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Prevail Until the Bitter End: Germans in the Waning Years of World War II

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In Prevail until the Bitter End, Alexandra Lohse explores the gossip and innuendo, the dissonant reactions and perceptions, of Germans to the violent dissolution of the Third Reich. Mobilized for total war, soldiers and citizens alike experienced an unprecedented convergence of military, economic, social, and political crises. But even in retreat, the militarized national In Prevail until the Bitter End, Alexandra Lohse explores the gossip and innuendo, the dissonant reactions and perceptions, of Germans to the violent dissolution of the Third Reich. Mobilized for total war, soldiers and citizens alike experienced an unprecedented convergence of military, economic, social, and political crises. But even in retreat, the militarized national community unleashed ferocious energies, staving off defeat for over two years and continuing a systematic murder campaign against European Jews and others. Was its faith in the Führer never shaken by the prospect of ultimate defeat? Lohse uncovers how Germans experienced life and death, investigates how mounting emergency conditions impacted their understanding of the nature and purpose of the conflagration, and shows how these factors impacted people's relationship with the Nazi regime. She draws on Nazi morale and censorship reports, features citizens' private letters and diaries, and incorporates a large body of Allied intelligence, including several thousand transcripts of surreptitiously recorded conversations among German POWs in Western Allied captivity. Lohse's historical reconstruction helps us understand how ordinary Germans interpreted their experiences as both the victims and perpetrators of extreme violence. We are immersively drawn into their desolate landscape: walking through bombed-out streets, scrounging for food, burning furniture, listening furtively to Allied broadcasts, unsure where the truth lay. Prevail until the Bitter End is about the stories that Germans told themselves to make sense of this world in crisis.


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In Prevail until the Bitter End, Alexandra Lohse explores the gossip and innuendo, the dissonant reactions and perceptions, of Germans to the violent dissolution of the Third Reich. Mobilized for total war, soldiers and citizens alike experienced an unprecedented convergence of military, economic, social, and political crises. But even in retreat, the militarized national In Prevail until the Bitter End, Alexandra Lohse explores the gossip and innuendo, the dissonant reactions and perceptions, of Germans to the violent dissolution of the Third Reich. Mobilized for total war, soldiers and citizens alike experienced an unprecedented convergence of military, economic, social, and political crises. But even in retreat, the militarized national community unleashed ferocious energies, staving off defeat for over two years and continuing a systematic murder campaign against European Jews and others. Was its faith in the Führer never shaken by the prospect of ultimate defeat? Lohse uncovers how Germans experienced life and death, investigates how mounting emergency conditions impacted their understanding of the nature and purpose of the conflagration, and shows how these factors impacted people's relationship with the Nazi regime. She draws on Nazi morale and censorship reports, features citizens' private letters and diaries, and incorporates a large body of Allied intelligence, including several thousand transcripts of surreptitiously recorded conversations among German POWs in Western Allied captivity. Lohse's historical reconstruction helps us understand how ordinary Germans interpreted their experiences as both the victims and perpetrators of extreme violence. We are immersively drawn into their desolate landscape: walking through bombed-out streets, scrounging for food, burning furniture, listening furtively to Allied broadcasts, unsure where the truth lay. Prevail until the Bitter End is about the stories that Germans told themselves to make sense of this world in crisis.

31 review for Prevail Until the Bitter End: Germans in the Waning Years of World War II

  1. 4 out of 5

    Umar Lee

    Good book describing the reaction to the German public to the final days and upcoming defeat of the Third Reich. Could've used some more details about Nazi campaigns of terror and reprisal attacks after the Spring of 1945. Good book describing the reaction to the German public to the final days and upcoming defeat of the Third Reich. Could've used some more details about Nazi campaigns of terror and reprisal attacks after the Spring of 1945.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelby

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jack Gladney

  5. 5 out of 5

    Magnus

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dipanjan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Manray9

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence Myers

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stefan Fergus

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brent

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tyson

  14. 5 out of 5

    JO H. Kinkaid

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  16. 5 out of 5

    WW2 Reads

  17. 4 out of 5

    Madison Johnson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jude

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chandrakanth N

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hend

  23. 5 out of 5

    Maddy Smith

  24. 4 out of 5

    John

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aostergren

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  29. 4 out of 5

    Roy Van Den Brande

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  31. 4 out of 5

    Naomi A

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