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Tenement Kid

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Fizzing with an infectious passion for the magic of rock music, Gillespie’s vivid and evocative memoir traces the Primal Scream frontman’s path from Glasgow tenement to the release of Screamadelica, the psychedelic masterpiece that ushered in the 90s. Tenement Kid is Bobby Gillespie's story up to the recording and release of the album that has been credited with 'starting t Fizzing with an infectious passion for the magic of rock music, Gillespie’s vivid and evocative memoir traces the Primal Scream frontman’s path from Glasgow tenement to the release of Screamadelica, the psychedelic masterpiece that ushered in the 90s. Tenement Kid is Bobby Gillespie's story up to the recording and release of the album that has been credited with 'starting the 90's', Screamadelica. Born into a working class Glaswegian family in the summer of 1961, Bobby's memoirs begin in the district of Springburn, soon to be evacuated in Edward Heath's brutal slum clearances. Leaving school at 16 and going to work as a printers' apprentice, Bobby's rock n roll epiphany arrives like a bolt of lightning shining from Phil Lynott's mirrored pickguard at his first gig at the Apollo in Glasgow. Filled with 'the holy spirit of rock n roll' his destiny is sealed with the arrival of the Sex Pistols and punk rock which to Bobby, represents an iconoclastic vision of class rebellion and would ultimately lead to him becoming an artist initially in the Jesus and Mary Chain then in Primal Scream. Structured in four parts, Tenement Kid builds like a breakbeat crescendo to the final quarter of the book, the Summer of Love, Boys Own parties, and the fateful meeting with Andrew Weatherall in an East Sussex field. As the '80s bleed into the '90s and a new kind of electronic soul music starts to pulse through the nation's consciousness, Primal Scream become the most innovative British band of the new decade, representing a new psychedelic vanguard taking shape at Creation Records. Ending with the release of Screamadelica and the tour that followed in the autumn, Tenement Kid is a book filled with the joy and wonder of a rock n roll apostle who would radically reshape the future sounds of fin de siecle British pop. Published thirty years after the release of their masterpiece, Bobby Gillespie's memoir cuts a righteous path through a decade lost to Thatcherism and saved by acid house.


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Fizzing with an infectious passion for the magic of rock music, Gillespie’s vivid and evocative memoir traces the Primal Scream frontman’s path from Glasgow tenement to the release of Screamadelica, the psychedelic masterpiece that ushered in the 90s. Tenement Kid is Bobby Gillespie's story up to the recording and release of the album that has been credited with 'starting t Fizzing with an infectious passion for the magic of rock music, Gillespie’s vivid and evocative memoir traces the Primal Scream frontman’s path from Glasgow tenement to the release of Screamadelica, the psychedelic masterpiece that ushered in the 90s. Tenement Kid is Bobby Gillespie's story up to the recording and release of the album that has been credited with 'starting the 90's', Screamadelica. Born into a working class Glaswegian family in the summer of 1961, Bobby's memoirs begin in the district of Springburn, soon to be evacuated in Edward Heath's brutal slum clearances. Leaving school at 16 and going to work as a printers' apprentice, Bobby's rock n roll epiphany arrives like a bolt of lightning shining from Phil Lynott's mirrored pickguard at his first gig at the Apollo in Glasgow. Filled with 'the holy spirit of rock n roll' his destiny is sealed with the arrival of the Sex Pistols and punk rock which to Bobby, represents an iconoclastic vision of class rebellion and would ultimately lead to him becoming an artist initially in the Jesus and Mary Chain then in Primal Scream. Structured in four parts, Tenement Kid builds like a breakbeat crescendo to the final quarter of the book, the Summer of Love, Boys Own parties, and the fateful meeting with Andrew Weatherall in an East Sussex field. As the '80s bleed into the '90s and a new kind of electronic soul music starts to pulse through the nation's consciousness, Primal Scream become the most innovative British band of the new decade, representing a new psychedelic vanguard taking shape at Creation Records. Ending with the release of Screamadelica and the tour that followed in the autumn, Tenement Kid is a book filled with the joy and wonder of a rock n roll apostle who would radically reshape the future sounds of fin de siecle British pop. Published thirty years after the release of their masterpiece, Bobby Gillespie's memoir cuts a righteous path through a decade lost to Thatcherism and saved by acid house.

30 review for Tenement Kid

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave Ross

    Get your rocks off! This is simply the best rock biography I've read in a long time. Learned a lot. I wished I'd spoken to Bobby about music at school, I thought the only thing we had in common was a love of Glasgow Celtic. Initially the book describes the Glasgow of my youth, a beautifully detailed trip. Part two is a musical journey and provides a guide to the 80s music scene. Nice mention for my old DJ mate Tam Coyle. A cracking read strap on the acid goggles enjoy. I look forward to the sequel Get your rocks off! This is simply the best rock biography I've read in a long time. Learned a lot. I wished I'd spoken to Bobby about music at school, I thought the only thing we had in common was a love of Glasgow Celtic. Initially the book describes the Glasgow of my youth, a beautifully detailed trip. Part two is a musical journey and provides a guide to the 80s music scene. Nice mention for my old DJ mate Tam Coyle. A cracking read strap on the acid goggles enjoy. I look forward to the sequel.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Started out with a wee bit of repetition of phrases and ideas (plus some and odd stylings) but soon found a speedy and excitable pace. Much like the Brett Anderson split autobiographies, this ends where things are about to really take off but it doesn't feel anticlimactic. Gillespie feels like an honest narrator, plainly describing the lows and highs without dishing dirt. Really looking forward to the next one but am PRAYING that this doesn't wrap up the later period of his life after the mainst Started out with a wee bit of repetition of phrases and ideas (plus some and odd stylings) but soon found a speedy and excitable pace. Much like the Brett Anderson split autobiographies, this ends where things are about to really take off but it doesn't feel anticlimactic. Gillespie feels like an honest narrator, plainly describing the lows and highs without dishing dirt. Really looking forward to the next one but am PRAYING that this doesn't wrap up the later period of his life after the mainstream success in a handful of pages like so many other artist's life stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The mask rarely slips over 400 pages, telling of Bobby Gillespie's life from childhood in Springburn until the release of Screamadelica. As a Glaswegian myself so much of this is familiar to me, from school aggro, to city centre clubs, and a thoroughly enjoyable read. The childhood tales and early political thoughts are the most interesting part. The early Jesus and Mary Chain gigs also sound mental. Funnily enough its the Primal Scream rock and roll stuff near the end that fades away, but a fas The mask rarely slips over 400 pages, telling of Bobby Gillespie's life from childhood in Springburn until the release of Screamadelica. As a Glaswegian myself so much of this is familiar to me, from school aggro, to city centre clubs, and a thoroughly enjoyable read. The childhood tales and early political thoughts are the most interesting part. The early Jesus and Mary Chain gigs also sound mental. Funnily enough its the Primal Scream rock and roll stuff near the end that fades away, but a fascinating read from one of Glasgow's most archetypally dour exports.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mancman

    I’ve recently read a Jesus and Mary Chain biography, so there was a certain crossover in this. This is written much more warmly, and with real thoughtfulness. It was full of honesty, revelations and confessions. If you’re even vaguely interested in music then there’s a world of discovery in here.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessie Hogg

    absolutely loved this! bobby gillespie writes with such appreciation, passion and detail; a real music fan. i really hope he carries this on and writes a second book on the latter career of the scream!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Coates

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bronte

  8. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alex Cornetto

  10. 4 out of 5

    1049 Gotho

  11. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Excell

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nastja Vogrinčič

  13. 5 out of 5

    Duncan Blair

  14. 4 out of 5

    Savage Reader

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lee Robertson

  16. 5 out of 5

    mr a moreland

  17. 4 out of 5

    Linda Skugge

  18. 4 out of 5

    James Steel

  19. 4 out of 5

    Johnboy Somerville

  20. 5 out of 5

    Miss L C Hodgson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Konrad Vanderheyden

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dmitry Kurkin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tasmin Petrie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jaimie Batchan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Lissimore

  26. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Stevenson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Philip Kret

  28. 5 out of 5

    willie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lynds Perrott

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie Bouret

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