Hot Best Seller

Life Against Death: The Psychoanalytical Meaning of History

Availability: Ready to download

A shocking and extreme interpretation of the father of psychoanalysis.


Compare

A shocking and extreme interpretation of the father of psychoanalysis.

30 review for Life Against Death: The Psychoanalytical Meaning of History

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keith Wilson

    I recently finished reading Life Against Death: The Psychoanalytic Meaning of History by Norman O. Brown. Since it’s a book that only the most psychoanalytically-minded shrink will enjoy, I’ll summarize it for you, so you don’t have to read it. It goes like this. Babies experience the world with the same level of intensity, the same level of pleasure and pain, that you, as an adult, experience sex. This is what Freud meant by Infant Sexuality, or the equally misunderstood phrase, Polymorphous Per I recently finished reading Life Against Death: The Psychoanalytic Meaning of History by Norman O. Brown. Since it’s a book that only the most psychoanalytically-minded shrink will enjoy, I’ll summarize it for you, so you don’t have to read it. It goes like this. Babies experience the world with the same level of intensity, the same level of pleasure and pain, that you, as an adult, experience sex. This is what Freud meant by Infant Sexuality, or the equally misunderstood phrase, Polymorphous Perversity. Freud didn’t mean that babies are sexual in the same way that adults are sexual, only that any sensual stimulation that was not pain was pleasure, everything from sucking your thumb to taking a good dump. In addition, it was easy to take pleasure because you could suck your thumb and take a dump anytime you wanted. This state of affairs made you, as a baby, the observant, engagable creature that you were. The whole world, including yourself, was your plaything. You learned fast, because you were so open to experience and able to experiment. Furthermore, because your parents sheltered you from many of the realities of the world, childhood was a prolonged period of privileged freedom. All this had to change. It began to change the moment your caretaker didn’t come when you called. You found that you were not the master of your domain. Something else, or someone else, was more important than you. You wished you could have whatever they had, so that you could have your caretaker anytime you wanted. This is what is meant by the Oedipal Phase and Penis Envy, two other widely misunderstood Freudian terms. So, what did you do? You suppressed your desires, especially your desire for your caretaker to come immediately, so that you were not made miserable by your desires. Instead of playing freely, you did the things that effectively brought your caretaker to your side. You performed, not for your own pleasure, but for her’s. Your play become work. So that you are not driven mad with pleasure and pain, you deadened your ability to sense. You eventually concentrated sensation to a single, small, hidden part of your body, your genitals. The pleasure you used to feel wherever and whenever, you now confine to the relatively rare act of sex, in a darkened room, with the blinds shut. Brown says this is madness. He says that society represses you, and, to please society, you repress yourself. As a result, you cannot recognize the realities of existence. Erotic energy is sublimated and turned to the production of objects, character structures, and political organizations that yield little pleasure. You alone, of all the animals, repress your true desires, live in continual conflict and guilt, and construct for yourself a corporate neurosis you call civilization. What does Brown propose you do instead? Brown's solution to your problem is the resurrection of the body. You need a science based on eros, a world animated by desire, not on objectivity that detaches mind from body. Therapy would be to return your soul to your body, return your self to yourself, and overcome this state of self alienation. History is the story of this search to reclaim the lost body. It’s the story of the struggle of the forces of life against the limits posed by death. Very interesting, Professor Brown, but I think you’re missing something. I’m all for partnering in a more effective way with the body. We often turn our bodies, in early adulthood, into neglected, abused, beasts of burden. We pay the price for this later. In later adulthood, we turn resentful and cantankerous toward our bodies as they begin to wear down from this treatment. Ever since toilet training, we fail to obey instinct, ignore gut feelings, deny our needs, and repress reasonable desires. We’re like masters that mistreat our slaves. The slaves revolt and then we’re in trouble. So, connect in a meaningful way to the body you have, by all means. Take care of it. Listen to it. Sometimes obey it. You’re not getting rid of your body, so you guys have got to learn to get along. However, you are not repressing yourself just to please society. It is often necessary to repress the immediate needs to the body so that greater gains that you would enjoy can be achieved. In other words: If you take a dump every time you want, you end up sitting around in shitty pants. A baby’s babbling is melodious. When you were a baby, you could make every sound that a human could possibly make. Now, you’ve lost that ability because you domesticated your utterances into a language. Baby cooing is cool; but people understand language; whereas they can’t understand babbling. When you suppress your impulses and follow the rules of a sport, you are no longer playing spontaneously. You may be playing tennis, golf, baseball, or soccer. Playing these sports can give much more pleasure than spontaneous play ever could. Well, maybe not golf. You can think of repression as you think of the net in tennis. If you played tennis without the net, sure, you’d have longer volleys and not have to stop and pick up balls so often, but there wouldn’t be a challenge and you wouldn’t experience the beauty of meeting that challenge with power and grace. History, you see, is a lot like tennis. It’s the story of how you play within limits. You can’t do whatever you want for as long as you want with whomever you want. There are lines, nets, and rules. When you accept those rules and play within them, that’s how life prevails over death. This review will also appear in my blog: www.keithwilsoncounseling.wordpress.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    mimosa maoist

    The sex stuff was more interesting than the death stuff as you might expect, but things pick up again once you get to the poop stuff.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    (revised review-03/19/15) Life Against Death is an intellectually challenging, yet always engaging work in which Brown deploys a Freudian reading of the "meaning" of history. Applying classic psychoanalytic concepts, he argues that forms of social organization can be analyzed as neurotic structures. In the latter part of the book, Brown argues that the forms of social organization in America (e.g. rationalism, Protestantism and capitalism) can be read as neurotic structures that are particularly (revised review-03/19/15) Life Against Death is an intellectually challenging, yet always engaging work in which Brown deploys a Freudian reading of the "meaning" of history. Applying classic psychoanalytic concepts, he argues that forms of social organization can be analyzed as neurotic structures. In the latter part of the book, Brown argues that the forms of social organization in America (e.g. rationalism, Protestantism and capitalism) can be read as neurotic structures that are particularly anal in character. As much as it deploys psychoanalytic concepts in an analysis of history, Brown's book is also an examination of those concepts. Over roughly forty years, Freud wrote many books detailing his theories, and during that time he refined some of his ideas, discarded others, and in some instances admitted that he could not resolve certain points of his theories to his own satisfaction. For its part, Life Against Death reflects an extensive acquaintance with Freud's thought: Brown does not give us the popular Psych 101 versions of concepts like id, reality principle or anal personality, but rather calls attention to the contrast between Freud's early and his later thinking on these and other subjects, as well as exploring that which is paradoxical in Freudian theory. Over his career, Freud struggled with his thought, and in Life Against Death Brown makes some of these struggles his own. For me, the two chapters in which Brown does psychoanalytic readings of the work of Martin Luther and of Jonathan Swift stand out as particularly memorable. Fun fact: during the Second World War, Brown worked for the OSS, a forerunner of the CIA.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    I read this while in Springfield, Vermont visiting a high school friend, Walt Wallace, and his wife, Karen Engdahl. Having finished the book I'd brought, I asked for things they'd recommend and obtained what I think was Karen's copy of 'Life Against Death'. Despite the chill, I read most of it while sitting outside of the local coffee house within earshot of the rapids in the center of town. Now, as everyone knows, Springfield has been identified as the home of the famous Simpson family, but the I read this while in Springfield, Vermont visiting a high school friend, Walt Wallace, and his wife, Karen Engdahl. Having finished the book I'd brought, I asked for things they'd recommend and obtained what I think was Karen's copy of 'Life Against Death'. Despite the chill, I read most of it while sitting outside of the local coffee house within earshot of the rapids in the center of town. Now, as everyone knows, Springfield has been identified as the home of the famous Simpson family, but then it was a quiet place, a former mill town which had been in decline for decades. The most notable element of this particular visit is that I met for the first time high school boys who wore dresses, a phenomenon I expected to spread throughout the country but which apparently remained confined to that area at around that time. What does one expect of the only state in the union to have an avowedly socialist senator? In his own way, Norman O. Brown challenged conventions with his own books. Indeed, he challenged cultural taboos, particularly as regards sexuality, and this from a primarily psychoanalytic perspective somewhat reminiscent of Wilhelm Reich and, yes, even the early Freud. Like Brown, I favor a shameless, highly libidinous openness of imagination. Like Brown, apparently at least, I don't practice it at all.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Arjun Ravichandran

    This is a dense, exhilarating examination of the human condition that takes on the form of a far-reaching interpretation of Freud. The author, in his first book, takes on that grand old seer of human short-sightedness, and takes him further than possibly he himself would have imagined possible. It's an ambitious reach. I can say, without reservation, that this book is truly brooking uncharted territory. The basic theme is this : the human animal, by dint of its deep-rooted guilt, refuses to live This is a dense, exhilarating examination of the human condition that takes on the form of a far-reaching interpretation of Freud. The author, in his first book, takes on that grand old seer of human short-sightedness, and takes him further than possibly he himself would have imagined possible. It's an ambitious reach. I can say, without reservation, that this book is truly brooking uncharted territory. The basic theme is this : the human animal, by dint of its deep-rooted guilt, refuses to live for itself and in itself, and continues churning out more and more history ; with which it then proceeds to aggravate further the guilt of the race. The author (unlike, say, Fromm) does not fall into the trap of opposing the 'noble savage' to the neurotic workaholic ; he shows how the same guilt-complex operated in primitive societies and was unleashed in different ways to our modern methods. To demonstrate this, the author calls on a host of scholars from various fields, including archaeology, anthropology, mysticism, economics, mythology, and (of course), psychoanalysis. It is this emphasis on the continuity of human neurosis across the span of time (and thus, the prevalent 'dead weight of the past on the brains of the living') that gives the book its aura of truly entering into unknown waters. For, if the author's diagnosis is correct, then we have always been neurotic. Thus, the human animal has never really lived. It has substituted a life for itself, a living in eternity, for a living on behalf of 'history'. I especially enjoyed the latter section of the book, where the author shows the hidden neurotic basis of our work culture, and specifically, our relation to money. This is not simply a standard Marxist criticism along the lines of 'false consciousness' (though the author has obviously read good ol' Karl), but is rather, a deeper analysis of the hidden existential guilt that runs our lives, that acts as a subterranean spiritual force that drives us to atone for our existence. The author brilliantly shows how primitive cultures felt this same guilt and sought to extirpate it through group practices such as shamanism, sacrifice, carefully timed bursts of energy etc. In the modern era, man continues to sacrifice himself, to atone for his guilt at being himself. The author shows that the only difference between age-old conceptions of human guilt, and the modern, unspoken feeling of guilt, simply lies in the fact that the former had a coalescing mechanism (forefathers, gods, etc) that did a decent job of purging the adherents of that culture ; in the latter, there is simply no such coalescing structure, making for a vague amorphous feeling of unease, that perfectly fits the vague and amorphous nature of the word 'progress' itself. The author's analysis of a connection between the complex of anality and money was also intriguing, and maliciously entertaining. Gold and shit are the two metaphorical opposites, after all. The chapter on Swift may not be of much interest to those who do not have some knowledge of literary theory, or those who have not read the man in his own words (a category into which I fall into). As mentioned, the book truly heads into uncharted territory ; the last section of the book offers up the author's prescription for undoing the almost-impossibly deep-rooted repression that afflicts the entire human race ; a case of fashioning the shiny noose that with which we hang ourselves. The author steps beyond the Marxist prescription of demolishing the base (with its' assumption that the superstructure will follow), as well as the traditional Freudian understanding of neurosis as an inescapable part of being human. He offers a deeply existential and spiritual approach to undoing repression, by advocating a new culture (in the original sense of the term), that will allow the human animal to live in eternity, rather than foolishly creating more and more history by the avenue of its own self-denial. In conclusion, this is a dense examination that was undoubtedly written for an educated audience. A decent knowledge of Freud is de rigeur, if only to see where the author is coming from and where he takes that thinker. Students of the Frankfurt School, as well as the broader field of critical theory, should enjoy this hefty tome, as well as anyone committed to a rethinking of what it means to be a human being.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I was introduced to Norman O. Brown's ideas thanks to the recommendations of Susan Sontag, and finally got a copy of Life Against Death to see what the big deal was. The answer: 500 pages bogged down in just the worst kind of Freudian analogy-drawing. This isn't to say that it was a waste-- the sections on Swift and Luther are both quite thought-provoking-- but this was something so much a product of the psychoanalysis-dominated, vaguely-but-not-really-Marxist '50s American intellectual scene. N I was introduced to Norman O. Brown's ideas thanks to the recommendations of Susan Sontag, and finally got a copy of Life Against Death to see what the big deal was. The answer: 500 pages bogged down in just the worst kind of Freudian analogy-drawing. This isn't to say that it was a waste-- the sections on Swift and Luther are both quite thought-provoking-- but this was something so much a product of the psychoanalysis-dominated, vaguely-but-not-really-Marxist '50s American intellectual scene. Not impressed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Itai Farhi

    In the spirit of his concluding remarks in favour of letting go of needless polemics, I will emphasise the parts of this book that are essential for the reconstruction of Freudian meta-psychology in the context of radical politics. Reading Brown's section on anality was the first time I understood the ramifications of Freud's discoveries concerning the ubiquity of baldly excremental content in the religious imagination. Brown's analysis of Luther is magisterial, harmonising the sociological inte In the spirit of his concluding remarks in favour of letting go of needless polemics, I will emphasise the parts of this book that are essential for the reconstruction of Freudian meta-psychology in the context of radical politics. Reading Brown's section on anality was the first time I understood the ramifications of Freud's discoveries concerning the ubiquity of baldly excremental content in the religious imagination. Brown's analysis of Luther is magisterial, harmonising the sociological interpretations of Protestantism as the spirit of capitalism with a fascinating examination of the Devil in the anti-capitalist strains of the reformation. Paradoxically, for an author so committed to the irrational, these passages contain some of the clearest, most lucid analysis of an otherwise elusive social formation that I have ever encountered. I took off one star for his eclecticism, another for his valorization of the rhetoric of the sacred. If you are at all interested in the psychology of money, this book is a must. Those looking for clues on what is to be done will be better served searching in Marcuse, who can be read as a companion to Brown. The fact that Brown drifts away from Marxism in Love's Body in no way takes away from the radical vision this book suggests, and Marxists would learn a great deal from engaging seriously with his critique of instrumental reason.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anton

    This is a very, very, important book. It is slow going, at least at my i.q. level. (Three digit..) It may seem repetitive. He hammers away at the main points, all of which are abstract and require some grappling, again depending on your grasping level, and to some extent, your prior reading level. There are, I'm sure, intellectuals all over the world today, this post-modern world that is, who are lost in the weeds that Norman O. Brown has sown. Undoubtedly, I am one. This is a very, very, important book. It is slow going, at least at my i.q. level. (Three digit..) It may seem repetitive. He hammers away at the main points, all of which are abstract and require some grappling, again depending on your grasping level, and to some extent, your prior reading level. There are, I'm sure, intellectuals all over the world today, this post-modern world that is, who are lost in the weeds that Norman O. Brown has sown. Undoubtedly, I am one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Victor de munck

    i haven't read this for 35 years or so and can't say anything but generalities: its still the best book i ever read. connects psychoanalysis with mysticism pragmaticism, econiomics, history and marxism. its a wild ride that lets the brain buzz in on parts and sip nectar and at other times just pass through a dense landscape. i haven't read this for 35 years or so and can't say anything but generalities: its still the best book i ever read. connects psychoanalysis with mysticism pragmaticism, econiomics, history and marxism. its a wild ride that lets the brain buzz in on parts and sip nectar and at other times just pass through a dense landscape.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Alexandra

    There is something relatively amateurish and dry about Brown's voice. The entire time I read this book, I felt how youthful his writing style was when approaching the monolithic work of Freud. I kept saying to myself, i should just read Freud instead of this book. But, now months away from my first reading of this book, I find my thoughts continually return to Brown, and even reading Freud doesnt quite get you to all of the concepts as quickly that are covered in this work. To me, it would make There is something relatively amateurish and dry about Brown's voice. The entire time I read this book, I felt how youthful his writing style was when approaching the monolithic work of Freud. I kept saying to myself, i should just read Freud instead of this book. But, now months away from my first reading of this book, I find my thoughts continually return to Brown, and even reading Freud doesnt quite get you to all of the concepts as quickly that are covered in this work. To me, it would make an excellent beginning book for those who want to get to know more about psychoanalysis, anthropology, and philosophy. Worth reading, but by no means the most eloquent or poetic work. I am told Loves Body is where his poetry begins....

  11. 4 out of 5

    Megan Chia

    3.5/5. Brown approaches psychoanalysis as a theory of human culture most generally, not just as a study limited to certain neurotic people, as Freud intended. He provides a philosophy of history that makes sense of the world through the study of the human psyche, human culture, and history as a whole. Everything has psychoanalytic meaning which must be unpacked, in order to articulate the relationships between culture and neurosis. As such, he covers very fundamental psychoanalytic concepts, and 3.5/5. Brown approaches psychoanalysis as a theory of human culture most generally, not just as a study limited to certain neurotic people, as Freud intended. He provides a philosophy of history that makes sense of the world through the study of the human psyche, human culture, and history as a whole. Everything has psychoanalytic meaning which must be unpacked, in order to articulate the relationships between culture and neurosis. As such, he covers very fundamental psychoanalytic concepts, and key "phenomena" in history. Definitely not one of my favourites but an interesting thought exercise.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Bunch

    Norman O. Brown illustrates Freud's psychoanalytic theory as I've never seen it done before! Not only does Brown make the reader familiar with Freud's initial postulates, he pinpoints the errors and contradictions in Freud's theories and successfully offers theoretical remedies. Brown is unbelievably well read in regards to psychoanalysis as well as anthropological studies and unifies these two fields of study to take the reader on an adventure through the intricacies of human nature. An easy 5- Norman O. Brown illustrates Freud's psychoanalytic theory as I've never seen it done before! Not only does Brown make the reader familiar with Freud's initial postulates, he pinpoints the errors and contradictions in Freud's theories and successfully offers theoretical remedies. Brown is unbelievably well read in regards to psychoanalysis as well as anthropological studies and unifies these two fields of study to take the reader on an adventure through the intricacies of human nature. An easy 5-stars!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yosef the Heretic

    As hardcover Brown falls through the dropbox one does not feel like a lifelong pursuit is being left behind or ought to be recaptured, but that the reason nobody talks about Fraud anymore is because in the rarest of instances the better part of mankind has come to its senses in ceasing to seek sense in come.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Online-University of-the-Left

    Read it back in 1965, together with Marcuse's 'Eros and Civilization.' It fired up 'cultural revolution' views in the new left. But after that, it drifted away from helping us with the matters at hand. Read it back in 1965, together with Marcuse's 'Eros and Civilization.' It fired up 'cultural revolution' views in the new left. But after that, it drifted away from helping us with the matters at hand.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tournoy

    Well informed author. Book is rather for die-hard psychoanalysts. You want to know where your anger comes from? ... What is 'Your' shit? ... Read this one! Links psychoanalysis with mysticism. Well informed author. Book is rather for die-hard psychoanalysts. You want to know where your anger comes from? ... What is 'Your' shit? ... Read this one! Links psychoanalysis with mysticism.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julio Pino

    Mind-blowing exploration of sex, death, and history by an uber-Freudian author. Brown godfathered much of the Sixties free love philosophy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David

    Brown martials an impressive array of scholarship in this exploration of psychoanalytic concepts applied broadly to human history and culture. He bounces Freud off many great works of philosophy, poetry, and theology, and makes some impressive sparks fly. Unfortunately, the book is based on the absurd premise of the "death instinct", a n. A primitive impulse for destruction, decay, and death, manifested by a turning away from pleasure, postulated by Sigmund Freud as coexisting with and opposing t Brown martials an impressive array of scholarship in this exploration of psychoanalytic concepts applied broadly to human history and culture. He bounces Freud off many great works of philosophy, poetry, and theology, and makes some impressive sparks fly. Unfortunately, the book is based on the absurd premise of the "death instinct", a n. A primitive impulse for destruction, decay, and death, manifested by a turning away from pleasure, postulated by Sigmund Freud as coexisting with and opposing the life instinct. Also called Thanatos. Brown values art as a Dionysian and liberating force, rather than as a mere symptomology of the artist's psychic disturbance. The Basic Writings of Sigmund Freud (Psychopathology of Everyday Life, Freud explains how seemingly contradictory thoughts can coexist side by side. The concept of psychological tension may be related to a displeasure or aversion. Freud discussed sexuality. For instance, he noted that bisexual tendencies could be interpreted within the context of a female brain in a male body. The book brings out many aspects of human behavior that we rarely dwell on consciously. It is perfect for a class project in science, psychology or medicine. Freud's theories tend to be very complex Freud posed late in his career when his broad cultural speculations removed him from the concrete realities of therapy. With the instinctual dualism of this sex-death theory, Freud replaced the earlier, more sensible instinctual dualism he had once posed between sex and hunger. The sex-hunger, (or sex-reality, or species survival-individual survival) split that Freud's early work is based on is to my mind the one that makes sense, rooted as it is in concrete biology, and should never have been abandoned. Brown's writing is crippled by its foundation on the "death instinct", which posits all repression as self-repression, thus letting society off the hook for the human misery its strictures cause. In his final chapter, Brown purports to offer "The Way Out" of our societal morass, but the inherently misanthropic, conservative prejudices of 'death instinct' theory leave him capable of only the vaguest platitudes in this direction. Those interested in a real psychological theory of life against death would do well to check out the therapeutic and social writing of Paul Goodman, who wisely dismisses the 'death instinct' and makes some vital practical suggestions for altering our lifeways, at all levels, to allow Eros freer reign

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    I have no idea why this book does not get more play. It is of course a bit dated and perhaps a bit misguided in its move towards 'polymorphous perversity' as the overcoming of repression. That being said I don't read too many books with the same forceful, clear, and original analysis and argumentation. With the resurgence of psychoanalysis in the last decade hopefully this book will be taken up again. I have no idea why this book does not get more play. It is of course a bit dated and perhaps a bit misguided in its move towards 'polymorphous perversity' as the overcoming of repression. That being said I don't read too many books with the same forceful, clear, and original analysis and argumentation. With the resurgence of psychoanalysis in the last decade hopefully this book will be taken up again.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Val

    As someone that has not read Freud, it is possible that much of this book is lost on me. But as a non-Freudian, I must say I find many of the ideas described in the book to be quite bizarre. The chapters entitled "The Protestant Era" and "Filthy Lucre", which explore the relationship, from a psychoanalytical standpoint, between Protestantism and Capitalism are quite interesting, though again one has to put one's Freudian goggles on to make any sense of it. As someone that has not read Freud, it is possible that much of this book is lost on me. But as a non-Freudian, I must say I find many of the ideas described in the book to be quite bizarre. The chapters entitled "The Protestant Era" and "Filthy Lucre", which explore the relationship, from a psychoanalytical standpoint, between Protestantism and Capitalism are quite interesting, though again one has to put one's Freudian goggles on to make any sense of it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lysergius

    If the question "What is the human animal?" is on your mind, read this book! In my opinion, Life Against Death ranks among the most important modern contributions toward an understanding of the human condition. It is on the same short list as Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents and Camus' Myth of Sisyphus. Like these works and indeed the subject, it is not an easy read. If the question "What is the human animal?" is on your mind, read this book! In my opinion, Life Against Death ranks among the most important modern contributions toward an understanding of the human condition. It is on the same short list as Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents and Camus' Myth of Sisyphus. Like these works and indeed the subject, it is not an easy read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bryn

    Of definite interest to those concerned with the potential insights provided by exploring the connections between psychoanalysis & historical materialism- norman o. brown was a brilliant academic, but his true genius was his ability to present complex ideas in a truly engaging and exciting way.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Apparently Martin Luther once warded off the Devil by farting. Just one of the many interesting tidbits in this book. Cites Freud on virtually every page but not afraid to point out the confusions of the "master" (yes he does refer to Freud that way...maybe with some irony). Apparently Martin Luther once warded off the Devil by farting. Just one of the many interesting tidbits in this book. Cites Freud on virtually every page but not afraid to point out the confusions of the "master" (yes he does refer to Freud that way...maybe with some irony).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    As good a interpretation/re-imaging of Freud that you'll find. That it suffers from unrealistic, Utopian thoughts is a mark against it, but otherwise, the chapters on art, money, Marx and Martin Luther, do much to advance a science of mankind. As good a interpretation/re-imaging of Freud that you'll find. That it suffers from unrealistic, Utopian thoughts is a mark against it, but otherwise, the chapters on art, money, Marx and Martin Luther, do much to advance a science of mankind.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Totally blew my mind, very interesting. Didn't agree with a lot of it and is slightly far fetched it seems but a fascinating way to learn about Freud, via Browns interpretations, along with his own ideas of course. Totally blew my mind, very interesting. Didn't agree with a lot of it and is slightly far fetched it seems but a fascinating way to learn about Freud, via Browns interpretations, along with his own ideas of course.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Another gem picked up from the bibliography of the No Dogs group. I could've done without part 4, but the rest of the book is genius. Another gem picked up from the bibliography of the No Dogs group. I could've done without part 4, but the rest of the book is genius.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    I dip in and out of this book that a dear old friend gave me some years ago. Insightful, inspiring, and simply dynamic. Like a headlamp to be worn through certain thick fogs.

  27. 4 out of 5

    EdMohs

    one of the first non-fiction I ever read it was thoughtful and radical in its day major influence on my thoughts

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adriaan Krabbendam

    Eyeopener. Some serious mistakes. Still the thing to read for those who doubt freudian theory. Very useful for literary writers. His "Love's Body" is more a work af art. Eyeopener. Some serious mistakes. Still the thing to read for those who doubt freudian theory. Very useful for literary writers. His "Love's Body" is more a work af art.

  29. 5 out of 5

    pjr8888

    wesleyan paperback edition, fourth printing april 1972 read for M.Div. graduate studies, jauary 1973

  30. 4 out of 5

    Charley Earp

    This book redefined the meaning of Freud and human psychology for me.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...