main investigator with hesitance rang true. She is unable to investigate freely given the restrictions on women in the 19th Century for example not being able to follow a lead as her Father forbids her to do so as it could be too dangerous in the fog. I felt sorry for Dickens as he found himself trapped In Newgate prison, a place he had written about because of its appalling environment. The mystery around the murder and the Lightening society was satisfyingly interesting and I could not guess who the eventual murderer was at the final reveal. The puzzles that poor Kate had to solve were appropriately literary and led to women writers from that time that I am ashamed to say I hadn't heard of. The atmosphere is well described and the descriptions of the grubbiness of Newgate and the smells and sounds of the streets really brings 19th Century London to life especially when the author describes the food Kate frequently buys from the street vendors. There are a number of secondary characters both real and fictional but I loved reading about Julie Aga, the actress who won't let pregnancy and society help her friends and the gruff Mr Hogarth. Content warning Possible sexual assault ( off-page) Perfect for Fans Historical crime featuring real-life people Summary I will definitely be adding the backlist of the Dicken of a Crime series to my reading list

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rajiv

    [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] I have not read the previous book in the series, but I found “The Pickwick Murders” to be a thrilling mystery. The plot captured my interest as soon as Charles experiences something shocking, thinking Augustus will initiate him into the Lightning Club. I felt terrible for Charles as he found Samual’s body and wondered what to do. My heart went out to Charles in some scenes, primarily when Curdle randomly attacks him for no rea [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] I have not read the previous book in the series, but I found “The Pickwick Murders” to be a thrilling mystery. The plot captured my interest as soon as Charles experiences something shocking, thinking Augustus will initiate him into the Lightning Club. I felt terrible for Charles as he found Samual’s body and wondered what to do. My heart went out to Charles in some scenes, primarily when Curdle randomly attacks him for no reason. The author does not disappoint in the mystery and thrills, as something shocking happens in every chapter. Moreover, I like how strong Kate is and decides to investigate herself through William’s help. Kate is the star of the show, and I thought the author portrayed her beautifully. She shares a friendly relationship with her father and her sister Mary, and I enjoyed how she took charge of the situation to help Charles. The author paces the mystery nicely, and I was intrigued when Kate started receiving the letters. Some memorable moments are when she meets Charles’s father or deciphers the poem with Agnes Baillie. Even Breese, Fred, and Julie added nicely to the supporting cast. Frankly, I loved Fred, Julie, and Kate as the brave trio as they investigated the crime and tried to find out what was happening. However, my only criticism of the story is that the person, in the end, turned out to be someone I had suspected, so I was not shocked by the reveal. Apart from that, I thought “The Pickwick Murders” was a very creative book and has inspired me to pick up the first book to see how it all started. If you love Charles Dickens and historical mysteries, do check out the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    After the disaster that was the previous book [for me], I had high hopes for this one [and it was fitting as I read "The Pickwick Papers" this year as well]. Unfortunately, for me, this just didn't deliver and I will be done with the series now. My issue was length [this was about 50-70 pages too long, but even with the current length, it still took me NINE DAYS to read it because I was so bored with it and dreaded having to pick it up and read it], Kate [and her incessant hand-wringing, all whi After the disaster that was the previous book [for me], I had high hopes for this one [and it was fitting as I read "The Pickwick Papers" this year as well]. Unfortunately, for me, this just didn't deliver and I will be done with the series now. My issue was length [this was about 50-70 pages too long, but even with the current length, it still took me NINE DAYS to read it because I was so bored with it and dreaded having to pick it up and read it], Kate [and her incessant hand-wringing, all while trying to emulate Julie, all while dreaming of her wedding, all while TRYING TO SOLVE THE MURDER, all while fighting off...whom exactly?] was still problematic in this book - she has forgiven him for the secrets he kept in the previous book [though it would seem her family has not totally and their continued mistrust of someone they have known for so long continues to rankle me], but she does bring it up from time to time. She should be a great character in this [as she leads the story], but I found her at times to be whiny and tedious. Also, along with it being too long, there is the basic story itself. It seems HIGHLY unlikely that any of this would happen, just because Charles happens to write an article about a man who is not really a nice person, the plot itself becomes extremely confusing [WHERE are we in the story? Is this a flashback? Is this happening in real time? WHAT. IS. GOING. ON?] - so much so that I found myself needing to reread sections to try and figure out just what the deal was, and don't even get me started on the whole prison [Newgate] stay. Overall, this was a long, drawn-out, ultimately boring read that I really could not wait to be done with [the reveal and end was just so...bland? After all that running around and subterfuge, that is the ending we get? What the heck? Meh]. I had such high hopes for this series as I love Charles Dickens and for this book in general [again after being so disappointed over the last one], but I am once again disappointed and again, this will be my last book in the series. Thank you to NetGalley, Heather Redmond, and Kensington Books for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Many thanks to NetGalley and Kensington Publishing for this Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review The Pickwick Murders. All opinions are my own. Charles Dickens is in big trouble in The Pickwick Murders, the fourth in the “Dickens of a Crime” series by Heather Redmond. To help out with our reading, the author has provided a “who’s who” at the beginning of the book so that the players can be identified, noting the ones which were real historical figures. Handy, that. At our beginning, Many thanks to NetGalley and Kensington Publishing for this Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review The Pickwick Murders. All opinions are my own. Charles Dickens is in big trouble in The Pickwick Murders, the fourth in the “Dickens of a Crime” series by Heather Redmond. To help out with our reading, the author has provided a “who’s who” at the beginning of the book so that the players can be identified, noting the ones which were real historical figures. Handy, that. At our beginning, journalist Dickens is in a small village to report on the results of a Parliamentary vote, which the Tory candidate wins handily. But there is a confrontation in the square – an anguished father with a sordid accusation of a missing daughter. Nothing for Charles to be concerned about, surely. But later, he’s warned off about the man he has written about in the article. And, receiving an invitation to join a prestigious club, upon arrival at the initiation site he stumbles across a dead body, is accused of the murder and is thrown into prison. He has acquired a powerful enemy. How is he going to get free? Only with the help of his fiancé, his brother and a plethora of friends. The conditions in Newgate Prison are described, appalling as they are. The author has done her research. There are puzzle letters to be got through (by Kate, the fiancé), and threats to her family. Everyone is in danger. A surprise enemy becomes evident. However, we know that Mr. Dickens is not going to the gallows. Kate and her associates do solve the case by dogged sleuthing, and get Charles released. Persistence being the key of course, to the point of the book meandering a lot, at least in my view. But I will be glad to see Mr. Dickens returned to the forefront of solving mysterious goings-on, in the next book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    gwendalyn _books_

    From the desk of Gwendalyn Anderson This is a non spoiler review, because you as reader need to read this book. Also, I feel sometimes I have in the past gave away to much of the plot line. This has diminished the pleasure for would be readers. FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Set in 1836 in London The Pickwick Murders is the fourth Charles Dickens Mystery Ser From the desk of Gwendalyn Anderson This is a non spoiler review, because you as reader need to read this book. Also, I feel sometimes I have in the past gave away to much of the plot line. This has diminished the pleasure for would be readers. FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Set in 1836 in London The Pickwick Murders is the fourth Charles Dickens Mystery Series. This time it’s up to Miss Kate Hogarth, to unravel the pieces to an intriguing puzzle to save her Fiancé. Charles Dickens, an up coming journalist for the Morning Chronicle. He seems to be making strides in his life. Just weeks before his book is to be release and his impending to marriage to his fiancée Miss Kate Hogarth. Things take a tragic turn for the worst. Feeling elated from receiving an invitation to join the exclusive Lightning Club Charles arrives at the place and time that invite states. Only his initiation is not what he had hoped it would be. Charles finds himself in the dreadful Newgate Prison, framed. Patiently waiting for his fiancé and family to do what they can to prove his innocence, Charles endures the horrific day to day life along with those others imprisoned in Newgate. The author has once again written a captivating cozy historical mystery. I had no trouble reading this book from start to finish without stopping. I enjoyed the author rich historical imagery and the writing was solid. The light mystery was perfectly executed. The author did a wonderful job creating engaging characters that were entertaining to read about.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    Set in 1836 London, twenty-four-year-old Charles Dickens is on the brink of becoming a published author. His is one of the quickest minds in London and as such receives a prestigious invitation to join the elite Lightning Club. But obtaining membership is a wee bit trickier than that. He must first gain physical entry but encounters trouble. His devoted fiance, Kate, is on the case. I like that the story is from her point of view so we are privy to her thoughts (though not enough for my taste). Set in 1836 London, twenty-four-year-old Charles Dickens is on the brink of becoming a published author. His is one of the quickest minds in London and as such receives a prestigious invitation to join the elite Lightning Club. But obtaining membership is a wee bit trickier than that. He must first gain physical entry but encounters trouble. His devoted fiance, Kate, is on the case. I like that the story is from her point of view so we are privy to her thoughts (though not enough for my taste). In order to aid her fiance she is tasked with riddles and introduced to quite the character. The story follows these timed tasks and their outcomes. My favourite aspects of this book, the fourth in the series, are the historical details, atmosphere and vernacular. The author mentions her favourite book by Dickens is The Pickwick Papers, as is mine. When reading fiction about favourite authors gives me reason to pause but is quite well done in this series. Sneaking in literary figures is fun. The story is somewhat predictable but a delightful read nonetheless, though the short stories interspersed feel like filler. If you are seeking a light and fun historical fiction with a mysterious element, do try this series. You may even learn more about Dickens! I'm curious about subsequent storylines and plots. My sincere thank you to Kensington Books and NetGalley for the privilege of reading this charmer.

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