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Outdoor Kids in an Inside World: Getting Your Family Out of the House and Radically Engaged with Nature

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The indispensable case for parenting tough, curious, and competent kids who feel at home in the outdoors, from the New York Times bestselling author and host of the TV series and podcast MeatEater In the era of screens and devices, the average American spends 90 percent of their time indoors, and children are no exception. Not only does this phenomenon have consequence The indispensable case for parenting tough, curious, and competent kids who feel at home in the outdoors, from the New York Times bestselling author and host of the TV series and podcast MeatEater In the era of screens and devices, the average American spends 90 percent of their time indoors, and children are no exception. Not only does this phenomenon have consequences for kids' physical and mental health, it jeopardizes their ability to understand and engage with anything beyond the built environment. Thankfully, with the right mind-set, families can find beauty, meaning, and connection in a life lived outdoors. Here, outdoors expert Steven Rinella shares the parenting wisdom he has garnered as a father whose family has lived amid the biggest cities and wildest corners of America. Throughout, he offers practical advice for getting kids radically engaged with nature in a muddy, thrilling, hands-on way, with the ultimate goal of helping them see their own place within the natural ecosystem. No matter their location--rural, suburban, or urban--caregivers and kids will bond over activities such as: - Camping to conquer fears, build tolerance for dirt and discomfort, and savor the timeless pleasure of swapping stories around a campfire. - Growing a vegetable garden to develop a capacity to nurture and an appreciation for hard work. - Fishing local lakes and rivers to learn the value of patience while grappling with the possibility of failure. - Hunting for sustainably managed wild game to face the realities of life, death, and what it really takes to obtain our food. Living an outdoor lifestyle fosters in kids an insatiable curiosity about the world around them, confidence and self-sufficiency, and, most important, a lifelong sense of stewardship of the natural world. This book helps families connect with nature--and one another--as a joyful part of everyday life.


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The indispensable case for parenting tough, curious, and competent kids who feel at home in the outdoors, from the New York Times bestselling author and host of the TV series and podcast MeatEater In the era of screens and devices, the average American spends 90 percent of their time indoors, and children are no exception. Not only does this phenomenon have consequence The indispensable case for parenting tough, curious, and competent kids who feel at home in the outdoors, from the New York Times bestselling author and host of the TV series and podcast MeatEater In the era of screens and devices, the average American spends 90 percent of their time indoors, and children are no exception. Not only does this phenomenon have consequences for kids' physical and mental health, it jeopardizes their ability to understand and engage with anything beyond the built environment. Thankfully, with the right mind-set, families can find beauty, meaning, and connection in a life lived outdoors. Here, outdoors expert Steven Rinella shares the parenting wisdom he has garnered as a father whose family has lived amid the biggest cities and wildest corners of America. Throughout, he offers practical advice for getting kids radically engaged with nature in a muddy, thrilling, hands-on way, with the ultimate goal of helping them see their own place within the natural ecosystem. No matter their location--rural, suburban, or urban--caregivers and kids will bond over activities such as: - Camping to conquer fears, build tolerance for dirt and discomfort, and savor the timeless pleasure of swapping stories around a campfire. - Growing a vegetable garden to develop a capacity to nurture and an appreciation for hard work. - Fishing local lakes and rivers to learn the value of patience while grappling with the possibility of failure. - Hunting for sustainably managed wild game to face the realities of life, death, and what it really takes to obtain our food. Living an outdoor lifestyle fosters in kids an insatiable curiosity about the world around them, confidence and self-sufficiency, and, most important, a lifelong sense of stewardship of the natural world. This book helps families connect with nature--and one another--as a joyful part of everyday life.

30 review for Outdoor Kids in an Inside World: Getting Your Family Out of the House and Radically Engaged with Nature

  1. 5 out of 5

    Provin Martin

    This book is a fun new summer read and an overall good book and great place to start getting back to nature. An interesting book to help families become one with their outdoor environment. It helps you implement an every day spiritual existence with nature. How do we get kids outside with so much indoor entertainment? Where is your closest nature getaway for families living in “concrete areas“? There’s even a fun section on expanding your knowledge of where you currently live. It consists of 15 This book is a fun new summer read and an overall good book and great place to start getting back to nature. An interesting book to help families become one with their outdoor environment. It helps you implement an every day spiritual existence with nature. How do we get kids outside with so much indoor entertainment? Where is your closest nature getaway for families living in “concrete areas“? There’s even a fun section on expanding your knowledge of where you currently live. It consists of 15 questions that will fill you with knowledge of your home environment. The chapters that follow are to help you bond with nature by sleeping outside, tending the land/soil, fishing etc.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ginni

    Context: I am not familiar with the author or his Netflix show. I don't think it changed my reading experience at all. This book stands alone well. A nice blend of nitty-gritty practical advice and overall philosophies that can mostly be boiled down to one general parenting guideline: you can't raise your kids to be something you yourself are not. If you want your kids to eat well, you have to eat well. If you want your kids to love God, you have to love God. If you want your kids to read, you ha Context: I am not familiar with the author or his Netflix show. I don't think it changed my reading experience at all. This book stands alone well. A nice blend of nitty-gritty practical advice and overall philosophies that can mostly be boiled down to one general parenting guideline: you can't raise your kids to be something you yourself are not. If you want your kids to eat well, you have to eat well. If you want your kids to love God, you have to love God. If you want your kids to read, you have to read. There's no outsourcing or faking this thing. This principle holds true for raising kids who appreciate nature: you're going to have to get your hands dirty and you're going to have to like it. To his credit, Rinella readily acknowledges that his methods (butchering caribou with your little ones, for example) will not work for or appeal to everyone. He encourages cultivating equanimity toward nature no matter what that looks like in your situation. And frankly, I have no desire to try to imitate the particulars of their lifestyle, but I appreciate and will hold onto the heart behind it. (I received this book for free through a Goodreads giveaway.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Pretty good book on outdoors and parenting. Learned some cool stuff about nature and some ideas to implement. Fun read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Buchli

    I loved this book, just as I loved his previous books. Partly this is because I enjoy Rinella’s writing style - a mix of poignancy and humor that I find deeply effective. And partly it’s because I share his philosophy and his advocacy for the outdoor life. Many thanks to NetGally for providing an ARC copy for my review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Maggie G

    Steven Rinella, host of Netflix's MeatEater, is an avid outdoorsman and hunter. Coming from a tight-knit family bonded by the outdoors, this novel is written to try to engage families in nature. As a fellow nature enthusiast, this book immediately caught my eye. I have always wanted a written guide with tips on raising my young children to respect and love nature. I had a certain idea of what I thought this book would have based off the description, but I found it was not what I thought. I had h Steven Rinella, host of Netflix's MeatEater, is an avid outdoorsman and hunter. Coming from a tight-knit family bonded by the outdoors, this novel is written to try to engage families in nature. As a fellow nature enthusiast, this book immediately caught my eye. I have always wanted a written guide with tips on raising my young children to respect and love nature. I had a certain idea of what I thought this book would have based off the description, but I found it was not what I thought. I had hoped to see a lot of tips, examples of activities, and some personal background pertaining to those topics. Instead, I found that the tips were hard to find, specific examples of activities weren't stated clearly, and there was more personal backstory than anything else. It seemed to be rambling quite a bit. While that rambling had wisdom and was interesting to read, it was not that important to the overall goal of the book. I would have loved to see more bulleted tips and specific activities to implement. Having stated what I did not like, there was still a lot I did like. I appreciated the feeling of inspiration knowing any family can do this. We actually ventured into 25 degree weather for a lovely hike because of that inspiration! It was wonderful to read how the Rinella family has bonded and grown together in nature. It is a beautiful picture to think that my family can accomplish this, too. Steven Rinella is definitely knowledgeable and this book shows it. If you are looking for more of a memoir and inspirational book to help your family engage with nature, this is a great resource. If you are looking for what I first thought this was, you may want to find another guide. Overall, this was a good read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jori

    This book makes a strong case that experiences in nature may be the greatest gift we give our children. Admittedly, I skipped the chapters on fishing and hunting, but I gained further motivation to finally get a rain gauge and to appreciate the wild wonders of our gardens, woods and waterways.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Herr

    I’ve read several books on this topic and this one didn’t stand out for me or inspire in the same way others have. Not a bad resource, though, if you’re just getting into it. His main focus is foraging, gardening, fishing and hunting as ways to get kids interacting with nature.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I always learn so much from Steve Rinella, and this book was no exception. His approach to nature is both radical but accessible, and the effect is engaging, inspiring, and at times laugh out loud funny. 10/10 would recommend, and I don't even have kids. Actually, in reading this most times I felt like the kid, in the sense that this book reminded me how important it is to stay curious and open about my environment, even as an adult. I always learn so much from Steve Rinella, and this book was no exception. His approach to nature is both radical but accessible, and the effect is engaging, inspiring, and at times laugh out loud funny. 10/10 would recommend, and I don't even have kids. Actually, in reading this most times I felt like the kid, in the sense that this book reminded me how important it is to stay curious and open about my environment, even as an adult.

  9. 5 out of 5

    This Feral Housewife

    Good book with some solid advice. However some of it comes from a place of privilege in the way that the author has more at his disposal than a lot of people out there. It is a good book and many parents will get a lot out of it just know that some of the stuff that is talked about in here will be harder or not achievable for everyone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cori

    I always say I need to add more Nonfiction to my reading list and this was a perfect book for that. I liked reading about the authors life experiences outdoors and raising his kids! There are some humorous stories (camping) and lots of perspectives of nature. The author admits that we all have our own limitations due to where we live, ability levels etc, so our story/experiences won't be the same as his. I most like the questions he posed so we could have better conversations with our families. I always say I need to add more Nonfiction to my reading list and this was a perfect book for that. I liked reading about the authors life experiences outdoors and raising his kids! There are some humorous stories (camping) and lots of perspectives of nature. The author admits that we all have our own limitations due to where we live, ability levels etc, so our story/experiences won't be the same as his. I most like the questions he posed so we could have better conversations with our families. Thank you to a Goodreads giveaway win and Penguin Random House publishing for my copy of this book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katarina

    As an outdoor adventure lover interested in learning methods to bring my child outdoors as she grows up, I was excited to read this book. The author is very knowledgeable and experienced with both being in nature himself and bringing his children out into nature. This book includes a lot of great insight and advice regarding how to bring your kids into nature more and enjoy it. I will definitely keep this advice in mind as my daughter is growing up. The main thing I didn't like about this book wa As an outdoor adventure lover interested in learning methods to bring my child outdoors as she grows up, I was excited to read this book. The author is very knowledgeable and experienced with both being in nature himself and bringing his children out into nature. This book includes a lot of great insight and advice regarding how to bring your kids into nature more and enjoy it. I will definitely keep this advice in mind as my daughter is growing up. The main thing I didn't like about this book was how the information was presented. At times the personal stories were too long. While they could be relevant, sometimes they seemed rambling. I would have appreciated if everything was more to the point - giving advice to parents. Also, I wish the information had been separated by titled sections in order to find information more easily. While reading whole books is great, as a busy parent, sometimes you just want to flip to something and read it without having to sift through the pages.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karissa Devore

    My husband and I are both big fans of Steve Rinella, and loved his book American Buffalo. So when this book was announced, I immediately moved it to the top of my “must read” list. It absolutely did not disappoint. I loved the conversational tone of this book, and how Rinella shares wisdom and suggestions more through storytelling than bulleted lists. Rather than a boring “how to” guide, this is like talking to a more experienced parent friend who is raising their children in a way you admire. H My husband and I are both big fans of Steve Rinella, and loved his book American Buffalo. So when this book was announced, I immediately moved it to the top of my “must read” list. It absolutely did not disappoint. I loved the conversational tone of this book, and how Rinella shares wisdom and suggestions more through storytelling than bulleted lists. Rather than a boring “how to” guide, this is like talking to a more experienced parent friend who is raising their children in a way you admire. He has opened my eyes to things I can easily do with my son to increase his love for and understanding of the natural world on a daily basis. I highly recommend this book for parents of children at any age- your kids are never too young or too old to benefit from this outdoor-centric approach to parenting. *I received an advance digital copy of this book and am leaving an honest review voluntarily.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meghen

    We raise our children to love the outdoors. They love looking under rocks for bugs and aren’t afraid of any type of creature they find. They love fishing and can’t wait to hunt some day. They love picking wild berries up north and get so proud of the amount they collect. They will eat any type of wild game we offer them and are fascinated watching my husband gut the fish they catch. I wanted to read this book to increase my personal knowledge of the outdoors and I’m so glad that I did. The premis We raise our children to love the outdoors. They love looking under rocks for bugs and aren’t afraid of any type of creature they find. They love fishing and can’t wait to hunt some day. They love picking wild berries up north and get so proud of the amount they collect. They will eat any type of wild game we offer them and are fascinated watching my husband gut the fish they catch. I wanted to read this book to increase my personal knowledge of the outdoors and I’m so glad that I did. The premise of this book is so important to our children’s lives. Steve covers so many important topics. He explains how gardening, foraging, fishing, and hunting are so beneficial in making a person strong, smart, proud, and kind. He recommends nature apps that I’ve never heard of that help you navigate the woods safely. He even recommended a silly and informative animal poop game that can be played on rainy camping days. I would recommend this book to every parent and anyone that is skeptical about the outdoors. This book is an incredibly easy read and it could be read in one day. Steve’s witty humor and conversational tone is very engaging for the reader. I guarantee you’ll learn something new and have a different outlook on the outdoors. Please pick this book up!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    My husband grew up in a very small rural town where he and a friend would roam at will for miles. It’s hard to even really comprehend what growing up like that must have been like. It sounds both idyllic and like something that’s nearly unachievable with our children. This book provides a good reminder that you don’t have to be somewhere completely off-the-grid rural to be able to regularly connect with nature and integrate it and it’s lessons into your life. The Rinella’s definitely takes the pa My husband grew up in a very small rural town where he and a friend would roam at will for miles. It’s hard to even really comprehend what growing up like that must have been like. It sounds both idyllic and like something that’s nearly unachievable with our children. This book provides a good reminder that you don’t have to be somewhere completely off-the-grid rural to be able to regularly connect with nature and integrate it and it’s lessons into your life. The Rinella’s definitely takes the paradigm to the far end of the spectrum, but certainly to a degree that is admirable, if not even aspirational. I, for one, am never going to take my kids hunting. I skimmed that chapter entirely. I appreciate Rinella’s perspective on hunting and regularized integration of the concept that humans are ultimately part of nature’s food chain. I also deeply appreciate teaching kids (and ourselves) to be conscious our where our food comes from and how the world will need to handle feeding a massive, a growing, global population. But, hunting is just not something I think I’d ever really be able to get into personally. Conversely, I really liked the chapter on foraging and plan to make this a part of our everyday experiences with nature. Overall, I liked the book and recommend it to anyone raising kids who would like to instill the value of respecting and coexisting with nature, resilience and the ability to cope with discomfort in order to have a richer life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Strukel

    I bought this book because my 11-year-old who is obsessed with the outdoors, hunting, and survival, pestered me. I wanted to screen it before giving it to him to read and I loved it. I do enjoy his show Meat Eater and I think Steven Rinella is a good writer and a good man and so I suspected that I would like it. It’s a mix between personal stories, facts, and “how to”s for getting kids outside and immersed in nature as a regular part of life. He starts with things that are more approachable like I bought this book because my 11-year-old who is obsessed with the outdoors, hunting, and survival, pestered me. I wanted to screen it before giving it to him to read and I loved it. I do enjoy his show Meat Eater and I think Steven Rinella is a good writer and a good man and so I suspected that I would like it. It’s a mix between personal stories, facts, and “how to”s for getting kids outside and immersed in nature as a regular part of life. He starts with things that are more approachable like gardening and foraging and then moves along the spectrum of difficulty to hunting and at the end ties it all together with just how to live with nature in your home and as a regular part of your life. If you’re needing inspiration to get outside yourself or get your family outside, I think this is a good start. I think my 11-year-old will really enjoy reading it, of course taking some of Rinella‘s advice!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    This book has been written by an American outdoorsman with a podcast and television show called, "MeatEater." The book is not about that though and more about how the author introduced his family and children to a deep respect and appreciation for nature and the outdoors. He presents and writes in such a way that you can't help but be impressed with how he's an invested dad and I was interested in the depths that he goes to in describing the natural world and allowing his children to experience This book has been written by an American outdoorsman with a podcast and television show called, "MeatEater." The book is not about that though and more about how the author introduced his family and children to a deep respect and appreciation for nature and the outdoors. He presents and writes in such a way that you can't help but be impressed with how he's an invested dad and I was interested in the depths that he goes to in describing the natural world and allowing his children to experience even the unpleasant parts of nature (i.e. getting stung repeatedly while hunting and staying still, finding dead animals or exploring the insides of a fish while gutting and cleaning them). He ties these lessons to larger life lessons but I lost steam reading this one about midway and could not relate at all to the hunting chapter at the end and the gun safety and lessons. It's clear that the author is teaching his children self reliance and responsibility but this is the chapter where he lost me. It was just an okay book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    Not shockingly, this book wasn’t especially revelatory to me (someone who spends a fair amount of time outdoors with my kid). It reads as solid instruction, though for this imagined group of parents who deeply value nature and the outdoors, but who don’t prioritize spending much time there? I found myself perpetually wondering who the book’s intended audience truly was, if it could reach that audience, and if they actually existed. For myself, it was a fast listen/read, and I enjoyed the anecdot Not shockingly, this book wasn’t especially revelatory to me (someone who spends a fair amount of time outdoors with my kid). It reads as solid instruction, though for this imagined group of parents who deeply value nature and the outdoors, but who don’t prioritize spending much time there? I found myself perpetually wondering who the book’s intended audience truly was, if it could reach that audience, and if they actually existed. For myself, it was a fast listen/read, and I enjoyed the anecdotes and commiseration I found in the whining, complaining, and “hard” aspects of outdoors-time with younger kids - and the implied suggestion that it does, in fact, pay off. Because, as the author notes, it can be a lot (a lot) of work.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Castaneda

    Outdoor Kids in an Inside World: Getting Your Family Out of the House and Radically Engaged with Nature by Steven Rinella is a call to go outside. This book seems inspired by the author's experiences with his family throughout the pandemic. While I would concede that parts of this book, like the part about hunting, will not be for everyone, I still think that portions of this book would benefit all families. We need to get kids outside and off screens. This book is a call to action. I received a Outdoor Kids in an Inside World: Getting Your Family Out of the House and Radically Engaged with Nature by Steven Rinella is a call to go outside. This book seems inspired by the author's experiences with his family throughout the pandemic. While I would concede that parts of this book, like the part about hunting, will not be for everyone, I still think that portions of this book would benefit all families. We need to get kids outside and off screens. This book is a call to action. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher with no obligations. These opinions are entirely my own.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Carr

    Not a bad book at all but I didn't think the title matched the contents and is a little misleading. Reads more like blips and blurbs of memories from his own childhood and that of how Steven & his wife are opting to reinforce time outside with their own three kids. I think I was expecting more of an instruction manual or expanded unique ideas of outdoor family time that we could do ourselves but besides hunting and clamming I didn't come away with a bucket list of adventures we haven't already i Not a bad book at all but I didn't think the title matched the contents and is a little misleading. Reads more like blips and blurbs of memories from his own childhood and that of how Steven & his wife are opting to reinforce time outside with their own three kids. I think I was expecting more of an instruction manual or expanded unique ideas of outdoor family time that we could do ourselves but besides hunting and clamming I didn't come away with a bucket list of adventures we haven't already incorporated into our lives.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael T

    The prompts in the first chapter were helpful. Beyond those, I thought the book was a self-indulgent list of "hey, look at the cool stuff my family does." I probably should have stopped reading the book but I kept hoping for more material like the prompts. The prompts in the first chapter were helpful. Beyond those, I thought the book was a self-indulgent list of "hey, look at the cool stuff my family does." I probably should have stopped reading the book but I kept hoping for more material like the prompts.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sharen

    Excellent info, perspective and encouragement for kids and families to get more connected to nature. Rinella is a fantastic storyteller and narrator. I listened to the audiobook and bought my husband a copy for Father's Day. Our family already tries to get outside a lot and encourages our kids not to get hung up with technology best we can. Rinella has given us more ideas to try in future to do even better as parents. Great book! Excellent info, perspective and encouragement for kids and families to get more connected to nature. Rinella is a fantastic storyteller and narrator. I listened to the audiobook and bought my husband a copy for Father's Day. Our family already tries to get outside a lot and encourages our kids not to get hung up with technology best we can. Rinella has given us more ideas to try in future to do even better as parents. Great book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I enjoyed Rinella's humor and insights. Fun book! I enjoyed Rinella's humor and insights. Fun book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Corinne Colbert

    It’s fine

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    My only criticism of this work is that it is less a manual for how to do things and appears to focus on persuading parents to share the outside world with their kids, along with general ideas and stories about doing so. It's a fast, well-written read. My only criticism of this work is that it is less a manual for how to do things and appears to focus on persuading parents to share the outside world with their kids, along with general ideas and stories about doing so. It's a fast, well-written read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Renee (LazyDayLit)

    I'm not familiar with the author or his show, et cetera, but was drawn to the title. We have no issues getting outdoors but this could be helpful for any parents thinking about it. I'm not familiar with the author or his show, et cetera, but was drawn to the title. We have no issues getting outdoors but this could be helpful for any parents thinking about it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Everly

    An excellent book! Reminds parents making the effort, even when not perfect, is the most important piece to creating an outdoor child. Living in suburbia I Iong for the ability to set my kids free like the summers of my past. However, just because it’s different doesn’t make is bad. Our garden is growing, our fishing licenses purchased…Nature is calling!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    “There can be an elasticity to the circumstances in which we live our lives, and in how we react to those circumstances.” This quote sums up the vibe of this book. As Rinella shares stories of introducing his children to nature you can see how something as simple as a muddy and rainy camping trip can prepare a child to face future life disparities with optimism. Confession. When I requested this book on NetGalley I had no clue who Steven Rinella was. Luckily you don’t have to have seen a single e “There can be an elasticity to the circumstances in which we live our lives, and in how we react to those circumstances.” This quote sums up the vibe of this book. As Rinella shares stories of introducing his children to nature you can see how something as simple as a muddy and rainy camping trip can prepare a child to face future life disparities with optimism. Confession. When I requested this book on NetGalley I had no clue who Steven Rinella was. Luckily you don’t have to have seen a single episode of MeatEater in order to have a few good takeaways from his latest book Outdoor Kinds in an Inside World: Getting Your Family Out of the House and Radically Engaged with Nature. Through his personal experiences, Rinella shares how he (and his wife of course) is parenting tough, curious, and competent kids who feel at home in the outdoors. The book was not what I expected. I was hoping for a larger focus on the ‘how” with ideas for implementing outdoor life with kids. Instead, the format was a blend of practical advice and personal stories, with a heavyweight on the personal stories. Although I found it to be an entertaining read, I would have rather seen the shift of the book’s focus on practical advice. Even for the seasoned outdoors enthusiast, activities like hiking, fishing, camping, etc. are WAY different with kids, especially when it comes to rolling with the punches. With that being said, I still enjoyed the read and reflecting on Rinella’s experiences and how they may look played in our own home. Especially the idea that this is a journey you (the parent) need to be on too, after all, our kids are a reflection of who we, the parent, are. I recommend this book to someone who is maybe interested in seeing the benefits of these philosophies through storytelling as opposed to learning the philosophies themselves. Thank you, NetGalley, Random House, and Steven Rinella for the gifted eARC in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ayelet

    Loved this book and got really inspired to try gardening and to learn the names of the plants and flowers in my neighborhood

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bill Friedrich

    There were portions of this book I loved like the camping section Steve wrote about. I would have liked to see a few more ideas presented and I left the book wishing for more. I also found it a bit philosophical with references to experts I never heard of. Overall I am a fan of Steve and most of his work. I do not think this is one of his best.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Allison Coombs

    Wow! I loved this! I don’t have children but I work with children and it truly helped to understand how important their connection with earth is! It also creates a ton of reflection where you think back to your own childhood and your own adventures in nature.

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