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Meet Me in Madrid

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In this sexy, sophisticated romantic comedy, two women juggle romance and career across continents. Charlotte Hilaire has a love-hate relationship with her work as a museum courier. On the one hand, it takes her around the world. On the other, her plan to become a professor is veering dangerously off track. Yet once in a while, maybe every third trip or so, the job goes deli In this sexy, sophisticated romantic comedy, two women juggle romance and career across continents. Charlotte Hilaire has a love-hate relationship with her work as a museum courier. On the one hand, it takes her around the world. On the other, her plan to become a professor is veering dangerously off track. Yet once in a while, maybe every third trip or so, the job goes delightfully sideways… When a blizzard strands Charlotte in Spain for a few extra days and she’s left with glorious free time on her hands, the only question is: Dare she invite her grad school crush for an after-dinner drink on a snowy night? Accomplished, take-no-prisoners art historian Adrianna Coates has built an enviable career since Charlotte saw her last. She’s brilliant. Sophisticated. Impressive as hell and strikingly beautiful. Hospitable, too, as she absolutely insists Charlotte spend the night on her pullout sofa as the storm rages on. One night becomes three and three nights become a hot and adventurous long-distance relationship when Charlotte returns to the States. But when Adrianna plots her next career move just as Charlotte finally opens a door in academia, distance may not be the only thing that keeps them apart. Carina Adores is home to highly romantic contemporary love stories where LGBTQ+ characters find their happily-ever-afters. Discover a new Carina Adores book every month!


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In this sexy, sophisticated romantic comedy, two women juggle romance and career across continents. Charlotte Hilaire has a love-hate relationship with her work as a museum courier. On the one hand, it takes her around the world. On the other, her plan to become a professor is veering dangerously off track. Yet once in a while, maybe every third trip or so, the job goes deli In this sexy, sophisticated romantic comedy, two women juggle romance and career across continents. Charlotte Hilaire has a love-hate relationship with her work as a museum courier. On the one hand, it takes her around the world. On the other, her plan to become a professor is veering dangerously off track. Yet once in a while, maybe every third trip or so, the job goes delightfully sideways… When a blizzard strands Charlotte in Spain for a few extra days and she’s left with glorious free time on her hands, the only question is: Dare she invite her grad school crush for an after-dinner drink on a snowy night? Accomplished, take-no-prisoners art historian Adrianna Coates has built an enviable career since Charlotte saw her last. She’s brilliant. Sophisticated. Impressive as hell and strikingly beautiful. Hospitable, too, as she absolutely insists Charlotte spend the night on her pullout sofa as the storm rages on. One night becomes three and three nights become a hot and adventurous long-distance relationship when Charlotte returns to the States. But when Adrianna plots her next career move just as Charlotte finally opens a door in academia, distance may not be the only thing that keeps them apart. Carina Adores is home to highly romantic contemporary love stories where LGBTQ+ characters find their happily-ever-afters. Discover a new Carina Adores book every month!

30 review for Meet Me in Madrid

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jude in the Stars

    I wanted to like this book a lot more than I eventually did. I liked the cover, I liked the premise, I liked that both MCs were BIPOC women in academia. In the end, it was nice and enjoyable but not excitingly so. Despite being a brilliant art history student, Charlotte Hilaire failed to find a teaching job and is now a courier for a museum. While in Madrid, she looks up Adrianna Coates, on whom she had a big crush when their paths crossed at Yale and who is on a research sabbatical in Spain. The I wanted to like this book a lot more than I eventually did. I liked the cover, I liked the premise, I liked that both MCs were BIPOC women in academia. In the end, it was nice and enjoyable but not excitingly so. Despite being a brilliant art history student, Charlotte Hilaire failed to find a teaching job and is now a courier for a museum. While in Madrid, she looks up Adrianna Coates, on whom she had a big crush when their paths crossed at Yale and who is on a research sabbatical in Spain. The two women click immediately and what should have been a one-night stand turns into three nights and the beginning of a long-distance relationship. I’m not sure I can explain why this book didn’t work for me. The characters are interesting but I never really cared about them. I didn’t mind the instalust, that’s never a real problem for me, even less so when the characters have actually met before, as is the case here. I was told there was chemistry between them and I was willing to believe it, but never felt it in a convincing way. It all felt a bit bland. The author clearly knows the setting she chose – art history and academia – and that’s what I’ll remember, along with her take on queer women of colour in that environment. One scene stands out for me, that I won’t spoil, but it involves Charlotte speaking up despite the risks to her job and her future. Meet Me in Madrid could have been a very different book if this same passion had made it into more chapters. I received a copy from the publisher and I am voluntarily leaving a review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hsinju

    2.5 stars rounded down. 3 stars for the storyline but docking 1 star for the... writing? LDR + academia? Sounds super intriguing! It is very difficult to write LDRs since most of the time, the main characters are physically apart, and Meet Me in Madrid definitely suffered from that. For the first 60% of the book, both characters were just... waiting to see each other every few weeks. There was no clear goal for either of them as Adrianna was on sabbatical in Madrid (and lives on the West Coast) an 2.5 stars rounded down. 3 stars for the storyline but docking 1 star for the... writing? LDR + academia? Sounds super intriguing! It is very difficult to write LDRs since most of the time, the main characters are physically apart, and Meet Me in Madrid definitely suffered from that. For the first 60% of the book, both characters were just... waiting to see each other every few weeks. There was no clear goal for either of them as Adrianna was on sabbatical in Madrid (and lives on the West Coast) and Charlotte was stuck at Woodley, on the East Coast. Everything picked up around the 60% mark and the stakes got pretty high, which I enjoyed. However, I find Charlotte and Adrianna both unreasonable sometimes in their own way, and I didn’t really see how their relationship got past a fling. Plus, I don’t feel like I know either of them much. Racism and sexism are two main themes in the book. While I appreciate Lowell incorporating both the MCs’ experiences and history references, I think that the thematic execution was very heavy-handed. And I also had some issues with the wording, not just because some sentences read like using a thesaurus for word replacement, but that... it felt like the author was trying too hard. Even though I’m assuming the author is a queer person of color, the narrative reads oddly like it’s written by a cishet white author. And I’m also guessing that the author does not read much romance. The good side is that it is not super formulaic, but the bad side is that the pacing is a bit off and there is a lot of summaries of events throughout the book. And there is a 3rd POV for one scene that I don’t think is necessary. Also, I’m still scratching my head about why the author used the word “blacklist”... I enjoyed the academic aspect of the story, being in academia myself. While the demographic in engineering is largely different from that in art history, there are still a lot of things I can relate to. It was a letdown to find that the romance between two queer women of color wasn’t as satisfying as all the university and conference talks. Random, but isn’t it fun that both Quinn Ivins’ Love Factor (my review) and this book are sapphics in academia with a sexist homophobe called Grayson? All in all, Meet Me in Madrid had the potential to be much better, but it reads kind of awkwardly (because of the word choices) with okay-ish characters. A decent try at highlighting discrimination in academia for Lowell, but a slightly disappointing debut. (Where is the cat on the cover???) content warnings: racism, sexism, homophobia, depression, cheating, drug abuse, suicide, sexual harassment, past TA-student relationship? I received a digital review copy from Carina Adores via NetGalley and am voluntarily leaving a review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    charlotte,

    On my blog. Rep: Black lesbian mc, Afro Latina lesbian mc, bi side character, Jewish bi side character, gay side character Galley provided by publisher It sounds harsh but Meet Me in Madrid has to be one of the most boring books I’ve read recently. I don’t know what it was about it, but I started skimming within a few chapters of the start, and I simply couldn’t bring myself to care one bit about the characters. This isn’t a bad book! For another person, perhaps none of it would have mattered an On my blog. Rep: Black lesbian mc, Afro Latina lesbian mc, bi side character, Jewish bi side character, gay side character Galley provided by publisher It sounds harsh but Meet Me in Madrid has to be one of the most boring books I’ve read recently. I don’t know what it was about it, but I started skimming within a few chapters of the start, and I simply couldn’t bring myself to care one bit about the characters. This isn’t a bad book! For another person, perhaps none of it would have mattered and they’d have enjoyed it a lot more. For me? Well. It was a death knell. Probably the biggest sticking point for me was the writing. To me—and I stress to me because I think attitude to writing style is one of the most personal things when reviewing a book—it felt stilted and forced. And that was clearest in the conversations characters had. Not only that, the book didn’t seem able to find a tense it wanted to stay in. I get that the parts in present tense were supposed to be like… true whatever, whenever, kind of lines, but they’d have read just as well in past tense. All that tense switch did was throw me out of the story. As I said, writing style preferences are personal, but I think here what happened is that dislike of writing proliferated down to every other aspect of the book. I didn’t care for the writing, so I didn’t care for the characters, so I didn’t care for the relationship. Everything I didn’t like about this book comes back to the writing style. So really, this entire review comes back to that. Like I said, it’s personal, and there really wasn’t much else to the book that made me think it was bad. Style aside, it was well-paced and, if I’d liked the characters, I could see myself liking the relationship (despite not being a massive fan of the age gap). But the writing…

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    I'm contemplating running the Madrid half marathon so I figured it was time to read a book set in Madrid. This just didn't live up to my expectations. This book just wasn't for me. It holds so much promise, but the writing is off-putting and it ends up being boring and it could not hold my attention. The representation is great, leading ladies of colour and highly educated with good jobs. That is sadly also where it stops. I'm sure this works for other people, please find other reviews to find out I'm contemplating running the Madrid half marathon so I figured it was time to read a book set in Madrid. This just didn't live up to my expectations. This book just wasn't for me. It holds so much promise, but the writing is off-putting and it ends up being boring and it could not hold my attention. The representation is great, leading ladies of colour and highly educated with good jobs. That is sadly also where it stops. I'm sure this works for other people, please find other reviews to find out if this book is for you. 2.5 stars *ARC received in exchange for a voluntary and honest review*

  5. 4 out of 5

    sophia

    3.5 Thank you to NetGalley for the preview of the four chapters! It is a very promising adult, sapphic romance. I can't say much, since I've only read four chapters. Based on them though, the writing is beautiful and the plot easy to follow, while simultaneously keeping you interested. Both Adrianna and Charlotte seem to be mature, impressive women and I'm intrigued to read about how their relationship evolves! However, it was a bit fast paced, so the connection between the two women didn't feel ve 3.5 Thank you to NetGalley for the preview of the four chapters! It is a very promising adult, sapphic romance. I can't say much, since I've only read four chapters. Based on them though, the writing is beautiful and the plot easy to follow, while simultaneously keeping you interested. Both Adrianna and Charlotte seem to be mature, impressive women and I'm intrigued to read about how their relationship evolves! However, it was a bit fast paced, so the connection between the two women didn't feel very natural. I'm looking forward to reading the whole book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heinerway

    As a Spaniard, I try to read every lesbian romance related to Spain. So I was in for this story about two academic women meeting in Madrid. Unfortunately for me there was very little shown of Madrid, as our main characters didn't go out in the city, and all their following rendezvous were in the States. All in all this was an OK read. As a Spaniard, I try to read every lesbian romance related to Spain. So I was in for this story about two academic women meeting in Madrid. Unfortunately for me there was very little shown of Madrid, as our main characters didn't go out in the city, and all their following rendezvous were in the States. All in all this was an OK read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jena

    Meet Me in Madrid follows the story of two black, queer, academics who reunite in Madrid, only to deal with the complexities of a long distance relationship, as well as balancing their work and personal lives. Objectively, I think this is a 4 star book, but personally I didn't really connect with the story, and on a subjective level, this was a 3 star read for me. This is no fault of the writing and simply has to do with my personal preferences. Still, this is a strong story, with cute romance a Meet Me in Madrid follows the story of two black, queer, academics who reunite in Madrid, only to deal with the complexities of a long distance relationship, as well as balancing their work and personal lives. Objectively, I think this is a 4 star book, but personally I didn't really connect with the story, and on a subjective level, this was a 3 star read for me. This is no fault of the writing and simply has to do with my personal preferences. Still, this is a strong story, with cute romance and some really topical themes. I found the stand out feature of this book to be the way it discussed the lack of diversity in academia and the prejudice queer people and POC face in that domain. My main complaint for this book is just that I felt like the main characters fell in love (or at least were infatuated with one another) super quickly, which made it a bit difficult to connect to the romance. Still, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend this book to people, just perhaps to a demographic of readers who have a different preferred writing style than I do, as this wasn't my personal favourite. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    luce

    I tried reading this a few times but I'm afraid that I find the author's writing style to be rather weak (the kind of writing that is more suited to fanfic). I'm sure many will love this so I encourage prospective readers to check out more positive reviews. I tried reading this a few times but I'm afraid that I find the author's writing style to be rather weak (the kind of writing that is more suited to fanfic). I'm sure many will love this so I encourage prospective readers to check out more positive reviews.

  9. 4 out of 5

    AC

    Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene... Except it isn't two households, ccit's two women, and it isn't fair Verona, it's Madrid. And no one dies at the end, which is refreshing (looking at you, Boys on the Side and Fried Green Tomatoes). There's bound to be spoilery stuff here. Charlotte, once a Yale undergrad and now (some kind of lowly curator title) and courier shepherding pieces of art to the places they've been loaned, is stranded in Madrid during a sudd Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene... Except it isn't two households, ccit's two women, and it isn't fair Verona, it's Madrid. And no one dies at the end, which is refreshing (looking at you, Boys on the Side and Fried Green Tomatoes). There's bound to be spoilery stuff here. Charlotte, once a Yale undergrad and now (some kind of lowly curator title) and courier shepherding pieces of art to the places they've been loaned, is stranded in Madrid during a sudden storm. Adrianna, once a Yale lecturer, and now a lecturer on the entirely opposite coast, is in Madrid on a sabbatical, running down and transcribing the diaries of a nun. They knew one another briefly,back at Yale, but now they've both been focused on their life in academia, pursuing their careers. They meet up at a cafe Adrianna knows, and the writing at that point tells you what going to happen: instalove. There's nothing wrong with that, of course, ass it's a trope of the genre. I did like the wrinkle that there is at least the fact they knew one another in some way prior to Madrid. This means they're also a bit older than the characters who usually inhabit the gene, and they're also both black, another departure from the genre. No young white women with blond hair, blue eyes, zero body fat and perfect abs here: the author paints both women as "buxom", which I took to mean that both have at least something approximating a bit of middle age spread in addition to both having big chests. After a three day marathon of sex, Charlotte heads back to New Haven, and both women have the newly-met-but-too-far-away stars in their eyes, looking forward to their next meeting, in NYC, for the new year. There's a brief appearance by Hadley, a slim, white, young woman with perfect everything (oops, I guess not all tropes are dead) at the beginning of the new year version of Madrid, someone Charlotte can't stand for reasons not well explained, who invites them to a NYE party at her parents' house, and they go, for some reason. After finishing the book, I understand why, but it was a little heavy handed. More sex, over the next couple of days. Adrianna flies back to Madrid, and we get an encore of Emotions. Charlotte is tasked with taking some art out to California, and Adrianna insists that she meet Esther, a dear friend of hers. Esther's having a time with her husband, who has been having an affair with one of his students. To put the betrayal on blast, he sends the student to tell Esther about it. After getting stuck in LA by yet another freak storm, Charlotte winds up at Esther's teaching her son Fisher to make beignets. There's a weird, uncomfortably written conversation between Esther and Charlotte, and the "is this older woman, having been married to a shitty dude with whom she had a son, really a lesbian, or at least bi?" thing was off-putting. There's also a connection made, thanks to networking, when Esther takes Charlotte to Piedmont, who may or may not be in the market for a half courier/half lecturer type of person. Next up: Chicago (Adrianna's hometown) at Valentines Day! Also, interviews, where she once again faces the dean from Piedmont, but they have to pretend they don't know one another. Charlotte also gives a talk on race and art, and her asshole boss from the museum - "I don't see you as a person of color, Charlotte" - is there, once again saying stupid things, this time about how Brer Rabbit and Songs of the South are not racist, I guess, and how art shouldn't be politicized. It's the sort of blather some overly educated jerk says when they're trying to put down one of their own employees with a nonsensical what if. What I thought immediately, and what Adrianna actually says in the book against his crap, is that his statement itself is political. More sexytimes. They depart from one another, again. In between all this - and sometimes when they're recovering from a round of sex, there's discussion of how difficult it is in general to have a career in the arts, and in particular, how hard it is for black, gay women to have a career in the arts. This is true (not just of the arts, of course, BIPOC LGBTQAI+ folk have a hard time of it anywhere) but the way it's written feels like it's been copied out of a policy paper. Later in the book, we get the Sophie's Choice: both women get job offers, but it would mean they would swap coasts, and still have the same problem: long distance relationships, even with these two who can get horny on command via facetime, are problematic in a lot of ways. They finally have their first blowup, after Adrianna tells Charlotte abut her offer from Yale. They get snippy from one another, and then give each other the silent treatment: no texts, no calls, no facetime. Esther tells Adrianna she's being a jerk and to knock it off. We get the usual makeup bit, but of course, they are still apart. Charlotte,her pal James, and three other people get the axe fro the museum thanks to Jerkface McRacistBoss. James, crafty queen that he is, has receipts: Jerkface gets fired, the five are rehired, and Charlotte is given a vague promise or promotion to Deputy Curator when the woman in charge retires. But where we land is in Cali. Esther has hooked up with Hadley, so we have a May-September romance with the two mains, and a May-December with the secondaries. It also occurred to me that out of the four white adult guys we meet for any real time, one is gay, one is a dean of the arts college, one is a two-timing douchebag, and the last is a racist homophobe. If you're reading for the sex, you'll be delighted: there's a lot of it, and it's very graphic, sometimes to the point of being clinical. If you're reading for the story: it's ok. The writing style seems to be most comfortable when the topic is academia, and the descriptions of interviews and campus visits was the best writing and the best look at getting hired in academia that I've read outside of nonfiction. Three out of five stars (possibly a fiver if erotica is your thing). Thanks to Harlequin/Carina Press/Carina Adores and NetGalley for the reading copy. At the end of the day, it's a HEA - how could it not be?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    In Verity Lowell's Meet Me in Madrid , two career-minded women embark on a long-distance relationship and encounter obstacles along the way. Charlotte’s job as a museum courier gives her the opportunity to travel the world, but honestly not see much of it in the process. So when complications strand her in Madrid, she’s excited to extend her stay. If only she knew someone to spend her time with. And then she remembers: Adrianna, who was a few years ahead of her in school when they were both PhD In Verity Lowell's Meet Me in Madrid , two career-minded women embark on a long-distance relationship and encounter obstacles along the way. Charlotte’s job as a museum courier gives her the opportunity to travel the world, but honestly not see much of it in the process. So when complications strand her in Madrid, she’s excited to extend her stay. If only she knew someone to spend her time with. And then she remembers: Adrianna, who was a few years ahead of her in school when they were both PhD candidates, lives and works in Madrid. Adrianna, the thought of whom makes Charlotte a little weak in the knees. When the two reconnect, sparks fly, and Adrianna offers Charlotte the opportunity to stay with her during her time in Madrid. It’s not long before they’re head over heels for each other and figuring out how to make a long-distance relationship work. But if that’s not enough of a challenge, when Charlotte finally finds a way back into academia, Adrianna’s latest career move may be the biggest obstacle of all for the two of them. While the romantic component of Meet Me in Madrid is sweet and interesting, what I thought was best about the book was its discussion of the prejudices and racism that people of color, the LGBTQIA+ community, and women face in academia. I haven’t read a lot of F/F romance but Carina Adores definitely has a number of titles I’d like to check out! See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    3.5 stars rounded to 4 for Goodreads [I received a digital arc for an honest review] Meet Me in Madrid is a lesbian adult romance by Verity Lowell. The story of two women trying to balance their personal relationship with their career goals, all while being thousands of miles away from each other. Looking at the cover, I thought I was in for a light contemporary romance with a good amount of emotion because of the struggles that come with a long distance relationship. I was not expecting the amount 3.5 stars rounded to 4 for Goodreads [I received a digital arc for an honest review] Meet Me in Madrid is a lesbian adult romance by Verity Lowell. The story of two women trying to balance their personal relationship with their career goals, all while being thousands of miles away from each other. Looking at the cover, I thought I was in for a light contemporary romance with a good amount of emotion because of the struggles that come with a long distance relationship. I was not expecting the amount of steam I would encounter, and I am not mad about it lol It starts with a one-night stand that's so much more than a one-night stand as soon as it starts. Then every time our leading ladies are together they definitely make the most of it and in between those meet up they aren't shy and enjoy phone sex. Their distance does not put out the intimate fire between them. Besides the physical intimacy , one thing I love about long distance romances is the emotional connection that is formed between the women. While both strong characters on their own, neither of them outshone the other. They were supportive of each other's goals and career. I also really appreciated that the age gap between them wasn't some big deal, and neither of them obsessed over the fact. The reason this isn't getting a higher rating for me is because outside the romance, I found all the history jargon rather dull and found myself skimming whenever job situations were happening. Overall, this was a passionate romance between two strong BIPOC who have to learn to make room in their independent lives for love.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara B

    Oh honey mine! This book was really interesting in terms of the characters and their representations in the book, and I truly commend the author for that. The two main characters are women of colour that have dedicated their lives to academia and the arts while putting love off. Together, they discover with each other, how important love is if you have the right person to share it with. It's my first book I've read with this storyline, even though it was a bit different, I still enjoyed reading a Oh honey mine! This book was really interesting in terms of the characters and their representations in the book, and I truly commend the author for that. The two main characters are women of colour that have dedicated their lives to academia and the arts while putting love off. Together, they discover with each other, how important love is if you have the right person to share it with. It's my first book I've read with this storyline, even though it was a bit different, I still enjoyed reading about it and experiencing it. If you love spicy romances with characters that catch all the feels, you'll enjoy this! Thank you to NetGalley and Carina Press for the earc in return for an honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jacque

    gonna write a full review soon but I adored this book, definitely one of my favorite reads this year❤️reading this felt languid, sexy and indulgent, but also really emotional and raw and just fantastic. highly reccomend CW for racism & homophobia in the workplace (view spoiler)[ (which is eventually combatted & handily shut down) (hide spoiler)] and for brief reference to fatphobia gonna write a full review soon but I adored this book, definitely one of my favorite reads this year❤️reading this felt languid, sexy and indulgent, but also really emotional and raw and just fantastic. highly reccomend CW for racism & homophobia in the workplace (view spoiler)[ (which is eventually combatted & handily shut down) (hide spoiler)] and for brief reference to fatphobia

  14. 5 out of 5

    emerson

    *e-ARC provided by NetGalley * I've decided not to give this book a rating because I haven't finished it and frankly I don't know what my final opinion would have been. I really wanted to enjoy it, especially because of the inclusion of art history in it. Unfortunately, I couldn't make it past 25%. I haven't DNFed a book before, so this review might be a bit all over the place. Most of the criticisms I've seen for this book were for the writing style, which I agree was not the best, but it wasn't *e-ARC provided by NetGalley * I've decided not to give this book a rating because I haven't finished it and frankly I don't know what my final opinion would have been. I really wanted to enjoy it, especially because of the inclusion of art history in it. Unfortunately, I couldn't make it past 25%. I haven't DNFed a book before, so this review might be a bit all over the place. Most of the criticisms I've seen for this book were for the writing style, which I agree was not the best, but it wasn't that that put me off of this book. My biggest issue was really just the chemistry between the characters. To be fair, I completely forgot that there wasn't going to be a slow burn element to the relationship and that definitely wasn't something I wanted, but also, in the 25% I read, I barely felt a connection between the characters even though they'd already gotten together. Also, I had an issue differentiating the characters. I don't know if this was just a me problem, but so much felt like it was happening while trying to explain the characters backgrounds that nothing being explained made sense to me. I couldn't even tell you which character was in the US and which one was in Madrid. I can't say much else because I didn't read much of it, but this wasn't for me but I encourage people who may be more interested and can tough it out to try it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna Reads Here

    Release Date: October 26th, 2021 Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ | Steam: 🔥🔥🔥🔥 Review: The premise of the book hooked me with promises of two academic Black queer women who find each other many years since their last interaction and fall in love. Plus, with Madrid as a backdrop, I was really eager to dive into this. Meet Me in Madrid is all of those things, but it’s so much more than just a love story and I like that I was able to go on this journey with them as they figured out their own lives and careers. While add Release Date: October 26th, 2021 Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ | Steam: 🔥🔥🔥🔥 Review: The premise of the book hooked me with promises of two academic Black queer women who find each other many years since their last interaction and fall in love. Plus, with Madrid as a backdrop, I was really eager to dive into this. Meet Me in Madrid is all of those things, but it’s so much more than just a love story and I like that I was able to go on this journey with them as they figured out their own lives and careers. While addressing important issues or homophobia and racism, the book also tackles love and following your dreams. Both women - Charlotte and Adrianna - have big dreams and aspirations. They want to achieve so much in their lives that their dreams are sometimes bigger than they are. But it shows you how two people so academically gifted are able to find the balance in the hard world they live in to make time for each other. One of the strong themes in the book is the lack of diversity in academia and how these two women question it, discuss it and do whatever it takes to change it. And the diversity is not just about people of colour, but people of different sexual orientations. Charlotte and Adrianna’s romance is cute, sexy and definitely steamy. Their attraction to each other kicks off almost as soon as they are reunited and I love that it wasn’t all shy and coy, they tackled it head on and enjoyed every minute of it. Their relationship might be the central focus of the book, but it shares place with the details of their respective careers. I feel like we got so much insight into their work lives and how they try to make it work instead of getting more about their relationship. This is partly because the two characters are barely ever together in the same place and their relationship relies heavily on phone calls and FaceTime conversations. And while I loved their romance, I felt like it wasn’t enough. The deep dive into their respective careers was too much for me, but I’m sure that this much information and insight would definitely appeal to some other readers. I also enjoyed meeting the secondary characters and seeing how all of them play into the story. I am definitely intrigued by what else Verity Lowell might right in the future, because her style of writing, her knowledge of the topics and the focus on queer women of colour really made this story a strong one. Thanks to Carina Press & NetGalley for providing me with an advance copy. I am voluntarily leaving an honest review. Read more of my reviews on anna reads here

  16. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    ***I would have rated this a 2.5 if I could. While I did enjoy this easy read, and long for stories that are about queer adults rather than coming of age/coming out stories, something was missing to make me feel close or empathetic towards the characters. The majority of the story is focused on when they are together, or are a few days before or after seeing on another. I wish we would’ve seen the longing that an LDR can cause and actually gotten to see deeper conversations between the two when th ***I would have rated this a 2.5 if I could. While I did enjoy this easy read, and long for stories that are about queer adults rather than coming of age/coming out stories, something was missing to make me feel close or empathetic towards the characters. The majority of the story is focused on when they are together, or are a few days before or after seeing on another. I wish we would’ve seen the longing that an LDR can cause and actually gotten to see deeper conversations between the two when they are apart rather than just them having phone sex. It overall led to me not feeling tied to this relationship other than the fact than I knew I should be rooting for it. There are also a lot of inconsistencies in this book that should have been caught by the editor. Lots of typos, or even then calling an area of Chicago “Logan Park” to then start referring to it as “Logan Square” 2 paragraphs later. At first I thought I was confused, but then I realized it was the same location and the name of the neighborhood has gotten mixed up the first time it was introduced (also, I am from Chicago and can attest there is no “Logan Park” lol) The age difference is also an interestingly handled topic. By context, Adrianna is 42 and Charlotte we assume about 32 or at youngest, 30. However, she is portrayed through her naivety and insecurity as a women on her early 20’s. This makes the age difference seem so apparent as Adrianna was portrayed as the more mature, level headed one. If they had wanted to make the way Charlotte was acting or the differences in their ages more believable, Charlotte should have been 25. Another unbelievable thing was the logistics of their sex. This emphasis on grinding against one another until completion seemed as if it were written by a straight male, rather than the queer women it was. At times, the way they spoke about their sex even seemed very heterosexual, such as referring to being “inside her.” Sure, I understood what they meant, but it seemed very heterosexually framed. I also disliked the weird, sudden pet names they used for one another, just after barely starting their relationship. Maybe that is just my personal taste, but it seemed awkward and off putting since we lacked seeing deep conversations/intimacy as I mentioned in the beginning. In the end, I read this book with my partner as a fun activity and it was still an enjoyable and easy read. I do not regret reading but would also not recommend.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kate (The Quirky Kate)

    Disclaimer: This review and rating is based on a four-chapter preview provided by NetGalley. Meet Me in Madrid will be available to read on October 26, 2021. Thank you, NetGalley and HARLEQUIN - Carina Press, for allowing me the opportunity to read an advanced preview in exchange for an honest review. This was my first time reading Verity Lowell, and I'm so glad I could get a sneak peek into her next book, Meet Me in Madrid! I love a good second chance romance story, and this book does not disapp Disclaimer: This review and rating is based on a four-chapter preview provided by NetGalley. Meet Me in Madrid will be available to read on October 26, 2021. Thank you, NetGalley and HARLEQUIN - Carina Press, for allowing me the opportunity to read an advanced preview in exchange for an honest review. This was my first time reading Verity Lowell, and I'm so glad I could get a sneak peek into her next book, Meet Me in Madrid! I love a good second chance romance story, and this book does not disappoint! It's fast-paced, which I love. We see Adrianna and Charlotte reconnect right off the bat. Wine and a snowstorm ensue, leaving them with the only obvious option-- get snowed in together. While the romance aspect of this book is perfectly steamy, Lowell also fits in topics around race and sexism without it seeming weirdly out of place. It was actually a breath of fresh air! I'm so happy I was able to get a preview of this novel, and I can't wait to read where Adrianna and Charlotte left off!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    From the get go, I was hooked by the story. It was so refreshing to see two POC in a #lesfic romance, and even better but two women in Academia. Charlotte and Adrianna reunite in Spain serendipitously, and after a grad-school crush their romance develops very quickly over 4 days together. They are then left with a strong connection, but a very long distance romance. I really enjoyed following the long distance romance, and anyone who has experienced this type of relationship would definitely rela From the get go, I was hooked by the story. It was so refreshing to see two POC in a #lesfic romance, and even better but two women in Academia. Charlotte and Adrianna reunite in Spain serendipitously, and after a grad-school crush their romance develops very quickly over 4 days together. They are then left with a strong connection, but a very long distance romance. I really enjoyed following the long distance romance, and anyone who has experienced this type of relationship would definitely relate to this part of the story. It took me back to when I first started dating my wife and we had a few months of separation and it was so difficult and tested our relationship. It can definitely make or break a romance! All in all, a great romance that I highly recommend if you like your characters to be smart, outspoken and sexy. Many thanks to Netgalley and Carina Press / Carina Adores for a copy of this novel. ARC provided in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hazel

    Even though this was only a preview of this book, I read enough to know that I will probably not be picking it up again. I thought it was a great concept, and had great representation, and I love to see sapphic women (especially women of colour) in writing, but I just didn't enjoy what I read. I think the main thing was the writing style - it felt overly descriptive and almost seemed to sexualise the women. I can absolutely see how some people would enjoy this, but it just wasn't for me. I won't Even though this was only a preview of this book, I read enough to know that I will probably not be picking it up again. I thought it was a great concept, and had great representation, and I love to see sapphic women (especially women of colour) in writing, but I just didn't enjoy what I read. I think the main thing was the writing style - it felt overly descriptive and almost seemed to sexualise the women. I can absolutely see how some people would enjoy this, but it just wasn't for me. I won't be picking up this book when it comes out - I wish that I liked it, but I didn't. Loved the cover though! (shelved under DNF because I read the first few chapters in the preview but will not be continuing it.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mar

    2.5 stars this was a bit of a dissapointment for me. I wanted to loved this book so much because POC sapphic love stories there are very few but unfortunately the plot and romance weren't developed enough. i also couldn't connect with either of the mcs which was a bummer. And still, this wasn't a bad book. There were some parts that I truly enjoyed and I wish we had more of that. Thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for the change to read this book in exchnge for an honest review. 2.5 stars this was a bit of a dissapointment for me. I wanted to loved this book so much because POC sapphic love stories there are very few but unfortunately the plot and romance weren't developed enough. i also couldn't connect with either of the mcs which was a bummer. And still, this wasn't a bad book. There were some parts that I truly enjoyed and I wish we had more of that. Thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for the change to read this book in exchnge for an honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Harlequin Books

    Categories Carina Adores, Contemporary Romance, Female/Female, Romantic Comedy, Multicultural & Interracial Romance, Lesbian

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Sapphic adult romance lets GOOOOO

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lauren loves llamas

    The cover caught my eye, and I couldn’t resist picking up a book about two sapphic women navigating their careers and relationships in their thirties and forties. While some of it worked for me, there were other parts that weren’t my jam. Charlotte is a courier for an art museum, which means lots of travel on very short turnarounds. An unexpected layover in Madrid leads to her reconnecting with Adriana, who was a few years ahead of her at Yale, but who she always had a crush on. They met over a d The cover caught my eye, and I couldn’t resist picking up a book about two sapphic women navigating their careers and relationships in their thirties and forties. While some of it worked for me, there were other parts that weren’t my jam. Charlotte is a courier for an art museum, which means lots of travel on very short turnarounds. An unexpected layover in Madrid leads to her reconnecting with Adriana, who was a few years ahead of her at Yale, but who she always had a crush on. They met over a decade ago when Charlotte was still an undergrad and Adriana was a TA. But now, three nights together in Madrid fuel a connection that neither woman wants to do without. But can they overcome the geographic differences and the disparate stages in their careers to finally be together? “Sweet Lord, Adrianna. What are we doing? How can we have spent all this time trying to advance in a field dominated by people who think we are less? That what we do doesn’t matter or isn’t real. I’m just so goddamned tired of it.” This book is slow paced and very angsty. Not only are both characters experiencing all the problems of embarking on a long distance relationship, but they’re also two queer BIPOC women in academia with all the nastiness and stress you’d expect from that. Adriana is in her forties and much further along in her career than Charlotte, though only four years separated them in grad school. With a teaching position at UCLA, she’s doing a sabbatical fellowship in Madrid studying pieces belong to a particularly art interested nun. She’s a consummate planner and very focused on her career, to the exclusion of anything else. Meanwhile, while Charlotte’s similarly talented and hardworking, she’s had two year long teaching positions that went nowhere. She ended up in her current courier/curator combo for lack of other options. Charlotte misses teaching students and the museum isn’t receptive to many of her ideas for new exhibits, choosing instead to stick with the same old white men of middling quality instead of “politically correct” fads (that is, anything that centers anyone not male, cis, het and white). The friction between their careers and love lives comes to a head when both have a chance at new opportunities – but, again, on opposite coasts. “What you see before you is a big ball of confusion. I’m living an out of body experience. When I left I was perfectly fine being here, being single. And now I can barely get up in the morning without her lying next to me. And all it took for me to get this way was three days. I feel crazy.” What this book does well is the emotions – and the steam! Each woman admires the other for their knowledge of their field and their accomplishments, though Charlotte has had less opportunities than Adriana. I never doubted the depth of their connection, and the various coping habits both women employ each time they have to leave each other was heartbreaking. But the exhilaration of them meeting up again matched the bittersweetness of those moments. The in-between, though, was super angsty, from wondering about what their relationship status is to the fear they’ll lose interest in each other while they’re apart to the frustration of being on two different continents. At times, it was a bit too much angst for me. Even when they’re apart, though, they still manage to connect in the margins, including some very hot video chats. And, woo, this book is steamy. Belying her demure exterior, Charlotte likes being in control in bed (or on the sofa, or the countertop, etc). But besides the steaminess, the scenes showed their deepening connection and the possibilities of what their relationship could be, given time together. The bleak moment, however, was everything I didn’t like about the book – super angsty and way too judgmental, honestly, and it made me dislike one of the main characters for their childish response. There wasn’t quite enough space left in the book for my opinion of her to recover, either. Overall, while there was a lot I liked about this book (the emotions, the academia bits), there was just a bit too much angst for me. I’ll definitely be keeping an eye on this author, however. I received an advance review copy of this book from NetGalley. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Content notes: (view spoiler)[racism, homophobia, sexual harassment, cheating (on MC by ex, before book starts), death of a parent (before book starts), estranged family, fatmisia, alcohol (hide spoiler)]

  24. 4 out of 5

    CB

    Thank you NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for a review. This book is the story of two academics that knew each other in passing back during their school years and meet later on in life while they are both in Madrid for work. So, the positives; I loved that both characters were academics because that is a world I don't know much about. I also loved that it was starring two women of color because that is also something we don't see enough of in sapphic romance. Their relationship was rel Thank you NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for a review. This book is the story of two academics that knew each other in passing back during their school years and meet later on in life while they are both in Madrid for work. So, the positives; I loved that both characters were academics because that is a world I don't know much about. I also loved that it was starring two women of color because that is also something we don't see enough of in sapphic romance. Their relationship was relatable and the love scenes were spicy but not overdone. What I didn't like: there was a formalness to the writing style that felt more suitable to literary fiction and not a romance. I'm not saying that romance can't be highbrow, but I felt like because of the writing style I was removed from the romance. There was also the fact that I did not feel like I got to know Charlotte and Adrianna in any real way. We get hints of who they are but nothing concrete. There was way too much time spent on their careers and what that involved and not enough on who they were as people. Also, I don't think every book has to be a slow burn but there could have been more tension and buildup to their physical relationship. It happened so abruptly and while the sex scenes were fun; I was being told about their intimacy more than feeling it. The other issue I had which might be the one that annoyed me the most was that it felt like I was told these women were Black but if I hadn't been told, I would not have known. Now I don't think race should be the focus of who a character is but in a world of books where white women are often centered, I appreciate seeing women of color as the main characters. As a Black woman, this is especially important. It felt like the only time their race was brought up was as an issue in their jobs rendering it a problem. Yes, it is acknowledged that the treatment is wrong and unfair (also the issues that come about it felt a bit on the nose) but I would have liked to see the positive side as well. Their world was very white, down to who their friends were and who they worked with, and I just don't see how realistic that is, especially being surrounded by the negative attitudes they mentioned. If anything, this would push you more towards commiserating with your own people and perhaps make you more inclined to entrench yourself in your own culture. The way it is presented, it's like them knowing each other is the only time they find someone to relate to. Also, Adrianna was a Black Latina according to something said in passing but it is in no way a part of the story. Such a missed opportunity. Overall, I would definitely read another book by this author and for a debut, I think it was worth reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kate Schwab

    2 stars, 2.5 spice This is a shame- I received the first 4 chapters as a preview on Netgalley and rated those 4 stars. I was intrigued in the beginning and I thought this had such potential. Compared to other Contemporary romances its quite diverse, with ethnicity, having adult main characters (30s & 40s vs most being like 18-25 in everything else I read), focusing around women who are career focused, and having almost every character being part of the LGBTQ+ Community. I decided the first 4 chapt 2 stars, 2.5 spice This is a shame- I received the first 4 chapters as a preview on Netgalley and rated those 4 stars. I was intrigued in the beginning and I thought this had such potential. Compared to other Contemporary romances its quite diverse, with ethnicity, having adult main characters (30s & 40s vs most being like 18-25 in everything else I read), focusing around women who are career focused, and having almost every character being part of the LGBTQ+ Community. I decided the first 4 chapters hooked me enough to continue with the story and was able to get it digitally on Libby. It is clear the author has a strong knowledge of both the arts and academia (at least it seems that way, because frankly some of it was a lot to follow, and I ended up skimming). Simply put I was bored, but if you want a detailed list of why I am giving a rare 2 stars; CONFLICTS THAT SIMPLY WERENT CONFLICTS - The secondary conflicts seem to resolve themselves quickly without much issue (most times within a page or two). And then the main conflict shouldn't have even been a conflict if they had just openly communicated. LACK OF CHARACTER AND RELATIONSHIP DEVELOPMENT - There wasn't much tension, and I lacked connection to the characters because the few times we saw them together they were 'doing it'. Which is great and all, but the moments when they were supposedly getting to know each other and falling in love were via text/call/facetime in the months they were separated and as the reader we saw none of that. I honesty can't remember anything specific about either of their personalities apart from them working a lot and being queer POC. POV - 3rd person omniscient has to be my least favorite POV, especially for Romance. There were many instances when I got confused and had to reread sections because I wasn't sure which woman we were referring to. And even though we got to see their feelings at all times it was never as thoughts and it was never deep so I lacked that connection. I would have like 3rd person limited better and maybe switched back and forth . Or better yet doing first person and switching depending on the chapter would have been best. It would have helped build tension and would have allowed us to see more in depth to the character's thoughts and behaviors. Because it was 3rd person omniscient I never felt like I was missing a character. which in a book that is covering a long distance relationship we needed to feel that distance in order to feel for the characters

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emily Marie

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. TW: racism, sexism, misogynoir Charlotte has a PhD in art history, a job where she gets to travel the world and good friends. But the PhD isn't getting her into academia, where she desperately wants to be, the job doesn't actually include much seeing the places she visits and the good friends are actually James, her gay colleague and Natalie, who barely makes an appearance. When a blizzard strands her in Madrid a Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. TW: racism, sexism, misogynoir Charlotte has a PhD in art history, a job where she gets to travel the world and good friends. But the PhD isn't getting her into academia, where she desperately wants to be, the job doesn't actually include much seeing the places she visits and the good friends are actually James, her gay colleague and Natalie, who barely makes an appearance. When a blizzard strands her in Madrid and she contacts Adrianna, a person she knew once, on a whim, he life rapidly changes in a whirlwind of passion, plane rides and Adrianna. Adrianna who has everything Charlotte wants and is charming and beautiful and smart and sexy. When opportunities and possibilities come their way, will they be able to balance their newfound relationship with their dreams? This is a cute, funny, sexy Sapphic romance with a dollop of art history and a dash of academia. The relationship between Charlotte and Adrianna feels organic, even if they are immediately attracted to one another, which is an art in and of itself. The pacing and writing of the story is fitting for the fun contemporary romance it wants to be. The wit is amazing, especially in face of the heavy topics it does touch on: racism, sexism and misogynoir in academia and the arts. My personal feeling is that this was done well, though I strongly urge you to read the reviews of BIPOC on this in particular. I loved the queer rep and especially how the story underlines that feeling safe at work or at school is a lot easier when there are other queer people and the way just existing seems to be easier and more free. This was done extremely well. I loved this aspect in combination with academia, especially women in academia. It felt like a reminder that I am not alone, that I can occupy as much space as any other. The smut however, was...mediocre. It always started so good and was over way too quickly, feeling cut off and sometimes even cold. This didn't fit into the rest of the story and the exquisite storytelling that detailed how the two women fell deeper and deeper in love. I recommend this story to anyone who loves romcoms, academia and travel and particularly to queer women who occupy such spaces. It is a reminder that you are not alone.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Charlotte Hilaire lives a busy life as a museum courier. She travels from museum to museum, country to country. It sounds much more exciting than it can be. She sticks to a tight schedule and never has the time for anything fun. When a blizzard in Spain delays Charlotte’s return to the states, she finally has the chance for fun. Except the fun leads her in a place she wasn’t quite expecting when she meets up with former classmate, and crush, Adrianna Coates. The heat between the pair combusts ove Charlotte Hilaire lives a busy life as a museum courier. She travels from museum to museum, country to country. It sounds much more exciting than it can be. She sticks to a tight schedule and never has the time for anything fun. When a blizzard in Spain delays Charlotte’s return to the states, she finally has the chance for fun. Except the fun leads her in a place she wasn’t quite expecting when she meets up with former classmate, and crush, Adrianna Coates. The heat between the pair combusts over the span of the three days Charlotte is stuck in Spain. They spend more time in the bedroom than outside of it. As time passes, they find themselves calling and wanting to see more and more of each other, even when facing the distance. In an effort to become closer to each other they both take the chance of turning their careers in different directions to make it possible. What I really liked? How smart Charlotte and Adrianna were and how they admired that aspect in each other. I love when there are characters who are themselves and they have little geeky things they get excited about. Also the steam factor. I hoped with the portrayal of a long-distance relationship there would be video chat and phone sessions. I wasn’t disappointed. The buildup to them meeting up with each other in persona again was exciting. There were a few flat spots where I felt things just dragged a little too much for my liking. Some of the secondary characters I just, felt weren’t needed or were an after thought. There was a lot of angst and judgment in the workplace that while is prevalent in the academic world, I like my romance with a little less angst. So if angst is your thing, you’ll find it in this novel for sure.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sharelle Harris

    I wish there was a 2.5 star option because that’s truly where I’d put this. It’s a perfect beach read if you aren’t looking to get super invested. While I definitely did objectively enjoy the story, as I would enjoy any story about a fem for fem lesbian relationship, the writing fell a bit flat for me at times. Ultimately decided on 2 stars due to things I think should have been caught in editing. For one, there are some inconsistencies from one page to the next on small things like what someone I wish there was a 2.5 star option because that’s truly where I’d put this. It’s a perfect beach read if you aren’t looking to get super invested. While I definitely did objectively enjoy the story, as I would enjoy any story about a fem for fem lesbian relationship, the writing fell a bit flat for me at times. Ultimately decided on 2 stars due to things I think should have been caught in editing. For one, there are some inconsistencies from one page to the next on small things like what someone is wearing, the name of a neighborhood, etc. Also, the descriptions of some of the sex scenes, particularly the earlier ones, were just confusing. As in, “why does this sound inaccurate?” Moments where I was left thinking either I had missed something or it was written by a straight person. I found it difficult to get invested in their relationship. Throughout I kept hearing how in love they were with one another but never read anything that to me would warrant such love. Perhaps I can blame this on the fact that they were long distance, but I just wish there was more writing to draw out the time they did have together or the conversations they were having when apart to SHOW me their connection building. I also felt there was a ton of confusion in Charlotte’s character and personality. This is woman in her 30’s with a PHD and yet she’s written like a 20 something fresh out of college head over heels over this older woman. The immaturity in her character comes out every so often to the point that, by the end of the book I didn’t even totally like her that much. Overall a fun story that I don’t regret reading but also don’t intend to recommend.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Interesting FF Romance Brought Down By Preachy Politics And Blatant Racism. As a romance, this book works. It starts out as a "forced" (ish) proximity before turning into a bridge-the-gap, all revolving around two female academics at different points in their careers. Not for the "clean" / "sweet" crowd, as others have noted there is a fair amount of sex in the first four chapters alone. Also falls into the trap of describing both women as very buxom, which is a bit of a cop-out to my mind desig Interesting FF Romance Brought Down By Preachy Politics And Blatant Racism. As a romance, this book works. It starts out as a "forced" (ish) proximity before turning into a bridge-the-gap, all revolving around two female academics at different points in their careers. Not for the "clean" / "sweet" crowd, as others have noted there is a fair amount of sex in the first four chapters alone. Also falls into the trap of describing both women as very buxom, which is a bit of a cop-out to my mind designed to get those of us with... "active imaginations"... more into the book. But that point is but a minor quibble. The preachy politics, and in particular the blatant racism, is the reason for the star deduction here. Let me be perfectly clear. My standard is this: If you reverse the [insert demographic in question] and keep everything else absolutely identical, would anyone cry foul? I believe this book fails that test in its characterization of its singular straight white male character, and thus the star deduction. But still, on the whole this is a mostly solid book, and thus it is *only* a singular star deducted. Fans of the romance genre generally should enjoy this one, fans of FF romances in particular will probably thoroughly enjoy this one, and it does indeed dive into areas not frequented, particularly academia and art professors. Thus, this book is recommended.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Gallo LeBlanc

    Two queer women of color & former classmates -- Charlotte & Adrianna -- reunite in Madrid and get stranded together during a blizzard. Sparks fly and a whirlwind international long distance relationship ensues. I enjoyed this book and would recommend to anyone interested in lgbtqia+ romance/contemporary romance or fans of Casey McQuiston & Alexis Hall. This is the first book I've read by the author Verity Lowell and I'll likely read her other titles going forward. I'm an avid reader of mm romanc Two queer women of color & former classmates -- Charlotte & Adrianna -- reunite in Madrid and get stranded together during a blizzard. Sparks fly and a whirlwind international long distance relationship ensues. I enjoyed this book and would recommend to anyone interested in lgbtqia+ romance/contemporary romance or fans of Casey McQuiston & Alexis Hall. This is the first book I've read by the author Verity Lowell and I'll likely read her other titles going forward. I'm an avid reader of mm romance novels and 'Meet Me in Madrid' is my first ff romance. I enjoyed the writing and the unique perspectives of the heroines who are both PhD's working in academia as queer woman of color. I always think it's important to amplify the POVs of queer/female/people of color's voices since as the minority their POV is often silenced Check out Meet Me in Madrid by Verity Lowell and be sure to pick up this LGBTQIA+ romance wherever you buy books! ✦ Goodreads ➜ https://bit.ly/3ACqFcx ✦ Amazon ➜ https://amzn.to/3zozl4s ✦ Apple ➜ https://apple.co/3kmSO1l ✦ Google ➜ https://bit.ly/3ACqGgB ✦ Kobo ➜ https://bit.ly/3tUoTAP ✦ Nook ➜ https://bit.ly/2Xxlfk3 TAGS: fiction, romance, contemporary romance, LGBTQIA+, long distance romance, rom-com, ff romance, female/female *Thanks to Edelweiss, NetGalley, Verity Lowell & Carina Adores for providing a free eARC in exchange for my honest review. #Edelweiss #NetGalley #CarinaPress #MeetMeInMadrid @edelweiss_squad @CarinaPress

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