Hot Best Seller

Hunting by Stars

Availability: Ready to download

From the acclaimed author of The Marrow Thieves comes a thrilling new story about hope and survival that New York Times bestselling author Angeline Boulley called “a revelatory must-read” Years ago, when plagues and natural disasters killed millions of people, much of the world stopped dreaming. Without dreams, people are haunted, sick, mad, unable to rebuild. The governme From the acclaimed author of The Marrow Thieves comes a thrilling new story about hope and survival that New York Times bestselling author Angeline Boulley called “a revelatory must-read” Years ago, when plagues and natural disasters killed millions of people, much of the world stopped dreaming. Without dreams, people are haunted, sick, mad, unable to rebuild. The government soon finds that the Indigenous people of North America have retained their dreams, an ability rumored to be housed in the very marrow of their bones. Soon, residential schools pop up—or are re-opened—across the land to bring in the dreamers and harvest their dreams. Seventeen-year-old French lost his family to these schools and has spent the years since heading north with his new found family: a group of other dreamers, who, like him, are trying to build and thrive as a community. But then French wakes up in a pitch-black room, locked in and alone for the first time in years, and he knows immediately where he is—and what it will take to escape. Meanwhile, out in the world, his found family searches for him and dodges new dangers—school Recruiters, a blood cult, even the land itself. When their paths finally collide, French must decide how far he is willing to go—and how many loved ones is he willing to betray—in order to survive. This engrossing, action-packed, deftly-drawn novel expands on the world of Cherie Dimaline’s award-winning The Marrow Thieves, and it will haunt readers long after they’ve turned the final page.


Compare

From the acclaimed author of The Marrow Thieves comes a thrilling new story about hope and survival that New York Times bestselling author Angeline Boulley called “a revelatory must-read” Years ago, when plagues and natural disasters killed millions of people, much of the world stopped dreaming. Without dreams, people are haunted, sick, mad, unable to rebuild. The governme From the acclaimed author of The Marrow Thieves comes a thrilling new story about hope and survival that New York Times bestselling author Angeline Boulley called “a revelatory must-read” Years ago, when plagues and natural disasters killed millions of people, much of the world stopped dreaming. Without dreams, people are haunted, sick, mad, unable to rebuild. The government soon finds that the Indigenous people of North America have retained their dreams, an ability rumored to be housed in the very marrow of their bones. Soon, residential schools pop up—or are re-opened—across the land to bring in the dreamers and harvest their dreams. Seventeen-year-old French lost his family to these schools and has spent the years since heading north with his new found family: a group of other dreamers, who, like him, are trying to build and thrive as a community. But then French wakes up in a pitch-black room, locked in and alone for the first time in years, and he knows immediately where he is—and what it will take to escape. Meanwhile, out in the world, his found family searches for him and dodges new dangers—school Recruiters, a blood cult, even the land itself. When their paths finally collide, French must decide how far he is willing to go—and how many loved ones is he willing to betray—in order to survive. This engrossing, action-packed, deftly-drawn novel expands on the world of Cherie Dimaline’s award-winning The Marrow Thieves, and it will haunt readers long after they’ve turned the final page.

30 review for Hunting by Stars

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Roanhorse

    A gripping and heartbreaking return to the world of THE MARROW THIEVES. Kept me up all night reading. At turns brutal and dark, hopeful and beautiful. Pulls no punches and asks hard questions without any easy answers. Highly recommend.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    An amazing sequel to The Marrow Thieves, Hunting by Stars picks up immediately after the end of the first book. I don't know about you, but I hoped that Frenchie and his family were done with their trials for awhile. That turns out not to be the case. If anything, their previous struggles pale in comparison to what lies ahead of them. By turns brutal, emotional, raw, and hopeful, the story provides an unflinching look at what one would be willing to do for freedom and for family, and the heavy co An amazing sequel to The Marrow Thieves, Hunting by Stars picks up immediately after the end of the first book. I don't know about you, but I hoped that Frenchie and his family were done with their trials for awhile. That turns out not to be the case. If anything, their previous struggles pale in comparison to what lies ahead of them. By turns brutal, emotional, raw, and hopeful, the story provides an unflinching look at what one would be willing to do for freedom and for family, and the heavy costs associated with those choices. As hard as parts of this book were to read, I can't say enough about the power of Dimaline's writing. She expertly captures the grittiness of living and dying, the existential horror at the intersection of reality and imagination, the devastating legacy of Canadian residential and US Indian boarding schools that continues to reverberate from history and into the future. For so long, we as a species were violent. Our violence was neglect; our violence was arrogance. The wasp sting of capitalism was left to grow malignant without proper care. And wasps can keep on stinging once they begin. They don’t die like bees, so they don’t have to be as committed to the damage. We as humans forgot our specific place and spread into every place instead. As if we were removed from consequence. As if we were untouchable. We couldn’t even imagine the Earth retaliating. And then it did.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    4.5 stars. Cherie Dimaline returns to the dystopian world she created in Marrow Thieves, where, after a plague, everyone but the indigenous lost their ability to dream, inflicting madness and more death upon an already hurting population. Unfortunately, what did this population do once it became obvious the indigenous weren't similarly affected? Capture, extract the bone marrow from indigenous people, and murder them. In fact, an entire operation, similar to the residential school system, was cre 4.5 stars. Cherie Dimaline returns to the dystopian world she created in Marrow Thieves, where, after a plague, everyone but the indigenous lost their ability to dream, inflicting madness and more death upon an already hurting population. Unfortunately, what did this population do once it became obvious the indigenous weren't similarly affected? Capture, extract the bone marrow from indigenous people, and murder them. In fact, an entire operation, similar to the residential school system, was created to ensure a supply of marrow for the afflicted. In book one, we met young Frenchie, a boy whose brother sacrificed himself to Recruiters (as the kidnappers are called) so Frenchie could escape. After falling in with a small group of other indigenous, Frenchie spends years on the run, learning a number of skills to help his group and making strong, loving bonds with these people. When this book opens, Frenchie has been captured; he's disoriented, terrified because though he doesn't know where he is (except that it's likely a marrow extraction facility), feeling very, very alone, and worried that his found family was also captured. Luckily, they weren't, and they spend time looking for Frenchie, while continuing to attempt to evade capture. This book is so much darker than book one (I know, how much worse can the situation get for these characters?) This time, Dimaline puts a face to the captors and collaborators/appeasers. Dimaline also has Frenchie and Rose (who decides to leave the group to rescue Frenchie) discover just what they are prepared to do and what they are prepared to give of themselves, when they encounter rationalizations and mounting danger, and others who stand in the way of their goals. Dimaline takes us to some disturbing places for and within these characters, but believable and tragic. It's not an easy book, as one sees the ease with which the racist captors diminish and murder a people, and the way some of the captives collaborate in the destruction of their own. For all that, this is a compelling book -- I tore through it, desperate to know how my favourite characters were going to survive this situation. I like Frenchie and Rose, but Miig! I love him so much, and this book shows us what a wonderful role model Miig is for Frenchie and the whole group. I am so glad Cherie Dimaline decided to revisit this harrowing world so we could see what was next for her characters; though their situations were grim and scary, there is so much love within the group, and I’m glad we got to spend more time with these people. Thank you to Netgalley and ABRAMS Kids for this ARC in exchange for my review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This book recently kept me company on a very long cross-province drive - I expected to only listen for a little while and then switch to music cause every other audiobook I’d tried couldn’t hold my attention, but oh no, this one grabbed me instantly, and I listened for hours and hours straight, 75% in one go, and would have done it all if I’d only had more road! I honestly think this is the best dystopian series I have ever read, and I don’t mean just YA dystopian, I mean all dystopian. The Marr This book recently kept me company on a very long cross-province drive - I expected to only listen for a little while and then switch to music cause every other audiobook I’d tried couldn’t hold my attention, but oh no, this one grabbed me instantly, and I listened for hours and hours straight, 75% in one go, and would have done it all if I’d only had more road! I honestly think this is the best dystopian series I have ever read, and I don’t mean just YA dystopian, I mean all dystopian. The Marrow Thieves and now this stunning sequel are beyond powerful, beyond timely, and I am totally incapable of saying just how much. The way Cherie Dimaline has packed these characters with so much heart, you can’t not care for them with every ounce of your own in return. Reading this I was filled with equal parts anguish, hope, heartbreak, anger, urgency, and awe, completely invested and riveted and pulled in. This sequel is so necessary, a seamless continuation of the brilliance of the first book, even more so after listening to the author’s note and finding out why it was written, and for who (whom? 😬). I’m so thankful for this series, for its wisdom and its warnings, for French and Rose and all the rest, and if there’s more story to come, I will be most eagerly waiting!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jessica (justagirlwithabook)

    Cherie Dimaline really didn’t hold back with this sequel to The Marrow Thieves, available October 18, 2021! I had some mixed feelings as I read this because I read it as both an adult reader as well as a junior high (7th-8th) librarian; reading this served two purposes: one, for my own personal desire to read the sequel, and two, to decide whether or not the sequel would be perfectly fine to add to our library’s collection. But before I go into all my thoughts, a quick summary! Hunting by Stars p Cherie Dimaline really didn’t hold back with this sequel to The Marrow Thieves, available October 18, 2021! I had some mixed feelings as I read this because I read it as both an adult reader as well as a junior high (7th-8th) librarian; reading this served two purposes: one, for my own personal desire to read the sequel, and two, to decide whether or not the sequel would be perfectly fine to add to our library’s collection. But before I go into all my thoughts, a quick summary! Hunting by Stars picks up a little bit after the events of The Marrow Thieves. French has been captured and is being held in a residential school. Meanwhile, his band of friends take charge in the search and a few even decide to implement a plan to find him and bring him back. While the events of the first book were tough, the challenges presented to the main characters are even tougher this time around, and not all will come out of it unscathed. What I Loved: - There were many back and forth chapters between characters and groups of people, which I tend to love as a reader (but also admit can be difficult to follow as a junior higher). Some of these chapters were set aside specifically for a character to share their story of how they arrived where they did, and I appreciated having that extra new background information about characters I remembered from the first book. - I love how personal this story was in how it incorporates Cree language and culture. (The author’s note was especially wonderful seeing all that went into the story. I really appreciated how she encouraged readers to talk to teachers and do research on other nations and histories, especially in regards to residential schools in Canada and the US.) - There are some really obvious parallels between the events of the story and the recent events of mass graves being found a residential schools. I found it incredibly timely that the story touched on this information in its own way. - There were a few parts that were almost reminiscent of Stephen King’s “The Institute” which was interesting to me. What I Didn’t Love: - This sequel really upped the ante on profanity usage to the point that it was even a bit distracting. As a junior high librarian, I just can’t justify putting a book in the library that had so much (and a significantly large variety!), and this really breaks my heart because the first one was so impactful and I wanted desperately to be able to house the continuation of the story. As a reader, I didn’t mind it but it was distracting at times and took away from the enjoyment of falling into the story. - The back and forth between characters and groups was initially confusing (to get your bearings) and I could see junior high kids struggling to stay oriented. - I wish there had been a little bit more of an explanation of how this world really worked and how everyone got there. (More details on the past world.) - There were some content moments that were really tough and I was not expecting, and while these sort of ended up okay (ish?) in most cases (and entirely fine in others), again, some of it was just more than I could justify putting in our library. As an adult reading the book, some of it was rough but still made for a great read. Overall: Overall, I really enjoyed this book as a general reader but have some reservations as a junior high librarian. This is definitely more Young Adult than the first book and I would be cautious when considering putting it in a library for 7th-8th graders or below. This might be fine for upper level high schoolers or more mature YA readers that could handle some of the tougher content and profanity. I definitely do recommend this to adults and young adults who read the first book, enjoyed it, and want to know where the story went. Content Warnings: - Significant amounts of profanity - Loss of family members and friends (grief, coping) - Death of relatives and friends - Some violence - Abuse (medically, physically) - Near death of a child (smothering) - Cult content (dominant male, predatory behavior, abuse of women) - Culture and identity theft of Indigenous individuals (and associated trauma) Thank you to Netgalley and ABRAMS Kids for an e-ARC of this book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    smalltownbookmom

    So much more than a YA fantasy book! This was a compelling, continuation of the Marrow thieves story featuring the rag-tag cast of Indigenous characters I fell in love with the first time as they continue to evade capture by authorities looking to use their blood to cure people afflicted with a pandemic like disease. So much of this dystopian story rings eerily true, from the legacy of residential schools, the history of racial discrimination and ill treatment of Indigenous peoples and of course So much more than a YA fantasy book! This was a compelling, continuation of the Marrow thieves story featuring the rag-tag cast of Indigenous characters I fell in love with the first time as they continue to evade capture by authorities looking to use their blood to cure people afflicted with a pandemic like disease. So much of this dystopian story rings eerily true, from the legacy of residential schools, the history of racial discrimination and ill treatment of Indigenous peoples and of course life during a pandemic. I couldn't put this sequel down and look forward to more should we be so lucky. Much thanks to NetGalley, Libro.fm and the publisher for my review copies!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Risa

    An ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. 5 stars What can I say? I really love everything I read from Cherie Dimaline. She creates engaging and timely stories that pull me in immediately. She writes with care and love when representing a variety of identities in meaningful ways. She makes me think and laugh multiple times in the same text. She is, simply put, a fantastic storyteller. Once this book is released, I will be looking for opport An ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. 5 stars What can I say? I really love everything I read from Cherie Dimaline. She creates engaging and timely stories that pull me in immediately. She writes with care and love when representing a variety of identities in meaningful ways. She makes me think and laugh multiple times in the same text. She is, simply put, a fantastic storyteller. Once this book is released, I will be looking for opportunities to incorporate the novel (or possibly even selections from it) into classes with my high school English students.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel

    I received an ARC through the online SLJ Teen Live! event back in August. I have not read the first Marrow Thieves, so my thoughts are from the perspective of a fresh reader. Cherie Dimaline's Hunting By Stars is a raw, emotional story about persecution, family, and identity. The danger these characters face is palpable, and I legitimately wasn't sure who was going to make it out of this one. I will say the premise itself is a little hard to swallow for a story that grounds itself in such stark r I received an ARC through the online SLJ Teen Live! event back in August. I have not read the first Marrow Thieves, so my thoughts are from the perspective of a fresh reader. Cherie Dimaline's Hunting By Stars is a raw, emotional story about persecution, family, and identity. The danger these characters face is palpable, and I legitimately wasn't sure who was going to make it out of this one. I will say the premise itself is a little hard to swallow for a story that grounds itself in such stark realism, that a global lack of dreams would lead to people trying to harvest Indigenous bone marrow (believing dreams to be stored in there). The harvest camps and systems of capturing Indigenous people are pretty sophisticated and organized for people who have supposedly gone mad from this virus. However, if you can accept the premise and move on, you're in for one heck of a ride. French is a standout protagonist, and I loved watching his journey over the course of the novel. The decisions he's forced to make, coupled with the characters he meets, dive deep into the morality of survival in this situation. At what point is survival noble, and when is it selfish? Is living another day worth it if you do horrible things to do so, and can you live with yourself if you're forced to choose between lives? Rose, another great character, is a fantastic contrast due to her firm, unchanging approach at life. Each character brings something unique to the table, and though you get more time with some than others, you feel each loss as a punch to the gut. I also loved the worldbuilding. The people you meet along the way, vigilantes, how the harvest camps operate, the blood cult - each creative wrinkle offers something unique and makes the world feel more lived-in. This is a world you'd never want to visit, but it feels almost every bit as real as this one. If you're Christian and have certain sensitivities to how your faith is represented, you might want to sit this one out. There is a section that paints Christianity in a very unflattering light, heavily associating it with the people who commit these cruelties against Indigenous people. As a Messianic myself, it did bother me a bit, but once you get past the section it barely comes up again. I understand Christianity has historically been involved with colonialization and atrocities against Indigenous people, which the book is commenting on. I also understand not every narrative needs to provide positive examples when commenting on issues, and as a book about Indigenous people it naturally reflects more Indigenous beliefs, but I'd be lying if this section wasn't a bit of a turnoff. In terms of negatives, I don't have too many. Certain plot points introduced near the end just disappear, which may be saved for a later installment, but it does seem a little odd to introduce a tension that late and do nothing with it. The beginning is a little slow, but once it picks up speed it never lets up. Overall I had a great time reading this, and if you're a fan of survival or dystopian fiction and have any interest in the premise whatsoever, check it out. You won't be disappointed.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Bradley

    I really enjoyed this book. While I enjoyed her first book the Marrow Thieves, I didn't connect to the characters in the same way as I did with this book. Maybe I was grappling more initially with the setting and the many parallels to our Residential school history, but the Marrow Thieves didn't grab me like Hunting by the Stars did. As soon as I started her second book, I couldn't put it down. I settled right back into the story and while it was maybe even more disturbing, I cared more for Fren I really enjoyed this book. While I enjoyed her first book the Marrow Thieves, I didn't connect to the characters in the same way as I did with this book. Maybe I was grappling more initially with the setting and the many parallels to our Residential school history, but the Marrow Thieves didn't grab me like Hunting by the Stars did. As soon as I started her second book, I couldn't put it down. I settled right back into the story and while it was maybe even more disturbing, I cared more for Frenchie and his group of survivors. The suspense and action kept me wondering about what could possibly come next. I really hope Cherie is not done with these characters because I know I am not! Thank you to netgalley for the free ARC and the opportunity to preview this book prior to publishing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sophie - biblisophagist

    "Maybe dreams were always in the marrow. Maybe not. Maybe they used to be everywhere-muscles, skin, voice-and then we learned how to hide them better." "Sometimes you risk everything for a life worth living, even if you're not the one who'll be alive to live it." Not me crying over another Cherie Dimaline book :,) Cherie Dimaline sucked me in immediately with The Marrow Thieves; it made me laugh and cry and hope and fear. The sequel, Hunting By Stars, was no different. This book is about a world wra "Maybe dreams were always in the marrow. Maybe not. Maybe they used to be everywhere-muscles, skin, voice-and then we learned how to hide them better." "Sometimes you risk everything for a life worth living, even if you're not the one who'll be alive to live it." Not me crying over another Cherie Dimaline book :,) Cherie Dimaline sucked me in immediately with The Marrow Thieves; it made me laugh and cry and hope and fear. The sequel, Hunting By Stars, was no different. This book is about a world wracked by trauma - pandemics, climate change, so much loss - but mostly it’s about a family. In The Marrow Thieves, our main character, Frenchie, and his found family are searching for safety from the new residential schools. In Hunting by Stars, Frenchie has been abducted into one and must fight his way back to the people he loves while they continue to seek asylum. Dimaline writes a cast of beautifully complex Indigenous characters full of so much hope and love even after a worsening world continues to kill and steal from them. They build community and continue to search for a place to be and share who they are once again. In the previous book, the focus is totally on the building of Frenchie's family and their story, but in this sequel, the author gives faces and names to the oppressors and shows us the firsthand treatment of Indigenous peoples, treated as animals or something not even living at all. This family goes through trauma after trauma, but the resilience and the decision to continue to love and survive never leaves any of them even as their family grows smaller and larger. These books are fast-paced but I stop to read passages I love over and over because to me they often sound too poetic to keep in my head. I’ve even read passages aloud to friends because they just needed to be heard. Dimaline's characters feel like friends and I felt happy or sad or anxious for them in turns as this story went on. There's also a vampire cult if you're into that kind of thing ;) Thank you to Netgalley and ABRAMS Kids for my copy!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luanne Ollivier

    I was so excited to read Cherie Dimaline's new book - Hunting by Stars. It continues the story that began in her 2017 multi award winning novel, The Marrow Thieves. In the not so distant future, a plague and natural disasters have decimated the world - and erased the ability to dream. Without dreams people go mad. Until...the government discovers that Indigenous people are still dreaming. And now they are being hunted for their bone marrow, as the government believes that's where the dreams are s I was so excited to read Cherie Dimaline's new book - Hunting by Stars. It continues the story that began in her 2017 multi award winning novel, The Marrow Thieves. In the not so distant future, a plague and natural disasters have decimated the world - and erased the ability to dream. Without dreams people go mad. Until...the government discovers that Indigenous people are still dreaming. And now they are being hunted for their bone marrow, as the government believes that's where the dreams are stored. Seventeen year old French and his family have been on the run for years, hiding in the forests, determined to build their community, keep their language - and stay out of the hands of the Recruiters. But a single slip finds French in a cement walled unlit room - and he knows where he is... There is a large cast of characters, with some being lost and some being found along the way. I've become quite invested in everyone's story over the two books. We come to know the stories of many characters through their own words. I love the sense of community, the continuity, the loves, the losses, the hopes and yes, dreams. And what family is. Dimaline's world building is believable, well described and easily imagined as I read. I started Hunting by Stars on September 30th, which seemed very fitting as the day was the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. There are many levels to Hunting by Stars. It's a fabulous, suspense filled page turner that you won't be able to put down. But it's also a narrative on the horrific treatment of Indigenous people - fact, not fiction. Residential schools, horrific living conditions with no clean water, missing women on the Highway of Tears, racism and so much, much more. Gut wrenchingly good - absolutely a five star read! Dimaline is a consummate storyteller. You'll want to read The Marrow Thieves first. I don't think this story is done - I'll be watching for the third book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Advanced Reader’s Copy provided by NetGalley, ABRAMS Kids, and Amulet Books in exchange for an honest review. Ok, so yeah, I thought Dimaline put readers through the wringer with THE MARROW THIEVES. But that was nothing compared to HUNTING BY STARS. This book hits you hard from the first chapter and does not let up. At all. There is no time to even catch your breath. The last 40% of the book is intense. This is a powerful read. I loved the addition of Nam. The vigilantes were.... well they were so Advanced Reader’s Copy provided by NetGalley, ABRAMS Kids, and Amulet Books in exchange for an honest review. Ok, so yeah, I thought Dimaline put readers through the wringer with THE MARROW THIEVES. But that was nothing compared to HUNTING BY STARS. This book hits you hard from the first chapter and does not let up. At all. There is no time to even catch your breath. The last 40% of the book is intense. This is a powerful read. I loved the addition of Nam. The vigilantes were.... well they were something (honestly they were perfect white lady privilege). What happened in the shed absolutely gutted me, and the revelation of who one of the people French meets in the school was a mind-blown moment. Sooooo Cherie Dimaline - you gave us a sequel you never really intended on writing. But with how this sequel ends.... PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE revisit these characters and give us one more book. I NEED to know what happens next.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jolynne

    One of the best sequels I have ever read. Love, family, survival, culture, history, and heartbreak, and hope all come together in this story set in the future with the past history of residential schools and Indian boarding schools as the backdrop. "That isn't our border. That's an imaginary line drawn by politicians and land prospectors. The only thing we have to worry about is who the original people are so we can honor the lands we are on, and if we do that and remember to keep doing that, the One of the best sequels I have ever read. Love, family, survival, culture, history, and heartbreak, and hope all come together in this story set in the future with the past history of residential schools and Indian boarding schools as the backdrop. "That isn't our border. That's an imaginary line drawn by politicians and land prospectors. The only thing we have to worry about is who the original people are so we can honor the lands we are on, and if we do that and remember to keep doing that, they don't win. They never win when we remember." AND, that acknowledgment, wow.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Holy!! This was so intense - I love that the author responded to requests to write a follow-up! This is the follow up to The Marrow Thieves, a dystopian book featuring a look at a future ravaged by climate change, where the only people left dreaming are indigenous people - everyone is trying to round them up and take their marrow where dreams live. Frenchie and his group were on the run together and at the end of the last book, something happens and the group is split up. This book picks up righ Holy!! This was so intense - I love that the author responded to requests to write a follow-up! This is the follow up to The Marrow Thieves, a dystopian book featuring a look at a future ravaged by climate change, where the only people left dreaming are indigenous people - everyone is trying to round them up and take their marrow where dreams live. Frenchie and his group were on the run together and at the end of the last book, something happens and the group is split up. This book picks up right from there and the group is facing more and more danger and being closed in on. It was so intense and you were just rooting for everyone, because you start to love these characters. Cherie also has a way of touching on racism, indigenous issues, in a dystopian setting. So good! I always want more from these characters. (My tiny critique is a few things happened with perfect coincidences, but honestly, you just want to see it all come together so it's ok!)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This book is amazing, even more amazing than the first one. Toward the end it was so intense that I kept having to put it down, but then I was desperate to know what was going to happen so I kept having to pick it up. Dimaline has the most beautiful prose, which combined with realistic characters and gripping, propulsive action makes this book simply incredible. It paints a heartbreaking picture of Canada’s past and present, while finding hope in the preservation of language and culture and joy This book is amazing, even more amazing than the first one. Toward the end it was so intense that I kept having to put it down, but then I was desperate to know what was going to happen so I kept having to pick it up. Dimaline has the most beautiful prose, which combined with realistic characters and gripping, propulsive action makes this book simply incredible. It paints a heartbreaking picture of Canada’s past and present, while finding hope in the preservation of language and culture and joy in found family. Just an incredible read, I’ll be thinking about it for ages.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bethe

    A return to the world of the Marrow Thieves finds French captured and in the hands of the dreaded recruiters, the rest of his found family looking for him. Rose has a wild search, French has a big surprise in the schools. Great ending - hope there is more to the story. Interesting author note at the end. Great quote by Meeg at 11:47:02: That’s what matters most - how you use your voice and sometimes even your whole body when things are at their worst.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anneka

    Wow! So good! So intense. I’m so grateful the author gave in and decided to write the sequel (and I look forward to the next installment)! It was really hard to listen to at times; the pain was overwhelming. The decisions that had to be made. The death and torture and brainwashing. Just wow.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Luke Spooner

    A nice follow up to the Marrow Theives, French and Rose are great characters. I LOVED the epilogue.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alexis (hookedtobooks)

    Thank you Penguin Random House Canada for the copy of this book. - Read if you like: The Marrow Thieves, YA Science Fiction. - This book was maybe better than the first one. It picks up right where the first book left off; French has been captured and he knows he has to keep his wits about him if he wants to escape. - There is a ton of adventure in this book as French and his group struggles to survive in a world that is trying to harm/control Indigenous people because of their ability to dream. The w Thank you Penguin Random House Canada for the copy of this book. - Read if you like: The Marrow Thieves, YA Science Fiction. - This book was maybe better than the first one. It picks up right where the first book left off; French has been captured and he knows he has to keep his wits about him if he wants to escape. - There is a ton of adventure in this book as French and his group struggles to survive in a world that is trying to harm/control Indigenous people because of their ability to dream. The writing is amazing, the plot was fast paced, and I am so glad that the author decided to continue the story. - CW: death, torture, imprisonment, giving birth, violence, death of a loved one, murder.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    A fitting sequel to The Marrow Thieves, this gripping and thought-provoking fiction gives insights into what could happen if a virus released into the world infected everyone except indigenous peoples, and how and what - based on has happened in the past - they could expect the world to react. At the same time, this book is full of hope that, as a community of existing and chosen families, they would persist and survive through hardships and cruelty with their humanity intact.

  21. 5 out of 5

    ColleenIsBooked

    I finished this book a couple weeks ago, but I’ve been trying to get all my thoughts together. I was so happy to see that there was another book in the Marrow Thieves world following French and his new family. While I loved the way the Marrow Thieves ended, I was really hoping we’d be able to see more of the terrifying world. We definitely get that in this book. While there are some very hard parts to read, there is so much hope and resilience within these pages. My heart was constantly breaking I finished this book a couple weeks ago, but I’ve been trying to get all my thoughts together. I was so happy to see that there was another book in the Marrow Thieves world following French and his new family. While I loved the way the Marrow Thieves ended, I was really hoping we’d be able to see more of the terrifying world. We definitely get that in this book. While there are some very hard parts to read, there is so much hope and resilience within these pages. My heart was constantly breaking and mending as I read. I found myself tearing up at points and I definitely spent the last like 20% crying. This is such a well-crafted story and you really get attached to the characters and feel so deeply for them. Though you can read Hunting by Stars without having read the first, I would highly recommend you start with The Marrow Thieves, If only for the depth of the character growth and the terrifyingly haunting world building. I find myself thinking about this world a lot. I highly recommend this series, but please be aware there are a lot of content and trigger warnings associated with it. Some trigger warnings to be mindful of in Hunting by Stars include: abduction, cannibalism, violence, child death, death, grief, torture, hunger/starvation, graphic birthing scene, cult behavior, murder. There is probably more than this that I have forgotten. While the story can be difficult to read at times, the way that Dimaline is able to express such depths of human emotion and connection is well worth it. The way the she writes this found family makes my heart hurt in such a good way. I highly, highly recommend you read this book. **Massive thank you to Amulet Books/Abrams and NetGalley for the eARC! All thoughts are my own.**

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    I see what you did there Cherie Dimaline and hope others will too! Hunting by Stars was a brilliant conclusion (never say never?) to the Marrow Thieves. Opening with French in a dark room in one of the newly revived residential schools, the reader is introduced to the horrors almost immediately. The schools have rebranded as institutes but are still trying to remove the history and stories of indigenous peoples via their dreams. The non indigenous people have come to learn how much indigenous peo I see what you did there Cherie Dimaline and hope others will too! Hunting by Stars was a brilliant conclusion (never say never?) to the Marrow Thieves. Opening with French in a dark room in one of the newly revived residential schools, the reader is introduced to the horrors almost immediately. The schools have rebranded as institutes but are still trying to remove the history and stories of indigenous peoples via their dreams. The non indigenous people have come to learn how much indigenous peoples have to offer in terms of surviving in the post plague and dying world. Judging by comments made in The Marrow Thieves I believe this book takes place in approximately 2050. Dimaline is so adept in her ability to bring to light important topics of colonialism and racism without spelling it out for the reader. The result is reflection and hopefully a plan to be an ally. I loved the world-building and often felt like I was right there in the scene with the character. The descriptions of how things feel, be it negative or positive were graspable to my own senses. While there is an F bomb thrown in there now and then, it is written with ages 12 and up in mind. I hope middle and high schools carry this book and that it is shared widely. For adults, there is nothing in this novel that seems immature and works perfectly for an adult audience. Thank you to @netgalley and @penguinrandomca / @penguinteenca for this ARC in exchange for my honest opinions. This ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ read comes out October 19, 2021.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris G.

    Even those who have not read The Marrow Thieves will be quickly pulled into Frenchie’s world where residential schools have been reopened so that the bone marrow of indigenous peoples can be harvested and given to whites, who have lost the ability to dream. Torn from his family and newly arrived at such a school, Frankie is tortured and then reunited with the brother Mitch, who allowed himself to be captured years before, saving Frankie in the process. Mitch has paid the price of survival, becom Even those who have not read The Marrow Thieves will be quickly pulled into Frenchie’s world where residential schools have been reopened so that the bone marrow of indigenous peoples can be harvested and given to whites, who have lost the ability to dream. Torn from his family and newly arrived at such a school, Frankie is tortured and then reunited with the brother Mitch, who allowed himself to be captured years before, saving Frankie in the process. Mitch has paid the price of survival, becoming a recruiter trained to capture his own people. Will this be Frenchie’s only route to survival? Meanwhile, Frenchie’s beloved, Rose, has set off on a desperate journey to find and free him. Skillful, evocative description, strong use of symbolism, intense suspense, and clearly drawn characters make for a wrenching, worthwhile read. EARC from Edelweiss.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Okay so this series (well, at first just The Marrow Thieves of course) has been on my radar for ages. Heck, it's been on my wishlist for ages! And then I saw that there was a sequel happening! So, on a whim, I requested the sequel, bought this gorgeous edition of book one, and here we are with an incredible new series for me to recommend to you! This is kind of a review of both books, sin You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Okay so this series (well, at first just The Marrow Thieves of course) has been on my radar for ages. Heck, it's been on my wishlist for ages! And then I saw that there was a sequel happening! So, on a whim, I requested the sequel, bought this gorgeous edition of book one, and here we are with an incredible new series for me to recommend to you! This is kind of a review of both books, since it seems weird to just skip the first one. Also, since I am trying to keep this as spoiler-free for both books as I can, I will be vague on purpose. The premise initially threw me off a bit, because I didn't (and I suppose still cannot fully) wrap my head around it: After all kinds of global disasters, there is some kind of new disease that renders most people unable to dream, and I think eventually kills them? Anywho, because white people are historically The Worst™, they decide to grab dreams however they can get them, from the Indigenous folks of Canada and the US. Namely, via their bone marrow. And, you know, stealing it and killing them. I mean.  Frenchie has been on the run with his brother for ages, trying to avoid the complete asshats who steal Indigenous people from their homes, the forest, or really wherever they happen to stumble upon them. I cannot even imagine the horror they must have felt every single day, and the author does an amazing job of relaying that terror to the reader. Eventually, they're found, and Frenchie ends up alone, after his brother lets himself be found to save Frenchie. Eventually, Frenchie meets up with an amazing group of others on the run/hide, and they become quite a family. The story mainly focuses on Frenchie's group's survival quest, and the horrors that will befall them if they happen to get caught. It's incredibly difficult to trust people in this world, yet they have found in each other a group that they can and do fully trust, and it's beautiful. They share their own stories of their pasts, their families, how they came to the group. It's incredibly moving. But when there is action, it's certainly exciting! I think that both books do a wonderful job of balancing the character development and action, all while still incorporating a lot of worldbuilding. I loved the first book, and was eager to dive into the second. In fact, I found the second even more compelling and beautifully written. Again, while being vague, it had all of the same strengths as The Marrow Thieves: Strong and likable characters, great pacing, beautiful writing, a lot of adventure, and a ton of emotion. The gray morality and impossible choices are amped up a ton in Hunting the Stars too, which as you all know by now, is kind of my thing. There is more in depth world-building, answering some of the questions I had from the first installment. And I think while the ending is fully satisfying, it sets up more from this world quite nicely. Bottom Line: This series has pretty much everything you could ask for, so just read it. Read it now.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... HUNTING BY STARS is an intense, riveting, and suspenseful story of family, survival, and betrayal. After plagues and natural disasters changed the populace, most people lost the ability to dream, leading to madness and eventually death. Only the Native Americans retained this ability - and the answers of the populace have been to steal their marrow as treatment for the dream sickness. As such, the government has reopened institutio See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... HUNTING BY STARS is an intense, riveting, and suspenseful story of family, survival, and betrayal. After plagues and natural disasters changed the populace, most people lost the ability to dream, leading to madness and eventually death. Only the Native Americans retained this ability - and the answers of the populace have been to steal their marrow as treatment for the dream sickness. As such, the government has reopened institutions and has devoted resources to tracking down and capturing the dreamers to use them for medicine. These "schools" are places where Native people are taken to be used up and tortured if not turned against others and used as a weapon to locate and bring more people in. The book primarily follows Rose and French, as French wakes up in one of the schools and Rose sets out to find them. Their family is also involved along the way, with those they have chosen to make a home. There are many obstacles and challenges as Rose and French try to make their ways back together in an action-packed story. What I loved: This thrilling read tackles some really important topics around the treatment and exploitation of indigenous peoples, with parallels from the past to this dystopian future that seems somewhat speculative given those parallels. The book also tackles themes around individual past/stories, the ethical balance of sacrifices on the small/large scale, indoctrination/brain-washing, cults, forced choice progressiveness, the cruelty of humanity along with the justification of these cruelties, and so much more. This would be a great choice for book clubs as there is much to dive deeper into and themes that resonate with both the past and present. The characters were really compelling, and both Rose and French's stories keep the reader hooked. I was also invested in the story of Wab and Chi Boy, who are pregnant during these dangerous times. The other stories included around the cult, the vigilante group, and other members of the family were also really fascinating, expanding on the provocative themes that make this story so powerful. The plot was easy to become immersed in, and the fast pace was kept even more intensely by the alternating points-of-view that included cliffhangers to keep you guessing until you get back to that story. This style of writing makes the book impossible to put down, and I appreciated the way it made the book even more immersing and consistently intense. This is a highly devourable read. What left me wanting more: As a small point, I do wish there was a bit more history included with the world-building (particularly about the plagues/disasters and how this lead to the dream problem), but given that this is a sequel, there may have been more in the first book. Final verdict: A thought-provoking and thrilling read, HUNTING BY STARS is a powerful story about family, humanity, and survival. Highly recommend for fans of YA dystopian/speculative fiction and those who enjoyed THE HANDMAID'S TALE, UNDER THE NEVER SKY, and EVE. Please note that I received an ARC from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

    Although the world portrayed in this book is terrifying, it was such a treat to be back in it and following these characters again. The first book had closure, but still left me wondering what would happen to them. Dimaline really put everyone through it in this though. She had me nervous, tense, and on edge the entire way. I liked that the story was told through multiple perspectives this time. French is an interesting character, but The Marrow Thieves if this one had only been from his POV, we Although the world portrayed in this book is terrifying, it was such a treat to be back in it and following these characters again. The first book had closure, but still left me wondering what would happen to them. Dimaline really put everyone through it in this though. She had me nervous, tense, and on edge the entire way. I liked that the story was told through multiple perspectives this time. French is an interesting character, but The Marrow Thieves if this one had only been from his POV, we wouldn't have seen much of his family, who I came to love. The plot bordered on ridiculousness a little, but in a way that worked and elevated the horrifying injustices taking place. Every character was forced to make difficult decisions and put in situations that made me want to scream. I mean, a cult of blood stealers? White women acting as vigilantes? Brainwashing through the Program? Infuriating. (view spoiler)[My heart ached for French, finding his brother after all this time and having to kill him. I wished he could be redeemed and the three of them could've been reunited (his dad). It's definitely a stronger story about connectedness with French choosing and protecting his found family though. Rose was much more endearing to me in this book, too. She was a badass and much more open to letting people in. I BAWLED when Tree and Zheegwon died and when Wab was going to kill her baby to spare it. (hide spoiler)] Anyway, I may have liked this one better than the first book. Dimaline's writing has gained strength and her return to this story was masterful.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    This sequel to Marrow Thieves stands on its own as a narrative. It follows the story of the heroes of the first novel and recalls their path, but carves out a new journey as well as ties up loose ends. Ultimately, this would be best read as a duology, but having not read the first book I can still say that the second novel was great on its own. Told in different perspectives, the story follows the plague that continues to haunt North America. People are turning into zombies and are desperate for This sequel to Marrow Thieves stands on its own as a narrative. It follows the story of the heroes of the first novel and recalls their path, but carves out a new journey as well as ties up loose ends. Ultimately, this would be best read as a duology, but having not read the first book I can still say that the second novel was great on its own. Told in different perspectives, the story follows the plague that continues to haunt North America. People are turning into zombies and are desperate for a cure. As time goes on they discover that indigenous people are still able to dream, and those most desperate will do anything to get their dreams back. The solution becomes to steal the marrow of First Nation people. French, Miigwans, Wab, Chi Boy, Derrick, Rose, Zheegwon, and Tree are the main characters who have forged a bond of family. When Hunting By Stars begins, French has been kidnapped by a residential school that has reopened as a way of kidnapping and killing Native American people for their marrow. The family survives in the wild and hatches a plan to rescue French. The things they discover within the residential schools and who they can or can't trust made this story fast-paced and at times difficult to read. Thanks to NetGalley for the e-arc. #NetGalleyreads

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    I received a gifted copy of Hunting by Stars by Cherie Dimaline from Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review. The Marrow Thieves had captivated and haunted me ever since I read it last summer. The story of survival, dreams, family, found family, and belonging is one that lingers in your mind - especially as it deals with really real issues in a futuristic way that feels too real and possible. And while I was strangely content with the way the book ended - hopeless and yet hop I received a gifted copy of Hunting by Stars by Cherie Dimaline from Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review. The Marrow Thieves had captivated and haunted me ever since I read it last summer. The story of survival, dreams, family, found family, and belonging is one that lingers in your mind - especially as it deals with really real issues in a futuristic way that feels too real and possible. And while I was strangely content with the way the book ended - hopeless and yet hopeful at the same time - I was okay with the open-ended ending. So it came as a pleasant surprise when I found out that a sequel would be out - Hunting by Stars. It picks up right after the events of The Marrow Thieves and it is just as intense as the first novel. I was holding my breath throughout the book as events unfolded. And I was once again captivated by the storytelling style that Cherie Dimaline weaves in her books. This story of betrayal, of redemption, of facing the worst of humanity - is a look into the ways we all find ways to survive and justify the means. Just like with Marrow Thieves, Hunting by Stars is a story that I will carry with me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Thanks to Netgalley for the arc. I’m so thankful Dimaline for listening to her readers and continuing French’s story. After finishing this, I hope she’ll do it again! The story picks up right where it ended in The Marrow Thieves, but follows as French realizes he was abducted by Recruiters and taken to a school. Chaos ensues as he experiences horrors that he never could have imagined, including coming face to face with the brother he thought was dead. Rose cannot wait for news and starts out for t Thanks to Netgalley for the arc. I’m so thankful Dimaline for listening to her readers and continuing French’s story. After finishing this, I hope she’ll do it again! The story picks up right where it ended in The Marrow Thieves, but follows as French realizes he was abducted by Recruiters and taken to a school. Chaos ensues as he experiences horrors that he never could have imagined, including coming face to face with the brother he thought was dead. Rose cannot wait for news and starts out for the nearest school with Derrick in tow and stumbles upon a different house of horrors. Once the rest of the group receives news of French and what the schools plan to do, they must run even if it means leaving Rose behind. The situations Rose and Miig’s group encounter were hard for me to wrap my mind around, and the ending seemed rushed. Reading this story as more and more mass graves are being discovered at the sites of former Residential Schools in both Canada and the US made the horrors of this dystopian story even more chilling.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    If you liked the Marrow Thieves (and I did), you are going to love Hunting by Stars. Quick recap: a Plague has left humankind unable to dream, except for indigenous peoples. Native peoples are being hunted and experimented on. We left Frenchie being dragged off by Recruiters to a School, where his marrow will be extracted and sold. He's back in Hunting by Stars, struggling to survive School, to be reunited with his family. There's a deal to be struck with the Devil, however, before he can return. If you liked the Marrow Thieves (and I did), you are going to love Hunting by Stars. Quick recap: a Plague has left humankind unable to dream, except for indigenous peoples. Native peoples are being hunted and experimented on. We left Frenchie being dragged off by Recruiters to a School, where his marrow will be extracted and sold. He's back in Hunting by Stars, struggling to survive School, to be reunited with his family. There's a deal to be struck with the Devil, however, before he can return. Meanwhile, other members of his family have run into a blood drinking cult. And then there's the vigilantes who attack after the group has been smuggled into the US. There is more excitement, tight plotting and beautiful language in this novel. As Miig tells Nam (a new, gender nonconforming character): "The only thing we have to worry about is who the original people are so we can honor the lands we are on. And if we do that, remember to keep doing that, they don't win. They never win when we remember."

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...