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Aaron Slater, Illustrator

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An uplifting story about the power of art, finding your voice, and telling your story even when you’re out of step with your peers from the #1 bestselling creators of Sofia Valdez, Future Prez and Ada Twist, Scientist! Aaron Slater loves listening to stories and dreams of one day writing them himself. But when it comes to reading, the letters just look like squiggles to hi An uplifting story about the power of art, finding your voice, and telling your story even when you’re out of step with your peers from the #1 bestselling creators of Sofia Valdez, Future Prez and Ada Twist, Scientist! Aaron Slater loves listening to stories and dreams of one day writing them himself. But when it comes to reading, the letters just look like squiggles to him, and it soon becomes clear he struggles more than his peers. When his teacher asks each child in the class to write a story, Aaron can’t get a single word down. He is sure his dream of being a storyteller is out of reach . . . until inspiration strikes, and Aaron finds a way to spin a tale in a way that is uniquely his. Follow Iggy Peck, Rosie Revere, Ada Twist, Sofia Valdez, and Aaron Slater on all of their adventures! Add the picture books, chapter books, and activity books starring The Questioneers by Andrea Beaty and David Roberts to your family library today.


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An uplifting story about the power of art, finding your voice, and telling your story even when you’re out of step with your peers from the #1 bestselling creators of Sofia Valdez, Future Prez and Ada Twist, Scientist! Aaron Slater loves listening to stories and dreams of one day writing them himself. But when it comes to reading, the letters just look like squiggles to hi An uplifting story about the power of art, finding your voice, and telling your story even when you’re out of step with your peers from the #1 bestselling creators of Sofia Valdez, Future Prez and Ada Twist, Scientist! Aaron Slater loves listening to stories and dreams of one day writing them himself. But when it comes to reading, the letters just look like squiggles to him, and it soon becomes clear he struggles more than his peers. When his teacher asks each child in the class to write a story, Aaron can’t get a single word down. He is sure his dream of being a storyteller is out of reach . . . until inspiration strikes, and Aaron finds a way to spin a tale in a way that is uniquely his. Follow Iggy Peck, Rosie Revere, Ada Twist, Sofia Valdez, and Aaron Slater on all of their adventures! Add the picture books, chapter books, and activity books starring The Questioneers by Andrea Beaty and David Roberts to your family library today.

30 review for Aaron Slater, Illustrator

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Aaron Slater, Illustrator is a children's picture book written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts. It centers on Aaron Slater, an African American boy who has dyslexia. Beaty's text is simplistic and rhythmically poetic. While some of the rhyming couplets seemed forced, it is nevertheless, beautifully written and for the most part has a steady beat and flowed well. Notably, the text is printed in dyslexic-friendly type. Roberts' illustrations are beautiful and colorful, albeit a tad Aaron Slater, Illustrator is a children's picture book written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts. It centers on Aaron Slater, an African American boy who has dyslexia. Beaty's text is simplistic and rhythmically poetic. While some of the rhyming couplets seemed forced, it is nevertheless, beautifully written and for the most part has a steady beat and flowed well. Notably, the text is printed in dyslexic-friendly type. Roberts' illustrations are beautiful and colorful, albeit a tad cartoonish, which is apropos for a book directed to a younger age group. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. It presents a boy overcoming insecurities related to reading comprehension. Aaron Slater love to draw, but more than drawing, however, young Aaron wishes to write, but when he tries to read, the letters appear scrambled and retreats into his drawings. At the beginning of the next school year, a writing prompt from a new teacher inspires Aaron, who spends his evening attempting to write a story to write something true. The next day in class, having failed to put words on paper, Aaron finds his voice and launches into a story through illustrations. All in all, Aaron Slater, Illustrator is a touching and empowering narrative with empathetic art and lyrical text.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This was a wonderful book about a boy who has dyslexia - it's written in rhyme, and the meter was generally consistent. I listened to the audiobook which is very well-produced with a jazzy background score. The story and message here are wonderful, and it certainly made me curious to see the actual illustrations too. I would say that the story is on the longer side and some children may struggle to maintain focus, and some of the words are a bit challenging ("Delphinium"). 4.5/5 Stars Thank you t This was a wonderful book about a boy who has dyslexia - it's written in rhyme, and the meter was generally consistent. I listened to the audiobook which is very well-produced with a jazzy background score. The story and message here are wonderful, and it certainly made me curious to see the actual illustrations too. I would say that the story is on the longer side and some children may struggle to maintain focus, and some of the words are a bit challenging ("Delphinium"). 4.5/5 Stars Thank you to Netgalley for the review copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    A rhyming story that tells about a young boy who loves to draw and create stories. A nice addition to the series, and as are all the books - beautifully illustrated. A rhyming story that tells about a young boy who loves to draw and create stories. A nice addition to the series, and as are all the books - beautifully illustrated.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Camille

    Another wonderful book in the Questioneers series. It was great to see a young Black boy be centered in the story. This was significant for my two boys who love these books. It was also significant that Andrea Beaty wrote a story about a young person with a learning disability who could express himself in other ways such as art and illustration. What Aaron could do as an artist mattered and he was still seen and heard. I love this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    TheEuphoricZat

    Thanks to #pridebooktours for making this book available to me as part of the book tour. This follows Aaron Slater a very talent young artist. Just like every other boy, he likes to sit with his parents and family listening to them read to him. He wants to some day read and write his own story but everything he tries and no matter how hard he tries, he just can't seem to do it like his peers. His art is his way of expressing his story. So when his new class teacher asks everyone of her students Thanks to #pridebooktours for making this book available to me as part of the book tour. This follows Aaron Slater a very talent young artist. Just like every other boy, he likes to sit with his parents and family listening to them read to him. He wants to some day read and write his own story but everything he tries and no matter how hard he tries, he just can't seem to do it like his peers. His art is his way of expressing his story. So when his new class teacher asks everyone of her students to write a story and read in class, Aaron stays late into the night trying to write until the words start to float. The next day, he stand in the middle of his class and tells them a story he 'wrote'. Everyone loved his story. Aaron is dyslexic and his art is his form of expression. Honestly I loved this book so much, it was so beautifully written (almost lyrical, like a rhyme), the story was so heart-warming, and it focused on a reading disability that I battled with as a young child, dyslexia. The art work is just simply divine with a diverse cast of characters. Its a children's book but everyone would benefit from reading it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    The latest book from the talented Andrea Beaty made me cry. Aaron Slater is a talented artist from a very young age and all he wants to do is tell stories. When he arrives at school he is eager to learn to read, but the words don't make sense. He retreats into himself and decides to blend in. Then, in grade two Aaron has to share a story he's written with the class. While he can't read his story to his class, he closes his eyes and paints a picture with beautiful descriptive words. Eventually Aa The latest book from the talented Andrea Beaty made me cry. Aaron Slater is a talented artist from a very young age and all he wants to do is tell stories. When he arrives at school he is eager to learn to read, but the words don't make sense. He retreats into himself and decides to blend in. Then, in grade two Aaron has to share a story he's written with the class. While he can't read his story to his class, he closes his eyes and paints a picture with beautiful descriptive words. Eventually Aaron learns to read, although it's still hard. And he starts sharing his wonderful illustrations with his classmates. A gem of a book! The author's note share more information about dyslexia and other learning challenges. I hope when teachers and librarians read aloud this important book they read those notes and let students know they are not alone. The book is set of Dyslexie topface.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Taylor

    This book is a tribute to "Aaron Douglas, an African American painter, muralist, and graphic artist who lived from 1899 to 1979. He was a key figure in the Harlem Renaissance..." Look him up! You may be familiar with his work even if you aren't familiar with his name. First of all, huge props to the writer for keeping the rhyming scheme and meter consistent through so much text, it shows serious skill and dedication. This story is about a boy with dyslexia finding a means of expressing himself t This book is a tribute to "Aaron Douglas, an African American painter, muralist, and graphic artist who lived from 1899 to 1979. He was a key figure in the Harlem Renaissance..." Look him up! You may be familiar with his work even if you aren't familiar with his name. First of all, huge props to the writer for keeping the rhyming scheme and meter consistent through so much text, it shows serious skill and dedication. This story is about a boy with dyslexia finding a means of expressing himself through illustration. I love that the author is taking on the mission expose children to characters with diverse abilities and disabilities. I haven't read any of the other books in the series, but they're moving to the top of my list.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karrie

    A great addition to the series. As always diversity is celebrated without being pulpited. Aaron has dyslexia and gets the chance to discover his storytelling talent through art. I particularly liked the panel showing the kids waiting to share their stories illustrating kids different learning disabilities concurrent with Aaron’s.

  9. 5 out of 5

    marmix

    I love this series! Sometimes writing in verse is a detriment, but Beaty does it so well. My kids, who are definitely older than the intended audience, will still sit around me for a read aloud for a new "Questioners" book. Books about books have a special place in my heart, and this one was a pleasure to read. The illustrations in this little story of an illustrator were likewise bright, beautiful, and could almost tell the story on their own. I was impressed to learn that the story was inspire I love this series! Sometimes writing in verse is a detriment, but Beaty does it so well. My kids, who are definitely older than the intended audience, will still sit around me for a read aloud for a new "Questioners" book. Books about books have a special place in my heart, and this one was a pleasure to read. The illustrations in this little story of an illustrator were likewise bright, beautiful, and could almost tell the story on their own. I was impressed to learn that the story was inspired by Aaron Douglas and the book used a typeface designed specifically for people with dyslexia.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Reading is my Escape

    In this book, Aaron is a creative young boy who can’t wait to read & write so he can tell his own stories. But as the other children learn about letters and words, all he sees are squiggles. The book uses a dyslexic-friendly font to tell Aaron’s story as he realizes he can create stories in his own way. A great addition to the Questioneers series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wee

    Touch my heart I am a children illustrator. I started reading when I was 8 years old. It was very hard- that is why I draws. Reading this fills my heart with joy because kids with reading problem dont have to feel ashamed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    A story about a boy with dyslexia written in a font specifically designed for people with dyslexia. Another great book in the Questioneer series!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I think this was the best in the series!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Be still my heart. I nearly cried at this child’s bravery.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karen Arendt

    Aaron Slater, Illustrator is Absolutely perfect on so many levels! It discusses dyslexia and is based on an artist from the Harlem Renaissance, and shows perseverance.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Millard

    THIS ONE MADE ME CRY. 🥺 I am a big fan of the Ada Twist books and all the other companion books from her friends in grade two. But this one hit home for me as I am teaching my very artistic boy how to read. He constantly asks when we will be done with school so he can draw or craft. We both loved this one and he loved seeing the characters from the other books as well. I love these books so much.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jules

    My family and I got Iggy Peck, Architect and thoroughly enjoyed the story of a little boy who sees the world differently. He learns to share his talents with his classmates and help the adults loosen up in the process. The following book, Rosie Revere Engineer, was similar and we began buying every book in the series. However, each book has subsequently become more about checking intersectional boxes, until we've gotten to Aaron Slater, who is the learning disabled adopted minority child of his My family and I got Iggy Peck, Architect and thoroughly enjoyed the story of a little boy who sees the world differently. He learns to share his talents with his classmates and help the adults loosen up in the process. The following book, Rosie Revere Engineer, was similar and we began buying every book in the series. However, each book has subsequently become more about checking intersectional boxes, until we've gotten to Aaron Slater, who is the learning disabled adopted minority child of his interacial homosexual parents. Unfortunately, the story just becomes about how hard it is for him to overcome his disabilities and the affiliated labels that he has internalized. It's not about him becoming an illustrator at all or how his special talents and abilities enhance the lives of the people around him like the earlier books in the series. I wanted so badly to love this book, the illustrations are still lovely, but I don't think I'll be spending more time on money on this series. Sadly, it's become formulaic and moralizing as so many children's books nowadays are apt to do.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Beth Rodgers

    ‘Aaron Slater, Illustrator,’ by Andrea Beaty, illustrated by David Roberts, tells the story of a young boy who sees images more than he knows how to write about them. His dyslexia keeps him from doing quite as well as he wants in school with his reading, and when his second grade teacher asks his class to write a story, Aaron can’t write a single word. The difficulty is upsetting to him, and he feels his dreams of storytelling are too far out of reach. When he learns that telling a story doesn’t ‘Aaron Slater, Illustrator,’ by Andrea Beaty, illustrated by David Roberts, tells the story of a young boy who sees images more than he knows how to write about them. His dyslexia keeps him from doing quite as well as he wants in school with his reading, and when his second grade teacher asks his class to write a story, Aaron can’t write a single word. The difficulty is upsetting to him, and he feels his dreams of storytelling are too far out of reach. When he learns that telling a story doesn’t mean you have to use words, he begins to excel, thriving through the images he creates in his head, even before he can make one doodle or drawing on paper. The graph paper backgrounds and bountiful use of colors, along with the incorporation of his teacher and friends into the drawings and pages he makes up in his mind, are beautiful. There was one image in particular in which he is leading the charge, flying with large wings in front of his classmates and his teacher, carrying a colored pencil. However, the colored pencil looks more like a baton, as though he is conducting the orchestra of people behind him as he shares how they relate to the story he is telling. He continues to work hard on his reading and drawing, always adding to the Illustrator’s Garden at the end of his school hallway. Aaron’s story is timeless and true, one of someone who wants something and wants more than anything to have it, despite the circumstances that are seemingly in the way. It was especially neat that the story was written in Dyslexie, a typeface specially designed for people with dyslexia. It was also interesting to learn in the author’s note in the back of the book that fifteen to twenty percent of all people have dyslexia. The story does a wonderful job showcasing how Aaron’s dyslexia informs who he is, rather than defining him. He is more than capable and remains true to himself, never veering from his goals. Beth Rodgers, Author of ‘Welcome to Chanu-Con!,’ a Children's Picture Book, and ‘Freshman Fourteen’ and ‘Sweet Fifteen,’ Young Adult Novels *Review originally posted at YABooksCentral.com*

  19. 5 out of 5

    WhatBookNext .com

    Wee Aaron Slater has grown up in a garden full of sweet fragrances, summer breezes, music, laughter and love. As soon as he was able he began to draw, at first on the slate path with his bucket of chalk. He still loved to sit on the swing with his family, feel the breeze and listen to stories read out loud. He decides the best thing in the whole world is to write stories. First step is to read stories, which proves much harder than at first thought. Aaron feels like giving up on his dream. Soon he Wee Aaron Slater has grown up in a garden full of sweet fragrances, summer breezes, music, laughter and love. As soon as he was able he began to draw, at first on the slate path with his bucket of chalk. He still loved to sit on the swing with his family, feel the breeze and listen to stories read out loud. He decides the best thing in the whole world is to write stories. First step is to read stories, which proves much harder than at first thought. Aaron feels like giving up on his dream. Soon he is old enough for school. He’s ready, he’s bright and keen to show the world who he is. Now is when he’ll learn to read! Alas, it isn’t to be, and he can’t understand it. His friends seem to have the knack, why not him? The test comes when his new, fresh teacher gives her class an assignment. ‘Write me a story. Write something true.’ Aaron tries, and tries and…. tries, but as he’s already learnt, pictures are his thing, not words. But maybe, just maybe there is another way to tell a story. The fourth picture book in the amazing series called The Questioneers – Aaron Slater, Illustrator is also told in rhyming verse. Aaron is keen to learn to read and write like his friends, but for some reason it comes so much harder for him. As his confidence suffers so does his personality. He wants to hide his inability to read and does so by trying to blend into the background. His skills in drawing eventually bring him back out into the open and reveal his true self as he realises there are other ways to tell stories. I liked the way he struggled on with his reading, making gradual progress. This shows a young reader that they too can achieve this with help and determination, and that although they may not be like their peers in one way, they will have their own way to shine. Aaron’s confusion with reading and writing is aptly illustrated in jumbled letters and words often scattered at his feet, portraying the learning difficulty of dyslexia. Aaron Slater, Illustrator is designed in a dyslexia-friendly font and other learning difficulties are discussed in the Author’s Note in the back of the book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amy Farris-Stojsavljevic

    Fun fact: one of the first books I bought kiddo was ROSIE REVERE AND THE RAUCOUS RIVETERS, the first chapter book in the Questioneers series. Not because I thought she would start reading at the tender age of six months, but because I happened across the author, Andrea Beaty, doing a book signing at my local children’s bookstore to celebrate the release. I wasn’t yet familiar with the picture book installments in the series, but now that I am, I’m absolutely smitten. The latest release is AARON S Fun fact: one of the first books I bought kiddo was ROSIE REVERE AND THE RAUCOUS RIVETERS, the first chapter book in the Questioneers series. Not because I thought she would start reading at the tender age of six months, but because I happened across the author, Andrea Beaty, doing a book signing at my local children’s bookstore to celebrate the release. I wasn’t yet familiar with the picture book installments in the series, but now that I am, I’m absolutely smitten. The latest release is AARON SLATER, ILLUSTRATOR. The story follows Aaron, a boy who desperately wants to be a storyteller, but because of his dyslexia, he struggles with reading and writing. But what he can do better than most is draw. When his teacher asks his class to write a story, Aaron has trouble at first but then calls on his visual abilities to weave a story that amazes his classmates and his teacher.  The story is told in rhyme and is an enjoyable, melodious read. I’m always impressed by authors who can sustain an intricate story told in rhyme over the course of 25+ pages, and AARON SLATER, ILLUSTRATOR is a shining example of that ability.  With a tender story about finding your voice, a diverse cast of characters, and a tear-jerker of an ending, AARON SLATER, ILLUSTRATOR is a powerful addition to the Questioneers picture book series, and I can’t wait to read what Andrea Beaty comes up with next.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amy Oberts

    Wow. Just. Wow. There is something indescribably soothing and compelling about a picture book written in rhyme. And not the kind of rhyme that is "silly" or that feels "forced"--but the kind of rhyme that comes from painstakingly wordsmithing a complex story to bring it to life in the most creative of ways. "Aaron Slater, Illustrator" is the tale of a young boy who loves escaping into stories he hears, and he has a natural, artistic ability that he expresses by creating illustrations. Unbeknownst t Wow. Just. Wow. There is something indescribably soothing and compelling about a picture book written in rhyme. And not the kind of rhyme that is "silly" or that feels "forced"--but the kind of rhyme that comes from painstakingly wordsmithing a complex story to bring it to life in the most creative of ways. "Aaron Slater, Illustrator" is the tale of a young boy who loves escaping into stories he hears, and he has a natural, artistic ability that he expresses by creating illustrations. Unbeknownst to the reader, Aaron's dyslexia makes learning to read a painful process, which comes to a head the night he is assigned to compose an original short story. This book beautifully weaves together multiple, complex subject matters. It is a picture book perfectly balanced in terms of text and illustrations, with a compelling format for audiences of all ages. (Incidentally, it is what I had hoped for from Malcolm Mitchell's "My Very Favorite Book in the Whole Wide World.") I simply cannot wait to share this story with young listeners and readers at our library. It might be my favorite publication from 2021! Publication Date: 2021 Format: Picture book; book 5 in "The Questioneers" series Elements: Poetry/prose; varying layouts in terms of white space/illustrated proportions Connection/Topics: Stories, illustrations, reading; dyslexia, anxiety; self-worth, talents

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darlena Glenn

    The back matter explanation made all the difference to me! I purchased this book out of pure excitement over Ada Twist, Scientist and the rest of the Visioneers Series. The flowers are absolutely captivating on the cover to the point where I almost don't want to use the book jacket, but I know it will get ruined if I don't. There was a 2nd grade student in my class 4 years ago who was dyslexic. But she could draw and did so all the time. She struggled with reading. When she was in 3rd grade, one The back matter explanation made all the difference to me! I purchased this book out of pure excitement over Ada Twist, Scientist and the rest of the Visioneers Series. The flowers are absolutely captivating on the cover to the point where I almost don't want to use the book jacket, but I know it will get ruined if I don't. There was a 2nd grade student in my class 4 years ago who was dyslexic. But she could draw and did so all the time. She struggled with reading. When she was in 3rd grade, one day after testing her teacher sent her to my 1st grade class. This student drew an entire picture book on folded ledger paper with drawings of my current students and me. Then she sat my students down and proceeded to tell them the story to go with her colorful drawings. I later attempted to advocate for this student with her EC Teacher who refused to see that art was a way to bridge the reading gap with this young student. Unfortunately, she graduated from 5th grade without being a fluent reader. I want to buy this book and give it to the EC Teacher (but I think she will be retiring soon). I was so upset with her for not utilizing the students' strength to overcome her reading deficiencies.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Roben

    Even before I started reading, I was loving the illustrations. The dragon on the cover. The pansy on the title page. I wanted to grab my colored pencils and draw! Rhyming text is lovely. And I really enjoyed the age progression for Aaron - from baby to 2nd grader. I think kids will appreciate seeing Aaron grow up. The book shows Aaron using lots of different types of art - hand prints and crayons and pencil and chalk. He loves to create but he also loves words and the stories they create. And he r Even before I started reading, I was loving the illustrations. The dragon on the cover. The pansy on the title page. I wanted to grab my colored pencils and draw! Rhyming text is lovely. And I really enjoyed the age progression for Aaron - from baby to 2nd grader. I think kids will appreciate seeing Aaron grow up. The book shows Aaron using lots of different types of art - hand prints and crayons and pencil and chalk. He loves to create but he also loves words and the stories they create. And he really, really wants to learn to read. He thinks he will go to school on the first day and come home a reader! But the letters don't make sense to Aaron. He continues to create art. But not being able to read like the others makes him sad and angry and confused. Then one day, with the help of a teacher, Aaron discovers that his art and his ability to tell stories are amazing. With help, he slowly learns to read! And he still gets to create with his art. Bonus! The test of the book is Dyslexie which is a specially designed typeface for people with dyslexia! My favorite so far in this wonderful series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    As is the case for many other youngsters, Aaron Slater struggles to learn how to read, but he loves listening to stories, telling his own stories, and illustrating them. Thank goodness he has a supportive teacher who understands his needs and has his back. The illustrations, created with watercolor, pen, and ink, will tug at readers' hearts as Aaron goes from colorful and confident to wanting to blend in with the rest of the crowd and go unnoticed and then back again. After all, there's more tha As is the case for many other youngsters, Aaron Slater struggles to learn how to read, but he loves listening to stories, telling his own stories, and illustrating them. Thank goodness he has a supportive teacher who understands his needs and has his back. The illustrations, created with watercolor, pen, and ink, will tug at readers' hearts as Aaron goes from colorful and confident to wanting to blend in with the rest of the crowd and go unnoticed and then back again. After all, there's more than one way to tell a story and so many different stories to tell. As is the case with the other picture books by this creative team, this one encourages readers to be true to themselves, follow their hearts, and keep their eyes on their dreams. Not everyone learns the same or has the same gifts. Like me, many readers will be rooting for Aaron each step of the way. This one would be perfect for sharing with students to teach them empathy and heighten their awareness that differences aren't something to be avoided but sometimes something to be celebrated.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    I am a huge fan of the Questioneers picture book series by Andrea Beatty and this latest release - Aaron Slater, Illustrator - touched my heart even more than I could have ever imagined. It is a story about a young boy, Aaron, who has the heart of a dreamer who finds himself having trouble reading the words that make up the stories that he loves. This problem persists even as he enters school and he decides to blend in with the rest of the class until he is no longer able to hide his difficultie I am a huge fan of the Questioneers picture book series by Andrea Beatty and this latest release - Aaron Slater, Illustrator - touched my heart even more than I could have ever imagined. It is a story about a young boy, Aaron, who has the heart of a dreamer who finds himself having trouble reading the words that make up the stories that he loves. This problem persists even as he enters school and he decides to blend in with the rest of the class until he is no longer able to hide his difficulties. What happens next is beautiful and hopeful to all students and adults who have ever had trouble in school. It is a story for those who have struggled with dyslexia, those who have struggled with traditional challenges of the educational system, and a call for hope. As a teacher, I was touched and inspired by this story. Truly a beautiful new addition to an already wonderful picture book series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    Each individual expresses their sensory perceptions in a manner distinctive to them. At times, their impressions will coincide with those of other beings. Frequently, they stand alone with their ideas. They understand how their impressions and ideas relate to others through looking, speaking, listening, and reading. Most individuals are eager to develop the skills necessary to observe with their senses and to articulate and react to what they encounter. This learning, though, can be a challenge. Each individual expresses their sensory perceptions in a manner distinctive to them. At times, their impressions will coincide with those of other beings. Frequently, they stand alone with their ideas. They understand how their impressions and ideas relate to others through looking, speaking, listening, and reading. Most individuals are eager to develop the skills necessary to observe with their senses and to articulate and react to what they encounter. This learning, though, can be a challenge. Aaron Slater, Illustrator (Abrams Books for Young Readers, November 2, 2021) written by Andrea Beaty with illustrations by David Roberts is the newest title in The Questioneers series. Readers will be charmed by Aaron Slater's view of the world, his love of stories, and how he shapes his own tales. My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Aaron falls in love with stories at a young age. "But what he loves most -- what makes Aaron's heart sing -- is to listen to books in the old garden swing. To write stories, he thinks, is the greatest of things." While he is a gifted artist and storyteller, reading does not come easy for him. In fact, by second grade he is heartbroken at his failure, but joy of joys, Aaron has a teacher who recognizes his talents. "Hers fills with joy at the soul of this artist, courageous and true. She smiles a Aaron falls in love with stories at a young age. "But what he loves most -- what makes Aaron's heart sing -- is to listen to books in the old garden swing. To write stories, he thinks, is the greatest of things." While he is a gifted artist and storyteller, reading does not come easy for him. In fact, by second grade he is heartbroken at his failure, but joy of joys, Aaron has a teacher who recognizes his talents. "Hers fills with joy at the soul of this artist, courageous and true. She smiles and whispers, "Aaron . . . Thank you." A truly inspiring picture book! Also don't miss the informative and insightful notes at the end.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erin *BookDragon_Library*

    One stride with the other books in the Questioneer series and I love to see each book getting more diverse and tackling topics like Dyslexia. This is well illustrated and a wonderful book for a read aloud with the rhythmic, rhyming text and bright illustrations. I like the fact that a lot of the diversity is just there and no attention drawn to it or even a mention, like the two moms, four kids with 1 being white and (maybe?) has hearing aids, and then 3 black. Fans of the series can spot the ot One stride with the other books in the Questioneer series and I love to see each book getting more diverse and tackling topics like Dyslexia. This is well illustrated and a wonderful book for a read aloud with the rhythmic, rhyming text and bright illustrations. I like the fact that a lot of the diversity is just there and no attention drawn to it or even a mention, like the two moms, four kids with 1 being white and (maybe?) has hearing aids, and then 3 black. Fans of the series can spot the other Questioneers in the class picture scenes. Notes: Dyslexia, Black boy main character, two moms (no attention given to it), Dyslexic font, rhyming

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Rumschlag

    A lovely and thoughtful picture book. This book tackles dyslexia, highlighting how people with dyslexia can feel different or behind their peers. Ultimately, Aaron triumphs with artwork and storytelling, and learns to never give up despite difficulties and obstacles. The artwork is bright, imaginative, and colorful. I appreciate how the book's font is Dyslexie, a typeface developed for people with dyslexia. My only concern is the wordiness of the book, and the depth of the language - frequent st A lovely and thoughtful picture book. This book tackles dyslexia, highlighting how people with dyslexia can feel different or behind their peers. Ultimately, Aaron triumphs with artwork and storytelling, and learns to never give up despite difficulties and obstacles. The artwork is bright, imaginative, and colorful. I appreciate how the book's font is Dyslexie, a typeface developed for people with dyslexia. My only concern is the wordiness of the book, and the depth of the language - frequent stops to define vocabulary or explain metaphors interrupt the carefully considered rhythm of the poetry.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    The rhyme and meter of this story are sure to keep younger readers and listeners engaged. The illustrations are also beautifully colored. In the story, Aaron is neurodivergent and although he has many other talents this prevents him from reading as early and as fast as he wants to. Aaron also has a talent for drawing. His teacher recognizes his gifts as well as encourages him to read and develop that gift in his own time. Questioneer favorites Rosy, Ida, and Iggy can be seen on the classroom pag The rhyme and meter of this story are sure to keep younger readers and listeners engaged. The illustrations are also beautifully colored. In the story, Aaron is neurodivergent and although he has many other talents this prevents him from reading as early and as fast as he wants to. Aaron also has a talent for drawing. His teacher recognizes his gifts as well as encourages him to read and develop that gift in his own time. Questioneer favorites Rosy, Ida, and Iggy can be seen on the classroom pages. An author's note reveals that his name Aaron Douglas Slater is a nod to famous Harlem Renaissance artist Aaron Douglas.

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