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Sharpe's Assassin

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New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell returns with his iconic hero, Richard Sharpe. SHARPE IS BACK. Outsider. Hero. Rogue. And the one man you want on your side. If any man can do the impossible it's Richard Sharpe . . . Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe is a man with a reputation. Born in the gutter, raised a foundling, he joined the army twenty-one years ago, and it’s bee New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell returns with his iconic hero, Richard Sharpe. SHARPE IS BACK. Outsider. Hero. Rogue. And the one man you want on your side. If any man can do the impossible it's Richard Sharpe . . . Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe is a man with a reputation. Born in the gutter, raised a foundling, he joined the army twenty-one years ago, and it’s been his home ever since. He’s a loose cannon, but his unconventional methods make him a valuable weapon. So when, the dust still settling after the Battle of Waterloo, the Duke of Wellington needs a favour, he turns to Sharpe. For Wellington knows that the end of one war is only the beginning of another. Napoleon's army may be defeated, but another enemy lies waiting in the shadows – a secretive group of fanatical revolutionaries hell-bent on revenge. Sharpe is dispatched to a new battleground: the maze of Paris streets where lines blur between friend and foe. And in search of a spy, he will have to defeat a lethal assassin determined to kill his target or die trying . . .


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New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell returns with his iconic hero, Richard Sharpe. SHARPE IS BACK. Outsider. Hero. Rogue. And the one man you want on your side. If any man can do the impossible it's Richard Sharpe . . . Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe is a man with a reputation. Born in the gutter, raised a foundling, he joined the army twenty-one years ago, and it’s bee New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell returns with his iconic hero, Richard Sharpe. SHARPE IS BACK. Outsider. Hero. Rogue. And the one man you want on your side. If any man can do the impossible it's Richard Sharpe . . . Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe is a man with a reputation. Born in the gutter, raised a foundling, he joined the army twenty-one years ago, and it’s been his home ever since. He’s a loose cannon, but his unconventional methods make him a valuable weapon. So when, the dust still settling after the Battle of Waterloo, the Duke of Wellington needs a favour, he turns to Sharpe. For Wellington knows that the end of one war is only the beginning of another. Napoleon's army may be defeated, but another enemy lies waiting in the shadows – a secretive group of fanatical revolutionaries hell-bent on revenge. Sharpe is dispatched to a new battleground: the maze of Paris streets where lines blur between friend and foe. And in search of a spy, he will have to defeat a lethal assassin determined to kill his target or die trying . . .

30 review for Sharpe's Assassin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    this is a binge read in one day (and ignore you've got work to do) book. The action is from start to finish and it doesn't matter if it's been years or days since you last visited the characters, they're here at their quirky, fierce, heroic best and it's just nice to be in their company again. this is a binge read in one day (and ignore you've got work to do) book. The action is from start to finish and it doesn't matter if it's been years or days since you last visited the characters, they're here at their quirky, fierce, heroic best and it's just nice to be in their company again.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Clemens Schoonderwoert

    **Should Read as 4.5 Stars!** This eventful novel is the 21st chronologically, and the 22nd in total, of the amazing Richard Sharpe series. The historical details at the end of the book are wonderfully described by the author, and implemented in a very likeable fashion in this post-Waterloo adventure. Storytelling is as ever of a superb quality, all characters, whether they are real historical or enjoyable fictional, come vividly to life in this delightful spy/war story, and the atmosphere and livi **Should Read as 4.5 Stars!** This eventful novel is the 21st chronologically, and the 22nd in total, of the amazing Richard Sharpe series. The historical details at the end of the book are wonderfully described by the author, and implemented in a very likeable fashion in this post-Waterloo adventure. Storytelling is as ever of a superb quality, all characters, whether they are real historical or enjoyable fictional, come vividly to life in this delightful spy/war story, and the atmosphere and living conditions of a defeated Paris and thus France come splendidly off the pages. I read a review from a certain L. Young stating that Harry Price was made a permanent Major at the end in Sharpe's Waterloo, but that is only partly true, because if reading correctly it was subject to recognition by Whitehall, but those responsible at Whitehall must probably have turned it down, so Harry Price is still a Captain in this tale also. This tale is mainly set in the year AD1815, right after the Battle of Waterloo, and it ends with an epilogue that is set in AD 1816. In this tale "acting" Leuitenant-Colonel Sharpe and his men, along whom are his brother-in-arms and best friend Sergeant-Major Patrick Harper, Sergeant Weller, Captain Price and Private Bee, not to forget in my view a rather unnecessary Major Charlie Morris, Sharpe's nemesis from India, and last but not least a rather poor spy in Mr Fox, and they are to pave the way for Duke of Wellington so he march into Paris unscathed, and at the same time to uncover a cult naming themselves "La Fraternité", with at its head the already deceased General Delaunay, at Waterloo, and Colonel Lanier, nicknamed "The Monster". What is to come is an entertaining historical adventure, where the interaction between the blood brothers Sharpe and Harper is paramount, and in which Sharpe and his men will have to fight their way from Waterloo, via Péronne and Ham, into Paris, and over there the discovery of the leader of "La Fraternité" in Lanier is soon made and at the end in a final desperate battle the end of the war will be concluded between Sharpe and Lanier in a most touching and camaraderie fashion. Still highly recommended, for this is a wonderful, in my view final?, goodbye to Sharpe, Harper and other likeable figures, and that's why I like to call this episode: "Sharpe's Final? Captivating Outing"!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nick Brett

    Sharpe’s Fury in 2006 was, astonishingly, the previous Richard Sharpe book. What a delight to have him back after all these years. This is set right in the aftermath of Waterloo (well worth reading that again before this, you don’t need to but it provides great context). Sharpe and his troops are burying their dead and coming to terms with Napoleon’s defeat. Expecting a rest they find the Duke of Wellington has further need of Sharpe’s unique skills. A nice touch that Wellington is very clear abo Sharpe’s Fury in 2006 was, astonishingly, the previous Richard Sharpe book. What a delight to have him back after all these years. This is set right in the aftermath of Waterloo (well worth reading that again before this, you don’t need to but it provides great context). Sharpe and his troops are burying their dead and coming to terms with Napoleon’s defeat. Expecting a rest they find the Duke of Wellington has further need of Sharpe’s unique skills. A nice touch that Wellington is very clear about Sharpe and how best to use him rather than looking down at him. So Sharpe is spearheading the main army towards Paris, but has to break the journey for the “minor” impossible task of taking a castle and freeing an important prisoner. Once in Paris, he finds a very different mission and struggles to know who to trust in a city whose citizens have just lost a critical battle. And in Paris, there is danger around every corner, but then Sharpe has history as a street fighter…. The big question is whether the author has recaptured that special something after all these years, and fans will be delighted that he has. Sharpe is battle weary but we see plenty of reminders of him both as a character but an experienced and respected leader of men. Some nice glimpses and memories of previous characters along with reflection of the journey he and Pat Harper have been through. Like all Sharpe novels it is a page turner and it was fantastic to have him back after all this time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kieran McAndrew

    Bonaparte's army is defeated at Waterloo and Lord Wellington dispatches Lieutenant Colonel Sharpe to the town of Ham to rescue a mysterious prisoner who may hold they key to ending the war permanently. Following the march to Paris, Sharpe meets resistance from a distrusting French Countess and her staff, who believe that he is not there to protect them, but steal their estate from under them. Meanwhile, a dangerous French officer has designs to kill Wellington and only Sharpe stands in his way. Co Bonaparte's army is defeated at Waterloo and Lord Wellington dispatches Lieutenant Colonel Sharpe to the town of Ham to rescue a mysterious prisoner who may hold they key to ending the war permanently. Following the march to Paris, Sharpe meets resistance from a distrusting French Countess and her staff, who believe that he is not there to protect them, but steal their estate from under them. Meanwhile, a dangerous French officer has designs to kill Wellington and only Sharpe stands in his way. Cornwell slips easily back into the world of his famous officer raised from the ranks and has written a bravura epilogue to the heroic guttersnipe's march to being a gentleman.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lee Revell

    I had begged (via his website) for Bernard Cornwell to do one more Sharpe for several years. I pretty much counted down the days from when the UK release date was announced and I was not disappointed. Don't know about anyone else, but for me the novel answers quite a few questions I had regarding Sharpe and indeed some of his men after the Battle of Waterloo. I think, without intention Bernard Cornwell has given me some life lessons through the entire Sharpe series....... The biggest of these being: I had begged (via his website) for Bernard Cornwell to do one more Sharpe for several years. I pretty much counted down the days from when the UK release date was announced and I was not disappointed. Don't know about anyone else, but for me the novel answers quite a few questions I had regarding Sharpe and indeed some of his men after the Battle of Waterloo. I think, without intention Bernard Cornwell has given me some life lessons through the entire Sharpe series....... The biggest of these being: The best form of revenge (for want of a better word) is to live your best life and be happy. Sharpe's Assassin is the perfect blend of old and new characters. My only pang of regret is my 100% certainty that this is the last time we'll see a new Sharpe. Although that is the hallmark of Cornwell's genius..... "Always leave them wanting more." I'm grateful to the author, and to Sharpe, Harper fictional Wellington, Hogan and all the other characters who have kept me company over more than 20 years. And finally to Sean Bean, who introduced me to Sharpe as a 15 year old boy. I fell in love with the concept of a private soldier becoming an officer in the British army in a time when it did not happen that often. I owe all these characters and the author and sincere debt of gratitude.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    "The war was over. And Richard Sharpe was going to war." Like a warm blanket. It's been 15(!) years since the last Richard Sharpe novel (Sharpe's Fury) and Cornwell's return to the Napoleonic wars and common soldier-turned British officer is like meeting an old friend and immediately settling into your old routines, in-jokes, and rhythms without missing a beat. Sharpe's Assassin immediately follows the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo (Sharpe's Waterloo) and newly promoted Lieutenant Colonel Sharp "The war was over. And Richard Sharpe was going to war." Like a warm blanket. It's been 15(!) years since the last Richard Sharpe novel (Sharpe's Fury) and Cornwell's return to the Napoleonic wars and common soldier-turned British officer is like meeting an old friend and immediately settling into your old routines, in-jokes, and rhythms without missing a beat. Sharpe's Assassin immediately follows the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo (Sharpe's Waterloo) and newly promoted Lieutenant Colonel Sharpe and Sergeant Major (retired?) Harper are interrupted from burying their dead compatriots and summoned by the Duke of Wellington to storm a remote bastion/prison complex. This quickly reveals a larger plot device of the British trying to recover European artwork stolen by the French Army over the years and stored in the Louvre as well as a mission to stop a group of Bonapartist die-hards. This also has Sharpe reuniting with his former company commander and the man responsible for having him flogged as an enlisted man, Major Morris. The action is kinetic and tight, the banter with lords and ladies is quick-witted and just disrespectful enough by Sharpe to keep things punchy, and angry-Sharpe remains a great literary joy. Going back into Sharpe's world invites inevitable comparisons to Cornwell's other long series, The Last Kingdom, and its main character Uhtred of Bebbanburg. On balance, Sharpe's world is so much more enjoyable. Uhtred and Sharpe are essentially the same character, but while Uhtred and his world are dreary, dour, and perennially gray, Sharpe and his world has a *spark* to it that makes the world, scenes (action and exposition), and characters feel that much more lively and therefore interesting. Will Sharpe and Harper march again? Hard to say, but I had a wonderful time tagging along for the ride.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam Barnes

    After 15 years of waiting, countless reenactments, numerous visits to Waterloo, including Waterloo 200, becoming friends with several of the Sharpe Cast, it's finally arrived! And boy am I happy. Having first discovered Sharpe back in 2006, I quickly devoured them all, culminating in a BA dissertation on the 95th, an MA on the 95th, and joining the ranks of the 95th Rifles as a reenactor. This book has been a long time coming for me, I've re-read the books countless times, religiously watched the After 15 years of waiting, countless reenactments, numerous visits to Waterloo, including Waterloo 200, becoming friends with several of the Sharpe Cast, it's finally arrived! And boy am I happy. Having first discovered Sharpe back in 2006, I quickly devoured them all, culminating in a BA dissertation on the 95th, an MA on the 95th, and joining the ranks of the 95th Rifles as a reenactor. This book has been a long time coming for me, I've re-read the books countless times, religiously watched the films, and always wanted more! So... Sharpe's Assassin. I LOVED it! Starting the day after Sharpe's Waterloo, and following the British Army's advance and occupation of Paris. There's the usual battle scenes, and Sharpe as usual finds himself in a spot of peril every so often, alongside Sjt Patrick Harper. It was great to get reacquainted with so many characters which have popped up through the series, some unwelcome additions, but it would've been great to see a long dead character pop back up. Such a shame, but he was firmly killed!!! All in all, it's a 5* book, the excitement and anticipation of waiting for this book was well worth it, the story was great. Well worth the wait

  8. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    A colorful read that had me precisely in the moment, breathless and wanting more! I’m a huge Richard Sharpe fan. Helped along by first meeting Sharpe as a tv program years ago. The rifleman from the dregs of society who took the kings shilling and went off “over the hills and far away” to fight Napoleon from one end of the European peninsula to the other, “ ‘From Portugal to the heart of France,” and now onto Paris. It’s 1815 and post Waterloo. Sharpe has been tasked as he so laconically puts it, A colorful read that had me precisely in the moment, breathless and wanting more! I’m a huge Richard Sharpe fan. Helped along by first meeting Sharpe as a tv program years ago. The rifleman from the dregs of society who took the kings shilling and went off “over the hills and far away” to fight Napoleon from one end of the European peninsula to the other, “ ‘From Portugal to the heart of France,” and now onto Paris. It’s 1815 and post Waterloo. Sharpe has been tasked as he so laconically puts it, to “ ‘Get first into France, capture a fortress, release some prisoners, and then rejoin the army.’ “ And that’s just the beginning of Sharpe’s current enterprise. Cornwell is just so descriptive! I was in the thick of battles, I came into Paris, held my anger in and honed it, as I channeled Richard Sharpe. And the old friends well met…even the memories evoked. Sharpe is tasked to hunt down an organization La Fraternité bent on assassinating Wellington, under the cover of restoring stolen paintings housed in the Louvre. (read Cornwell’s historical notes for more info.) If like me you love Cornwell’s writing and you’re attracted by the underdog who wins through, the irreverent scamp with a solid sense of integrity, who can cut through to the chase with no holds barred, then Richard Sharpe, a ‘forlorn hope’ survivor is your man. So many memories tied up in this novel. The gems of historical information Cornwell drops enlighten. Like Sharpe insisting men pay the conquered populace properly for supplies and not with worthless metal buttons hammered down to look like “genuine coinage.” Historical writing that truly engages! A Harper ARC via NetGalley Please note: Quotes taken from an advanced reading copy maybe subject to change (Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martin Paul

    Richard Sharpe is back! It's been a while, but Richard Sharpe is back, and it's like he never left. "Sharpe's Assassin" is pure, classic Sharpe and fans will not be disappointed. Our favourite characters are all back, with an old nemesis, a new enemy, and some new friends all thrown together in the aftermath of the famous battle. The book picks up directly after the events of "Sharpe's Waterloo", with Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe and Harper sadly burying Dan Hagman. But they're not even done before W Richard Sharpe is back! It's been a while, but Richard Sharpe is back, and it's like he never left. "Sharpe's Assassin" is pure, classic Sharpe and fans will not be disappointed. Our favourite characters are all back, with an old nemesis, a new enemy, and some new friends all thrown together in the aftermath of the famous battle. The book picks up directly after the events of "Sharpe's Waterloo", with Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe and Harper sadly burying Dan Hagman. But they're not even done before Wellington sends Sharpe to Paris to help retrieve some prisoners vital to the cause. Napoleon might be down but he and his supporters are not out. What follows is a tale that blends seamlessly with the saga fans love. The South Essex, as was, continues to follow Sharpe, even as he descends into the murky world of spies and conspiracies. Patrick Harper remains the true and strong friend that Sharpe depends on, as he struggles with the demands of a war he thought he was done with, and longs to return with his family to Normandy. Wellington remains the brusque, dour man we love, although his respect for Sharpe perhaps shines though a bit more now. We have all the components of a fine Sharpe story - an impregnable citadel to breach, rights to wrong, battles we simple cannot win, but do, and a baddie, who turns out to be a decent guy. Through the clever use of conversation and musings, we even get a potted history of Sharpe's life so far, for the benefit of new readers. Cornwell's research is as spot-on as usual, and he's careful to separate fact from fiction in the afterword, for perfectionists. Bernard Cornwell might well frown, but I simple cannot read a Sharpe novel now without hearing the voices of Sean Bean and Daragh O'Malley as Harper, and it adds an extra element to my enjoyment. No apologies. "Sharpe's Assassin" is what fans old and new have been waiting for, and I can't recommend it highly enough. Form line and get stuck in!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Williams

    Superb, you wouldn't think any time had passed at all from the last time Cornwell wrote Sharpe. Conspiracy and intrigue set immediately after Sharpe's Waterloo with the French in retreat but not truly beaten finds Sharpe sent to Paris to stop a supposed group of assassins loyal to Bonaparte who threaten Wellington's life. Simply a great adventure story as usual, full of action with a perfect ending. . .you know what you are getting with Sharpe and I was very excited to have a new story. Superb, you wouldn't think any time had passed at all from the last time Cornwell wrote Sharpe. Conspiracy and intrigue set immediately after Sharpe's Waterloo with the French in retreat but not truly beaten finds Sharpe sent to Paris to stop a supposed group of assassins loyal to Bonaparte who threaten Wellington's life. Simply a great adventure story as usual, full of action with a perfect ending. . .you know what you are getting with Sharpe and I was very excited to have a new story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    L.M. Mountford

    A fresh new instalment in the Sharpe series that's delightfully refreshing and hints at more from the much-loved franchise. The only drawback is that as this is set between Sharpe's Waterloo and Devil, there is no question about whether or not Sharp and Harper will survive. A fresh new instalment in the Sharpe series that's delightfully refreshing and hints at more from the much-loved franchise. The only drawback is that as this is set between Sharpe's Waterloo and Devil, there is no question about whether or not Sharp and Harper will survive.

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Newcomb

    It has been so long since we had a new Sharp novel and now that he has settled down, the usual seduction chapter was missing but otherwise he violently overcomes all obstacles against all of the odds. Great to see him back.

  13. 5 out of 5

    The Word Whisperer

    Waterloo Wasn’t the End of Sharpe’s War Sharpe is back, in this follow up story to Sharpe’s Waterloo SYSNOPSIS: Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe thought the Battle of Waterloo is the end of his war. He’s longing for the simple life in Normandy with Lucille and their son. But Wellington has one more battle for Sharpe. An English prisoner is being kept in the citadel of Ham, and Wellington wants him freed. Bonaparte is still at large after fleeing the battlefield, but there are whispers that La Fraternite’ Waterloo Wasn’t the End of Sharpe’s War Sharpe is back, in this follow up story to Sharpe’s Waterloo SYSNOPSIS: Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe thought the Battle of Waterloo is the end of his war. He’s longing for the simple life in Normandy with Lucille and their son. But Wellington has one more battle for Sharpe. An English prisoner is being kept in the citadel of Ham, and Wellington wants him freed. Bonaparte is still at large after fleeing the battlefield, but there are whispers that La Fraternite’, a loyal group of men to Bonaparte, who have vowed to fight to the bitter end, are planning an assassination attempt on Wellington himself. The war may be over, but Sharpe has one more battle to fight. REVIEW: As I flick through to the first page, the theme tune from the televised series is being played in my head. With the first dialogue all I can hear is Sean Bean’s voice as the roguish British soldier, Sharpe. Along with the Irish brogue of Sargent Pat Harper played by Daragh O'Malley, and it feels like old friends are back with a new tale to tell.  I always find it intriguing after watching an adaptation of a book, the actors who play the characters, always take on the persona in my imaginings when reading the next book in the series. And its no different with this latest instalment in the saga.   “He’s a rogue, a damned rogue, but he’s, my rogue. He also has the devil’s own luck and he wins his fights. And pray God he wins this one, ......” The Duke of Wellington.   Once more the indomitable Sharpe (Sean Bean) is called on to do the dirty work only a rogue could do so well. Ordered to capture a citadel on a fools errand, Sharpe has to use guise and cunning to capture it, without the risk of losing any more of his battalion. But his battle is only partly done. After freeing the English prisoner, Sharpe now finds himself, along with Harper, a Mister Fox and only a dozen men, left to infiltrate Paris, discover the identities of La Fraternite' and stop any assassination attempt from occurring. All the while protecting Mister Fox as he tries to identify stolen art the French have stolen. During this Sharpe encounters a member of La Fraternite' who is the mirror image of Sharpe in cunning and ruthlessness. How do you defeat an opponent that you admire? That is the conundrum facing Sharpe. Cornwell once more used his mastery to draw you back into Sharpe's life and left you rooting for this extraordinary man, who despite his humble beginnings is more of a gentleman than the officer's he’s surrounded by. Who can't help rooting for the underdog who rises above it all? VERDICT: 4****/5 A page turner from the start, filled with all the action you expect Cornwell’s books. I just wish Sean Bean was able to reprise his role of Sharpe, as this is one of Sharpe's adventures that deserves to be adapted.   Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an advanced digital copy to review. Sharpe's Assassin is out 30th September to buy.  

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emma Cox

    After a long hiatus, Sharpe is back and in fighting form. Despite the French defeat at Waterloo, Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe’s war has not yet ended. Wellington’s orders send him to Paris, but first he must break out an imprisoned spy, whose information is key to discovering a group of revenge seeking revolutionaries, intent on assassinating the Duke. But Sharpe wants the war to be done and return to Normandy with Lucille and his son. To keep fighting a war that is already won seems senseless, but After a long hiatus, Sharpe is back and in fighting form. Despite the French defeat at Waterloo, Lieutenant-Colonel Sharpe’s war has not yet ended. Wellington’s orders send him to Paris, but first he must break out an imprisoned spy, whose information is key to discovering a group of revenge seeking revolutionaries, intent on assassinating the Duke. But Sharpe wants the war to be done and return to Normandy with Lucille and his son. To keep fighting a war that is already won seems senseless, but fighting is in Sharpe’s blood. From his childhood, right through Flanders, India, Portugal, Spain and France, he has clawed his way from the gutters into the ranks, and now he must find these assassins and fight a monster, or die trying. Long-standing readers of the series will know exactly what to expect, and won’t be disappointed. Of course, Harper accompanies our rogue hero; I have thoroughly missed reading these two! I love their friendship and the banter between them. It was interesting to follow Sharpe around 19th century Paris, which is vividly brought to life by the historical research. Cornwell also writes brilliant villains, and they come in the guises of both the French enemy, and as an unwelcome character from Sharpe’s past. There are also the usual foppish characters on Sharpe’s side who he finds infuriating, and the common soldiers—his own troops—who he is immensely proud of. Plus, there is a touching opening where Sharpe and Harper say goodbye to a friend, and a bloody good rifleman. Cornwell gives enough backstory to the series so far, but readers new to Sharpe might benefit from holding back reading this novel and go first to some of the earlier books. I recommend Sharpe’s Eagle, the first written, or Sharpe’s Tiger, the first in chronological order. Long-term fans of the books will have no trouble, and it is a welcome addition to the series, and I hope there is more to follow. An ARC was provided to me for free by the publisher via Net Galley in return for an honest review

  15. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    In a previous review of one of Bernard Cornwell's books in the Last Kingdom series, I complained that I thought that the series had gone on too long and compared it to the Sharpe series I implied that Cornwell had stopped before he ran out of steam. Lo and behold he then wrote another Sharpe book, and rightly so ! The characters and plot are still pin point sharp.(No pun intended). The story is still a cracking good read and a real page turner. I know that Cornwell is shoehorning new stories into In a previous review of one of Bernard Cornwell's books in the Last Kingdom series, I complained that I thought that the series had gone on too long and compared it to the Sharpe series I implied that Cornwell had stopped before he ran out of steam. Lo and behold he then wrote another Sharpe book, and rightly so ! The characters and plot are still pin point sharp.(No pun intended). The story is still a cracking good read and a real page turner. I know that Cornwell is shoehorning new stories into Sharpe's timeline but he is doing so successfully and long may he continue to do so.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Adkins

    Sharp is back After a 15-year hiatus Bernard Cornwell returns to the Sharp Series. For those that are not familiar with the series, it is about a British Soldier Richard Sharpe who started as a private in the army and then through acts of bravery is made an officer in the 95th Rifles Regiment. The author uses actual British battles that occurred during the Napoleonic Wars (1805-1815) and has Sharpe and his men involved in them in some manner. This book Sharpe’s Assassin takes place immediately af Sharp is back After a 15-year hiatus Bernard Cornwell returns to the Sharp Series. For those that are not familiar with the series, it is about a British Soldier Richard Sharpe who started as a private in the army and then through acts of bravery is made an officer in the 95th Rifles Regiment. The author uses actual British battles that occurred during the Napoleonic Wars (1805-1815) and has Sharpe and his men involved in them in some manner. This book Sharpe’s Assassin takes place immediately after the Battle of Waterloo, June 1815, where the British finally defeated Napoleon’s forces. He is then given a mission by the Duke of Wellington which sees him going to Paris and dealing with a faction of French soldiers that are not happy with the losses at Waterloo and aim to seek revenge. If you were worried that the author has lost his edge over time well don’t be. This book has all the elements of a great Sharpe story, lots of action, humour and interesting depictions of military life and battle. If you have never read any of the previous Sharpe books don’t worry, they are more or less stand-alone novels and can be read in any order, in fact, there is always a debate about what order you should read them in, the order in which they are published or the historical order that the books take place in. I do recommend that you read Sharpe’s Waterloo prior to this one as that sets up the events that take place in this book. Also check out the British TV series Sharpe where Sean Bean portrays Richard Sharpe, perfect casting.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Oundle Crime

    Thirty-one years after the publication of Sharpe’s Waterloo (the penultimate book in his Richard Sharpe series) Bernard Cornwell has just published a new Sharpe novel – Sharpe’s Assassin – and it’s a great story. It’s set in the days and weeks immediately after the Battle of Waterloo, because of course that battle didn’t formally end the war. It took another three weeks for Napoleon to abdicate and for the Allies to establish themselves in Paris. This novel opens with Richard Sharpe being called Thirty-one years after the publication of Sharpe’s Waterloo (the penultimate book in his Richard Sharpe series) Bernard Cornwell has just published a new Sharpe novel – Sharpe’s Assassin – and it’s a great story. It’s set in the days and weeks immediately after the Battle of Waterloo, because of course that battle didn’t formally end the war. It took another three weeks for Napoleon to abdicate and for the Allies to establish themselves in Paris. This novel opens with Richard Sharpe being called from the battlefield, where he is burying dead colleagues and friends, to attend the Duke of Wellington. Before the battle, Sharpe had been promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel to give him a rank suitable to be an aide to William, Prince of Orange. Later, during the fighting, he took command of his battalion as officers fell. None of this had been missed by the Duke of Wellington who now wants him for a special mission. While the Allies are pushing through France to reach Paris, Sharpe’s battalion is ordered to divert to a town called Ham, near Péronne, to capture a fortress where an English spy is being held prisoner. Of course he succeeds in typical style, with trickery and gung-ho daring. From there the battalion and the freed English spy proceed to Paris with all haste, because Napoleon’s loyalists are organising themselves for a fightback. In the back streets of Paris they have to battle an unseen enemy and there are spies, treachery and betrayals to overcome. It’s great stuff and like all good adventures this ends well – for Sharpe anyway, if less so for a lot of French soldiers! It’s cheerful escapism, where instead of white hats, the heroes wear Rifleman’s Green. My verdict What I love about all Bernard Cornwell’s books is that he tells his stories with such gusto. Of course, historical facts are the bedrock of the novels but he weaves so much more into them that his characters always leap off the page. He also has a real feel for landscape and atmosphere, so you can’t help but be pulled into the story. Over the years I’ve read all the Sharpe novels and they are great adventures. And while you can follow the Peninsular War step-by-step with Sharpe, from 1807-1815, it never feels like a history lesson. They are really interesting novels, grounded in fact yet great fun to read. As for Sharpe’s Assassin, it seemed strange to be reading about Sharpe again after such a long time, but it was just as much fun. And I rather hope this new story will introduce a new generation of readers to the Sharpe series. This earns 4+ Stars from me. Review by: Oundle Crime

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark taylor

    I got Sharpe’s Assassin by Bernard Cornwell. From NetGalley for a fair and honest review. Sharpe’s Assassin is the latest in the book in the Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell. The Novel is set straight after the Battle of Waterloo, where the Napoleon has finally been defeated. Although there are remnants of the French Army that want exact revenge on the victorious allies. With this in mind the Duke first orders Sharpe to free an important prisoner, from a fortified castle and then got to Paris and I got Sharpe’s Assassin by Bernard Cornwell. From NetGalley for a fair and honest review. Sharpe’s Assassin is the latest in the book in the Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell. The Novel is set straight after the Battle of Waterloo, where the Napoleon has finally been defeated. Although there are remnants of the French Army that want exact revenge on the victorious allies. With this in mind the Duke first orders Sharpe to free an important prisoner, from a fortified castle and then got to Paris and stop any revenge attacks on the Allies. It’s been a few years since I read the any of the books in the Sharpe Series, and even longer since Bernard Cornwell has written one, so it was with great delight when I saw a new one was out. Now there was some trepidation in starting this book as there are times when a writer goes back and writes a book from a series which he has not written in quiet a while, then the quality suffers. However, with Bernard Cornwell and Sharpe’s Assassin, I was not disappointed. Though I would not say this is the best Richard Sharpe novel, it is the type of writing and format of all those classic books, action throughout the book. Which readers of those original books will enjoy. In addition to this with Tom Harper in the story and the way he and Sharpe, get on really made the book for me. All in all, I would defiantly recommend the novel to people who have read previous books in the series as well as new readers, as the books can be read as standalone novels. So, give Bernard Cornwell’s latest novel in the Richard Sharpe series Sharpes Assassin a go.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David

    It's been 15 years or so since Bernard Cornwell last returned to perhaps his most famous creation Richard Sharpe, in Sharpe's Fury. In chronological order, that was then, novel # 11 of 23 (including short stories in that count). While Cornwell continued on with his 'Saxon Stories / Last Kingdom' series starring Uhtred of Bebbanburg (read those. Enjoyed those), I've always held a soft spot for the soldier-up-from-the-ranks of Richard Sharpe, so I was quite happy to hear that he would be returning t It's been 15 years or so since Bernard Cornwell last returned to perhaps his most famous creation Richard Sharpe, in Sharpe's Fury. In chronological order, that was then, novel # 11 of 23 (including short stories in that count). While Cornwell continued on with his 'Saxon Stories / Last Kingdom' series starring Uhtred of Bebbanburg (read those. Enjoyed those), I've always held a soft spot for the soldier-up-from-the-ranks of Richard Sharpe, so I was quite happy to hear that he would be returning to that character. This is that return, chronologically novel # 23 of 24, taking place almost immediately after the Battle of Waterloo (worth reading Sharpe's Waterloo again - you don't need to, but it gives context). There's no historical battle (for the setting) this time around; instead we have Sharpe getting caught up in/foil an a plot to assassinate the Duke of Wellington - who, here, seems to have mellowed somewhat towards Sharpe - and the returning King Louis XVIII, with a large portion of the novel set in and around the environs of Paris (in particular The Louvre). Good to have Sharpe and Harper back together!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Belinda Mitchell-Innes

    An exceedingly jolly jape. Once I received this I basically sat down and read this. Mumbling at anyone with the temerity to interrupt me. I loved Sharpe the first time round (all 20 plus rounds come to think of it) and here Sharpe is back, with a son in tow and his delicious aristocrat partner. What is very clever in this novel is the way Bernard Cornwell manages to introduce enough of the back story into the novel without irritating you if you've read the series. I believe he does this so well y An exceedingly jolly jape. Once I received this I basically sat down and read this. Mumbling at anyone with the temerity to interrupt me. I loved Sharpe the first time round (all 20 plus rounds come to think of it) and here Sharpe is back, with a son in tow and his delicious aristocrat partner. What is very clever in this novel is the way Bernard Cornwell manages to introduce enough of the back story into the novel without irritating you if you've read the series. I believe he does this so well you could read this as a stand alone novel and still enjoy it. It's interesting that whilst there is an over arching story line about the plot to assassinate Wellington, it equally well could have been written as three stand alone long stories. Loads of action, killing and interesting forms of attack. Fast paced and exhilarating. Thinking about Sharpe as I sit writing this I'm very much reminded of Hercules and the scale of his labours and the inventive way he solves them. One of the reasons I have always loved these novels is that they are what I call 'twofers', ie great story and plot plus a good amount of history sprinkled in. I particularly loved the section in Paris where I discovered a whole series of facts I hadn't been aware of before, elephants, monkeys, ladders, second class medals and vine yards. Wonderful to met Pat Harper again as well. All in all a rollicking read. I received this as an APC from NetGalley in return for reviewing it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Lloyd

    I'm sorry I'm not feeling this latest addition to the Sharpe Books, although I do welcome the Author bringing him back. Some unanswered questions from years gone by have been concluded and its good to Sharpe and Harper back together, though it wasn't the book the hype suggested. For a start it seems rushed and unedited, there are several mistakes, which is very unlike Cornwell. The characters are ill described and Fox has to be one of the most generic and boring of the whole series. The action sce I'm sorry I'm not feeling this latest addition to the Sharpe Books, although I do welcome the Author bringing him back. Some unanswered questions from years gone by have been concluded and its good to Sharpe and Harper back together, though it wasn't the book the hype suggested. For a start it seems rushed and unedited, there are several mistakes, which is very unlike Cornwell. The characters are ill described and Fox has to be one of the most generic and boring of the whole series. The action scene which for many I'm sure are here are also loose. There seems to be a 'Dan Brown' feel to this. There was as the Author points out fighting on the way to Paris, but this book does not tell it, Sharpe also seems to have turned very 21st century with his words. There are also two 'lol' moments in the book involving Harper, which compared with the other books are either hilarious or tragic depending on your view. At best this was heading for an average 3/5 but it completely tailed off. Hold it against some of the great Sharpe Books, Rifles, Enemy, Gold and Siege and it feel very different. Only Sharpe's Devil would be close in terms of it on the low rating. A strange omission is the reference to one of the authors other works 'Redcoat' Why? Its by far the best book out of the whole collection. I do still hope to see Sharpe march somewhere again, But I'll likely hold back from purchasing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam Ra

    New instalment after 15 years! The story picks on right after Waterloo, which is a great way to add on a new book to the wonderful series. Sharpe and Harper are sent to capture a fort without a single artillery piece, to live undercover in the occupied Paris to protect an art expert and spy in one person as well as to make a final battle in a dark mansion. All that ordered by the Duke himself. The war is over or is it? The novel is uneven. The spy story seems a bit chaotic, the tension is built a New instalment after 15 years! The story picks on right after Waterloo, which is a great way to add on a new book to the wonderful series. Sharpe and Harper are sent to capture a fort without a single artillery piece, to live undercover in the occupied Paris to protect an art expert and spy in one person as well as to make a final battle in a dark mansion. All that ordered by the Duke himself. The war is over or is it? The novel is uneven. The spy story seems a bit chaotic, the tension is built and then lost. Somewhere in the second half the storytelling becomes compelling again. I particularly enjoyed the situational humour resulting from the visits to the Louvre. Some tropes are cheesy -- a secret organisation, the Monster, Napoleon's devils. Others are very entertaining, such as the atmosphere of Paris suspended between war and peace, wine smuggling, grotesque statues. The warmer relationship between Sharpe and the Duke is an interesting development. The trope of fearing death and avoiding battle that started in the last previous books is wonderfully continued here. Sharpe truly revolts about unnecessary loss of life when the war was supposed to be over, broods on losing "good men", which now involves his rankers as much as the Frenchmen. At the same time Sharpe has become a wonderful leader. Devoted to his men, taking pride in knowing them all and their abilities as well as their inglorious past.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laurence Baldwin

    And he's back! After such a long wait Sharpe is back, and it was such a relief to settle into the familiar style and enjoy one more adventure. Set in the post-Waterloo campaign of the summer of 1815 (Abba were wrong, of course, Naploeon didn't surrender at Waterloo!), I loved the tribute to Hagman. Many fans were upset at Hagman's demise at the battle, but he is referenced a few times during this tale, by way of making up for that! Cornwell has managed to fit this into the existing timeline well And he's back! After such a long wait Sharpe is back, and it was such a relief to settle into the familiar style and enjoy one more adventure. Set in the post-Waterloo campaign of the summer of 1815 (Abba were wrong, of course, Naploeon didn't surrender at Waterloo!), I loved the tribute to Hagman. Many fans were upset at Hagman's demise at the battle, but he is referenced a few times during this tale, by way of making up for that! Cornwell has managed to fit this into the existing timeline well, and even recognises the contribution of the Prussians to the campaign, albeit with the grudging Anglocentric view of the world which his main character usually maintains. One thing I particularly liked, and which IS present in the other novels, is Sharpe's respect for other combatants as soldiers trapped in the politics of the situation, rather than seeing them as one dimensional enemies. Sharpe's war-weariness and increasing awareness of his own mortality is at the forefront again, as it is with other later period stories in the series, making him more human and relatable. As always Cornwell's fight scenes remain the best descriptions in fiction of the down and dirty brutality of hand to hand combat. My copy was the signed special edition from Waterstones which includes 'extra content', that turns out to be the short story 'Sharpe's Ransom', previously published by the Sharpe Appreciation Society in 2003 (as part of 'Shape's Christmas').

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew McAuley

    Sharpe marches again, for I think the twenty-second time. The same old story is here: inept and cowardly officer who clashes with Sharpe, insurmountable odds, an implacable French foe and Sharpe sent by the Duke on a quest like he's the main character in a computer game where he has to defeat the enemy army single-handed. There is not much new in Sharpe' Assassin other than there is no large-scale battle, but the book stays true to Cornwall's tradition of basically writing the same book over and Sharpe marches again, for I think the twenty-second time. The same old story is here: inept and cowardly officer who clashes with Sharpe, insurmountable odds, an implacable French foe and Sharpe sent by the Duke on a quest like he's the main character in a computer game where he has to defeat the enemy army single-handed. There is not much new in Sharpe' Assassin other than there is no large-scale battle, but the book stays true to Cornwall's tradition of basically writing the same book over and over. There are no surprises and as always, Cornwall reuses the same descriptions he's presented in the previous books, although I didn't get to tick-off Fusiliers skinning their knuckles on bayonets while loading their muskets, which it feels like appeared in all the previous Sharpe books. Although Assassin is as a complete rehash of previous work, it does work the Sharpe books are always entertaining, silly as they sometimes are, it is 'boys own' escapism that might not be so popular if it ever tried to do anything differently. It does however feel a little shorter than many of the earlier books Assassin is the second to last book chronologically and ends with the close of the Napoleoinic Wars, but I expect it will be far from the last adventure for Colonel Sharpe.

  25. 5 out of 5

    The Bauchler

    I believe the working title was 'Sharpe’s Grump':) Ol' Dick is still a grumpy man - despite everything going quite well for the guy these days. He doesn't suffer (many) of the usual trials and tribulations he has in the past, but he's still a bitter chap. Actually, in this latest tale he's probably as comfortably off as he's ever been. Certainly we no longer have the statutory disdainful superior officer character anymore...but oh, how he still rails against the injustices of Regency England, and I believe the working title was 'Sharpe’s Grump':) Ol' Dick is still a grumpy man - despite everything going quite well for the guy these days. He doesn't suffer (many) of the usual trials and tribulations he has in the past, but he's still a bitter chap. Actually, in this latest tale he's probably as comfortably off as he's ever been. Certainly we no longer have the statutory disdainful superior officer character anymore...but oh, how he still rails against the injustices of Regency England, and he rails in a Sean Bean Yorkshire accent, if you have the Audible version. I now really read the novels for Harper - a much more interesting/complex character and without whom Sharpe is really pretty dull. The passages where their conversation/friendship appear are easily the most interesting and often touching. Despite all the above I still enjoyed this latest dose of Sharpe. I will, like ever faithful Harper, continue

  26. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    Richard Sharpe one of my favorite series. It’s been a LONG time since #21, so I anxiously dove into #22 (which could easily be read as a standalone novel). It’s set in and around Paris in 1815, right after the Battle of Waterloo. Sharpe, a grizzled veteran, is on a special mission - directly from The Duke of Wellington (a reoccurring series character) - to save Europe’s art stolen by the French. (Sounds familiar? Like the movie/book “The Monuments Men”?) Along with his small hand-picked crew, ou Richard Sharpe one of my favorite series. It’s been a LONG time since #21, so I anxiously dove into #22 (which could easily be read as a standalone novel). It’s set in and around Paris in 1815, right after the Battle of Waterloo. Sharpe, a grizzled veteran, is on a special mission - directly from The Duke of Wellington (a reoccurring series character) - to save Europe’s art stolen by the French. (Sounds familiar? Like the movie/book “The Monuments Men”?) Along with his small hand-picked crew, our hero Sharpe, goes behind enemy lines as the Parisians seethe with animosity for any British. You know, I never considered France immediately following the demise of Napoleon. And neither did I consider that the Louvre contained ill-gotten treasures. Interesting. Add to this a secret French plot to assassinate England’s leaders, including the Duke. I sure hope there’s a #23. (Oh, and BTW, I sure do like sword fights.)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Sharpe’s Assassin is the twenty-first historical novel in the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell prisoner ll. It is set in June 1815, immediately after the Battle of Waterloo, and during the occupation of Paris. Now a Lieutenant Colonel, Sharpe needs to free an English spy being held prisoner, then get him to Paris. The book is filled with history including Napoleon Bonaparte, King Louis XVIII,the (fictional) Loyalist group La Fraternitie (the Brotherhood), and more. As in the other Sharp Sharpe’s Assassin is the twenty-first historical novel in the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell prisoner ll. It is set in June 1815, immediately after the Battle of Waterloo, and during the occupation of Paris. Now a Lieutenant Colonel, Sharpe needs to free an English spy being held prisoner, then get him to Paris. The book is filled with history including Napoleon Bonaparte, King Louis XVIII,the (fictional) Loyalist group La Fraternitie (the Brotherhood), and more. As in the other Sharpe books, this book features a corrupt senior officer who wants to eliminate Sharpe rather than be caught out for his misdeeds. Although part of a series, the book stands alone nicely and can be enjoyed on its own. Cornwell is my husband’s favorite author, and he grabbed this book as soon as it arrived. He was glued to his Kindle until he finished it, and joins me in thanking Harper and NetGalley for providing the copy in exchange for this honest review. Four stars.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam Jones

    Mr Sharpe you have been missed! I have previously read the Sharpe series of books a few years ago, and whilst I struggled to remember what had happened to the main characters in Sharpe's Waterloo, there was enough reference to bring it back to my memory. The author has crafted another signature novel in the series, and I thoroughly loved being transported back into the past again. Whilst marching to Paris after the Battle of Waterloo, is tasked with a new mission by the Duke of Wellington to find o Mr Sharpe you have been missed! I have previously read the Sharpe series of books a few years ago, and whilst I struggled to remember what had happened to the main characters in Sharpe's Waterloo, there was enough reference to bring it back to my memory. The author has crafted another signature novel in the series, and I thoroughly loved being transported back into the past again. Whilst marching to Paris after the Battle of Waterloo, is tasked with a new mission by the Duke of Wellington to find out who wants to assassinate him and stop him. This leads to some twisting and turning as the story moves along at pace, with Sharpe having to rely on his wits and his friend Pat! If you are a fan of the Sharpe books or even historical fiction, then this is highly recommended for you. I was provided a free ARC from NetGalley and the publisher in return for my honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Deans

    Like other reviewers, I have occasionally begged BC via his website to do more Sharpe. What I'd really like is a prequel where we see the end of his childhood, the time in Yorkshire (murder) and joining the army via Hakeswill, but this current story will do just fine. Mind you, the great BC had actually forgotten a few little details from previous books when cobbling this together, but never mind. I forgave him. I guess my main issue with the book is that it felt a little rushed and a little super Like other reviewers, I have occasionally begged BC via his website to do more Sharpe. What I'd really like is a prequel where we see the end of his childhood, the time in Yorkshire (murder) and joining the army via Hakeswill, but this current story will do just fine. Mind you, the great BC had actually forgotten a few little details from previous books when cobbling this together, but never mind. I forgave him. I guess my main issue with the book is that it felt a little rushed and a little superficial. The usual depth to a Sharpe novel wasn't quite there. He also relied on some previously used strategies (more than once) to the extent it was too easy to guess what was coming. That said, I still enjoyed it enough to ration myself to just pages at a time - to prolong the pleasure of being in a new Sharpe world.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Boxell

    Other's give the background so I won't go into detail just say that this is immediately post Waterloo. Sharpe this time is part British Army Officer and part agent acting for Wellington. Many of the usual characters are missing having been killed at Waterloo but one infamous one does return to plague Lt Colonel Richard Sharpe. The action is taunt and, I found, more interesting, than some of the later Sharpe books, though it did have the almost compulsory duel with the bad guy at the end of the bo Other's give the background so I won't go into detail just say that this is immediately post Waterloo. Sharpe this time is part British Army Officer and part agent acting for Wellington. Many of the usual characters are missing having been killed at Waterloo but one infamous one does return to plague Lt Colonel Richard Sharpe. The action is taunt and, I found, more interesting, than some of the later Sharpe books, though it did have the almost compulsory duel with the bad guy at the end of the book.. This one fits between Sharpe's Waterloo and Sharpe's Devil. That last book seemed to me to be the author not so much as expanding Sharpe's story as floundering around looking for a new line as he could not let his famous character go. So, Five Stars. I read this in a day and ignored other tasks to read it: yes it was that compelling.

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