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Ada and the Galaxies

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Stargazers rejoice! In his first book for children, renowned physicist Alan Lightman and collaborators, with help from the Hubble telescope, light up the night sky. New York Times best-selling author Alan Lightman, in collaboration with Olga Pastuchiv, brings galaxies close in a stunning picture-book tribute to the interconnectedness of the natural world. Layering photograp Stargazers rejoice! In his first book for children, renowned physicist Alan Lightman and collaborators, with help from the Hubble telescope, light up the night sky. New York Times best-selling author Alan Lightman, in collaboration with Olga Pastuchiv, brings galaxies close in a stunning picture-book tribute to the interconnectedness of the natural world. Layering photographs taken from the Hubble telescope into charming and expressive art, illustrator Susanna Chapman zooms in on one child's experiences: Ada knows that the best place for star-gazing is on the island in Maine where she vacations with her grandparents. By day, she tracks osprey in the trees, paddles a kayak, and hunts for shells. But she's most in her element when the sun goes down and the stars blink to life. Will the fog this year foil her plans, or will her grandfather find a way to shine a spotlight on the vast puzzle of the universe . . . until the weather turns?


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Stargazers rejoice! In his first book for children, renowned physicist Alan Lightman and collaborators, with help from the Hubble telescope, light up the night sky. New York Times best-selling author Alan Lightman, in collaboration with Olga Pastuchiv, brings galaxies close in a stunning picture-book tribute to the interconnectedness of the natural world. Layering photograp Stargazers rejoice! In his first book for children, renowned physicist Alan Lightman and collaborators, with help from the Hubble telescope, light up the night sky. New York Times best-selling author Alan Lightman, in collaboration with Olga Pastuchiv, brings galaxies close in a stunning picture-book tribute to the interconnectedness of the natural world. Layering photographs taken from the Hubble telescope into charming and expressive art, illustrator Susanna Chapman zooms in on one child's experiences: Ada knows that the best place for star-gazing is on the island in Maine where she vacations with her grandparents. By day, she tracks osprey in the trees, paddles a kayak, and hunts for shells. But she's most in her element when the sun goes down and the stars blink to life. Will the fog this year foil her plans, or will her grandfather find a way to shine a spotlight on the vast puzzle of the universe . . . until the weather turns?

30 review for Ada and the Galaxies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Figgy

    Good story about learning about the stars, with scientifically accurate information. Also a good way to distract a kid who wants to see the stars, but can't because of the fog. Instead of looking up and being disappointed that we can't see them, we can learn more about them, and imagine what else might lie out there in the universe. Gorgeous illustrations, including the incorporation of actual photos from the hubble telescope. Good story about learning about the stars, with scientifically accurate information. Also a good way to distract a kid who wants to see the stars, but can't because of the fog. Instead of looking up and being disappointed that we can't see them, we can learn more about them, and imagine what else might lie out there in the universe. Gorgeous illustrations, including the incorporation of actual photos from the hubble telescope.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vera Godley

    Ada is certainly a precocious little girl, quite lively, inquisitive, and loveable. I love the interaction between Ada and her grandparents who live on an island in Maine. Ada goes to visit them and wants to see and learn about the stars. She can't see stars in the night sky in New York because of all the lights. Maine is different and the opportunity will hopefully present itself. The book is a product of MIT Press and is the first children's book by MIT Professor Alan Lightman who draws from h Ada is certainly a precocious little girl, quite lively, inquisitive, and loveable. I love the interaction between Ada and her grandparents who live on an island in Maine. Ada goes to visit them and wants to see and learn about the stars. She can't see stars in the night sky in New York because of all the lights. Maine is different and the opportunity will hopefully present itself. The book is a product of MIT Press and is the first children's book by MIT Professor Alan Lightman who draws from his personal family background for this book. We are told numbers given in the book are accurate as is the assumption that there are "people" on planets in other galaxies. I realize this is a story for preschool and early elementary age children, but I truly expected more "star" and "galaxy" in the book. There are pictures taken from the Hubble space telescope camera which brings authenticity to the story. All-in-all, the book is charming, a delightful read for little ones, a grand multi-generational story, and a bit of science to whet one's interest. I received a complimentary copy to facilitate a review. Opinions are mine, alone and are freely given.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    This book is more for first and second graders rather than preschoolers. A little girl who lives in the city, Ada, visits her grandparents in Maine and can't wait to see the stars that she can't see at home. The illustrations of the little girl's day on the beach with her grandparents are bright watercolors that beautifully depict a summer day. However the illustrations of the night sky, and of books depicting the night sky use actual photographs from the Hubble telescope to magnificent effect. This book is more for first and second graders rather than preschoolers. A little girl who lives in the city, Ada, visits her grandparents in Maine and can't wait to see the stars that she can't see at home. The illustrations of the little girl's day on the beach with her grandparents are bright watercolors that beautifully depict a summer day. However the illustrations of the night sky, and of books depicting the night sky use actual photographs from the Hubble telescope to magnificent effect. An author's note provides information about the Hubble telescope, galaxies and astronomers theories about life in other solar systems. We are also told that "The numbers [Grandpa] uses to describe the size and distance of galaxies are scientifically accurate."

  4. 4 out of 5

    mad mags

    (Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review through Library Thing's early Reviewers program.) Young Ada love to stargaze, but her budding passion is thwarted by the light pollution in her hometown of New York City. She longs for the summers, when she can visit her grandparents Ama and Poobah on their island home in Maine. Once she and her mom finally arrive, Ada is still impatient to see the stars, but at least there's plenty to do in the meantime: birdwatching, building faer (Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review through Library Thing's early Reviewers program.) Young Ada love to stargaze, but her budding passion is thwarted by the light pollution in her hometown of New York City. She longs for the summers, when she can visit her grandparents Ama and Poobah on their island home in Maine. Once she and her mom finally arrive, Ada is still impatient to see the stars, but at least there's plenty to do in the meantime: birdwatching, building faerie castles, and learning how to judge the passage of time by the tides. This is a really lovely picture book for kids aged 4-8 years old. (My niece is a little young to meet ADA, but I'm hanging onto to it for her!) The illustrations are charming and are nicely complemented by real photos taken by the Hubble Telescope. ADA AND THE GALAXIES is a great introduction to STEM for younger readers!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Alan Lightman's first book for children, with Olga Pastuchiv, was inspired by his own granddaughter's visit to Maine. He tells of young girl Ada who has the biggest pleasure visiting her grandparents, Ama and Poobah, on an island in Maine. There are so many things to do at the edge of the sea, like kayaking and building a fairy house with bits collected. However, what she's really excited about is seeing the stars. She lives in the city where those bright lights keep the stars from showing up. Alan Lightman's first book for children, with Olga Pastuchiv, was inspired by his own granddaughter's visit to Maine. He tells of young girl Ada who has the biggest pleasure visiting her grandparents, Ama and Poobah, on an island in Maine. There are so many things to do at the edge of the sea, like kayaking and building a fairy house with bits collected. However, what she's really excited about is seeing the stars. She lives in the city where those bright lights keep the stars from showing up. It's a lively and loving story with these three, illustrated in watercolor by Susanna Chapman who incorporates real Hubble Space Telescope pictures of galaxies into her art. (I want to visit, too!) Thanks to MIT Kids Press, an imprint of Candlewick Press for this copy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Fall 2021 (September); ~ LibraryThing Arc Thank you to Alan Lightman, Olga Pastuchiv, Susanna Chapman, MIT Kids Press, and LibraryThing for this early reviewer copy for an honest review. As an avid reader, lover of books, English Professor, and aunt of several amazing nieces and nephews, I do delight in choosing children's books every once in a while to be a reviewer on. This beautiful book is about introducing even more than just the stars at night to children. Opening up the wide truth of just Fall 2021 (September); ~ LibraryThing Arc Thank you to Alan Lightman, Olga Pastuchiv, Susanna Chapman, MIT Kids Press, and LibraryThing for this early reviewer copy for an honest review. As an avid reader, lover of books, English Professor, and aunt of several amazing nieces and nephews, I do delight in choosing children's books every once in a while to be a reviewer on. This beautiful book is about introducing even more than just the stars at night to children. Opening up the wide truth of just how large the universe(s) out there, beyond our little blue marble, are, and how wonderous it all is. I, also, really appreciated that the last few pages after the story ended were even more facts about space.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eve Costarelli

    This is a gorgeous STEAM book that layers actual photographs taken from the Hubble telescope with beautiful ink & watercolor illustrations that weave scientific facts with a charming story of one child’s experiences with the natural world around them. From the craggy coastline and tiny sea creatures to the burst of a million tiny lights in the sky, we follow the story from land to sky and back again. I love the authentic facts delivered in a simple way that add scientific accuracy to this charmi This is a gorgeous STEAM book that layers actual photographs taken from the Hubble telescope with beautiful ink & watercolor illustrations that weave scientific facts with a charming story of one child’s experiences with the natural world around them. From the craggy coastline and tiny sea creatures to the burst of a million tiny lights in the sky, we follow the story from land to sky and back again. I love the authentic facts delivered in a simple way that add scientific accuracy to this charming tale of a child who loves nature, her family and especially the dream of what the galaxies hold. This is the perfect story for the budding scientist or to get one interested in the vast possibilities of life and variety of dreams that surround us.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Ada loves to look at the sky, especially the stars, but living in the city as she does, she doesn't get to see them very often. A trip to see her grandparents in Maine gives Ada a chance to see the stars, but she has a hard time waiting for night to come. To keep her occupied, Ada and her family go down to the beach where they explore the shoreline and the creatures that live there. When a fog rolls in, it seems that Ada has lost her chance to enjoy the stars, but her grandfather pulls out some Ada loves to look at the sky, especially the stars, but living in the city as she does, she doesn't get to see them very often. A trip to see her grandparents in Maine gives Ada a chance to see the stars, but she has a hard time waiting for night to come. To keep her occupied, Ada and her family go down to the beach where they explore the shoreline and the creatures that live there. When a fog rolls in, it seems that Ada has lost her chance to enjoy the stars, but her grandfather pulls out some books and teachers her about galaxies. The lovely watercolor and digital illustrations are complemented nicely by actual photographs of galaxies. This delightful book combines a wonderful familial relationship between a grandfather and granddaughter but provides wonderful science information about a shoreline habitat and galaxies. A wonderful book to share with children who are intrigued by science.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Barbra

    Ada loves star gazing and when she travels to her grandparents in Maine, she can hardly wait to see the night sky. While she waits for darkness, she explores the marvels of the coastline. Poobah explains the galaxies to her and when the fog lifts, she finally can see the stars. Readers will get a chance to see amazing photos taken from the Hubble Space Telescope turned into expressive art. A great way to introduce children to the wonders of the universe.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alissa Tsaparikos

    This is a sweet story that is both about the struggles of waiting as well as the scientific wonder that is the stars above us. Chapman's illustrations really bring that wonder to life, giving the ending to this story a satisfying and lovely end. Backmatter gives more information about stars and notes that the terms and numbers given in the story are scientifically accurate, which is a nice touch. This is a sweet story that is both about the struggles of waiting as well as the scientific wonder that is the stars above us. Chapman's illustrations really bring that wonder to life, giving the ending to this story a satisfying and lovely end. Backmatter gives more information about stars and notes that the terms and numbers given in the story are scientifically accurate, which is a nice touch.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Dreamer

    3.5 This is a nice story about girl who loves stars and visits her grandparents in Maine. Lots of science tidbits included...telling time by water covering a rock, ospreys nesting, noticing crabs, talking about the size of the universe. The through-line is impatience because Ada has to wait for dark and a clear sky to see the stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    Beautifully illustrated story of a young girl visiting her grandparents in Maine,filling time while waiting to see the stars in the night sky. Actual Hubble Space Telescope photos are overlaid with drawn illustrations.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    3.5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pearl Bass

    BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE, TALK. Everyday diversity

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Featured in this Monona Public Library unboxing video. https://fb.watch/8y7zjYgBxq/ Featured in this Monona Public Library unboxing video. https://fb.watch/8y7zjYgBxq/

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christen

    This book was probably too young for my boys. But we did enjoy the real pictures from the Hubble telescope.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Beautiful Illustrations Note: it does talk about “other people living in other galaxies”.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Arvia Maharhani

    Ilustrasinya cakep, jadi pengen lihat bintang

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Kahn

    Absolutely lovely story about a visit to grandparents and becoming immersed in nature while waiting for nightfall and the stars. Beautiful all around.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura Hodgins

    The illustrations paired with the Hubble Telescope photos-fabulous, add a charming story, loved it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Hunter

  23. 5 out of 5

    Selena

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather Runnels

  25. 5 out of 5

    Violet

  26. 4 out of 5

    Em

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie Darrin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jaimie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Vallejos

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