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Bright Lights, Prairie Dust: Reflections on Life, Loss, and Love from Little House's Ma

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Karen Grassle, the beloved actress who played Ma on Little House on the Prairie, grew up at the edge of the Pacific Ocean in a family where love was plentiful but alcohol wreaked havoc. In this candid memoir, Grassle reveals her journey to succeed as an actress even as she struggles to overcome depression, combat her own dependence on alcohol, and find true love. With humo Karen Grassle, the beloved actress who played Ma on Little House on the Prairie, grew up at the edge of the Pacific Ocean in a family where love was plentiful but alcohol wreaked havoc. In this candid memoir, Grassle reveals her journey to succeed as an actress even as she struggles to overcome depression, combat her own dependence on alcohol, and find true love. With humor and hard-won wisdom, Grassle takes readers on an inspiring journey through the political turmoil on ’60s campuses, on to studies with some of the most celebrated artists at the famed London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts, and ultimately behind the curtains of Broadway stages and storied Hollywood sets. In these pages, readers meet actors and directors who have captivated us on screen and stage as they fall in love, betray and befriend, and don costumes only to reveal themselves. We know Karen Grassle best as the proud prairie woman Caroline Ingalls, with her quiet strength and devotion to family, but this memoir introduces readers to the complex, funny, rebellious, and soulful woman who, in addition to being the force behind those many strong women she played, fought passionately―as a writer, producer, and activist―on behalf of equal rights for women. Raw, emotional, and tender, Bright Lights celebrates and honors womanhood, in all its complexity.


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Karen Grassle, the beloved actress who played Ma on Little House on the Prairie, grew up at the edge of the Pacific Ocean in a family where love was plentiful but alcohol wreaked havoc. In this candid memoir, Grassle reveals her journey to succeed as an actress even as she struggles to overcome depression, combat her own dependence on alcohol, and find true love. With humo Karen Grassle, the beloved actress who played Ma on Little House on the Prairie, grew up at the edge of the Pacific Ocean in a family where love was plentiful but alcohol wreaked havoc. In this candid memoir, Grassle reveals her journey to succeed as an actress even as she struggles to overcome depression, combat her own dependence on alcohol, and find true love. With humor and hard-won wisdom, Grassle takes readers on an inspiring journey through the political turmoil on ’60s campuses, on to studies with some of the most celebrated artists at the famed London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts, and ultimately behind the curtains of Broadway stages and storied Hollywood sets. In these pages, readers meet actors and directors who have captivated us on screen and stage as they fall in love, betray and befriend, and don costumes only to reveal themselves. We know Karen Grassle best as the proud prairie woman Caroline Ingalls, with her quiet strength and devotion to family, but this memoir introduces readers to the complex, funny, rebellious, and soulful woman who, in addition to being the force behind those many strong women she played, fought passionately―as a writer, producer, and activist―on behalf of equal rights for women. Raw, emotional, and tender, Bright Lights celebrates and honors womanhood, in all its complexity.

30 review for Bright Lights, Prairie Dust: Reflections on Life, Loss, and Love from Little House's Ma

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Fitzgerald

    (I would have made the rating 3.5 stars if I could have.) A well- written memoir, by a lady I have watched on my t.v. screen since I was three. I went into this book knowing that it was not written by Caroline Ingalls in the 1800s! Rather by a “baby boomer” who was a young adult in the tumultuous 60’s. And whose boss in the 70’s was Michael Landon, loved for his directing and acting, but also known to hold grudges and pout like a child when crossed. The chapters about Karen’s childhood were my fa (I would have made the rating 3.5 stars if I could have.) A well- written memoir, by a lady I have watched on my t.v. screen since I was three. I went into this book knowing that it was not written by Caroline Ingalls in the 1800s! Rather by a “baby boomer” who was a young adult in the tumultuous 60’s. And whose boss in the 70’s was Michael Landon, loved for his directing and acting, but also known to hold grudges and pout like a child when crossed. The chapters about Karen’s childhood were my favorites. Her writing style reminded me of another author’s memoirs, The Girl from Yamhill and My Own Two Feet, by Beverly Cleary. Both of these women wrote about their lives with much straightforwardness and clarity, a style I enjoy reading. I do wish the chapters about Karen’s “Little House” experiences had been longer, but that’s because I grew up with the show and love reading anecdotes about it. To put your personal life in print for anyone to see is an extremely brave thing to do. Karen revealed herself, “warts and all”, in a very realistic way. I have even more respect for this wonderful lady now! (And, I am hopefully going to meet her at a book signing next week!😃)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wendi Lee

    This heart-breaking story is not for the faint of heart. Little House's "Ma" did not experience what we all imagine her experiencing. I do love her honestly and vulnerability, even though the story is hard to digest as a lifelong Little House fan. This heart-breaking story is not for the faint of heart. Little House's "Ma" did not experience what we all imagine her experiencing. I do love her honestly and vulnerability, even though the story is hard to digest as a lifelong Little House fan.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    My Review Of BRIGHT LIGHTS, PRAIRIE DUST By Author, Karen Grassle Published by sheWritesPress Gifted by Publicist @MB Communications On Sale: 10/19/21 ***** This was such a keen and no holds barred memoir of Karen Grassle; known as “Ma” on Little House on the Prairie. If you’ve read all the books and watched every episode like I have, you know that kinship you feel just by seeing a picture of Karen Grassle. We journeyed so many miles and went through so much heartbreak and triumph’s with her and the Wi My Review Of BRIGHT LIGHTS, PRAIRIE DUST By Author, Karen Grassle Published by sheWritesPress Gifted by Publicist @MB Communications On Sale: 10/19/21 ***** This was such a keen and no holds barred memoir of Karen Grassle; known as “Ma” on Little House on the Prairie. If you’ve read all the books and watched every episode like I have, you know that kinship you feel just by seeing a picture of Karen Grassle. We journeyed so many miles and went through so much heartbreak and triumph’s with her and the Wilder family. Now she writes of her life growing up with an alcoholic father that tried to commit suicide, all the while struggling to fit in and find her identity. She tells of her strengths, weaknesses and lapses in judgement. Her journey to be educated at Berkley, to following her heart to do theatre and eventually evolving and landing a tv series. The quest to find love and using her promiscuity to try and obtain it. It’s a constant up and down hill battle leading her in and out of depression and following the path into alcoholism like her father. Her blatant honesty about what it was like filming Little House on the Prairie and her struggles for equality in contracts and pay. The sides of Michael Landon she sees and having to deal with him as a boss and as a fellow actor lets you into a world that you never knew beyond the tv screen. I thoroughly enjoyed this well written and fascinating read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ron and Nancy Kendrick

    So Disappointing I had been looking forward to this book! What a major disappointment. I have read both books by the Melissa's. Along with several other cast members. This is by far the least interesting. I almost gave up on it. Move on not worth the money or time! So Disappointing I had been looking forward to this book! What a major disappointment. I have read both books by the Melissa's. Along with several other cast members. This is by far the least interesting. I almost gave up on it. Move on not worth the money or time!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zandria

    The first half of this book was unbelievably boring. I soldiered through because I figured it would get more interesting once Grassle got her role on Little House, and it did. We learn some things about her eight years on the series (including her efforts to increase her salary after the first year, since she’d been an unknown and was severely underpaid, and how Landon punished her by freezing her out and reducing her time on-screen). I learned that Grassle had depression for many years and strug The first half of this book was unbelievably boring. I soldiered through because I figured it would get more interesting once Grassle got her role on Little House, and it did. We learn some things about her eight years on the series (including her efforts to increase her salary after the first year, since she’d been an unknown and was severely underpaid, and how Landon punished her by freezing her out and reducing her time on-screen). I learned that Grassle had depression for many years and struggled with alcoholism. I liked hearing about her feminist leanings, including making a movie about battered women and trying to help get the Equal Rights Amendment passed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hare

    I struggled with this one. Too much pre-little house discussion and absolutely nothing post-little house so no way of really knowing how life went when show ended. I had a feeling I wouldn’t like “ma” after reading this, but wasn’t prepared for the lack of accountability for actions. I am sure being a woman in a man’s world was terrible, but it was written where you root for Karen. Instead it feels like she got what the drunk had coming which is not what I expected. Wished it had contained a bit m I struggled with this one. Too much pre-little house discussion and absolutely nothing post-little house so no way of really knowing how life went when show ended. I had a feeling I wouldn’t like “ma” after reading this, but wasn’t prepared for the lack of accountability for actions. I am sure being a woman in a man’s world was terrible, but it was written where you root for Karen. Instead it feels like she got what the drunk had coming which is not what I expected. Wished it had contained a bit more of Karen’s highlights/good things to offset the struggles. I usually enjoy glimpses into celebrities lives as proof they are human, but this one was just sad and not that enjoyable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mediaman

    Think of the opposite of Ma Ingalls and you get depressing, out-of-control Karen Grassle in a deeply disappointing and often shocking memoir that focuses mostly on her addictions, feminist rants, and mental health issues. She even near the end of the book tosses in an afterthought about her two abortions. If you're looking for a clean, moral actress to share stories of her happy life, you won't find it here. And if you want lots of insights into the Little House TV series you also will go unsati Think of the opposite of Ma Ingalls and you get depressing, out-of-control Karen Grassle in a deeply disappointing and often shocking memoir that focuses mostly on her addictions, feminist rants, and mental health issues. She even near the end of the book tosses in an afterthought about her two abortions. If you're looking for a clean, moral actress to share stories of her happy life, you won't find it here. And if you want lots of insights into the Little House TV series you also will go unsatisfied--beyond the first year there's barely anything about the series, which takes up less than one-fifth of the book's pages. The rest of it? Non-stop drinking, drugs, smoking, complaining (way too much complaining!), negativity, multiple suicide attempts, factual errors, insults, expectations that she should be given everything by her parents or the government, and ultimately a very unhappy woman that need very serious mental health help at a young age but thought of herself as above others. The book ends 40 years ago when the show stopped, so this isn't even a complete memoir. There is so much wrong with Grassle, but it isn't really a surprise. We had all heard the rumors over the years and seen how she didn't want to be publicly associated with the role or the show. At least we now know her version of why--and she goes overboard to make Michael Landon look like a horrible monster. Yet she fails to actually look deep into herself and see that she caused most of her own problems. She is constantly depressed or internally upset and blame-shifts everything. Her depression and mental illness start in her younger years and she partially blames it on an alcoholic father. Soon she starts to live more like a hippie and sleeps around with pretty much any guy she can find, including many married men. A few she names, most she doesn't, but she feels almost proud of being sexually free and irresponsible. Her boasting of getting abortions and her condemnation of those that are pro-life or conservative is disgusting. We get it--you don't want to be associated with a home-centered prairie mother, but for an actress who claims to be tolerant and open-minded she's just another unthinking bigoted liberal. Much of the book is about her theatrical career, which is honestly pretty boring since none of us saw her in any of the minor productions she mentions. She has no money, mooches off others all the time, complains about not having subway fare but smokes dope all the time, has a cigarette addiction, and is hooked on wine. Wake up America--if you're buying drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes maybe you shouldn't be asking taxpayers or parents to fund your lifestyle! Her totally unrealistic expectations and unwillingness to work minimum wage jobs to make a living shows her lack of character. She also did virtually no TV work when out of nowhere she was called to audition for Little House based on a few professional photos she had taken (one of the pics was topless), then stumbled into the role not even knowing how a television program was shot or produced. She whines throughout the book and there nothing positive about it. After her first year on Little House she thinks she deserves a raise despite having signed a contract. Landon gets upset at her insistence on getting paid more and he refuses but starts shrinking her role in the second season, which was obvious to viewers. She blames Landon throughout this period and yet the fact is her expectations were unreasonable. She wasn't a famous longtime experienced TV actress who could demand more money or walk, she was a new TV performer who should have been thrilled to be in a hit. Instead she drank more, took more drugs, smoked more dope, and puffed a lot of cigarettes. Then wondered why she was mentally ill and needed to see a therapist. Eventually she appears in a few other TV series or movies, but we hear nothing about them except for The Love Boat (why?) and a film she wrote called Battered. Grassle complains her way through those as well, at the same time trying to become a feminist voice. Then there's a long section on how women are mistreated and the failure to pass the ERA. Grassle doesn't understand economic basics and seems to feel that everyone should be paid the same thing and have access to the same public rest rooms with no thought to consequences of these policies. She actually says that the reason women are crazy are because it's a male-dominated society. So she admits she and other females are mentally unstable but instead of taking responsibility for the thousands of bad choices she makes she blames men. There is nothing positive or upbeat about this book. I was disappointed to see Kristin Chenoweth's back cover blurb that says, "So uplifting! So full of hope! The perfect read on life's reflections." That is 100% false and the opposite of this memoir. There isn't an uplifting moment in it, unless her throw-away moment when she decides to finally become sober. After 20 years of spiraling out of control she just one day stops drinking and drugs. Well, if you could do it then you could have made that same choice two decades earlier, so you can't blame society or men or parents or Hollywood--it's all your individual choice that has to be made every day. There's little hope in this beyond that single choice. We don't really know what happens at the end beyond a couple pages that allude to a marriage and show reunion, but nothing about her kid that she so longed to have after two abortions. There will be those that love this book, especially anti-male feminists that think Little House was "too perfect" as Grassle says (it wasn't at all--try watching it to see how politically liberal the show really was and unrealistic for its era). And the 60 pages or so about the show's first season are interesting. But it's filled with depressing negativity that she should take responsibility for. If you want real inspiration go read the Little House books instead.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I guess I was hoping for more about her Little House on the Prairie experiences. From the cover, title and chapter quotes the book is clearly being marketed that way. To Grassle's credit, whatever conflicts and disappointments were going on in the background, they did not mar her performance in the least. It's nice that the book ends on a positive note and I really hope she has found fulfillment in her life post-Little House. 2.5 stars I guess I was hoping for more about her Little House on the Prairie experiences. From the cover, title and chapter quotes the book is clearly being marketed that way. To Grassle's credit, whatever conflicts and disappointments were going on in the background, they did not mar her performance in the least. It's nice that the book ends on a positive note and I really hope she has found fulfillment in her life post-Little House. 2.5 stars

  9. 4 out of 5

    R. Jetleb

    Normally I'm not into memoirs but was very interested in Karen Grassle's story, especially her time on Little House on the Prairie as Ma. It was a show I loved as an older child in the 70s. I ended up skimming through a lot of the book to get to the Little House stuff. Normally I'm not into memoirs but was very interested in Karen Grassle's story, especially her time on Little House on the Prairie as Ma. It was a show I loved as an older child in the 70s. I ended up skimming through a lot of the book to get to the Little House stuff.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donna Coffeen

    She wrote this for herself, not thinking at all of the audience. Self absorbed and truly disappointing. Not for a Little House fan because that was only 15% of the book. Little to no mention of anyone but Charles and Harriet.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Oneof Thecoolkids

    Meh. Another poor me Difficult to read. Slow moving and full of insecurities from the author. Didn't really have a good flow to it. If you are thinking this would be a trip down nostalgia lane of Little House, think again. Meh. Another poor me Difficult to read. Slow moving and full of insecurities from the author. Didn't really have a good flow to it. If you are thinking this would be a trip down nostalgia lane of Little House, think again.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Stovall

    Trying to read this was like slogging through a swamp. A few good points, but not worth the time or energy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary Coder

    THANKS SO MUCH! MEGAN BEATIE COMMUNICATIONS For an ARC of Bright Lights and Prarie Dust~Reflections of Life, Loss and Love from Little Houses Ma by Karen Grassle. This is the interesting memoir of the actress who played MA on the much beloved television series of Little House on the Prarie. The book introduces readers to the complex, funny, rebellious, and soulful woman who, in addition to being the force behind those many strong women she played, fought passionately―as a writer, producer, and a THANKS SO MUCH! MEGAN BEATIE COMMUNICATIONS For an ARC of Bright Lights and Prarie Dust~Reflections of Life, Loss and Love from Little Houses Ma by Karen Grassle. This is the interesting memoir of the actress who played MA on the much beloved television series of Little House on the Prarie. The book introduces readers to the complex, funny, rebellious, and soulful woman who, in addition to being the force behind those many strong women she played, fought passionately―as a writer, producer, and activist―on behalf of equal rights for women. Raw, emotional, and tender,  Her story is compelling and revealing, funny and honest as well as often moving and emotional. She dishes about subjects such as alcohol abuse in her family, politics in the 1960's, her life on stage and living in London and of course Little House behind the scenes, what it was like working with the girls and Micheal Landon and so much more. 🌾🌼🌾 Throughout her well-lived, many faceted life she has gone through changes and experiences both tragic and joyful such as № that will enlighten, amuse and intrigue the reader and bring to light and solidify the true character of the amazing woman that touched and entertained fans for so many years. Even now  she continues to endear herself to those who have adored her strong yet tender and kind personality that was not just the characters she played on stage and television but the true heart and soul of the woman who will always hold a special place in the heart of millions and be remembered fondly as our Ma. I wholeheartedly recommend this book to anyone who grew up with Ingalls family in Walnut Grove. 🌼🌾🌼🌾🌼 AVAILABLE NOVEMBER 5TH #bookreviewpost #bookblogpost  #newbookpost  #booknerdsofig #bookstagrammer  #bookbloggin #reviewpost #honestreview #ireviewbooksnstuff #illreadit #illreadandreviewit #galleyreviewer #womenwhoread  #readmorebooksyall #sendgalleysplease #sendmoregalleysplz #ineed2read #morebooks #booksandbeauty #readmore #beautyandbooks #booktokker  #booktoknewb #readthis #honestedits  #bookrec #honestreviewer #ireviewbooksandbeautyandstuff

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. As a loyal LHOTP fan, I know that, despite the tone and status of the show, everything didn’t go well on the set. Others who were there already wrote about it. It is moving and always interesting to read Karen’s story, the ups and downs she experienced, on and off the set, before and after the filming. Writing with sincerity, Karen doesn’t give herself the good part. It’s her side of the story, but she honestly tells about her life, her values, her mistakes and he I thoroughly enjoyed this book. As a loyal LHOTP fan, I know that, despite the tone and status of the show, everything didn’t go well on the set. Others who were there already wrote about it. It is moving and always interesting to read Karen’s story, the ups and downs she experienced, on and off the set, before and after the filming. Writing with sincerity, Karen doesn’t give herself the good part. It’s her side of the story, but she honestly tells about her life, her values, her mistakes and her achievements. It is captivating to read Karen’s account of her childhood and her years as a student and then as a young actress pursuing her dreams, all this through the turbulent 60s and mid 70s, in California, New-York City and London. Reading about the successes, failures and hardships she faced, and how she dealt with them, is quite engrossing, and also intriguing, because clearly Karen and “Caroline” couldn’t be more different ! Yes, Mike Landon is losing a few feathers along the pages, but we already know he was not the saint many fans still believe he was. But Karen’s honesty about her own flaws, demonstrates brilliantly that nothing is either black or white, and she’s able to highlight the good as well as the bad in all those people (celebrities like Mike Landon, or unknown) who crossed her path. Yes, Mike Landon was not always a good guy. Yes, Karen Grassle was definitely not “Ma”. They were human beings and that doesn’t change at all my fondness for the show. It is also quite interesting to read about the fights Karen led for women’s rights over the years, and the strong beliefs and values that are a constant in her life. When you finish the book, you just wish you could meet Karen in a cosy cafe or restaurant and continue the conversation.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Hattersley

    For someone who has grown up with LHOTP all her life, this book was not what I had expected. You have an image of an actress and Im sure we all agree that as Karen played "Ma" and that's the image we all have. The wholesome image. This book takes that image and puts an arrow in it. But in a good way. This book is honest. This book tells Karens version of events (after all Mr Landon is not here to give his). It's unvarnished. It's real and that It gives every aspect of Karens life to us, the read For someone who has grown up with LHOTP all her life, this book was not what I had expected. You have an image of an actress and Im sure we all agree that as Karen played "Ma" and that's the image we all have. The wholesome image. This book takes that image and puts an arrow in it. But in a good way. This book is honest. This book tells Karens version of events (after all Mr Landon is not here to give his). It's unvarnished. It's real and that It gives every aspect of Karens life to us, the reader. Whether the episode is good, bad or ugly, it is there for us to examine in our own way. From my point of view, I love to hear how our writers grew up. Its their upbringing and parental influences that make them who they are and Im sure that some of Karens fathers alcoholism was clearly an influence in her life. I applaud Karen for her brutal honesty and it is just that, brutal honesty. If you picked this book up looking for saccharine sweet "Ma" from LHOTP, put it back because this isn't it. This is the story of a life lived, mistakes made, people met, arguments had, family and career. But at the end of all of it, Karen should be incredibly proud. It takes guts to be so open and raw in a book and put yourself out for judgement by others. Thank you for that honesty. Thank you for your work and most of all thank you for seeing me through my childhood!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    If you are hoping for a sweet background story about everyone's favorite "Ma", this is not it. As with most things in Hollywood, what you see on the screen is far from the reality. It's a rough, self-destructive life that makes me sad for her and for myself because it really shattered my feelings for my favorite tv show growing up. I've read the other star's books from the series, I know it wasn't all sunshine and daisies. And yet, I will never be able to watch the show the same way again, which If you are hoping for a sweet background story about everyone's favorite "Ma", this is not it. As with most things in Hollywood, what you see on the screen is far from the reality. It's a rough, self-destructive life that makes me sad for her and for myself because it really shattered my feelings for my favorite tv show growing up. I've read the other star's books from the series, I know it wasn't all sunshine and daisies. And yet, I will never be able to watch the show the same way again, which makes me sad. My personal feelings aside, the writing was done well, lot's of details to make you really picture the scene. In summary, not the book to read if you are looking for a good role model.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rhea

    Having been a big fan of Little House on the Prairie and Karen Grassle for a long time, I knew I had to read this book. And it didn’t disappoint. Honest, raw, sometimes horribly sad and sometimes funny, the book is beautifully written without any sugarcoat, and is a sincere account of Karen Grassle’s life. It made me think about my own strengths and weaknesses, and I feel that it could help readers do the same - and maybe even come to terms with their own traits. The honesty and frankness of thi Having been a big fan of Little House on the Prairie and Karen Grassle for a long time, I knew I had to read this book. And it didn’t disappoint. Honest, raw, sometimes horribly sad and sometimes funny, the book is beautifully written without any sugarcoat, and is a sincere account of Karen Grassle’s life. It made me think about my own strengths and weaknesses, and I feel that it could help readers do the same - and maybe even come to terms with their own traits. The honesty and frankness of this book combined with the flow gives it an almost intimate feel, as if you are sitting next to and listening to the story in person.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lani

    Based on some reviews by other readers, I have decided to stop reading this. I have read all the books written by the child actors from Little House and I loved them, but I can already tell I don't want to know any more about "Ma." My brother and I find it amusing to wax poetic about our childhood times watching Little House on the Prairie and I don't want to be disillusioned by Karen's behaviors, thoughts and version of events during filming. I can definitely tell this one is not for me. Many th Based on some reviews by other readers, I have decided to stop reading this. I have read all the books written by the child actors from Little House and I loved them, but I can already tell I don't want to know any more about "Ma." My brother and I find it amusing to wax poetic about our childhood times watching Little House on the Prairie and I don't want to be disillusioned by Karen's behaviors, thoughts and version of events during filming. I can definitely tell this one is not for me. Many thanks to the reviewers on this book - I could not comment because we are not friends, but I appreciate your honesty!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dina Roberts

    I think Grassle does a great job in describing what it’s like to work in a bittersweet, toxic workplace. She has the ability to see and describe the positive and negative in people… whether it’s herself or others. I don’t think one has to be a fan of Little House to like the book. There’s so much more…feminism, fighting against domestic violence, college days in the 60’s, ballet, alcoholism, Broadway, Jung psychology, fake breasts, etc. Grassle has lived a very rich life, and I’m glad she took t I think Grassle does a great job in describing what it’s like to work in a bittersweet, toxic workplace. She has the ability to see and describe the positive and negative in people… whether it’s herself or others. I don’t think one has to be a fan of Little House to like the book. There’s so much more…feminism, fighting against domestic violence, college days in the 60’s, ballet, alcoholism, Broadway, Jung psychology, fake breasts, etc. Grassle has lived a very rich life, and I’m glad she took the time to share it with us. Well… and I’ve been listening to the audio book for about 3 weeks. Grassle has been keeping me company as I take walks, do my chores. I might miss her a bit.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Pointer

    I really wanted to like this I always admired the character of Caroline Ingalls, and admired the beautiful woman who portrayed her. I understand that it was important for her to speak her truth, so hats off to her for that. What I did not like was her tales of sex, drinking, and drunks. Perhaps because it left me no illusions of what “ma” was like. The story was not very well written. I guess I had been hoping for some happy stories, instead of stories about what jerks people were.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Debra Randall

    I was always a fan of LHOP and even if a "cleansed" version of the time depicted, liked the first 6 years as an escape. I've always admired Karen and seen her in other things. I've read the bios of the 3 main characters and looked forward to reading Karen's. It was an interesting and varied life she had and even if some fans would like to skip to page 180 or so to get to the TV section, you'd miss how she got to where she was and why certain decisions were made. She had a lot of obstacles and th I was always a fan of LHOP and even if a "cleansed" version of the time depicted, liked the first 6 years as an escape. I've always admired Karen and seen her in other things. I've read the bios of the 3 main characters and looked forward to reading Karen's. It was an interesting and varied life she had and even if some fans would like to skip to page 180 or so to get to the TV section, you'd miss how she got to where she was and why certain decisions were made. She had a lot of obstacles and the times for women then were not as easy. She wasn't perfect, but no one is and I admire her honesty. I know Karen got some criticism for her saying Mr Landon wasn't an "angel" but he wasn't always and that was known by anyone who read anything about him, even from his children. He wasn't fair with pay, with her and even other costars. That said, she wasn't slamming him throughout the book. She gives kudos when deserved. I thought when finishing, if you were a fan of LHOP, you would enjoy the book, but know there isn't a ton about the show itself, it is about Karen, and there aren't a lot of photos, just a few to show her from child to adult and a handful from LHOP.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linda Medic

    I really wanted to like this book, but it was by far the worst book I’ve read in the last few years. It was given to me as a gift, and I struggled to finish it. Here’s my opinion : Grassle comes across as a whiny, alcoholic actress. Michael Landon, among others, definitely get thrown under the bus. Who knows (or really cares) what actually happened. This book is so sporadic and hard to follow besides being boring. I can’t believe I actually read the whole thing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kivalina Mauck

    Great Job Karen on this book. Ma has always been on of my favorite people on Little House. I started watching when I was a little girl. I am 51. I read every book about this family that I could get my hands on. My first favorite is Laura, then MA always has been. Thanks for telling your story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sheri Heffner

    I loved it! I loved this book. She sure was a rebel growing up and as a teenager and a young woman. I understood her struggle with alcoholism. I don't drink but I know people who struggle with alcohol and drugs. I read this book in four days and enjoyed all of it. I loved it! I loved this book. She sure was a rebel growing up and as a teenager and a young woman. I understood her struggle with alcoholism. I don't drink but I know people who struggle with alcohol and drugs. I read this book in four days and enjoyed all of it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

    Did not finish. I've read and enjoyed other Little House memoirs, but I just couldn't like this one, as much as I wanted to. I was listening to the audio version, and it might be more engaging in the print version. Did not finish. I've read and enjoyed other Little House memoirs, but I just couldn't like this one, as much as I wanted to. I was listening to the audio version, and it might be more engaging in the print version.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christine Danielle

    Added

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melody Lee

    I would love to read this book grew up on little house on prairie with ma ingalls was the best. Great actress

  28. 4 out of 5

    Craig Culwell

    Hi I did watched Little House On The Prairie. When it first aired on tv. I did have seen Karen Grassle 2018 at Mansfield MO. I hope I get free copy of her book. Craig Culwell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    Very interesting read. She is very forthcoming. ❤️❤️ Many trials and triumphs. Her writing about anxiety, alcoholism, sexism, and other life obstacles gives hope that we too can triumph.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Cochrane

    Karen Grassle is so much more than Caroline Ingalls. In her book, she shares her struggles, imperfections and, ultimately, her resilience. I finished the book in 2 days. So so good!

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