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Rebellion, 1967: A Memoir

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Janet Duffy, a spunky, seventeen-year-old Irish girl, is eager to start college―but instability between her alcoholic father and self-absorbed mother jeopardize her dream, so she sets up her own apartment with her younger sister in Jamaica, Queens, and treks to City College in Manhattan, New York. The routine is deadening, but she finds purpose in the black community, work Janet Duffy, a spunky, seventeen-year-old Irish girl, is eager to start college―but instability between her alcoholic father and self-absorbed mother jeopardize her dream, so she sets up her own apartment with her younger sister in Jamaica, Queens, and treks to City College in Manhattan, New York. The routine is deadening, but she finds purpose in the black community, working for a mural painter and volunteering for a civil rights activist. After turning eighteen, Janet marches with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and falls for a young black saxophone player, Carmen. Her father, a policeman, explodes over their relationship, so Janet rebels―runs away with the jazz musician, and then winds up in the East Village in the Summer of Love. In the ensuing months she deals with heartbreak, sexual harassment, poverty, and danger―but eventually, she asks for the help she needs in order to pick up the pieces of her life and return to her dream.


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Janet Duffy, a spunky, seventeen-year-old Irish girl, is eager to start college―but instability between her alcoholic father and self-absorbed mother jeopardize her dream, so she sets up her own apartment with her younger sister in Jamaica, Queens, and treks to City College in Manhattan, New York. The routine is deadening, but she finds purpose in the black community, work Janet Duffy, a spunky, seventeen-year-old Irish girl, is eager to start college―but instability between her alcoholic father and self-absorbed mother jeopardize her dream, so she sets up her own apartment with her younger sister in Jamaica, Queens, and treks to City College in Manhattan, New York. The routine is deadening, but she finds purpose in the black community, working for a mural painter and volunteering for a civil rights activist. After turning eighteen, Janet marches with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and falls for a young black saxophone player, Carmen. Her father, a policeman, explodes over their relationship, so Janet rebels―runs away with the jazz musician, and then winds up in the East Village in the Summer of Love. In the ensuing months she deals with heartbreak, sexual harassment, poverty, and danger―but eventually, she asks for the help she needs in order to pick up the pieces of her life and return to her dream.

39 review for Rebellion, 1967: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gabi Coatsworth

    Although this book covers only one year, it covers a major series of events in the author's life. This mild-mannered, good-hearted girl from an alcoholic Irish family, finds a replacement family among the Black community of New York, where her concern for human rights helps her make friends, but also puts her in danger. It's striking for its honesty and for the many varied events this woman experienced in such a short time, but one can only marvel at the resilience and courage of an eighteen-yea Although this book covers only one year, it covers a major series of events in the author's life. This mild-mannered, good-hearted girl from an alcoholic Irish family, finds a replacement family among the Black community of New York, where her concern for human rights helps her make friends, but also puts her in danger. It's striking for its honesty and for the many varied events this woman experienced in such a short time, but one can only marvel at the resilience and courage of an eighteen-year-old desperate to make her way as an artist on her own, in spite of the obstacles. She persisted, for sure. As someone born in England, I found the historical details fascinating, and held my breath several times as I read, even though I knew that the author survived, because the suspense of some of the situations she finds herself in is well conveyed. It was another time, but the yearning of the young to be free and help others be free too, is still with us today, with any luck. I received an ARC of this book, in exchange for an unbiased review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Roesel

    It's 1967. Janet Luongo is a white seventeen year-old. Her dreams of going to college are dimmed by her family's neglect and lack of interest. Her mother believes "without men, women are nothing," a belief Janet doesn't embrace. In her memoir, REBELLION, 1967 (SheWritesPress) Janet Luongo finds her community in a very unlikely place. Janet first wonders who is she? A difficult, rebellious, bookworm, creative artist, dependent daughter and independent woman. She dreams of being something bigger th It's 1967. Janet Luongo is a white seventeen year-old. Her dreams of going to college are dimmed by her family's neglect and lack of interest. Her mother believes "without men, women are nothing," a belief Janet doesn't embrace. In her memoir, REBELLION, 1967 (SheWritesPress) Janet Luongo finds her community in a very unlikely place. Janet first wonders who is she? A difficult, rebellious, bookworm, creative artist, dependent daughter and independent woman. She dreams of being something bigger than herself and this leads her to Freedom House - a hang-out for politically active black people. In a society that frowns upon whites and blacks interacting, Janet embraces the teachings of her upbringing in the Unitarian Universalist seekers of truth. Janet Luongo's memoir is one year out of her life in which she explores racial injustice, troubled teenagers and artists at risk. Not much has changed. It could be today. Compelling characters, complex relationships and honesty take readers on a dangerous journey where to survive, Janet has to have the courage to escape. I felt Janet's writing trustworthy, loyal, fair and sincere. It's one of the most powerful memoirs I've ever read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Figueroa

    This memoir explores the life of Janet Luongo during the 60s. Janet luongo is a talented artist that found strength and courage thanks to the difficult times she survived during the 60s and 70s. She overcame tough situations that happened for having an alcoholic father and a self-absorbed mother. She was determined to start college, but life wasn't easy at home, so in the midst of the difficulties she found comfort and sense of belonging within the black community. The book has couple of scenes th This memoir explores the life of Janet Luongo during the 60s. Janet luongo is a talented artist that found strength and courage thanks to the difficult times she survived during the 60s and 70s. She overcame tough situations that happened for having an alcoholic father and a self-absorbed mother. She was determined to start college, but life wasn't easy at home, so in the midst of the difficulties she found comfort and sense of belonging within the black community. The book has couple of scenes that were difficult to read since the author survived several dangerous situations, which leave the rader a message of resilience and perseverance. I enjoyed this book very much and appreciate all the historical facts. Great memoir. Thank you @booksparks for my gifted copy in exchange for my honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Janet Luongo

    I'm the author so a bit biased! I'm glad I wrote it, and I do like it. I am getting really good feedback. I hope those who read and like it will post a good rating and review on Goodreads. (It seems a couple of negatives can drag #s down). Thank you. Janet I'm the author so a bit biased! I'm glad I wrote it, and I do like it. I am getting really good feedback. I hope those who read and like it will post a good rating and review on Goodreads. (It seems a couple of negatives can drag #s down). Thank you. Janet

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Shepherd

    I received my copy free from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway. Perhaps the most troubling memoir I have ever read, this is more a tale of a dysfunctional family.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katheryne

    I absolutely loved this book! My favorite genre - memoir. My favorite city - NYC. A riveting time period in American life - the 60s. A vulnerable, compelling, authentic voice - Janet Luongo. Janet - thank you for sharing your story and life with us. Every page is riveting and I love all the details you include about the history, culture, and experiences from this time in your life. I am truly captivated.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Lanigan

  8. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  9. 5 out of 5

    ProudMom

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meghan C.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ilene Harris

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Lee Arnold

  13. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline Masumian

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenifer Greenwell

  16. 4 out of 5

    Oi Wah

  17. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tess Marie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Edward

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Brooks

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michaeline Perry

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Maki

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paige Pagnotta

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  29. 5 out of 5

    Doris Moore

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

  31. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  32. 5 out of 5

    Bismah

  33. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  34. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Phung

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tarah Luke

  36. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  37. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  38. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Tilton

  39. 4 out of 5

    Jean Felty

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