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Glimmer

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This new cli-fi epic chronicles a future NYC wracked by climate change and follows the individuals who must make the most of what remains to survive. It's 2110, the Earth's glaciers have melted, and there's no climate fix in sight. As refugees stream inland from the inundated coasts, social structures and national economies are stressed to the point of fracture. Food produc This new cli-fi epic chronicles a future NYC wracked by climate change and follows the individuals who must make the most of what remains to survive. It's 2110, the Earth's glaciers have melted, and there's no climate fix in sight. As refugees stream inland from the inundated coasts, social structures and national economies are stressed to the point of fracture. Food production falters. Pandemics rage. Rising sea level and devastating superstorms have flooded much of Manhattan and wrecked its infrastructure. Its residents have mostly fled, but a few die-hards have bet their survival on the hope that digging in and staying local is a safer strategy. As the weather worsens, can a damaged population of poor folk, artists, misfits, and loners work out their differences in time to create a sustainable long-term society? In a lawless city, where the well-armed rich have appropriated the high ground, can an ex-priest find a middle road between non-violence and all-out war? The lives of his downtown band of leftovers will depend on it. Sheltering among them, a young girl named Glimmer struggles to regain a past lost to trauma. As her memory returns, she finds she must choose who and how to be, and who and what to believe in, even if it means giving up a love she has only recently found herself able to embrace.


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This new cli-fi epic chronicles a future NYC wracked by climate change and follows the individuals who must make the most of what remains to survive. It's 2110, the Earth's glaciers have melted, and there's no climate fix in sight. As refugees stream inland from the inundated coasts, social structures and national economies are stressed to the point of fracture. Food produc This new cli-fi epic chronicles a future NYC wracked by climate change and follows the individuals who must make the most of what remains to survive. It's 2110, the Earth's glaciers have melted, and there's no climate fix in sight. As refugees stream inland from the inundated coasts, social structures and national economies are stressed to the point of fracture. Food production falters. Pandemics rage. Rising sea level and devastating superstorms have flooded much of Manhattan and wrecked its infrastructure. Its residents have mostly fled, but a few die-hards have bet their survival on the hope that digging in and staying local is a safer strategy. As the weather worsens, can a damaged population of poor folk, artists, misfits, and loners work out their differences in time to create a sustainable long-term society? In a lawless city, where the well-armed rich have appropriated the high ground, can an ex-priest find a middle road between non-violence and all-out war? The lives of his downtown band of leftovers will depend on it. Sheltering among them, a young girl named Glimmer struggles to regain a past lost to trauma. As her memory returns, she finds she must choose who and how to be, and who and what to believe in, even if it means giving up a love she has only recently found herself able to embrace.

45 review for Glimmer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    3.5 Stars This was a solid post apocalyptic novel. The main character was likeable, although she read quite young. While this is classified as adult science fiction, it will have cross appeal for YA readers with teenagers characters frequently speaking in slang.  I have read a lot of post-apocalyptic fiction and so I did not find this story particularly innovative or unique. Instead, I found it to be fairly predictable, but that also made for a comforting experience. The novel also reminded me of 3.5 Stars This was a solid post apocalyptic novel. The main character was likeable, although she read quite young. While this is classified as adult science fiction, it will have cross appeal for YA readers with teenagers characters frequently speaking in slang.  I have read a lot of post-apocalyptic fiction and so I did not find this story particularly innovative or unique. Instead, I found it to be fairly predictable, but that also made for a comforting experience. The novel also reminded me of several survival video games I have played. While not particularly revolutionary, I appreciated that the novel provided an engaging plot with good characters.  Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher. 

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight 4.5* Okay let me get this out of the way: Glimmer has a slow start. In fact, I complained a little that I needn't know the details of every post-apocalyptic block of Manhattan.  But if you're into cli-fi, I promise it is worth pushing through. Now that we've gotten that bit out of the way, I will tell you why I was so glad that I kept on reading! ►Look, if this book doesn't scare the b You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight 4.5* Okay let me get this out of the way: Glimmer has a slow start. In fact, I complained a little that I needn't know the details of every post-apocalyptic block of Manhattan.  But if you're into cli-fi, I promise it is worth pushing through. Now that we've gotten that bit out of the way, I will tell you why I was so glad that I kept on reading! ►Look, if this book doesn't scare the bejeezus out of you, Idk what will. It is more than plausible, frankly. It's probable that this mess is where the world is headed. It's very eerie, because the author does a phenomenal job of showing the evolution, even though the story we are reading takes place quite a few years down the road. And not only does the book showcase the environmental/physical ramifications, it illustrates exactly how humanity would behave. And spoiler, it isn't pretty. Which leads me to my next point.... ►It is beyond relevant. Remember how people reacted a year ago when we couldn't find toilet paper? Multiply that by all the things. Turns out, mankind is pretty gross. I mean, even now, people won't put on some damn cloth to save the lives of others, so. My point is, the way humanity is shown here is on freaking point. Sure, there are some great folks! Don't get me wrong, there is still plenty of good in the world (in this fictional world and our own, to be sure). But wow, there are a lot of selfish and bad people. Glimmer does not sugarcoat that at all, which I appreciated. Because at the end of the day, at the end of the world, it turns out it isn't just the elements you're battling against. When there aren't enough resources to go around, things get rough, and fast. Which will again segue into my next bullet point... ►This is so thought provoking. I mean, not only should you probably be thinking "oh crap we need to get it together in regards to climate change", but it makes you consider the person you'd be in the shoes of Glimmer or her cohorts at Unca Joe. Or, perhaps, whether you'd even be among them. Maybe you'd be in one of the other groups, for better or for worse. Maybe you'd have ended up on the mainland, or in the rich people neighborhood. But no matter who you were, the facts still stood: there was water everywhere, precious few resources to go around, and a constant struggle to survive. ►I really enjoyed Glimmer and her group. When we meet Glimmer, she's not even sure who she is, or really anything before her life at Unca Joe. But we know that she is scrappy and smart and determined to survive. She's a great friend, and cares about others, but she's still very aware of the hard choices that constantly face her and the rest of the group. It's nice to see the concept of "found family" despite all the hardship. ►The worldbuilding was very well done. Even though we don't completely know what is happening beyond Manhattan, it's all certainly acknowledged. The author does an incredible job of painting a desperate, yet hopeful atmosphere, and while I was a little distracted by all the detail at the start, it really served the rest of the story well, as I could absolutely picture where Glimmer and company were, and what obstacles they were facing. Bottom Line: I love a survival story. I love a "no good choices" story. And I definitely love a thought provoking story with characters you want to root for. This book, it has it all.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie McDaniel

    As this book's subtitle states, this is "A Novel of Climate Change," but it's not quite in the way you might think. Yes, we have the drowning coasts, the collapsed governments, the climate refugees, the decaying society, the chronic shortages of food and everyday items (although I guess we have learned a little about that in this age of empty toilet paper aisles), the burning forests, the stifling daytime heat, and last but not least, the recurring Category 5 (and 6!) hurricanes that are so much As this book's subtitle states, this is "A Novel of Climate Change," but it's not quite in the way you might think. Yes, we have the drowning coasts, the collapsed governments, the climate refugees, the decaying society, the chronic shortages of food and everyday items (although I guess we have learned a little about that in this age of empty toilet paper aisles), the burning forests, the stifling daytime heat, and last but not least, the recurring Category 5 (and 6!) hurricanes that are so much a fact of life in this harrowing future....but that's not really what the story is about. This story is about the people that are growing up in this terrible age, and how they are taking this collapsing way of life and remaking it. Marjorie B. Kellogg is a very underrated writer. I remember her from a long ago mass market paperback, Harmony, which has some similar themes to this book. This setting is the abandoned (at least by rich people, leaving it to those who can't afford to go anywhere else) island of Manhattan, the bottom part of which has been wholly or partially swallowed up by rising sea levels. This has caused a restructuring of society in the form of "dens," groups of people living on the higher floors of the surviving buildings, who "pick" the empty neighborhoods and bring back anything usable. Several of the dens grow rooftop food and have goats and chickens, and survive as best they can with no help from any state or federal government, as they have been left entirely on their own. Our protagonist is Glimmer, a young woman rescued after one of the category 5 superstorms, Abel, tore through Manhattan a few months ago, leaving her with amnesia and PTSD. She was found by the inhabitants of one of the dens, Unca Joe's, and since she is essentially a blank slate, she provides a useful entry point to understanding this strange new society. There are other dens, including Macy's, made up almost entirely of young orphaned or abandoned children; the more uptown Empire State, with better technology than most; the Storm Worshippers, a "wacko sect pledged to a hurricane goddess"; and BlackAdder, the enemy den, who steals and kills and, as we see towards the book's climax, does some pretty damn terrible things. Because this book is so character-focused and driven, it could be considered slow by some. I would say its pace is more deliberate, exploring the character interactions and how this new society is building itself from the ground (or water) up. (Although the book's climax, with Unca Joe's and other dens racing against time and surging seas to move their entire population to a new home in Yankee Stadium in advance of an oncoming Category 6 superstorm, is nail-biting.) At the beginning of the book, Glimmer wishes only to escape to the Mainland; as she slowly remembers her past and realizes that there will be no sanctuary on the Mainland, she throws in her lot with the ragtag refugees building a new life in what's left of the Bronx. I suppose this could be called anthropological SF, as it is more concerned with the new society emerging from the drowned remnants of the old than the ramifications of its worldbuilding (which is just as well, I suppose, since what we do see is horrific enough). (And lest you think a Category 6 hurricane is implausible, well, this article published just a month ago will change your mind. It repeats nearly everything Kellogg extrapolates in this book, and those hurricanes will probably make their appearance even earlier than her timeline.) The main knock I have against this book is the ending; it's abrupt and feels incomplete, although it certainly carries home the book's main theme: even in the direst of circumstances, humans can and will work together to build a new world. This is intelligent, thoughtful science fiction, and worth seeking out for those who like chewy ideas and characters with depth.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Arch Bala

    Glimmer by Marjorie B. Kellogg is a pseudo-dystopian novel set in New York City in 2110, where climate change has altered the city's landscape, mostly flooded and practically destroyed. Those who could escape from it did, and those left behind bonded and created some sort of faction - ala Water World - called dens. The titular character Glimmer is simply a name that she gave herself and who seemed to have lost her memory—narrating the grim situation of the city and the world entire, and her life Glimmer by Marjorie B. Kellogg is a pseudo-dystopian novel set in New York City in 2110, where climate change has altered the city's landscape, mostly flooded and practically destroyed. Those who could escape from it did, and those left behind bonded and created some sort of faction - ala Water World - called dens. The titular character Glimmer is simply a name that she gave herself and who seemed to have lost her memory—narrating the grim situation of the city and the world entire, and her life in Unca Joe den. I do love Glimmer as a character. She's very likable, smart, and very determined. She is a young adult that makes excellent choices. The world-building created by the author here is a scenario that will make you realize that we humans are the most vulnerable on this planet, and we need to get our shit together before it's too late. Some of the things mentioned here are happening now in some parts of the world. The most recent example is when the Covid19 pandemic started, and people drove in numbers and hoarded supplies. It's selfishness that corrupted people. In Glimmer, it's worse, so just imagine that. It took me a while to finish Glimmer. The first half was sluggish and not as engaging, but the premise is interesting enough for me to push through with it. After the very slow beginning, the pacing started to pick up, and the story just bulldozed into something scary, exciting, and thought-provoking. There are a lot of great scenes here, particularly when the group got together to move into a new home - Uhm, within the city as well. It was heart-racing and heartwarming altogether. I do love the relevance of this book on what's happening in the world now. I love the research that went into it because they are all realistic, and some are even happening now. You just have to persevere with its slow pacing initially, but I promised that it delivers a good and pretty solid story overall. The ending was a bit abrupt, but it really won't matter by the time you finish it. Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars Published October 19th 2021 by Daw Books A copy of this book was provided by the publisher, Daw Books, via Netgalley for an impartial and honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lori L (She Treads Softly)

    Glimmer by Marjorie B Kellogg is a recommended character driven climate science fiction novel set in NYC in 2110. Rising sea levels, superstorms, and a changing climate have left much of the city wrecked and/or flooded. Those who could fled the city. The survivors left behind have banded into their own social support structures called dens. Members of the dens live on the upper floors of buildings and work together to find supplies and food, while protecting each other. Glimmer, a name she gave h Glimmer by Marjorie B Kellogg is a recommended character driven climate science fiction novel set in NYC in 2110. Rising sea levels, superstorms, and a changing climate have left much of the city wrecked and/or flooded. Those who could fled the city. The survivors left behind have banded into their own social support structures called dens. Members of the dens live on the upper floors of buildings and work together to find supplies and food, while protecting each other. Glimmer, a name she gave herself after she lost her memory, is a young woman living in this dystopian future. She is part of one of the oldest dens, Unca Joe, and has her friends and support system there. It is an unpredictable life, but every now and then Glimmer senses that she recognizes something from before. But when it seems that another group is planning some attack against her den perhaps she does need to consider a change. This is a character driven novel above all else and it succeeds in that regard as the characters are fully realized and placed into this dystopian future. They are not, however, relatable or very engaging. The world building is very good also. However, it is also a very slow, tedious, even paced novel that takes a certain amount of determination to continue reading. I started and stopped this novel three times before I made myself finish it. In the end it is okay, but there have been better cli-sci-fi novels with quicker paces that will provide the same message. Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of DAW. http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2021/1...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bill T.

    I gave up on this book pretty quickly -- not because it offended me in any way, but just because it didn't really call to me. More than one plot thread might have helped draw me in. Still, rejected without prejudice -- maybe I'll get back to it someday. In the meantime, no real opinion, so no rating. I gave up on this book pretty quickly -- not because it offended me in any way, but just because it didn't really call to me. More than one plot thread might have helped draw me in. Still, rejected without prejudice -- maybe I'll get back to it someday. In the meantime, no real opinion, so no rating.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Judith E. Karnuth

    Interesting NYC post-apocalyptic Novel I enjoyed the premise of this novel. NYC left to its own devices during sea-level rise. It had a little bit of everything, focused on one young lady.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Boon

    Reminds me of a different version of Kim Stanley Robinson's NEW YORK 2140 - a vision of New York in the future given climate change and societal collapse. It's an entertaining read, that falls apart a bit at the end (not as realistic as the rest). Good cli-fi. Reminds me of a different version of Kim Stanley Robinson's NEW YORK 2140 - a vision of New York in the future given climate change and societal collapse. It's an entertaining read, that falls apart a bit at the end (not as realistic as the rest). Good cli-fi.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Bancroft

    Glimmer hits all the marks for me: character, plot, and especially language and setting. I hope more people read it and it takes off.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lauren loves llamas

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peter Girard

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  13. 5 out of 5

    Edward

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisalena

  15. 5 out of 5

    Art

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lira

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Isaak Reyentovich

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mitch Allen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alec Brownie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Goran

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Dees

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Roll

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

  27. 5 out of 5

    Women_of_the_Future

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sad Recluse

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate (Feathered Turtle Press)

  31. 5 out of 5

    Paul Coward

  32. 4 out of 5

    Raychel

  33. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

  34. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  35. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

  36. 5 out of 5

    Fee

  37. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  38. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  39. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  40. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

  41. 5 out of 5

    Thorn

  42. 5 out of 5

    withpins

  43. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Case

  44. 5 out of 5

    Christopher York

  45. 4 out of 5

    Alex

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