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Run: Book One

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First you march, then you run. From the #1 bestselling, award–winning team behind March comes the first book in their new, groundbreaking graphic novel series, Run: Book One “In sharing my story, it is my hope that a new generation will be inspired by Run to actively participate in the democratic process and help build a more perfect Union here in America.” –Congressman Jo First you march, then you run. From the #1 bestselling, award–winning team behind March comes the first book in their new, groundbreaking graphic novel series, Run: Book One “In sharing my story, it is my hope that a new generation will be inspired by Run to actively participate in the democratic process and help build a more perfect Union here in America.” –Congressman John Lewis The sequel to the #1 New York Times bestselling graphic novel series March—the continuation of the life story of John Lewis and the struggles seen across the United States after the Selma voting rights campaign. To John Lewis, the civil rights movement came to an end with the signing of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. But that was after more than five years as one of the preeminent figures of the movement, leading sit–in protests and fighting segregation on interstate busways as an original Freedom Rider. It was after becoming chairman of SNCC (the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) and being the youngest speaker at the March on Washington. It was after helping organize the Mississippi Freedom Summer and the ensuing delegate challenge at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. And after coleading the march from Selma to Montgomery on what became known as “Bloody Sunday.” All too often, the depiction of history ends with a great victory. But John Lewis knew that victories are just the beginning. In Run: Book One, John Lewis and longtime collaborator Andrew Aydin reteam with Nate Powell—the award–winning illustrator of the March trilogy—and are joined by L. Fury—making an astonishing graphic novel debut—to tell this often overlooked chapter of civil rights history.


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First you march, then you run. From the #1 bestselling, award–winning team behind March comes the first book in their new, groundbreaking graphic novel series, Run: Book One “In sharing my story, it is my hope that a new generation will be inspired by Run to actively participate in the democratic process and help build a more perfect Union here in America.” –Congressman Jo First you march, then you run. From the #1 bestselling, award–winning team behind March comes the first book in their new, groundbreaking graphic novel series, Run: Book One “In sharing my story, it is my hope that a new generation will be inspired by Run to actively participate in the democratic process and help build a more perfect Union here in America.” –Congressman John Lewis The sequel to the #1 New York Times bestselling graphic novel series March—the continuation of the life story of John Lewis and the struggles seen across the United States after the Selma voting rights campaign. To John Lewis, the civil rights movement came to an end with the signing of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. But that was after more than five years as one of the preeminent figures of the movement, leading sit–in protests and fighting segregation on interstate busways as an original Freedom Rider. It was after becoming chairman of SNCC (the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) and being the youngest speaker at the March on Washington. It was after helping organize the Mississippi Freedom Summer and the ensuing delegate challenge at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. And after coleading the march from Selma to Montgomery on what became known as “Bloody Sunday.” All too often, the depiction of history ends with a great victory. But John Lewis knew that victories are just the beginning. In Run: Book One, John Lewis and longtime collaborator Andrew Aydin reteam with Nate Powell—the award–winning illustrator of the March trilogy—and are joined by L. Fury—making an astonishing graphic novel debut—to tell this often overlooked chapter of civil rights history.

30 review for Run: Book One

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    The first volume of the sequel to the award-winning series March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell. That series was scripted by Lewis's communication director Aydin based on Lewis's own autobiographical writing and illustrated by Powell. A must-read graphic history, with a YA audience in mind, I guess, but it has proved as most good books to be a hit with all ages. This one, Run, Book One, is released after the passing of Lewis (R.I.P.!), though we are told that Lewis was part of the pr The first volume of the sequel to the award-winning series March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell. That series was scripted by Lewis's communication director Aydin based on Lewis's own autobiographical writing and illustrated by Powell. A must-read graphic history, with a YA audience in mind, I guess, but it has proved as most good books to be a hit with all ages. This one, Run, Book One, is released after the passing of Lewis (R.I.P.!), though we are told that Lewis was part of the process almost to the very end so it is fair to say it is his story, based on his writing and his input as the work went forward, though it is also clear that the work is more deeply enhanced by research into many other texts regarding this period. This book is focused largely on 1965-66, after the Voting Rights Act and Lewis’ ouster from SNCC in 1966, and lots of continuing political turmoil. It also adds an artist to share in the work with Powell, the surprising choice of new and much less experienced L. Fury, in her first long form graphic project. This volume is meticulously researched and very helpful for anyone interested in this American Civil Rights period, the sixties, but it is very dense, featuring many, many important individuals you would not know without bios of players, so that is there. It's also text-heavy, as so much information needs to be shared. And then there are the 35 pages of appendices, including the bios, references, and commentary. Having two artists with slightly different approaches/styles was disappointing, because I am a fan of Nate Powell, but it was only mildly jarring, finally. For someone like me that lived through this period, it was riveting and gave me a fresh perspective on the events of those times. But it is relevant to racial politics of today, certainly!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ben Ostrowsky

    At first, it was difficult for me to grasp just how much care, research, and attention to detail went into the creation of Run: Book One. The art and storytelling are exceptional—I’ve wanted to read a story in which committee deliberations were not pedantic minutiae but thrilling drama, and here the world has that story. There’s enough explanation for readers born a generation later to understand the economic and geopolitical context, and it’s offered in a way that never hurts the pace. But no un At first, it was difficult for me to grasp just how much care, research, and attention to detail went into the creation of Run: Book One. The art and storytelling are exceptional—I’ve wanted to read a story in which committee deliberations were not pedantic minutiae but thrilling drama, and here the world has that story. There’s enough explanation for readers born a generation later to understand the economic and geopolitical context, and it’s offered in a way that never hurts the pace. But no undue liberties were taken with historical fact, which becomes clear in the 30+ pages of end matter in which the authors explain the lengths to which they went. In choosing the clothing people were shown wearing, they considered not only what year and season it was, but also the person’s age and economic condition. Same goes for the vehicles: not only the model year, but also how old of a car these folks were probably driving and how dinged-up it would look by then. They interviewed participants, and consulted archivists and historians, and even checked on the history of Post-It notes. And then they followed it up by impeccable citations for every source they used. Now, I’m a librarian and a geek, so I’m inclined to love something all the more when it’s well-researched. But the story itself is compelling and complex, and it all really happened. My only complaint—and I expect it will be resolved by the creation of Run: Book Two and Three—is that this volume only leads up to just before the political career of Rep. John Lewis, ending with his decision to run. With the passing of Rep. Lewis, the surviving authors have lost their most important collaborator. But I feel certain, based on the scholarly care put into Book One, that those volumes will follow, and will not disappoint.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    The sequel to John Lewis' terrific March series gets off to a strong start as the authors cover the tumultuous months for Lewis and his allies in the Civil Rights Movement between August 1965 and June 1966. It's scary how many parallels can be drawn to the present day with police brutality, an unpopular war going awry, politicians trying to hold onto power by suppressing votes and complicating voter registration, the Black Power slogan being as empowering and polarizing as Black Lives Matter, an The sequel to John Lewis' terrific March series gets off to a strong start as the authors cover the tumultuous months for Lewis and his allies in the Civil Rights Movement between August 1965 and June 1966. It's scary how many parallels can be drawn to the present day with police brutality, an unpopular war going awry, politicians trying to hold onto power by suppressing votes and complicating voter registration, the Black Power slogan being as empowering and polarizing as Black Lives Matter, and internecine struggles over nonviolent and militant means. My only criticism is that the scope gets so large and so many important events and people are crammed in that only a panel or two can be spared to touch on them. Readers with only a casual knowledge of the history might find themselves lost in the sea of names even with the helpful biographies provided in the back. But the central theme of Lewis trying to hold onto a path of nonviolence in a time of turbulence held the book together for me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    daria ❀ دریا

    i was a big fan of the original march comics and was so happy that john lewis continued with the graphic novel format to tell his story. in this volume, we see lewis and other prominent members/leaders of the civil rights movement deal with the aftermath of the voting rights act being signed into law. white supremacy rears its ugly head as klansmen, police, and other white members of the public continue to harass and abuse black people and keep them from voting. lewis is also dealing with shifti i was a big fan of the original march comics and was so happy that john lewis continued with the graphic novel format to tell his story. in this volume, we see lewis and other prominent members/leaders of the civil rights movement deal with the aftermath of the voting rights act being signed into law. white supremacy rears its ugly head as klansmen, police, and other white members of the public continue to harass and abuse black people and keep them from voting. lewis is also dealing with shifting ideologies within sncc (the student nonviolent coordinating committee), with up and coming members feeling like nonviolence is getting them nowhere, and that there needs to be more decisive push back against the oppression they are subjugated to. it was really fascinating to watch as lewis tried to navigate uncharted territory, lost and unsure where to go and what to do next. i can’t wait to read the next volume!

  5. 4 out of 5

    3rian 7acob

    “First you March, then you Run.” I’m a bit floored (in a good way) by this graphic novel. The brilliant March trilogy that precedes this work concludes with the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. But the struggle for civil rights was far from over. Run: Book One fulfills an important need by telling the stories that happened *after* such a significant milestone in the United States’ history - i.e., the narratives we don’t always get to see depicted: - Those who didn’t support the change fee “First you March, then you Run.” I’m a bit floored (in a good way) by this graphic novel. The brilliant March trilogy that precedes this work concludes with the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. But the struggle for civil rights was far from over. Run: Book One fulfills an important need by telling the stories that happened *after* such a significant milestone in the United States’ history - i.e., the narratives we don’t always get to see depicted: - Those who didn’t support the change feel threatened and angrily push back (I was haunted by the perverse distortion of seeing a supremacist “protest march”, which called to mind some of the disturbing imagery we’ve all witnessed in recent memory). - Meanwhile, those that accomplished progress start to fundamentally disagree on how to defend the change they’d fought for. - The voting rights of Black people are then immediately systematically threatened by suppression. It all makes for a timely and powerful read as we see the late Congressman John Lewis (then-chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) hold true to his principles and try to continue the work, despite the growing discord within his organization over a shift in values and methodology. L. Fury joins the creative team and her black and white artwork is nothing short of beautiful and evocative, meeting the bar set by March’s artist Nate Powell. The book’s supplemental materials include an essay on her approach to assuming this role, as well as notes on specific events depicted in the book and mini-biographies of those involved in the Civil Rights Movement. All illuminating sections that further enhanced my reading experience. These stories need to be told and this format is a powerful and effective means to make it accessible and immersive for a wide audience. Even if you haven’t read March (which you should!), you can jump in with this volume and appreciate it on its own. Absolutely worth your time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Newland

    I will always be uplifted by John Lewis and his story. This installment covers segments of history I know little about. This book provides milestones that make me want to investigate further for more and more details about the intricacies of the movement for civil rights. I look forward to Run book 2.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jason Furman

    Another amazing graphic novel from John Lewis and the creative team that produced March: Book One. I can't stress enough how well the medium works in telling this story, the vivid black-and-white pictures that take us from the aftermath of the Voting Rights Act to John Lewis resigning from SNCC and deciding he himself is going to run. It depicts the violence and brutality that continued for years after Black people had legally gotten protection for their voting rights, the debates over the tacti Another amazing graphic novel from John Lewis and the creative team that produced March: Book One. I can't stress enough how well the medium works in telling this story, the vivid black-and-white pictures that take us from the aftermath of the Voting Rights Act to John Lewis resigning from SNCC and deciding he himself is going to run. It depicts the violence and brutality that continued for years after Black people had legally gotten protection for their voting rights, the debates over the tactics to respond to it, and the rise of Stokley Carmichael and the Black Power movement as a continuation of and alternative to the traditional nonviolent civil rights movement. The story is told sympathetically and well (maybe not quite as well as March with its flashbacks from Obama's first inauguration). The afterword includes several pages of the artist (Nate Powell) describing his methods which gave me an even deeper appreciation of the book. He painstakingly went through old photographs and other sources as well as interviewed people in an attempt to get everything as right as possible, not a photo but something like it. Even with large groups he tried to have real people's faces in order to, as he explained, honor the many unnamed people that played a role in these events. He also showed places where he originally drew, for example, an office in the wrong way and then was corrected by a participant. The level of detail is extraordinary because so many comics are just slapdash inking and this one could have sold decently without anything resembling this degree of effort and artistry.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Baylor Heath

    I felt a little cheated when Nate Powell’s art was only featured in the first few pages (which was so essential to the immersive feel of the original trilogy), but I quickly began to enjoy L. Fury’s style (though slightly more amateurish). This first installment of a new series in followup to March had little room to breathe, but the moments it slowed down in a particular scene/subject it became highly engaging and immersive (*spoiler warning, if it’s possible to spoil history?* like Stokely Car I felt a little cheated when Nate Powell’s art was only featured in the first few pages (which was so essential to the immersive feel of the original trilogy), but I quickly began to enjoy L. Fury’s style (though slightly more amateurish). This first installment of a new series in followup to March had little room to breathe, but the moments it slowed down in a particular scene/subject it became highly engaging and immersive (*spoiler warning, if it’s possible to spoil history?* like Stokely Carmichael’s usurpation of John as the head of the SNCC, Carmichael’s pivoting the organization away from the nonviolent philosophy, and John’s despair at having lost everything he associated with his identity). I often want the version of this which is more of an imaginative dramatization of certain historical moments, but that’s just not what this is. It is a historical memoir which is chiefly educational and in that respect, it is quite successful! This installment particularly inspired respect for John and his unwavering devotion to social change through non-violence and love. I look forward to the next installments. RIP John Lewis. Luke, thanks for buying me this!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    [3 stars = this book is good; I enjoyed it] “Run” tells the important story of the Civil Rights movement during 1965-66, much of it focusing on the internal tensions and eventual fragmentation of the SNCC. Compared with the March Trilogy, this doesn’t pack the same visceral punch, but it is well worth reading. I just hope we don’t have to wait too long for the next installment of this new series. Adam wrote a great review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... [3 stars = this book is good; I enjoyed it] “Run” tells the important story of the Civil Rights movement during 1965-66, much of it focusing on the internal tensions and eventual fragmentation of the SNCC. Compared with the March Trilogy, this doesn’t pack the same visceral punch, but it is well worth reading. I just hope we don’t have to wait too long for the next installment of this new series. Adam wrote a great review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  10. 4 out of 5

    CJ

    This should be compulsory reading in high school history classes. I learned more from this one book about the period of time after the Voting Rights Act was signed than I have in any of my history classes in hs or college. Congressman Lewis lived an amazing life with courage, fighting for dignity while remaining true to his nonviolent beliefs. *Note, I would recommend reading March first as this starts directly after the end of that series and makes reference to events previously discussed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    BookishStitcher

    I didn't enjoy this as much as I did the March Trilogy, but it was still good. I definitely learned some news things about SNCC and John Lewis. I'm going the keep reading any other books that come out in this series. I really enjoy the graphic novel and historical accounts form. The artist put a lot of thought into recreating how things would have looked at the time, which I appreciate. I didn't enjoy this as much as I did the March Trilogy, but it was still good. I definitely learned some news things about SNCC and John Lewis. I'm going the keep reading any other books that come out in this series. I really enjoy the graphic novel and historical accounts form. The artist put a lot of thought into recreating how things would have looked at the time, which I appreciate.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris Barsanti

    Volume 2 is going to be a scorcher.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Summary: A follow-up to the March Trilogy, taking up John Lewis' story from 1964 until 1967.  I am a huge fan of the March Trilogy, a graphic novel trilogy that tells the early years of John Lewis' life, framed as him remembering his early life at Obama's Inauguration. The graphic novel format I think is particularly suited to the Civil Rights era history because the era's evocativeness is part of its importance. It is one thing to read a narrative history about Civil Rights era marches, it is so Summary: A follow-up to the March Trilogy, taking up John Lewis' story from 1964 until 1967.  I am a huge fan of the March Trilogy, a graphic novel trilogy that tells the early years of John Lewis' life, framed as him remembering his early life at Obama's Inauguration. The graphic novel format I think is particularly suited to the Civil Rights era history because the era's evocativeness is part of its importance. It is one thing to read a narrative history about Civil Rights era marches, it is something else to see images of those marches with a mix of dialogue and narrative. There is a reason that the March Trilogy was the first graphic novel to win a Pulitzer. In some ways, the history of the early years of the Civil Rights movement, Brown v Board in 1954 until Selma in 1965 is a simpler narrative. There was a righteous cause and while there was not universal agreement (civil disobedience was very controversial), once it was completed, the history has a clear narrative story of right and wrong. Post-1965 the narrative is much more nuanced and complicated. Pre-1965, the Civil Rights movement was largely focused on legal segregation and voting rights. Post-1965, the Civil Rights movement had less clear objectives. The Vietnam War and its disparate impact on minority communities, especially poor minority communities, and global solidarity with colonized communities around the world became the focus of some activists. Other activists tried to focus on poverty across racial lines. Other activists, especially women, began to focus on what we now call intersectionality and how different forms of discrimination overlap and act differently, and how the early Civil Rights era leadership had largely had a public male face with women doing significant parts of the organizing but were excluded from leadership. This post-1965 era requires a much more nuanced story that we are still grappling with as a society. The current discussions over Critical Race Theory are not discussed in the book, but CRT arose because the legal changes as a result of pre-1965 work, did not result in significant cultural changes. In a 1981 interview, political consultant Lee Atwater famously discussed the rise of less overt appeals to race as a motivating factor for engaging white voters. Derrick Bell and others lawyers that contributed to the rise of Critical Race Theory knew that a law simply saying that discrimination on the basis of race being illegal did not mean that discrimination did not occur. And once there was a shift as a result of the 1976 Washington vs Davis case which required proof of intent to discriminate, a very high bar, more covert discrimination became not only normal but more insidious because it worked with the cultural concept of color blindness to prevent race from being openly discussed. The concept of a colorblind constitution or colorblind legal theory was used to oppose efforts to address historic racial discrimination. Back to the book Run, much of the story of this first book in what I believe will be another trilogy is setting up the tension of the post-1965 civil rights era. John Lewis opposed the more militant Black Power methodology of Stokely Carmichael. Instead, he was interested in working through political systems and with an integrated civil rights movement to bring about cultural change. Lewis opposed the Vietnam War as did MLK and many others. But having a similar political opinion did not mean that there was an agreement about what to do to address the shared political opinion. The March Trilogy was mostly a hero story. John Lewis was only 23 when he spoke at the March on Washington, yet already he was a veteran organizer and leader. At the end of the first book of the Run series, John Lewis had been voted out as head of SNCC, did not have a job, was nearly broke, and was seeking a new role and methodology to fulfill his calling. Jon Meacham's recent biography of Lewis strongly captures how much of a calling that Lewis had to the civil rights movement, but Run is just getting started with that story. As I was writing this, I looked at Amazon and realized that I pre-ordered Run just over 3 years ago. As far as I know, the next book in the series has not been announced. John Lewis was involved in the writing of this book before he passed away in 2020. But he will not be involved in future books beyond the early charting of them. One of the features that I very much appreciated about Run is the series of short biographies at the end of the book. There are about 20 pages of summary descriptions of the characters of Run. Each of these is about a paragraph, so there is not a lot of detail, but the context is helpful. There is also a narrative description of the history that is graphically told in the main part of the book. And a section by the illustrator that describes the process of completing the book. The original March Trilogy was illustrated by Nate Powell. But he was not free to work on this one and it was illustrated by L Fury. The illustration retains a similar feel even if it is not the same as Powell's work. There is always a frustration in reading graphic novels that are produced serially, without the next volumes being complete. But if Run doesn't find an audience, the remaining books will not be writing and illustrated. I really appreciate the more complicated nuanced story. It is not as action-oriented, but it is honest and truthful to the history. And that is what we need.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Lovitt

    Run: Book One is the sequel to John Lewis’ award-winning graphic novel trilogy, March and it captures history in a way that is accessible to a broader range of readers than an autobiographical novel ever could. Released posthumously, Book: One focuses on Lewis’ work following the march on Selma in 1965. (READ FULL REVIEW: https://yourmoneygeek.com/john-lewis-...) There is something uniquely intimate about the way that Run has been crafted. Readers are invited to view a pivotal period of time in th Run: Book One is the sequel to John Lewis’ award-winning graphic novel trilogy, March and it captures history in a way that is accessible to a broader range of readers than an autobiographical novel ever could. Released posthumously, Book: One focuses on Lewis’ work following the march on Selma in 1965. (READ FULL REVIEW: https://yourmoneygeek.com/john-lewis-...) There is something uniquely intimate about the way that Run has been crafted. Readers are invited to view a pivotal period of time in the Civil Rights Movement through the eyes of an American hero and, tragically, many of the situations highlighted in his story have not changed in over fifty years. Black men senselessly murdered in the streets, police brutality, and voter suppression are still ever-present threats to the civil liberties of Black Americans today. Readers will likely see parallels between the protests during the summer of 2020 and the six-day uprising that took place in Watts in Los Angeles, spawning similar protests in other major cities. This parallel is not intentional, as Congressman Lewis passed away in July of 2020, but an important reminder that the race being run is not yet won. John Lewis’ recollection is also filled with a vulnerability that perhaps people wouldn’t have associated with a figurehead in the Civil Rights Movement. The final months of his tenure as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee are marred with conflict within the movement, he finds himself doubting his veracity as a leader, and struggling with who he is as a person outside of his activism. Run: Book One is also the final work completed by Congressman Lewis before his passing last summer and it stands as a seminal work towards educating younger audiences about the Civil Rights Movement, without the gloss of Hollywood. Most people will never pick up an autobiography or biography, but they may be swayed by the compelling art and rich storytelling in Run: Book One. Once you start reading it, you won’t want to put it down. It reveals intimate details and contextualizes key moments in history in a way that textbooks and documentaries never could. Run: Book One is co-written by Andrew Aydin, Lewis’ policy advisor who also co-wrote March, with artwork by Afua Richardson, Nate Powell, and L. Fury. It is available for purchase on Abrams Books and everywhere you shop for books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Leighton

    I loved John Lewis' three-part graphic novel March, which ended with the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964. Building on the saying "First you march, then you run!" Lewis wanted to title the second three-part series Run! to focus on the work still to be done, and to encourage people who care to run for office. Knowing he was dying of pancreatic cancer during the pandemic, finishing even the first volume of Run! was a challenge, but one he met. Run takes up where March leaves off - reminding I loved John Lewis' three-part graphic novel March, which ended with the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964. Building on the saying "First you march, then you run!" Lewis wanted to title the second three-part series Run! to focus on the work still to be done, and to encourage people who care to run for office. Knowing he was dying of pancreatic cancer during the pandemic, finishing even the first volume of Run! was a challenge, but one he met. Run takes up where March leaves off - reminding us that the Civil Rights Act didn't magically fix all the problems. The book opens with Lewis and friends trying to worship at an all White church, and being met by the KKK. This graphic novel reminds us of the everyday work that needed and needs to be done to continue the march toward equality and respect. There is a lot of historical information - Julian Bond's run for office, Lewis' leading of SNCC and subsequent defeat by Stokely Carmichael, the development of the Black Panther movement, the conflicting ideas about how to fight for equality and the enforcement of the Civil Rights Act. John Lewis was an incredibly brave, strong, and inspiring man; and this graphic novel will bring his story to a whole new generation - just like the 1957 comic “Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story” inspired a young John Lewis.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    A well researched graphic autobiography of John Lewis from August 1965, when Lewis is arrested for attending a white non-integrated church with some black friends, to when he was forced out of leading the SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) by the "Black Power" movement in May 1966. The story doesn't end - it is a cliff hanger on what he is going to do next at the age of 26 with nothing left. He is going to run... I wish I could include pictures in this review because the art is grea A well researched graphic autobiography of John Lewis from August 1965, when Lewis is arrested for attending a white non-integrated church with some black friends, to when he was forced out of leading the SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) by the "Black Power" movement in May 1966. The story doesn't end - it is a cliff hanger on what he is going to do next at the age of 26 with nothing left. He is going to run... I wish I could include pictures in this review because the art is great and the graphics communicate as much as the words do. One thing with the graphic format is they tend to only cover one small chapter of the total epic of the story. I recommend starting at March 1 and then read March 2 and March 3, and then this one Run 1, and then the ones not published yet, Run 2 and Run 3!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    The stunning MARCH series gets a welcome continuation. History has compressed and smoothed over the rocky road to civil rights wins in mid-century America; many seem to think that there were a few speeches, demonstrations, and sit-ins and segregation magically disappeared. Nope. Those who wanted to keep the status quo battled the civil rights cause at every turn, using both outright violence and underhanded political maneuvering. At the same time, the members of civil rights groups argued passio The stunning MARCH series gets a welcome continuation. History has compressed and smoothed over the rocky road to civil rights wins in mid-century America; many seem to think that there were a few speeches, demonstrations, and sit-ins and segregation magically disappeared. Nope. Those who wanted to keep the status quo battled the civil rights cause at every turn, using both outright violence and underhanded political maneuvering. At the same time, the members of civil rights groups argued passionately among each other about tactics and values. This series places readers right amidst this time of change and conflict and gives us a memorable education.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elijah Oakes Benson

    An excellent addition to Lewis's literary legacy. This book delves into a history I know next to nothing about: that of the civil rights movement after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Run: Book One couldn't be more relevant today, in our current struggle to secure the right to vote for all Americans. Additionally, Run is deft in its portrayal of the relationship between America's foreign interests and its hypocrisies at home. As a piece of history, art, and timeless criticism of rac An excellent addition to Lewis's literary legacy. This book delves into a history I know next to nothing about: that of the civil rights movement after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Run: Book One couldn't be more relevant today, in our current struggle to secure the right to vote for all Americans. Additionally, Run is deft in its portrayal of the relationship between America's foreign interests and its hypocrisies at home. As a piece of history, art, and timeless criticism of racism and capitalism, Run: Book One is a boundless success.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy Pickett

    Run: Book One opens after the signing of the Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1965. This great victory was not the end of the Civil Rights movement, but the beginning of a new chapter of “good trouble, necessary trouble” in the exceptional life of John Lewis. An important addition to American history that’s also relevant to today, as Run is an urgent reminder that securing equal voting rights is truly "the struggle of a lifetime." Run: Book One opens after the signing of the Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1965. This great victory was not the end of the Civil Rights movement, but the beginning of a new chapter of “good trouble, necessary trouble” in the exceptional life of John Lewis. An important addition to American history that’s also relevant to today, as Run is an urgent reminder that securing equal voting rights is truly "the struggle of a lifetime."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    I love the way that these graphic novels put history into context. The writing is engaging, as are the illustrations. Plus, you can tell so much research went into getting the details correct and making the story as authentic as possible. Honestly, I think these graphic novels should be read in school!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This was great. I wish we get to see the rest of it. Such a worthwhile read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    Beautiful. Can't wait for volume two. Beautiful. Can't wait for volume two.

  23. 5 out of 5

    kylie callender

    read for school (however pretentious this may sound, i read graphic novels far too fast for them to be fully enjoyable for me)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    A brilliant and poignant continuation in the life and work of the late John Lewis. Sure to be as powerful of a series that March truly is.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

    A good start to this new series, but at only 115 pages (plus 35 pages of backmatter) I wish they had waited and told the whole story in one volume.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    An outstanding follow-up to the March trilogy, picking up where it left off with the Selma march. This memoir offers a revealing look at the fractious state of the Civil Rights Movement as division manifested between those who embraced nonviolent tactics and those who pursued a more militant course. Lewis's steadfast commitment to nonviolence and his vision of the Beloved Community cost him his chairmanship of SNCC. Insightful end matter explains the research and creative process behind the book An outstanding follow-up to the March trilogy, picking up where it left off with the Selma march. This memoir offers a revealing look at the fractious state of the Civil Rights Movement as division manifested between those who embraced nonviolent tactics and those who pursued a more militant course. Lewis's steadfast commitment to nonviolence and his vision of the Beloved Community cost him his chairmanship of SNCC. Insightful end matter explains the research and creative process behind the book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    Run: Book One picks up where March: Book Three left off - just after the passage of the Voting Rights Act. This is a part of history that is really not often told, but it shows the important struggle of various civil rights groups to actually see the Voting Rights Act enforced and enacted. Like book one in the previous series, this book was incredibly important, but I also felt like it was setting the stage for the rest of John Lewis’s story. While I think everything John struggled with in exper Run: Book One picks up where March: Book Three left off - just after the passage of the Voting Rights Act. This is a part of history that is really not often told, but it shows the important struggle of various civil rights groups to actually see the Voting Rights Act enforced and enacted. Like book one in the previous series, this book was incredibly important, but I also felt like it was setting the stage for the rest of John Lewis’s story. While I think everything John struggled with in experiencing continued resistance to constitutional and human rights in society at large and in seeing SNCC veer away from non-violence and toward different paths of achieving true justice and power for Black people, I didn’t feel quite the same emotional punch I did in March: Book Two and Three. However, I have the feeling the last two installments in the Run trilogy will follow in its predecessors’ footsteps. As always, I have such a deep appreciation of John Lewis for standing up for what he believes in, especially in his condemnation of the Vietnam War and the parallels he drew between that fight for freedom and the fight for Black freedom in America. I also understand both the desire for non-violence and the disillusionment with it as a movement. If I were in the shoes of Black people then or now, I can’t say I would be committed to it. So much respect to all people fighting for what is right, no matter in which way you try to find power. I have not experienced that disenfranchisement and marginalization, so I do not begrudge anyone their resistance.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Whipple

    I was excited to receive a copy of Run through a Goodreads Giveaway, and it did not disappoint. Picking up after the passage of the voting rights act (see the March trilogy), Run covers the brief but deeply layered and tumultuous events in the final years that John Lewis served as Chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), 1965-66. The story focuses on Lewis, but his story needs to be put into context with events in the US and abroad, especially the Vietnam War. Lewis, Ayd I was excited to receive a copy of Run through a Goodreads Giveaway, and it did not disappoint. Picking up after the passage of the voting rights act (see the March trilogy), Run covers the brief but deeply layered and tumultuous events in the final years that John Lewis served as Chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), 1965-66. The story focuses on Lewis, but his story needs to be put into context with events in the US and abroad, especially the Vietnam War. Lewis, Aydin, Fury and Powell contextualize Lewis's story; how he helped shape the nation and its politics, as well as how the nation and its politics helped to shape him. While Lewis held tight to his nonviolent ideals, others felt that action was needed and the (still newly) established mechanisms of the civil rights movement began to disagree and fracture. The title Run expresses the urgency that Lewis felt during these years, but it also reflects contemporary sentiment as Americans continue to fight for justice for all. Extensive backmatter provides biographies for people involved in the Civil Rights movement, as well as notes on the research, sources, and the work that goes into creating a graphic representation of people and events. Outstanding, a must read for all! (Gr. 6+)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    A continuation of the graphic series March, picking up the story of John Lewis' tireless work for civil rights in the months following the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. Even though African Americans in the South could now register to vote relatively unimpeded, Lewis recounts that new obstacles suddenly appeared: the number of poling places were reduced, placing an added burden on poor people (mainly Blacks) to get to a place where they could vote; many poling places were moved to loc A continuation of the graphic series March, picking up the story of John Lewis' tireless work for civil rights in the months following the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. Even though African Americans in the South could now register to vote relatively unimpeded, Lewis recounts that new obstacles suddenly appeared: the number of poling places were reduced, placing an added burden on poor people (mainly Blacks) to get to a place where they could vote; many poling places were moved to locations where Black voters did not feel comfortable going; fees to file to run for office jumped as much as 100 per cent. Discord and divisions within the civil rights movement continued as well. The dispute over Black Power and the allowance that violence may, at times, be necessary was an enormous source of contention, leading to Lewis' ultimate ouster as head of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee for refusing to budge regarding his commitment to non-violence. The list of accolades for the March series is long and hopefully this new series will be equally well received. Its "comic book" format lends itself to use in schools to tell the long and tortured struggle for civil rights and the life of one of its heroes.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Neyly

    Graphic novel It doesn't feel quite right rating Run: Book One just three stars. But still ... I love the March trilogy and looked forward to what came next. And I do like Run: Book One. So why a sense of disappointment? Two reasons: *Didactic. Call it too much time looking at trees and missing the impact of the forest. *And, damn, the book abruptly stops with Lewis demoted from SNCC and questioning his past and future. Still, a book about a good man who dedicated his life to making a difference in Graphic novel It doesn't feel quite right rating Run: Book One just three stars. But still ... I love the March trilogy and looked forward to what came next. And I do like Run: Book One. So why a sense of disappointment? Two reasons: *Didactic. Call it too much time looking at trees and missing the impact of the forest. *And, damn, the book abruptly stops with Lewis demoted from SNCC and questioning his past and future. Still, a book about a good man who dedicated his life to making a difference in our country. Recommend: I highly highly highly recommend March. Make sure you get the trilogy in toto before you start. Wait on Run: Book One till the rest of trilogy makes its appearance. And I truly miss illustrator Nate Powell (March) - first cartoonist to win the National Book Award.

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